CAMPATH Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 103948/001.

Names and composition

"CAMPATH" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ALEMTUZUMAB.

Answered questions

Is there a cure for MS?
i have MS & heard about this guy in italy on how he thinks he's found the cure for MS is it all true or has the cure not really been found yet? & how close are they to finding the cure? Asked by Claris Faulstich 3 months ago.

geena, Campath-1H is a potentially new treatment for Multiple Sclerosis or MS. The scientific name for Campath-1H is alemtuzumab. The drug is a monoclonal antibody designed to target that part of the immune system which is assumed to be harming people with MS (PwMS). It has been developed for a number of years, and has already been used as a treatment for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. To the best of my knowledge, it is not in widespread use yet not yet having passed all the phases of trials. I believe, that a phase III extension study is also planned/being carried out around the world to determine whether it could help those with an early form of MS, and expected to complete in 2014. It takes some time for a new drug to be passed as safe. For example for a cancer drug, as with most drugs, there are 3 main phases of clinical trials that all new drugs have to go through before they can be licensed and prescribed for patients - Phase 1 trials recruit a small number of patients (up to about 30) to try to find out about drug side effects and the best dose to give. Phase 2 trials recruit more patients (up to about 50) and look at the effect the drug has on different types of cancer. Phase 3 trials are much bigger (100s or even 1000s of patients), and compare new treatments to the standard treatments to see which is better. Although many drugs or products start life in phase 1 trials, they don’t all get as far as phase 3 trials and the licensing process. There are also phase 4 trials. These are carried out after a drug has a license. They aim to find out more about the longer term risks and benefits and how well the drug works when it’s used more widely. I do not expect to see this drug readily available for some time to come. You mention a "Guy in Italy" - you are here, probably referring to the Italian Dr. Paolo Zamboni, who put forward the idea that many types of MS are actually caused by a blockage of the pathways that remove excess iron from the brain - and by simply clearing out a couple of major veins to reopen the blood flow, the root cause of the disease could be eliminated. This was publicised in 2009, and one of the biggest hurdles researchers faced has been the reluctance of neurologists to get behind the trials. However, it was reported in February of this year - 2011- that a host of trial information is scheduled to become available within the next 6 to 12 months. (Edited for spelling mistakes - sorry!) ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Elbert Nassimi 3 months ago.

no, but there are treatments and a new drug is coming out soon which is supposed to work miracles, thats all ive heard Answered by Angeline Hambright 3 months ago.

Maybe if they did they haven't shared it with the public yet Answered by Creola Wagaman 3 months ago.


Cancer medication. is this all normal?
so i know someone who went for a biopsy to see if the tumors in his arm are cancerous a few days ago and they have him on anti bodies to fight cancer just in case... do they usually do this? they didn't do this for my past 3 friends who got it but then again they were all cases that occurred either 3 yrs 2 yrs... Asked by Frieda Dezayas 3 months ago.

so i know someone who went for a biopsy to see if the tumors in his arm are cancerous a few days ago and they have him on anti bodies to fight cancer just in case... do they usually do this? they didn't do this for my past 3 friends who got it but then again they were all cases that occurred either 3 yrs 2 yrs or at the beginning of last year so none of them have been recent. also he said that his ears are bleeding, minorly not majorly, and hes in horrible horrible pain so is this possible a side effect from the medication? (im sorry he fell asleep before i could ask what medication it is)-- i am totally clueless when it comes to cancer, im only 16, and im really worried about him. Answered by Frank Koewler 3 months ago.

Sounds like Monoclonal Antibody-Types listed below: Alemtuzumab (Campath) Chronic lymphocytic leukemia Bevacizumab (Avastin) Brain cancer Breast cancer Colon cancer Kidney cancer Lung cancer Cetuximab (Erbitux) Colon cancer Head and neck cancers Ibritumomab (Zevalin) Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Ofatumumab (Arzerra) Chronic lymphocytic leukemia Panitumumab (Vectibix) Colon cancer Rituximab (Rituxan) Chronic lymphocytic leukemia Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Tositumomab (Bexxar) Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Trastuzumab (Herceptin) Breast cancer Stomach cancer Common side effects In general, the more-common side effects caused by monoclonal antibody drugs include: *Allergic reactions, such as hives or itching *Flu-like signs and symptoms, including chills, fatigue, fever, and muscle aches and pains *Nausea *Diarrhea *Skin rashes Serious side effects Serious, but rare, side effects of monoclonal antibody therapy may include: *Infusion reactions. Severe allergy-like reactions can occur and, in very few cases, lead to death. You may receive medicine to block an allergic reaction before you begin monoclonal antibody treatment. Infusion reactions usually occur while treatment is being administered or soon after, so your health care team will watch you closely for a reaction. *Dangerously low blood cell counts. Low levels of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets may lead to serious complications. *Heart problems. Certain monoclonal antibodies may cause heart problems, including heart failure and a small risk of heart attack. *Skin problems. Sores and rashes on your skin can lead to serious infections in some cases. Serious sores can also occur on the tissue that lines your cheeks and gums (mucosa). *Bleeding. Some of the monoclonal antibody drugs are designed to stop cancer from forming new blood vessels. There have been reports that these medications can cause bleeding Wake him, bleeding is not a good sign..he needs to see the doc, Pronto! Answered by Melina Monsegur 3 months ago.

Well, you should most definatly make sure the doctor is aware of all this. I was pretty hateful for a while during my second diagnosis. I was ANGRY that it had come back and ruined my plans. I had just started working again from the first time. I was doing good with my work, I had a financial savings plan to help us find a better house to rent and to get me a newer used car that wasnt falling apart and some other things. My hair had just gotten to a length I half way liked. And then here comes cancer, all over again. I mean, I was seriously soooo angry. Still am to a point, that second time changed a lot about my life on a permnent level. I did some things like that. I wanted to do what I wanted to do and what I wanted to do only. I ignored a lot of the neutropenic precautions because I resented needing them again. And the more the people around me tried to force me to do the things I was supposed to be doing or wouldnt let me do things I wasnt supposed to do, the worse it made me. Obviously, if he isnt capable of driving, dont let him. But if you are fighting about going out in public or washing hands or whatever else... dont. Remember that he IS an adult and it IS his life. I wonder if he is angry like that. I mean, its common knowledge that lung cancer is still a really bad diagnosis if not terminal. Would you not be angry if you suddenly found out your life was most certainly coming to an end, abruptly? You could try to encourage him to see a psychologist, but in this state of anger, he probably wont. Although, as mentioned above, you said he had radiation to the brain. If he has any of the cancer in his brain, that could explain a lot of his attitude and behavior, and for that reason, you need to make sure his docs are aware. If he is confusing reality with dreams, that could either be cancer in the brain, or maybe the narcotics. I have very vivid dreams anyways, and when I am taking that amount of narcotics, it sometimes gets a lil fuzzy the difference between the two as well. Whatever the reason, this may be why he refuses to sleep even when he is tired. You should also find out if anything about his meds is steroidal. The add steroids to the chemo cocktail all the time today. Its in an effort to combat weight loss during chemo, but depending on the dose he is getting, that could be a source or this behavior. Answered by Sherie Hockema 3 months ago.

Cancer is the term which encompasses a very complex group which contains wide range of cancerous diseases. This is considered as a class of diseases which is being characterized by the out-of-control cell growth. The classification is based on the type of the cell which is initially affected. It will harm your body when the damaged cells are dividing uncontrollably and forms masses or lumps of tissues. This is referred to as tumors. Usually the tumors will grow and will interfere with the nervous, digestive as well as circulatory systems. This in turn can even release some hormones which will alter the functions of your body. Those tumors which are occurring only at a single place and demonstrating limited growth will be considered as benign. Answered by Bridgette Chatman 3 months ago.

I'm pretty sure he's on antibiotics to fight infection... Drs won't treat a disease if they don't know what it is.. Answered by Tajuana Malvin 3 months ago.


Husband has very low platelet count has tried steroids with no results.?
My husband was treated with Campath which caused his immune system to destroy his platelet count can't seem to get any kind of answers from the doctors. Trying to get some kind of trial medication to help. I am getting desperate. They only gave him 4 days to live.We know that we can't stop the luekemia,but... Asked by Talitha Torrens 3 months ago.

My husband was treated with Campath which caused his immune system to destroy his platelet count can't seem to get any kind of answers from the doctors. Trying to get some kind of trial medication to help. I am getting desperate. They only gave him 4 days to live.We know that we can't stop the luekemia,but would like to get his platelet count up. Answered by Sharie Lally 3 months ago.

Ask for transfusions! My dad's platelet count went dangerously low. It took several units of blood and platelets to get him out of danger, but it help stabilize him until his body was able to start producing them again. He has multiple myeloma, a cousin of leukemia. Answered by Clarinda Lozier 3 months ago.

Is he not a candidate for a platelet transfusion? Answered by Kami Rauscher 3 months ago.


What is the molecular structure of Alemtuzumab?
I'm looking for the molecular structure of Alemtuzumab aka Campath/Lemtrada. Provide a link plz. Asked by Thelma Tollett 3 months ago.

Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD52. Answered by Melodee Doderer 3 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Geralyn Borello 3 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Zella Rosaro 3 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Treena Stringham 3 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Elaine Rosinski 3 months ago.


I was diagnosed with MS 6 months ago?
I have been asked to take place in the trials at Addambrooks Hospital in Cambridge for Phase 3 trails on Campath. There have been 2 trials prior to this 1 where 3 pepole died. Do you know anyone that has been on this trial in the past, and what were their experiences with the drug Campath Asked by Reynaldo Brodes 3 months ago.

You are newly diagnosed with a disease that may very well be slow progressing. Talk to your doctor about the best and safest medical care for you. A trial where 1 in 3 people died would scare the heck out of me. Answered by Donn Vienneau 3 months ago.


What can cure blisters/sores inside the throat caused by cancer treatments? my dad can't eat due to the pain.
Please help. He has had chemotherapy for Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. It was successful for a while then they found a "minor recurrence" and is now undergoing a powerful treatment called Campath. It seems to be working, but the side effects are really making him weak and depressed...plus he can't eat due to... Asked by Stacy Fagundes 3 months ago.

Please help. He has had chemotherapy for Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. It was successful for a while then they found a "minor recurrence" and is now undergoing a powerful treatment called Campath. It seems to be working, but the side effects are really making him weak and depressed...plus he can't eat due to the sores that have developed in his throat. these sores are in the way of his getting better...please help. How do we get rid of the throat sores/infection? He is on painkillers and has been given medication for it that doesn't seem to work...not even the good 'ol salt and warm water remedy....also...any tips on helping him through the depression? I know it's the medication causing it....he does want to be better....please help. Thank you very much. Answered by Minerva Medeiras 3 months ago.

Your oncologist should have already given your father an RX for whatever type of "magic mouthwash" would best fit his situation. Call your oncologist's nurse in the AM and ask about getting a magic mouthwash prescription. In the meantime try some OTC Biotene mouthwash but this is a poor substitute for the variety of prescription preparations available specifically for situations like you are describing. Do a search for magic mouthwash and you can read about some of the various formulas that are commonly used. If it was my Dad I'd be waking up the oncologist tomorrow AM. Answered by Lashanda Kubinski 3 months ago.

There is a "swish and swallow" solution that sometimes helps with pain. It is a combination of benadryl liquid, maalox and a topical anesthetic like xylocaine. You won't be able to get the xylocaine over the counter - you'll need a prescription for it. However, they do make numbing throat spray that your dad could spray directly in his throat. Even using a 1:1 solution of maalox and benadryl to swallow might make things feel better for awhile. The best thing you can do right now is to encourage your dad to drink. He may not feel like eating, but remind him to drink so that he does not get dehydrated. If he can't drink much, try ice chips or mashed popsicles. Unfortunately, it will just take some time for his throat to heal. The best things you can do now are to try some things he can swallow to help with the pain and to help him get some fluids down. I'm sorry he's having such a hard time. I'll remember him in my prayers. God bless. Answered by Melba Cheatwood 3 months ago.

I used a half Maalox, half benadryl solution. However, I did not swallow it. I used it every 4 hours or so. It's not a cure, but it helped. I also ate soft foods like jello, pudding and drank Gatorade. I tended to like soft cold foods and then after a few days I could eat warm food, like creamy chicken soup. Answered by Edythe Besley 3 months ago.

there is a lodz.. that his ocologist can prescribe. also my doctor prescribed lidocaine/hydranube/maalox su , you swish and garlge and spit out 1 to 2 teaspoonsfulls 4 times a day as need. it numbs the mouth. really nasty but enables you to eat a little with out pain. hopefully in time that he want need it for the sores. its painful. god bless, hope everything gets better for him. Answered by Karol Bergemann 3 months ago.

My dad's doctor prescribed something called carafate. That seemed to help. Answered by Breanna Acor 3 months ago.


What are at least 10 therapies for Multiple Sclerosis?
10 different types of therapies for MS. Asked by Porter Su 3 months ago.

It is a quite difficult question, as I love to give answers, i researched about it and found them as alemtuzumab (trade name Campath), daclizumab (trade name Zenapax), rituximab, dirucotide, BHT-3009, cladribine, dimethyl fumarate, estriol, fingolimod, laquinimod, minocycline, statins, temsirolimus and teriflunomide. Answered by Danille Mosca 3 months ago.


Cord Blood used as a possible kidney failure treatment?
Has anyone ever heard of cord blood used as a possible treatment to kidney failure. I've searched the web and have gathered a lot of information on what they have been doing in pushing the envelope on kidney failure treatments. I know they are also working with whipping out a persons marrow and replacing it... Asked by Princess Frattini 3 months ago.

Has anyone ever heard of cord blood used as a possible treatment to kidney failure. I've searched the web and have gathered a lot of information on what they have been doing in pushing the envelope on kidney failure treatments. I know they are also working with whipping out a persons marrow and replacing it with the donors marrow to offset rejection. Also, I've seen on the news how the U of Minnesota has recently found a way to erase dna in an organ and replacing it with ones own Dna to trick the immune system into thinking that its their own organ. I'm really interested in what others have to say because I'm currently rejecting my 3rd kidney transplant. I'm only 22 yrs old and will try everything to fight what I have now to make a comeback for my family and my new born son. Funny thing is we were going to safe his cord blood from when he was born but we didn't have any money and my kidney was working perfectly. Well any comments would be greatly appreciated! Ray Answered by Rowena Oehm 3 months ago.

Ray, I'm sorry to hear about your kidneys!! :( That's terrible but it's good you'll fight it.... Cord blood is used as an "unproved" treatment (but highly effective) for cerebral palsy/oxygen deprivation/brain disorders.... but as for kidneys... it's unsure. The thing with stem cell is that they have HIGH potential because they act like embryonic cells, which means they can potentially form into anything.... thus helping make more cells, however specialized they are. They're also "young and fresh." I'm sure you know this.... So... to answer you, it SEEMS possible but there's not enough information nor is it a standard practice yet. So even if you had banked your son's cord blood, it's unsure if you could've gotten someone to try, unless it was in another country. Don't feel bad. As for the U of Minn study, I don't know enough about that. I would think though that the technology is not advanced enough and that they'd want to do that process of injecting cells immediately after the transplant... Why not contact them? It can't hurt.... call them and keep asking and asking....ask for the doctor in charge of the study. Sometimes, if they're doing animal studies only and don't have FDA approval for people, you can make a claim to the FDA that it's cruel to withdraw what is a possible treatment to you, and that you have no other good options anyway... it works a lot. I'm sure you've tried all the following but have you tried: a) Switching your transplant acceptance medicine. Some people's bodies don't work too well on specific medicines but others work wonders... totally recommend this one. (Campath-1H, tacrolimus-- most common I think, any others not tried yet, mycophenolate mofetil)... the last is being done in research studies right now b) Lowering your immune system MORE, so your body doesn't work so hard to reject what it recognizes as a "foreign body" (immunosuppressing) c) Hemodialysis ("restarting" the system, essentially, by pumping blood through your body that's been filtered through a machine) d) Checking your diet top to bottom... like for example avoid salty foods which force your kidneys to work harder e) Dialysis through your stomach ... sounds weird but it can work as an alternate "kidney" if done properly f) finding a research study to be enrolled in... if it's a placebo vs real thing test and you suspect you're in the placebo study, get out. Answered by Irena Goos 3 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Cord Blood used as a possible kidney failure treatment? Has anyone ever heard of cord blood used as a possible treatment to kidney failure. I've searched the web and have gathered a lot of information on what they have been doing in pushing the envelope on kidney failure treatments. I know they are also working with whipping out a persons marrow and... Answered by Nicky Szmalc 3 months ago.

Natural Kidney Health Restoration Program Answered by Tyisha Macho 3 months ago.

Not sure about the rejection details, but I know you have to really stick to your anti-rejection drug regimen and not skip any doses. As for keeping kidneys working: 1. keeping your blood pressure under control if it is high helps. Calcium, low salt, rice or other soluable fiber foods (absorbs salt in the gut) help keep blood pressure under control. 2. a vegetarian diet could help. Too much protein overworks the kidneys...they have to turn excess protein into ammonia/urea waste by products. 3. Watch taking too much aspirin or NSAIDS (aspirin, naproxen, ibuprofen) which are filtered through the kidneys. (Tylenol is filtered through the liver.) 4. If you are diabetic, be sure to keep your diabetes under control. High blood glucose levels can damage small blood vessels and nerves in the kidneys. 5. Prayer can't hurt either. Note that these are just suggestions and you should check with your doctor first before trying anything new. It sounds like the answer above mine is very detailed. Probably someone who works in the urology/nephology field. Answered by Isadora Shellenbarger 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
103948/001 CAMPATH ALEMTUZUMAB VIAL/ INTRAVENOUS 10MG per ML
103948/002 CAMPATH ALEMTUZUMAB VIAL/ INTRAVENOUS 30MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
103948/001 CAMPATH ALEMTUZUMAB VIAL/ INTRAVENOUS 10MG per ML
103948/002 CAMPATH ALEMTUZUMAB VIAL/ INTRAVENOUS 30MG per ML
103948/003 LEMTRADA ALEMTUZUMAB INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12MG per 1.2ML (10MG per ML)

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