CALCIPOTRIENE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 077029/001.

Names and composition

"CALCIPOTRIENE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CALCIPOTRIENE.

Answered questions

My doctor told me to use Calcipotriene on my face but label says not to?
Hi,So I have severe psoriasis all over, and I use a combination of Soriatane and topical steroid creams to treat the areas affecting my body, However I also get psoriasis on my face, ears, eyebrows, etc, which I am not supposed to use the steroids to treat due to potential side effects from applying to that area... Asked by Racquel Trigleth 3 months ago.

Hi, So I have severe psoriasis all over, and I use a combination of Soriatane and topical steroid creams to treat the areas affecting my body, However I also get psoriasis on my face, ears, eyebrows, etc, which I am not supposed to use the steroids to treat due to potential side effects from applying to that area ( glaucoma etc) My dermatologist recently prescribed my calcipotriene to apply to my face ears and eyebrows saying that it doesn't have the same dangerous side effects BUT on the drug label it specifically says not to apply to face or near the eyes but it doesn't say why! Does anyone know if this is just a warning due to irritation or if there are dangerous side effects from doing so...I would hope my derm would be aware of this before telling me to apply to my face but ive gotten bad advice from doctors in the past so I dont want to just blindly trust that he is well versed in this medication. Thanks! Answered by Benjamin Kerbel 3 months ago.

Calcipotriene ( Dovonex ) should not be applied on the face! It causes irritation and flaking. The best thing to use is Protopic cream. Ask your dermatologist or your pharmacist. It also has no cortisone in , it's not a steroid and can be applied even on the eyelids and in other sensitive areas on the body ( genitals ). Just use a tiny bit. It works as fast and as good as corticosteroids. Answered by Reid Scrabeck 3 months ago.

As an alternative you may want to research using Salcura Dermaspray Gentle instead. It has no steroids, in fact it's all natural ingredients. we used it very successfully on our child's eczema. was 10 times more effective than everything else we tried. expresschemist co uk has pictures of people that it helped, including a young woman with severe psoriasis. Answered by Bobby Myers 3 months ago.

Do a double check with your pharmacists. Sometimes they know these medications better as they see them in use daily. Answered by Tillie Holling 3 months ago.


When and in what condition should I discontinue the calcipotriene ointment?
I am a 85 year old man with plaque psoriasis.I use calcipotriene for plaque psoriasis,when and in what conditions should I discontinue it ? can I use it contineusly with recomanded dose? Asked by Leena Pavan 3 months ago.

Your dermatologist should have given guidelines for this. I know when I use it, I can't stay on it for very many weeks because of the possible danger from too much calcium - once I had to stop because my bloodwork showed too much. Best to talk to your dermatologist. Answered by Carla Cholico 3 months ago.


Anyone know of a successful psoriasis treatment?
My boyfriend has a small patch of what looks like psoriasis by his ear. We got some of this coal tar gel called Psoriasin but it doesn't seem to be helping. Anyone with this have any helpful tips or treatments? Asked by Williemae Robante 3 months ago.

The standard management for psoriasis is currently calcipotriene, (Dovonex,) Dovobet is used for rescue treatment, unfortunately it contains a powerful flourinated steroid which if used on an ongoing basis produces skin thinning, marking, (striae,) and rebound exacerbations. Calcipotriene is a clean and pleasant preparation with few side effects, unfortunately it is not all that potent and its effects also tend to wane with time. The older psoriasis preparations, tar and dithranol, are still excellent and very effective, but they require experience of use to manage them, something few dermatologists and even fewer GPs still possess. They need to be applied in very low concentrations and initially for very short contact periods to avoid skin damage. The concentrations and application times can be gradually increased as tolerated. Unfortunately both these preparations are smelly and messy, so they are best applied at night and washed off in the morning. Olive oil can be used to help remove the tar. Answered by Gladis Pinilla 3 months ago.


DOES tACLONEX COME IN A GENERIC FORM?
Asked by Elois Kratochwil 3 months ago.

No, unfortunately, Taclonex (betamethasone diproprionate/calcipotriene) does not come in a generic form. Answered by Doyle Hillbrant 3 months ago.


What three organs participate in vitamin D production?
Asked by Tamatha Rameriez 3 months ago.

Vitamin D (also known as calciferol) is a hormone precursor that contributes to the maintenance of normal levels of calcium and phosphorus in the blood. Vitamin D is not a true vitamin since human skin can create vitamin D in some circumstances; it may be better described as a conditional vitamin. Vitamin D plays an important role in the maintenance of an intact and strong skeleton. Its primary task seems today to be to regulate the amount of calcium and phosphorus in the blood by ensuring correct intake from intestines and secretion. However, other related tasks are still under investigation Several studies show that vitamin D also regulates the growth of skin cells. Psoriasis gives shell-like skin as a result of uncontrolled cell growth. A synthetic vitamin D analogue called calcipotriene is used in the treatment of this disease. The human body produces its own vitamin D in the skin - this is done by activating some chemicals in the body. This process is dependent on ultraviolet radiation from sunlight. However, vitamin D should not be excluded from the diet, especially for people who do not receive sufficient exposure to UVB sunlight. Forms Vitamin D1: molecular compound of ergocalciferol with lumisterol, 1:1 Vitamin D2: ergocalciferol or calciferol (made from ergosterol) Vitamin D3: cholecalciferol (made from 7-dehydrocholesterol), precursor of calcidiol, which is the precursor of calcitriol Vitamin D4: 22,23-dihydroergocalciferol Vitamin D5: sitocalciferol (made from 7-dehydrositosterol) Vitamin D3, also known as cholecalciferol, is a form of vitamin D that is made by the human body. It is made in the skin when 7-dehydrocholesterol reacts with UVB ultraviolet light with wavelengths 290 to 315 nm. This can be found in sunlight when the sun is high enough above the horizon for UVB to penetrate the atmosphere and is responsible for the production of cholecalciferol. Up to 20,000 IU can be made in the skin only after one minimal erythemal dose of exposure, or until the skin just begins to turn pink. Vitamin D2 is derived by irradiating fungi to produce ergocalciferol. Ergocalciferol does not naturally occur in the human body unless it is added by supplementation. In the rat, D2 is more effective as a vitamin than D3, and in the squirrel monkey and the chick, D3 is more effective. In humans, D3 is more effective than D2 at increasing 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the circulating reservoir of the vitamin D hormone. In certain parts of the world, particularly at higher latitudes, total vitamin D input is usually not sufficient, especially in the winter, thus the recent concern about widespread vitamin D deficiency. To help prevent this, foods such as milk may be fortified with vitamin D2 or vitamin D3, typically giving 100 IU per glass. Cholecalciferol is transported to the liver where it is hydroxylated to calcidiol or 25-hydroxy-vitamin D, the form of the vitamin that the body stores. A blood calcidiol level is the only way to determine vitamin D deficiency; levels should be between 40 and 60 ng/mL (100 to 150 nMol/L) for optimal health. The most active form of the vitamin is calcitriol (1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D3), a potent hormone. Calcitriol is synthesized from calcidiol in the kidneys to perform its endocrine function of maintaining the calcium economy. Calcitriol binds to a transcription factor which then regulates gene expression of transport proteins like TRPV6 and calbindin that are involved in calcium absorption in the intestine. The general result is the maintenance of calcium and phosphorus levels in the bone and blood with the assistance of parathyroid hormone and calcitonin. A number of tissues throughout the human body also have the ability to make and regulate their own calcitriol. It is these autocrine and paracrine functions of the vitamin D system that may explain its association with a host of chronic diseases. The high rate of natural production of vitamin D in the skin is the single most important fact every person should know about vitamin D because it has such profound implications for the natural human condition. Vitamin D is a steroid hormone precursor that has recently been found to play a role in a wide variety of diseases. Current research indicates vitamin D deficiency plays a role in causing 17 varieties of cancer, heart disease, stroke, hypertension, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, depression, chronic pain, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, muscle wasting, birth defects and periodontal disease. This does not mean that vitamin D is the only cause of these diseases, or that you will not get them if you take vitamin D. What it does mean is that vitamin D, and the many ways in which it affects a person's health, can no longer be overlooked by the healthcare industry nor by individuals striving to maintain, or achieve, a greater state of health. Answered by Rueben Ekdahl 3 months ago.

Skin, Liver And Kidneys These three organs work together to synthesize 1,25-diydroxyvitamin D, the active form of vitamin D, which controls levels of calcium and phosphorus in the blood. In the skin, a modified cholesterol (fatty) molecule is converted to vitamin D by chemical changes through ultraviolet rays from the sun. In the liver, vitamin D3 is converted to 25-hydroxyvitamin D (calcidiol) before going to the kidney where it is converted to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) with the help of parathyroid hormone. Calcitriol acts on the intestine, kidneys, and bones to maintain normal levels of blood calcium and phosphorus. Too little calcium in the diet can lead to rickets in children and osteoporosis in adults. Answered by Cristen Guilianelli 3 months ago.

The Skin is one of em. Answered by Santa Fedora 3 months ago.

Small intestine, kidney, bone Answered by Clifton Banther 3 months ago.

The skin when it exposes to the sun!! Answered by Casie Colarusso 3 months ago.


What is the best none expenseve way to help with plage psorious?
i no i spelled it wrong but ive tryed everything and nothing works Asked by Jalisa Gatica 3 months ago.

I always tell my patients in the E.R that oatmeal bath such as aveno works great... I did pull some information from Web Md that looks great... Some doctors recommend salicylic acid ointment, which smoothes the skin by promoting the shedding of psoriatic scales. Steroid-based creams are effective, but because they can have harmful side effects, be especially careful to follow your doctor's instructions on their use. A topical ointment containing calcipotriene, which is related to vitamin D, has proven to be as effective as hydrocortisone creams for treating psoriasis. But use only limited amounts to avoid side effects. Coal-tar ointments and shampoos can alleviate symptoms, but many people are vulnerable to the side effects -- especially folliculitis, a pimple-like rash affecting the hair follicles. These medicines should be used only under a doctor's supervision. Anthralin therapy, which is made from the bark of a South American tree, is generally reserved for severe forms of psoriasis. Anthralin salve is carefully applied to the affected areas and removed after 10 to 30 minutes. All the white scales should be gone, revealing an underlying layer of fresh, normal skin. If not properly applied by a trained therapist, however, anthralin may irritate healthy skin and leave stains that can last several weeks. Prescription vitamin A-related gels don't work as quickly as steroids but tend to have fewer side effects. Women of childbearing age should use birth control while taking this medication because of the risk of birth defects if they become pregnant. Light Therapy Even regular doses of sunlight -- not enough to produce sunburn though -- can help lesions in many people. But try to avoid sunburns and other psoriasis triggers, such as skin injuries, insect bites, viral or bacterial infections, stress, and being overweight. For persistent, difficult-to-treat cases of psoriasis, many doctors recommend light therapy. One of the most effective treatments is PUVA (the drug psoralen combined with ultraviolet A, or UVA, light). Some people aren't good candidates for PUVA, since it has been shown to contribute to an increased risk of skin cancer, even decades after stopping to use this therapy. Some doctors may prescribe ultraviolet B light (UVB) treatment using a light box alone or with other therapies such as coal tar. A relatively new type of light treatment, called narrow-band UVB therapy, may be less carcinogenic than PUVA but just as effective. Oral Medications When other treatments fail, some doctors prescribe oral medications to treat psoriasis. Some of these medications affect the immune system. One such medication is methotrexate, an anticancer drug, which can produce dramatic clearing of the psoriasis lesions. However, it can cause side effects, so the prescribing doctor should perform regular blood tests. Other medications of this type include cyclosporine or hydroxyurea. Retinoids, compounds with vitamin A-like properties, can be helpful to people with severe psoriasis. As with topical vitamin A-like creams, women of childbearing age need to use birth control with this medication. New treatments for people with severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are now available. Several "biologic" drugs, which are made from human or animal proteins, focus on controlling the body's immune response. Some of these drugs are quite effective but are extremely expensive... If this is what you have already tried or if its not something that you wanted to do I have included the link for the web md site... I am sorry you have this and hope it gets better... Answered by Tenesha Blauman 3 months ago.

The best non-steroidal remedy for plaque psoriasis is the herbal cream from champori.com I haven't had a flare up for more than a year now after only few weeks of treatment. Answered by Rory Bellavance 3 months ago.


Weird Dent in fingernail?
I just noticed this weird dent in my finger nail, and what is it? How can I fix it? Asked by Dyan Moad 3 months ago.

There are topical applications you can use. Two of the most popular are Dovonex (calcipotriene a synthetic form of vitamin D3) and Tazorac (tazarotene vitamin A derivative). There have been studies on patients with fingernails psoriasis using calcipotriene with much success. Both Dovonex and Tazorac have shown to reduce pitted nails, in some cases symptoms have disappeared completely. Application of a topical cream (corticosteroids) has also been known to help improve pitted nails. Put recommended amount of cream on fingernails, wrap your nails in cellophane wrap, do this before bed. It can be very frustrating, and I have heard many stories of people going to a doctor and not being diagnosed correctly. If your condition is not severe then try using a topical treatment. Answered by Jolyn Mierzwinski 3 months ago.

i do no longer know if this is "sexual." i'm a at once married guy. For artwork on a daily basis i'm in suits and bow ties, a signature look going decrease back to intense college. My fantasy is to wed yet another groom in an fairly formal gay wedding ceremony. Answered by Vertie Hunsucker 3 months ago.


Severe 'eczema' on hands?
alright, well i keep going to doctors, dermatologists, and i just went to an allergist, they all say that i have either eczema or psoriasis. I've tried many different creams, hydrocortisone (2.5%), calcipotriene (.005%), fluro-something, (i forget the name but it was either .5% or .05%), and none of these... Asked by Lahoma Montag 3 months ago.

alright, well i keep going to doctors, dermatologists, and i just went to an allergist, they all say that i have either eczema or psoriasis. I've tried many different creams, hydrocortisone (2.5%), calcipotriene (.005%), fluro-something, (i forget the name but it was either .5% or .05%), and none of these medicines do anything. But I also get eczema on my face, elbows, and knees, but these medicines easily make that eczema go away. So what i'm thinking is, maybe whats on my hands isn't eczema at all. I don't know of course, i'm just a 17 year old kid. I got a job at a pudgies this summer (like kfc), i did end up touching raw chicken (Accidentally of course) and for a while i used latex gloves, i stopped using the latex but it didn't make anything better, that's just more information i'm not sure if it means anything. the eczema did start after i got this job by the way. my doctors never listen to me when i try to talk about any of it though. They just suggest different kinds of creams for me to use. But because the creams worked everywhere else except my hands, i'm thinking maybe that maybe it isn't eczema or psoriasis. Is it likely that i'm right? i mean couldn't it maybe be a finger fungus? or anything else? that's all that i can think of but i'm sure that there's plenty of other options that i have never heard of. maybe i'm just allergic to something? i finally convinced my mom that maybe that's it so she took me to an allergist, i have a patch on my back right now and i feel a bit of itching back there, so maybe i am allergic to something. I talked to my boss and i'm not going to be handling the chicken anymore. I hope things change but so far they haven't. What do you think? Answered by Courtney Jordt 3 months ago.


My dog a 43 lb terrier collie mix just ate 1 sudefed pill. what do i do ?
Asked by Klara Dininno 3 months ago.

CALL A VET--- SEE BELOW Other harmful medications include: •Psuedophedrine (Sudafed) •Heart Medications •Anti-depressants •Flourouracil (Efudex) •Calcipotriene (Dovonex) •Prescription Skin Creams •Isoniazid (tuberculosis medication) If your dog has taken any of these medicines call your emergency veterinarian immediately. Let the veterinarian know the name of the drug and the dosage (the number of milligrams if you have it). For dosages of aspirin and acetaminophen if you see symptoms such as lethargic behavior, vomiting, diarrhea or appetitive loss call your vet. Treatments for any of these drugs can include charcoal to absorb any remaining medication, drugs to protect against stomach ulcers, fluids to flush the drug from the blood and if severe, blood transfusions. Answered by Rebecka Rodda 3 months ago.

Call a vet immediately to ask their advice. Answered by Colby Nosis 3 months ago.

Call the vet now! Answered by Edra Manche 3 months ago.

I wouldn't worry about it. My vet had me give our dogs Benedryl when we traveled, for motion sickness. I didn't work BTW. They are 30lbs. Answered by Annmarie Guger 3 months ago.

don't let it happen again. Answered by Lonnie Sabatelli 3 months ago.


Can you overdose on Vitamin D?
I have psoriasis. I've had them for a long time now. I was just recently at my dermatologist and he prescribed me a cream. Its called Dovobet. It contains 2 drugs. Betamethasone and Calcipotriene. Calciportriene is a form of Vitamin D. Before I saw my dermatologist, I bought Vitamin D pills to try out also... Asked by Samira Butterbaugh 3 months ago.

I have psoriasis. I've had them for a long time now. I was just recently at my dermatologist and he prescribed me a cream. Its called Dovobet. It contains 2 drugs. Betamethasone and Calcipotriene. Calciportriene is a form of Vitamin D. Before I saw my dermatologist, I bought Vitamin D pills to try out also for the Psoriasis. I didn't know this cream had some Vitamin D. It doesn't tell me the percentage. What I'm wondering is, would it be too much Vitamin D for me to take if I took this cream AND pills? Is it possible to overdose on Vitamin D? Answered by Tonisha Cropley 3 months ago.

Yes it is, but you should ask the dermatologist. Many topical meds like the one you are describing only impart a small amount of the drug past your skin, so you may be okay taking both. Or just get out in the sun, your body makes vitamin D naturally. Answered by Lue Keawe 3 months ago.

It is definitely possible to overdose on vitamin D, and if you did it over long term, it would lead to hypercalcemnia (abnormally high calcium in the blood). Hypercalcemia can cause cardiac arrhythmias, tachycardia, anorexia, nausea and vomiting, excessive urination, confusion, and it also increases sensitivity to some heart medications and can cause seroiuus toxicity with digitalis. Osteoporosis can also occur long term because of vitamin D's action to enhance parathyroid hormone, which stimulates consumption of bone. The bottom line is, use it in the dose recommended and you'll be fine. Don't take too much. Answered by Marge Niebyl 3 months ago.

Yes, vitamin D has many effects, the most important of which is the aid of Calcium absorption. Incidentally, on sunny days vitamin D is normally created in adequate amounts by a reaction of sunlight with your skim... If you do not have levels of plasma calcium that are too low, there is no reason to take a ton of vitamin d. Most dairy items are fortified with it anyway. Moderation if everything is a good rule to live by. Answered by Trula Colder 3 months ago.

a simple blood test (heptic pannel) will help you your family doctor can do this for you, its not very expensive, too many vitamins or other suppliments can be hard on your liver i would check to see if you have elevated liver enzymes good luck to you Answered by Erica Vranek 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
077029/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.005%
077579/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.005%
078305/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.005%
078468/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.005%
090633/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.005%
200935/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.005%
205772/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.005%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020273/001 DOVONEX CALCIPOTRIENE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.005% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020554/001 DOVONEX CALCIPOTRIENE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.005%
020611/001 DOVONEX CALCIPOTRIENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.005% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
022563/001 SORILUX CALCIPOTRIENE AEROSOL, FOAM/TOPICAL 0.005%
077029/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.005%
077579/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.005%
078305/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.005%
078468/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.005%
090633/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.005%
200935/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.005%
205772/001 CALCIPOTRIENE CALCIPOTRIENE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.005%

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