CAMPRAL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 021431/001.

Names and composition

"CAMPRAL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021431/001 CAMPRAL ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 333MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
200142/001 ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 333MG
021431/001 CAMPRAL ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 333MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
200143/001 ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 333MG
202229/001 ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 333MG
205995/001 ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM ACAMPROSATE CALCIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 333MG

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Answered questions

Have any one take Naltrexone o campral?
I need to know wich one of this two is best? please is important thanks a lot Asked by Anastasia Vielmas 30 days ago.

Here are the basic medications used for alcohol treatment: Campral reduces the urge to drink which may be what you want. Thiamine 100mg twice daily then daily is very important to prevent severe neurological damage from alcohol toxicity and deficiency from alcohol. The Campral and Naltrexone require a Doctor, Thiamine is OTC. Remember- God loves you. ......................................... Medicines most often used to treat withdrawal symptoms during detoxification include: * Antianxiety medicines (such as diazepam), which treat withdrawal symptoms such as delirium tremens (DTs). * Seizure medicines, to reduce or stop severe withdrawal symptoms during detoxification. Medicines used to help keep you sober during recovery include: * Disulfiram (Antabuse), which slows the pleasurable effects that alcohol produces and makes you nauseated when you drink. * Naltrexone (ReVia), which interferes with the pleasure you get from drinking. * Acamprosate (Campral), which can reduce your craving for alcohol. This medicine was recently approved to treat alcohol abuse and dependence. * Topiramate (Topamax), which is a medicine used to treat seizures. One recent study shows that it might also help treat alcohol problems. 8 Experts are still studying how this medicine, and medicines like it, might help with recovery from alcohol abuse and addiction. Other medicines. Experts are testing other medicines to see if they might help people quit drinking. These include: * Ondansetron (Zofran). Researchers are still studying this medicine to see if it is a safe and effective treatment for alcohol problems. * Buspirone (BuSpar). This is an antianxiety drug that might help with alcohol problems. It has shown mixed results in studies. 5 * Nalmefene (Revex). This medicine is similar to naltrexone, and it has been tried as a treatment for alcohol problems. But recent research shows that it might not be effective. 9 Alcohol abuse can cause your body to become low in certain vitamins and minerals, especially thiamine (vitamin B1). You might need to take thiamine supplements to improve your nutrition during recovery. You also might need supplements to help replace fluids and electrolytes. What to Think About Antianxiety medicines are used during detoxification to help you safely withdraw from alcohol. Vitamins, particularly thiamine (vitamin B1), help prevent Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, which causes permanent brain damage from poor nutrition and long-term alcohol use. 10 All other conditions that frequently occur with alcohol abuse and dependence (such as depression or peptic ulcer) need proper treatment to help in your recovery. Answered by Sherell Lindhorst 30 days ago.


Anyone heard of Campral?
Is there anyone out there taking Campral? If so, did your doctor and/or pharmacist tell you that if you drink alcohol while taking it, that "IT WILL MAKE YOU VOMIT"? My pharmacist said it would, but my doctor never mentioned that, nor on WebMD.com does it say anything. I am just waiting for my doctor to... Asked by Georgette Too 30 days ago.

Is there anyone out there taking Campral? If so, did your doctor and/or pharmacist tell you that if you drink alcohol while taking it, that "IT WILL MAKE YOU VOMIT"? My pharmacist said it would, but my doctor never mentioned that, nor on WebMD.com does it say anything. I am just waiting for my doctor to return my call to tell me if thats true, but thought i would check it out on here also. Serious answers only, thank you kindly. Answered by Katharina Buol 30 days ago.

No, that is not one of the affects. In fact, you are supposed to continue taking it even if you drink again. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Campral? • Campral has been shown to help alcohol dependent patients to not start drinking again only when it is used as part of a treatment program that includes counseling and support. • Continue taking Campral even if you start drinking again. Discuss the fact that you have started drinking again with your doctor if this happens. • While you are taking Campral monitor for symptoms of depression and/or suicidal thoughts or actions. Contact your healthcare provider if you develop any new or worsening mental health symptoms during treatment with Campral. Do not stop taking Campral without first talking to your healthcare provider. • Campral is in the FDA pregnancy category C. Discuss the risks with your doctor. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Campral passes into breast milk and may affect a nursing infant. Do not take Campral without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Answered by Gaynelle Kalchthaler 30 days ago.


Is there typically a plan to quit Campral?
My psychiatrist put me on Campral. Obviously I want to quit drinking, but I'm thinking that after a given amount of time, maybe a few months, that maybe the Campral, too can go. Does anyone have any experience with this? Asked by Deeann Kotzur 30 days ago.

I've been on Campral for about a year now after I asked my doctor about it to help stop me craving alcohol. It's worked so far because I'm now well over a year sober. Of course I combined it with AA & counseling too which has pointed out where I was going wrong too. Hang on a minute, I'll just check the leaflet that comes with the Campral...Yeah, it's recommended in the leaflet that Campral should be taken for a year. There is no mention of coming off it but I don't think it should be a problem. I would keep taking the medication if it has been prescribed to you until the psychiatrist tells you to stop taking it. Depends on how much you wanna stay away from alcohol. Me, I never wanna go near it ever again. My last drink nearly killed me... Answered by Sumiko Petrowski 30 days ago.


Anyone have experience with Campral for alcoholics?
http://www.campral.com/home.aspx Asked by Piper Thorndike 30 days ago.

Essentially, like antabuse, Campral works to help alcoholics quit drinking if they are properly self motivated and intent on quitting. It treats the psychological addiction and reduces cravings, and if they do drink it reduces the pleasure gained from drinking. However, if the patient is not essentially of strong will, or otherwise not intent on quitting they will simply become noncompliant with the drug. Research shows that Campral (acamprosate) is effective in helping alcohol dependent people quit drinking alcohol in conjunction with psychotherapy (cognitive behaviour therapy). The main side effects are listed as: headache, diarrhoea, flatulence and nausea. Campral has the advantage over antabuse that if the patient drinks, they will not become actually unwell. Antabuse (disulfiram) blocks an enzyme that metabolizes alcohol (might actually block the aldehyde dehydrogenase - I'll go look it up) and if the patient drinks while they are taking antabuse then they get violently ill. Answered by Socorro Jamerson 30 days ago.


Does campral have any recreational use?
Have a nice full bottle of the stuff and was curious as to whether it has any recreational value. I heard it can give you a buzz and I know it's for alcohol abuse or w/e but yeah just wondering oh and if your just going to tell me not to take em and crap err save your hands from carple tunnel. Asked by Dean Domagalski 30 days ago.

absolutely not campral is acamprosate calcium its not going to give you a buzz if you take it the only thing it will do is not make you want to drink alcohol, by any chance do any of the people who told you that you can get a buzz off this stuff hate you or something? believe me take too much of this stuff and the last thing you will be getting is a buzz so just like i would save myself from carple tunnel if i was telling you not to use it (not that im telling you to even though nothing will happen and i dont advise it) you should err save yourself the trouble of getting sick and possibly going to the hospital but your probably going to do it anyway so good luck Answered by Glinda Goodhue 30 days ago.

Congradulations on being sober. I am an alcoholic and have been sober 9 weeks and before that it was 15. Thank you for the advice. Answered by Reginia Dahlberg 30 days ago.


Has anybody tried taking Campral to help with alcohol cravings?
I talked to my doctor today about my drinking problem. I want to stop drinking, but I know it's going to be hard. (I've tried before with no sucess) I asked her about medications to help me get through the process and she told me about Campral. I didn't start taking it yet because my doctor wants... Asked by Rona Housh 30 days ago.

I talked to my doctor today about my drinking problem. I want to stop drinking, but I know it's going to be hard. (I've tried before with no sucess) I asked her about medications to help me get through the process and she told me about Campral. I didn't start taking it yet because my doctor wants me to get my depression under control first (apparently Campral can worsen depression, which isn't what I need right now.) So I'm taking a new antidepressant and going back to my doctor in three weeks. Then we'll decide about the Campral. So in the meantime, I've decided to research it a little. If you know about it, or if you've taken it, I'd appreciate any imput. Thanks Answered by Sterling Rainbow 30 days ago.

Get into detox, then into a program of your choice, everything else is a waste of time. I know. Answered by Gabriela Benzel 30 days ago.


Can a person be on Campral and still drink in moderation?
or should they not drink at all? I was drinking almost everyday so my doctor prescribed me Campral and now I only drink on weekends. I don't get drunk on weekdays anymore. Asked by Maribeth Herdon 30 days ago.

Well....the reason for putting you on Campral in the first place was for drinking cessation. That's the idea. If you're having trouble with alcohol, then the advice would be to stop drinking in the first place. The other objective would be to LIMIT your drinking, period. Campral really won't DO that to any certain degree, and that it is totally and completely up to you. Moderation is fine, but people tend to have a very subjective idea of "moderation" when it comes to their personal drinking habits. If you're being safe, and drinking 1-2 drinks on the weekends, then I don't think that would be such an issue. However...if you're not drinking during the week, and then getting sloshed on the weekends...that's a whole other story. Best of luck. Answered by Karry Leupold 30 days ago.


What are the effects if you were to drink alcohol while you are taking Campral?
Asked by Caridad Laukitis 30 days ago.

I don't know what "Campral" is but if it is a prescribed medication, you should have the information from the pharmacy that came with the drug when you had the prescription filled. As far as I know it is NEVER a good idea to drink alcohol while taking prescription medications. EVER. But, you should really ask your pharmacist anyway just so you know exactly what COULD happen to you. Sometimes you cannot even drink or eat certain foods without serious drug interactions and these are always outlined in the information given to you at the time you pick up your prescription. Bottom line, I would not drink alcohol while taking any medication whatsoever. It is just not worth the possible dangerous interactions you might experience. Answered by Israel Cazorla 30 days ago.


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