Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019152/001.

Names and composition

"CALAN SR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019152/001 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
019152/002 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019152/003 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018485/001 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
018593/001 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
018593/002 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
018593/003 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
018817/001 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
018817/002 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
018817/003 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
018817/004 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
018925/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
019038/001 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
019152/001 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
019152/002 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019152/003 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
019614/001 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
019614/002 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
019614/003 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
019614/004 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020552/001 COVERA-HS VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020552/002 COVERA-HS VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020943/001 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
020943/002 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
020943/003 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
070225/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070340/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070341/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070348/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070451/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070468/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070482/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070483/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070577/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070617/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070672/001 VERAPAMIL HCL VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 2.5MG per ML
070695/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070696/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070697/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070737/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
070737/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 10MG per 4ML (2.5MG per ML)
070738/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 10MG per 4ML (2.5MG per ML)
070739/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070740/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070855/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070856/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070994/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070995/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071019/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071366/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071367/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071423/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071424/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071483/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071483/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071489/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071489/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071880/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071881/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071881/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072124/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
072125/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
072233/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072751/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072799/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072888/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072922/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
072923/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072924/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
073168/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
073485/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073568/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
073568/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074330/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074587/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074587/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074587/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075072/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075072/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075136/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
075138/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075138/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075138/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
078306/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
078306/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
078306/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
078906/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090529/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090529/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090529/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090700/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090700/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
200878/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
200878/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
200878/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
206173/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
206173/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

I have been trying to substitue generic verapimil for the brand name calan sr. Verap. does not seem as good?
Does not lower my blood pressure as good as the brand. Yet, I am told they are the same? Asked by Daryl Waldock 1 year ago.

There are certain small differences between name brands and generics. The active ingredient(s) are essentially the same, although they are allowed to be a certain percentage of chemical variation by the FDA (5% maybe?). This alone can sometimes cause a different level of activity in a person. Changes in the inactive ingredients such as dyes, sugars, or coatings can all change the way the medicine is absorbed and processed by the body. Answered by Dayna Surrency 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Mack Houskeeper 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Jarod Cowin 1 year ago.


Is verapamil safe during early pregnancy 0-3 months?
i already read that stuff on webmd. thanks Asked by Carol Curry 1 year ago.

Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Its use in pregnancy has been limited though the experimental effects of verapamil on fetal heart. If your neurologist say that it is safe, then it must be. If you want to be sure, get a second opinion. Answered by Tabitha Akuna 1 year ago.

This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Cheyenne Schult 1 year ago.


How I can Control my High Blood Pressure with out using Alopathic Drugs?
I M using the Drug Calan SR since one month but no result and some time my BP is going up to 193 systolic. 90 diastolic occasionally and pulse rate up to85, before I used Tenormin for at least 2 month it was also less effective but I feel the results better then Calan SR. with Tenormin puls rate was going... Asked by Buffy Cuffari 1 year ago.

I M using the Drug Calan SR since one month but no result and some time my BP is going up to 193 systolic. 90 diastolic occasionally and pulse rate up to85, before I used Tenormin for at least 2 month it was also less effective but I feel the results better then Calan SR. with Tenormin puls rate was going abnormally below normal level (up to 55). Is there any way to Withdraw these all rubbish druges by any safe way. Answered by Lucien Dingle 1 year ago.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Garlic Hawthorn Fish oil Folic acid Garlic is my favorite because I love the taste. If you dont you can take it in pill form. Hope this helps. Answered by Jessenia Fenimore 1 year ago.

mo listed some decent herbal supplements, but not everyone gets results from these. An easy way to do this is to begin an exercise program with advice from your doctor. With a bp as high as you listed, I would not recommend anything strenuous at first because you are at risk for complications. If your doctor feels you are healthy enough to begin a walking program, this would be a good start. Losing weight and improving your cardiovascular fitness is an excellent way to naturally decrease your blood pressure. I began working on my cardiovascular fitness and dropped my bp from low 140s/90s to normal, just under 120/80. Good luck, but consult your doctor first Answered by Stefanie Wittig 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Tressa Munlin 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Regenia Homyak 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Latesha Skultety 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Martine Kalisch 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Randal Gloden 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Valentin Lakes 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Guillermina Wasmus 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Asley Wyner 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Jenelle Nance 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Darren Hoefel 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Abbey Greeson 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Londa Fichera 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Bonny Glowinski 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Hazel Sayasane 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Megan Bisikirski 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Tosha Raye 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Ileen Morasco 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Dwana Peria 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Verona Bupp 1 year ago.


I have been trying to substitue generic verapimil for the brand name calan sr. Verap. does not seem as good?
Does not lower my blood pressure as good as the brand. Yet, I am told they are the same? Asked by Kandace Harwell 1 year ago.

There are certain small differences between name brands and generics. The active ingredient(s) are essentially the same, although they are allowed to be a certain percentage of chemical variation by the FDA (5% maybe?). This alone can sometimes cause a different level of activity in a person. Changes in the inactive ingredients such as dyes, sugars, or coatings can all change the way the medicine is absorbed and processed by the body. Answered by Kendrick Kinatyan 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Bryon Kralik 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Myong Nighbor 1 year ago.


Is verapamil safe during early pregnancy 0-3 months?
i already read that stuff on webmd. thanks Asked by Fred Battenhouse 1 year ago.

Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Its use in pregnancy has been limited though the experimental effects of verapamil on fetal heart. If your neurologist say that it is safe, then it must be. If you want to be sure, get a second opinion. Answered by Brigid Stvil 1 year ago.

This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Timmy Qasba 1 year ago.


How I can Control my High Blood Pressure with out using Alopathic Drugs?
I M using the Drug Calan SR since one month but no result and some time my BP is going up to 193 systolic. 90 diastolic occasionally and pulse rate up to85, before I used Tenormin for at least 2 month it was also less effective but I feel the results better then Calan SR. with Tenormin puls rate was going... Asked by Bradly Scurti 1 year ago.

I M using the Drug Calan SR since one month but no result and some time my BP is going up to 193 systolic. 90 diastolic occasionally and pulse rate up to85, before I used Tenormin for at least 2 month it was also less effective but I feel the results better then Calan SR. with Tenormin puls rate was going abnormally below normal level (up to 55). Is there any way to Withdraw these all rubbish druges by any safe way. Answered by Linnie Raczak 1 year ago.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Garlic Hawthorn Fish oil Folic acid Garlic is my favorite because I love the taste. If you dont you can take it in pill form. Hope this helps. Answered by Emilee Fossum 1 year ago.

mo listed some decent herbal supplements, but not everyone gets results from these. An easy way to do this is to begin an exercise program with advice from your doctor. With a bp as high as you listed, I would not recommend anything strenuous at first because you are at risk for complications. If your doctor feels you are healthy enough to begin a walking program, this would be a good start. Losing weight and improving your cardiovascular fitness is an excellent way to naturally decrease your blood pressure. I began working on my cardiovascular fitness and dropped my bp from low 140s/90s to normal, just under 120/80. Good luck, but consult your doctor first Answered by Somer Forgach 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Ahmad Kierstead 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Nancee Feisthamel 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Young Wurz 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Sherron Bossler 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Camila Dayer 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Anne Byes 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Samuel Arriola 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Courtney Zuber 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Nena Stickels 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Nettie Woock 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Lora Arkontaky 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Cleotilde Aylward 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Rikki Lauthern 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Courtney Yoneda 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Sherman Rosenbluth 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Samuel Mauriello 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Lorenza Teats 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Maria Bisogno 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Mazie Schlotter 1 year ago.


I have been trying to substitue generic verapimil for the brand name calan sr. Verap. does not seem as good?
Does not lower my blood pressure as good as the brand. Yet, I am told they are the same? Asked by Madie Abramson 1 year ago.

There are certain small differences between name brands and generics. The active ingredient(s) are essentially the same, although they are allowed to be a certain percentage of chemical variation by the FDA (5% maybe?). This alone can sometimes cause a different level of activity in a person. Changes in the inactive ingredients such as dyes, sugars, or coatings can all change the way the medicine is absorbed and processed by the body. Answered by Temeka Faltus 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Caleb Daquila 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Barry Dehnert 1 year ago.


Is verapamil safe during early pregnancy 0-3 months?
i already read that stuff on webmd. thanks Asked by Sharilyn Sabagh 1 year ago.

Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Its use in pregnancy has been limited though the experimental effects of verapamil on fetal heart. If your neurologist say that it is safe, then it must be. If you want to be sure, get a second opinion. Answered by Angelo Xayasith 1 year ago.

This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Annamaria Majied 1 year ago.


How I can Control my High Blood Pressure with out using Alopathic Drugs?
I M using the Drug Calan SR since one month but no result and some time my BP is going up to 193 systolic. 90 diastolic occasionally and pulse rate up to85, before I used Tenormin for at least 2 month it was also less effective but I feel the results better then Calan SR. with Tenormin puls rate was going... Asked by Willetta Debutiaco 1 year ago.

I M using the Drug Calan SR since one month but no result and some time my BP is going up to 193 systolic. 90 diastolic occasionally and pulse rate up to85, before I used Tenormin for at least 2 month it was also less effective but I feel the results better then Calan SR. with Tenormin puls rate was going abnormally below normal level (up to 55). Is there any way to Withdraw these all rubbish druges by any safe way. Answered by Chante Moncure 1 year ago.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Garlic Hawthorn Fish oil Folic acid Garlic is my favorite because I love the taste. If you dont you can take it in pill form. Hope this helps. Answered by Laurice Brogren 1 year ago.

mo listed some decent herbal supplements, but not everyone gets results from these. An easy way to do this is to begin an exercise program with advice from your doctor. With a bp as high as you listed, I would not recommend anything strenuous at first because you are at risk for complications. If your doctor feels you are healthy enough to begin a walking program, this would be a good start. Losing weight and improving your cardiovascular fitness is an excellent way to naturally decrease your blood pressure. I began working on my cardiovascular fitness and dropped my bp from low 140s/90s to normal, just under 120/80. Good luck, but consult your doctor first Answered by David Francies 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Rolf Wassink 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Almeda Showers 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Deidra Titsworth 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Hugh Amico 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Brittaney Bein 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Alla Brienza 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Ermelinda Mullineaux 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Kaylene Borgelt 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Frederica Krenn 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Haley Mees 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Hope Mooe 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Verlie Hudas 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Elanor Duett 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Dortha Alzugaray 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Floria Urioste 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Mitsuko Condron 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Edwin Barness 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Mckenzie Maciejczyk 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Vernon Synan 1 year ago.


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