Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 006620/001.

Names and composition

"CAFERGOT" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CAFFEINE and ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
006620/001 CAFERGOT CAFFEINE; ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 1MG
009000/002 CAFERGOT CAFFEINE; ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 100MG and 2MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
084294/001 CAFERGOT CAFFEINE; ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 1MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
006620/001 CAFERGOT CAFFEINE; ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 1MG
009000/002 CAFERGOT CAFFEINE; ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 100MG and 2MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
040510/001 ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE AND CAFFEINE CAFFEINE; ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 1MG
040590/001 ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE AND CAFFEINE CAFFEINE; ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 1MG
084294/001 CAFERGOT CAFFEINE; ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 1MG
086557/001 MIGERGOT CAFFEINE; ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 100MG and 2MG
086562/001 WIGRAINE CAFFEINE; ERGOTAMINE TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 1MG

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Answered questions

I wanna buy cafergot. What's the safest online pharmacy I can use?
Asked by Nickie Fishbeck 1 year ago.

Why? If you have migraines get a prescription for it from your doctor, in case your wondering, you can not make LSD out of cafergot, well you could but you would need several million dollars worth of professional lab equipment not to mention a doctorate in organic chemistry. Answered by Merri Dyle 1 year ago.


Can i die from Cafergot overdose?
So ive taken about 10 pills of cafergot today im curious can i die from it or do i need to take more Asked by Teodora Sciancalepore 1 year ago.

i am afraid i would not give you a good answer ,although i am a professional nurse , the medications that you are taking should be asked or checked from the doctor as i have researched the medications have side effects which may ruin your health. Answered by Sanjuana Hemminger 1 year ago.


Can you make acid (lsd) out of cafergot?
on wikipedia it lists ergotamine as a precursor to lsd, so I just wondered if it is possible and how? Not because I would ever pursue it, (that stage of life is over) but just for curiosity sake. Asked by Franchesca Wray 1 year ago.

LSD is extremely difficult to make from scratch (we went over its total synthesis in adv org chem one day, took an entire hour). However, from ergotamine it is comparatively easy, as the ergot fungus has already done most of the work for you. Look at the picture of ergotamine on wikipedia, and compare it to the picture of LSD on wikipedia. You'll find that the bottom half of ergotamine is an lysergic acyl group, attached to the rest of the molecule by an amide functionality (R-CO-NR2) to an iminal carbon. You can easily cleave this bond by treating ergotamine with mild acid and heat, to give you lysergic acid. Treating this with mild acid, heat, and diethylamine will give you lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), which you can extract into an organic solvent. Of course, when I say this is easy i mean it is easy if you have a chem lab at your disposal. If you don't, the most difficult reagent to procure would probably be diethylamine, which is the DEA watchlist for chemical precursors. Answered by Halina Celano 1 year ago.

Extremely difficult. You could maybe get as far as Lysergic Acid, but reading the literature, even the solvents needed to produce LSD and keep it in a stable form are surprisingly complicated. You would probably need a PhD in Organic Chemistry and a lot of high level organised crime friends, who could get you the (watched) reagents you needed. Answered by Herminia Tarnowski 1 year ago.

yes doable. probably gonna want to use a lewis acid to allow the use of milder hydrolysis conditions. dont want to hydrate that double bond! may be able to use an aqueuous workup here once you have isolated LSA, you can then use standard peptide coupling procedures to form the diethylamide. once again, your not just gonna mix diethylamine with LSA, unless you want to waste a bunch of your starting material. you would use peptide coupling reagents, IE activating agents to facilitate the amide formation. Answered by Arden Cumbaa 1 year ago.


I consumed cafergot every day. Is it dangerous?
Asked by Inger Elsworth 1 year ago.

Abnormalities affecting blood vessels are not uncommon after prolonged usage of the drug. Thickening of the arteries leading to poor blood flow, absent pulse, and muscle damage may occur. In extreme cases this may even lead to gangrene. Other cardio-vascular complications involve abnormalities of heart beat and hypertension. Answered by Myesha Cotney 1 year ago.


What will happen if i continue to use lexapro xanax and alprolazam and cafergot and darvacet?
Asked by Bryan Crumble 1 year ago.

Someone will need too write / read a eulogy at your funeral. Answered by Leighann Vergari 1 year ago.

xanax and alprolazam(generic xanax) are the same drug ...for anxiety or panic disorder. Lexapro is also prescribed for the same as well as depression. Darvocet is a pain medication and I have no idea what cafergot is. Long term effect...addiction with the xanax and darvocet, these are not drugs to be taken lightly. As far as the lexapro...it hasn't been on the market long enough to establish what the long term affects may or may not be. Speak to your doctor and a pharmacist for more information Answered by Erinn Odorizzi 1 year ago.

Well the cafergot is for GI disturbances which you probably have due to the other meds you take, but hey the good news is you should be so out of it you probably won't even know it hurts. See your Dr. or get a new one and get some help with your issues, please!! Answered by Lilia Kowalski 1 year ago.

Just because you feel well dose not mean you need to get off your meds, its means your meds are working and if the side effects are bothering you ask your doctor if they will go away, always ask your doctor before messing with your meds Answered by Tania Henderickson 1 year ago.

darvocet...nothing xanax..alprolazam same thing hard time sleeping or increase in anxiety Never discontinue your medications without supervision from a doctor. You can have really bad side effects. Answered by Fiona Roggenbaum 1 year ago.

I've done a search for you to see what the interactions of all these drugs would be: You have searched for drug interactions between the following drugs: Lexapro, Xanax, Cafergot & darvocet (acetaminophen-propoxyphene) Drug-Drug Interactions alprazolam and acetaminophen-propoxyphene (major Drug-Drug) Description: MONITOR CLOSELY: Sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and other central nervous system (CNS) depressants may have additive CNS- and/or respiratory-depressant effects with propoxyphene. Misuse of propoxyphene, either alone or in combination with other CNS depressants, has been a major cause of drug-related deaths, particularly in patients with a history of emotional disturbances, suicidal ideation, or alcohol and drug abuse. In a large Canadian study, propoxyphene use was also associated with a 60% increased risk of hip fracture in the elderly, and the risk was further increased by concomitant use of psychotropic agents (sedatives, antidepressants, neuroleptics), presumably due to additive psychomotor impairment. Therefore, these drugs may constitute a dangerous combination in certain susceptible populations. Pharmacokinetically, propoxyphene is a CYP450 2D6 inhibitor and may increase the plasma concentrations of many psychotropic agents such as neuroleptics (e.g., phenothiazines, haloperidol, risperidone), antidepressants (e.g., some tricyclic antidepressants and serotonin reuptake inhibitors), and phenobarbital. MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised if propoxyphene is used with sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and other CNS depressants, particularly in the elderly and in patients with a history of emotional disturbances, suicidal ideation, or alcohol and drug abuse. Dosage reductions may be appropriate. Patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression and other CNS adverse effects. Patients should be warned not to exceed recommended dosages, to avoid alcohol, and to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. acetaminophen-propoxyphene and propoxyphene (major Drug-Drug) Description: MONITOR CLOSELY: Sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and other central nervous system (CNS) depressants may have additive CNS- and/or respiratory-depressant effects with propoxyphene. Misuse of propoxyphene, either alone or in combination with other CNS depressants, has been a major cause of drug-related deaths, particularly in patients with a history of emotional disturbances, suicidal ideation, or alcohol and drug abuse. In a large Canadian study, propoxyphene use was also associated with a 60% increased risk of hip fracture in the elderly, and the risk was further increased by concomitant use of psychotropic agents (sedatives, antidepressants, neuroleptics), presumably due to additive psychomotor impairment. Therefore, these drugs may constitute a dangerous combination in certain susceptible populations. Pharmacokinetically, propoxyphene is a CYP450 2D6 inhibitor and may increase the plasma concentrations of many psychotropic agents such as neuroleptics (e.g., phenothiazines, haloperidol, risperidone), antidepressants (e.g., some tricyclic antidepressants and serotonin reuptake inhibitors), and phenobarbital. MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised if propoxyphene is used with sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and other CNS depressants, particularly in the elderly and in patients with a history of emotional disturbances, suicidal ideation, or alcohol and drug abuse. Dosage reductions may be appropriate. Patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression and other CNS adverse effects. Patients should be warned not to exceed recommended dosages, to avoid alcohol, and to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. caffeine-ergotamine and ergotamine (major Drug-Drug) Description: MONITOR CLOSELY: Concomitant use of agents with serotonergic activity such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, 5-HT1 receptor agonists, ergot alkaloids, lithium, St. John's wort, phenylpiperidine opioids, dextromethorphan, and 5-hydroxytryptophan may potentiate the risk of serotonin syndrome, which is a rare but serious and potentially fatal condition thought to result from hyperstimulation of brainstem 5-HT1A receptors. MANAGEMENT: In general, the concomitant use of multiple serotonergic agents should be avoided if possible, or otherwise approached with caution if potential benefit is deemed to outweigh the risk. Close monitoring is recommended for signs and symptoms of excessive serotonergic activity such as CNS irritability, altered consciousness, confusion, myoclonus, ataxia, abdominal cramping, hyperpyrexia, shivering, pupillary dilation, diaphoresis, hypertension, and tachycardia. Particular caution is advised when increasing the dosages of these agents. The potential risk of serotonin syndrome should be considered even when administering one serotonergic agent following discontinuation of another, as some agents may demonstrate a prolonged elimination half-life. For example, a 5-week washout period is recommended following use of fluoxetine before administering another serotonergic agent. alprazolam and escitalopram (Lexapro) (moderate Drug-Drug) Description: MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. MANAGEMENT: During concomitant use of these drugs, patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression. Ambulatory patients should be made aware of the possibility of additive CNS effects (e.g., drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion) and counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. Patients should also be advised to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities. Drug-Food Interactions caffeine-ergotamine (moderate Drug-Food) Description: MONITOR: Grapefruit juice may increase the plasma concentrations of some orally administered drugs that are substrates of the CYP450 3A4 isoenzyme. The proposed mechanism is inhibition of CYP450 3A4-mediated first-pass metabolism in the gut wall by certain compounds present in grapefruits. The extent and clinical significance are unknown. Moreover, pharmacokinetic alterations associated with interactions involving grapefruit juice are often subject to a high degree of interpatient variability. MANAGEMENT: Patients who regularly consume grapefruits and grapefruit juice should be monitored for adverse effects and altered plasma concentrations of drugs that are metabolized by CYP450 3A4. Grapefruits and grapefruit juice should be avoided if an interaction is suspected. Orange juice is not expected to interact with these drugs. alprazolam (moderate Drug-Food) Description: GENERALLY AVOID: The pharmacologic activity of oral midazolam, triazolam, and alprazolam may be increased if taken after drinking grapefruit juice. The proposed mechanism is CYP450 3A4 enzyme inhibition. MANAGEMENT: The manufacturer recommends that grapefruit juice should not be taken with oral midazolam. Patients taking triazolam or alprazolam should be monitored for excessive sedation. Alternatively, the patient could consume orange juice which does not interact with these drugs. caffeine-ergotamine (minor Drug-Food) Description: The effect of grapefruit juice on the pharmacologic activity of caffeine is controversial. One report suggests that grapefruit juice increases the effect of caffeine. The proposed mechanism is inhibition of cytochrome P-450 metabolism of caffeine. However, a well-conducted pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study did not demonstrate this effect. The clinical significance of this potential interaction is unknown. Answered by Aron Cammack 1 year ago.


My migraine always attack either before or after my menstrual. Each attacks will cause me vomiting?
and sometimes with shivering hands, unable to sleep and concentrate. Have been taking "cafergot", (hope the spelling is correct) at least for the past 15 years. Will there be any side effects? Is there any other medication, suppliment/diet or exercise that I can try? Asked by Ashanti Troll 1 year ago.

I'm sorry you suffer migranes. Cafergot has been one of the favorite drugs for treating vascular migraines for decades now, and it does have some long term possible effects, but they are more likely if you are taking large dosages on a daily basis. There should be a drug insert with your prescription which tells you the whole list, and if you don't have it, your pharmacist should be able to provide you with one. Migraines can be managed using multiple strategies to help control their frequency and sometimes their strength. Medication is only one strategy, and your doctor should have gone over the other things you can do or try. Since yours seem to be hormonally triggered, I would think the doctor would have suggested birth control pills as a means of controlling at least some of the influence. Other things would be to look at the diet, as there are some foods which can and do trigger migraines. The Cafergot you take is a compound of caffeine and egotimine. Ergotimine is a drug derived from a fungus which attacks rye grain in particular, and is a hallucinogenic in it's pure form. In the middle ages, bread made from the contaminated grain used to cause miscarriages, psychotic behavior, and even death. The dangers of overdose with the ergotamine remain the same today- which is why you should not be taking it daily, or in high doses. Again, you should have gotten these warnings from your doctor and pharmacist. In the prescribed dosages it is safe, just don't ever decide to take "just one more", and don't take it every day. When you do take it, you would definitely want any doctor treating you to know that you have, and how much. There are other drugs that you should not get while you are taking the Cafergot. The doctors will know which, and can avoid them, if they know you are taking cafergot. I highly suggest you discuss methods of treating and controlling your migranes with your doctor before you try any kind of supplements or herbal treatments. Some of them are harmless, some would not be, especially in combination with the medications you are taking. It would also help if you do a web search for the various migraine support groups/information. As I said, there are lots of different things you could consider and try, if you would like to change your migraine pattern. I'm sorry there isn't any better advice I can offer. My mother suffers from migraines as a result of a nerve disorder, and I have watched her suffer the same as you describe all my life. She has had to resort to injections of Demerol and had to be admitted to the hospital to manage the pain of some of her attacks. So I have a great deal of empathy for your suffering. There doesn't seem to be any magic solutions or perfect treatments out there, but there are things you can try to find the one that will work best for you. Good luck with the search, I hope you find yours soon. Answered by Ruthanne Dephillips 1 year ago.

I too have migraines and they seem to happen just like yours. Imitrex works for me but there are certain "tiggers" that can set off a migraine. These include aged cheese, chocolate, and many processed foods. During the attack, try lying quietly in a darkened room with head slightly elevated, drinking something with lots of caffeine like coffee or tea. Also if I have time before the attack happens, I take 3 Excedrin Migraine Tabs that you can get over the counter and sometimes that will prevent an actual migraine. Good luck from one who has suffered the pain of a migraine. Answered by Deon Money 1 year ago.

There is a point where one gets passionate about their beliefs, so it's not unusual to see some heat here. But there is also a point where such heat undermines the e.g. Christian belief in things like loving one's enemies or not paying evil with evil, etc. The best way to counter angry responses is to: 1) Respond by focusing purely on the issue, not the behaviour 2) Avoid use of 'I' or 'You' in responses, stick to third-person or less emotive, action-oriented (e.g. don't tell me this) and academic language 3) Avoid responding on the internet while you're angry. Sure, it's only natural to feel angry when you read something inflammatory, but it's not a good time to post when you're angry - allow time to cool off andn think it through, sort out what's behind it all 4) If you need to address the behaviour, do it with a private message if possible rather than in public on the net. 5) Agree with the other person's points if they are in fact valid in any way - be honest but give credit regardless of whether they deserve it by the way they said it. It helps to diffuse a few things sometimes. 6) Accept that some people will simply debate in a heated way and that it's not personal, just debating language - understanding this will mean a person can avoid taking things personally when they're not intended to be. Hope that helps. There will always be some angry responses and immature responses. The answer is that respectful etiquette begins with you, and when it keeps persisting it can lead to others doing the same. It also begins when one goes to God for being whole again so that they have an endless strength to give, even greater than anything people can bite off us when they respond like piranhas. When we are rich in God, we can afford to be generous and gracious and it overflows to others. Answered by Naomi Colucci 1 year ago.

I suffered from migraines when I was little. When I felt them coming on, I would take 2 Excedrin and drink a can of Mountain Dew, or eat a Hershey's Bar (caffine is a pain killer). This is what my doctor told me to do. If possible, I would lay down in a dark, quiet place. This always would help and I would avoided throwing up. However, if I didn't do anything I would always end up throwing up before I would feel better. Definitely ask your doctor though too! Answered by Jeanne Knopf 1 year ago.

Honey? T OMG! I get the shivers so bad, the palms of my hands burn and nothing can make me warm. Only time can. That is where the phrase "sick headache" comes from. If you have migraines, you need to stay under your doctor's care and make sure you have the proper medication on hand when it happens. It is your hormones that cause this horrible headache. Good luck honey, and believe me, get a doctor's prescription for something stronger than aspirin. Make sure you are not menopausal. Good luck Sweetie. Answered by Jettie Balsis 1 year ago.

Try taking fish oil capsules as directed on the bottle, and take a calcium-magnesium pill 2-3 times daily with meals. The week before your period take one cal-mag-zinc pill 3 times a day and double it to two pills 3 times daily if you have cramps or headache during the period. Ginger root is good for nausea. Peppermint oil can be applied to the forehead and temples for headache relief too. A high potency mulivitamin taken daily would be a good idea too. Answered by Shauna Voights 1 year ago.

There is an herbal supplement called fermalite. It was formulated specifically for migraines and the other symptoms that go along with the female cycle. Works excellent Answered by Annice Enrico 1 year ago.

My grilfriend always take2 2 tylenol & 2 advil at the same time, just when she feels the migraine is coming. This is the cheaper & better remedy. Answered by Isabelle Giglio 1 year ago.

Imitrex (sp?) has been very successful in treating migranes. Ask your doctor, it may be an option for you. Answered by Maribel Kallal 1 year ago.


CAN HERBS AND ANTIBIOTICS TOGETHER CAUSE THESE !!!!!!!!!!!!?
i wonder how much damage i might have done to my system, Asked by Nena Boyenga 1 year ago.

a pimple like normal colour of taste buds on my tongue and light white not thick coating or patches on the tongue. brushable but due to the pimple i don't. and if i do i injure it but initially it seems like the organism feeds whenever i take something sugary because i feel it and a burning sensation but after gargling with saltwater and mouthwash it stopped n i didnt treat it on time, when i first noticed it was when i was taking herbs(combination for typhoid and malaria) in the morning, cafegot at night and i mixed it once with erythromycin and didnt get myself then later blood pressure med . after this medication, i noticed this on my tongue and thought it was malaria and typhoid and took full dose of luterine and artemine 4 tab twice daily and deoxycyclin one tab twice daily together with azithromycin once a dy 4 6dys with just a spoon of blood medicine per dy but i wasnt sick. after which i had blurry vision after the medication and if i dont eat on time, i feel shaky. for a month i haven't use a medication for the tongue but for 6dys now am on nystatin suspension thrice per dy. the coating has reduced but i want both the coating and pimple like to go off immediately. i wasn't sick when i took all these just constant headache when i couldn't stop thinking. i know the drugs i took where much and crazy but staying off drugs for a month was to allow my system adjust after so much drugs which made me unable to treat the tongue for that long. i dnt know if nystatin is enough for it since it has stayed long without treatment. Answered by Justin Ramsbottom 1 year ago.

its cafergot for migraine, during then i took it together with erythromycin and i didnt get myself that night. the drug was artemether and lumefantrine together with deoxycycline and azithromycin. i want to know if the combination of herbs and cafergot together with one tab of erythromycin and bp med with cough syrup would cause this on my tongue and if by taking those additional tab will make it resistant to nystatin. Answered by Asley Wessells 1 year ago.

Goodness knows what you have taken. I can't find a cafegot, there is cafergot which contains caffeine, that would keep you awake (you say you took it at night). It also has the side effect of causing headaches. I can't find anything called luterine or artemine. Who on earth prescribed these? Erythromycin is a prescription only antibiotic. Doxocycline and azithromycin are prescription only antibiotics. You should have had instructions from your doctor and also you need to read the leaflets in the packs. Goodness knows what the blood pressure medicine was. Bumps on the surface of your tongue are called papillae. In some people, they get long, rather than being worn down by daily activities. They can harbor bacteria. Nystatin is an antifungal medicine used to treat infections with fungi and yeasts. And you can get a fungal infection - thrush - from taking antibiotics orally. The nystatin should cope with that. You can get sort of pimples on the tongue with thrush as well. That's all I can find to try and answer your question. I hope you haven't been self medicating. If so, go and discuss all this with a doctor and if the thrush doesn't clear up, go back and see your doctor. Stop taking so much stuff unless you are being advised/supervised by a good, medically qualified doctor. EDIT That dreadful combination you took will not make thrush resistant to nystatin. Cafergot is for migraine, but it also has a dide effect - dizziness, headaches, and it shouldn't be taken with erythromycin. Artemether and lumefantrine can cause headaches and dizziness, nausea, fatigue. Answered by Tilda Paddack 1 year ago.


I wanna buy cafergot. What's the safest online pharmacy I can use?
Asked by Hai Schuckers 1 year ago.

Why? If you have migraines get a prescription for it from your doctor, in case your wondering, you can not make LSD out of cafergot, well you could but you would need several million dollars worth of professional lab equipment not to mention a doctorate in organic chemistry. Answered by Cedric Aube 1 year ago.


Can i die from Cafergot overdose?
So ive taken about 10 pills of cafergot today im curious can i die from it or do i need to take more Asked by Maisie Pinchbeck 1 year ago.

i am afraid i would not give you a good answer ,although i am a professional nurse , the medications that you are taking should be asked or checked from the doctor as i have researched the medications have side effects which may ruin your health. Answered by Hien Morganfield 1 year ago.


Can you make acid (lsd) out of cafergot?
on wikipedia it lists ergotamine as a precursor to lsd, so I just wondered if it is possible and how? Not because I would ever pursue it, (that stage of life is over) but just for curiosity sake. Asked by Erasmo Ermita 1 year ago.

LSD is extremely difficult to make from scratch (we went over its total synthesis in adv org chem one day, took an entire hour). However, from ergotamine it is comparatively easy, as the ergot fungus has already done most of the work for you. Look at the picture of ergotamine on wikipedia, and compare it to the picture of LSD on wikipedia. You'll find that the bottom half of ergotamine is an lysergic acyl group, attached to the rest of the molecule by an amide functionality (R-CO-NR2) to an iminal carbon. You can easily cleave this bond by treating ergotamine with mild acid and heat, to give you lysergic acid. Treating this with mild acid, heat, and diethylamine will give you lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), which you can extract into an organic solvent. Of course, when I say this is easy i mean it is easy if you have a chem lab at your disposal. If you don't, the most difficult reagent to procure would probably be diethylamine, which is the DEA watchlist for chemical precursors. Answered by Caroll Duncker 1 year ago.

Extremely difficult. You could maybe get as far as Lysergic Acid, but reading the literature, even the solvents needed to produce LSD and keep it in a stable form are surprisingly complicated. You would probably need a PhD in Organic Chemistry and a lot of high level organised crime friends, who could get you the (watched) reagents you needed. Answered by Donette Revira 1 year ago.

yes doable. probably gonna want to use a lewis acid to allow the use of milder hydrolysis conditions. dont want to hydrate that double bond! may be able to use an aqueuous workup here once you have isolated LSA, you can then use standard peptide coupling procedures to form the diethylamide. once again, your not just gonna mix diethylamine with LSA, unless you want to waste a bunch of your starting material. you would use peptide coupling reagents, IE activating agents to facilitate the amide formation. Answered by George Courson 1 year ago.


I consumed cafergot every day. Is it dangerous?
Asked by Bonnie Millay 1 year ago.

Abnormalities affecting blood vessels are not uncommon after prolonged usage of the drug. Thickening of the arteries leading to poor blood flow, absent pulse, and muscle damage may occur. In extreme cases this may even lead to gangrene. Other cardio-vascular complications involve abnormalities of heart beat and hypertension. Answered by Charlsie Urban 1 year ago.


What will happen if i continue to use lexapro xanax and alprolazam and cafergot and darvacet?
Asked by Jere Solwold 1 year ago.

Someone will need too write / read a eulogy at your funeral. Answered by Johnny Risberg 1 year ago.

xanax and alprolazam(generic xanax) are the same drug ...for anxiety or panic disorder. Lexapro is also prescribed for the same as well as depression. Darvocet is a pain medication and I have no idea what cafergot is. Long term effect...addiction with the xanax and darvocet, these are not drugs to be taken lightly. As far as the lexapro...it hasn't been on the market long enough to establish what the long term affects may or may not be. Speak to your doctor and a pharmacist for more information Answered by Natisha Brunjes 1 year ago.

Well the cafergot is for GI disturbances which you probably have due to the other meds you take, but hey the good news is you should be so out of it you probably won't even know it hurts. See your Dr. or get a new one and get some help with your issues, please!! Answered by Jodee Lall 1 year ago.

Just because you feel well dose not mean you need to get off your meds, its means your meds are working and if the side effects are bothering you ask your doctor if they will go away, always ask your doctor before messing with your meds Answered by Denyse Browy 1 year ago.

darvocet...nothing xanax..alprolazam same thing hard time sleeping or increase in anxiety Never discontinue your medications without supervision from a doctor. You can have really bad side effects. Answered by Clifford Dumdei 1 year ago.

I've done a search for you to see what the interactions of all these drugs would be: You have searched for drug interactions between the following drugs: Lexapro, Xanax, Cafergot & darvocet (acetaminophen-propoxyphene) Drug-Drug Interactions alprazolam and acetaminophen-propoxyphene (major Drug-Drug) Description: MONITOR CLOSELY: Sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and other central nervous system (CNS) depressants may have additive CNS- and/or respiratory-depressant effects with propoxyphene. Misuse of propoxyphene, either alone or in combination with other CNS depressants, has been a major cause of drug-related deaths, particularly in patients with a history of emotional disturbances, suicidal ideation, or alcohol and drug abuse. In a large Canadian study, propoxyphene use was also associated with a 60% increased risk of hip fracture in the elderly, and the risk was further increased by concomitant use of psychotropic agents (sedatives, antidepressants, neuroleptics), presumably due to additive psychomotor impairment. Therefore, these drugs may constitute a dangerous combination in certain susceptible populations. Pharmacokinetically, propoxyphene is a CYP450 2D6 inhibitor and may increase the plasma concentrations of many psychotropic agents such as neuroleptics (e.g., phenothiazines, haloperidol, risperidone), antidepressants (e.g., some tricyclic antidepressants and serotonin reuptake inhibitors), and phenobarbital. MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised if propoxyphene is used with sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and other CNS depressants, particularly in the elderly and in patients with a history of emotional disturbances, suicidal ideation, or alcohol and drug abuse. Dosage reductions may be appropriate. Patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression and other CNS adverse effects. Patients should be warned not to exceed recommended dosages, to avoid alcohol, and to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. acetaminophen-propoxyphene and propoxyphene (major Drug-Drug) Description: MONITOR CLOSELY: Sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and other central nervous system (CNS) depressants may have additive CNS- and/or respiratory-depressant effects with propoxyphene. Misuse of propoxyphene, either alone or in combination with other CNS depressants, has been a major cause of drug-related deaths, particularly in patients with a history of emotional disturbances, suicidal ideation, or alcohol and drug abuse. In a large Canadian study, propoxyphene use was also associated with a 60% increased risk of hip fracture in the elderly, and the risk was further increased by concomitant use of psychotropic agents (sedatives, antidepressants, neuroleptics), presumably due to additive psychomotor impairment. Therefore, these drugs may constitute a dangerous combination in certain susceptible populations. Pharmacokinetically, propoxyphene is a CYP450 2D6 inhibitor and may increase the plasma concentrations of many psychotropic agents such as neuroleptics (e.g., phenothiazines, haloperidol, risperidone), antidepressants (e.g., some tricyclic antidepressants and serotonin reuptake inhibitors), and phenobarbital. MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised if propoxyphene is used with sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and other CNS depressants, particularly in the elderly and in patients with a history of emotional disturbances, suicidal ideation, or alcohol and drug abuse. Dosage reductions may be appropriate. Patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression and other CNS adverse effects. Patients should be warned not to exceed recommended dosages, to avoid alcohol, and to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. caffeine-ergotamine and ergotamine (major Drug-Drug) Description: MONITOR CLOSELY: Concomitant use of agents with serotonergic activity such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, 5-HT1 receptor agonists, ergot alkaloids, lithium, St. John's wort, phenylpiperidine opioids, dextromethorphan, and 5-hydroxytryptophan may potentiate the risk of serotonin syndrome, which is a rare but serious and potentially fatal condition thought to result from hyperstimulation of brainstem 5-HT1A receptors. MANAGEMENT: In general, the concomitant use of multiple serotonergic agents should be avoided if possible, or otherwise approached with caution if potential benefit is deemed to outweigh the risk. Close monitoring is recommended for signs and symptoms of excessive serotonergic activity such as CNS irritability, altered consciousness, confusion, myoclonus, ataxia, abdominal cramping, hyperpyrexia, shivering, pupillary dilation, diaphoresis, hypertension, and tachycardia. Particular caution is advised when increasing the dosages of these agents. The potential risk of serotonin syndrome should be considered even when administering one serotonergic agent following discontinuation of another, as some agents may demonstrate a prolonged elimination half-life. For example, a 5-week washout period is recommended following use of fluoxetine before administering another serotonergic agent. alprazolam and escitalopram (Lexapro) (moderate Drug-Drug) Description: MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. MANAGEMENT: During concomitant use of these drugs, patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression. Ambulatory patients should be made aware of the possibility of additive CNS effects (e.g., drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion) and counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. Patients should also be advised to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities. Drug-Food Interactions caffeine-ergotamine (moderate Drug-Food) Description: MONITOR: Grapefruit juice may increase the plasma concentrations of some orally administered drugs that are substrates of the CYP450 3A4 isoenzyme. The proposed mechanism is inhibition of CYP450 3A4-mediated first-pass metabolism in the gut wall by certain compounds present in grapefruits. The extent and clinical significance are unknown. Moreover, pharmacokinetic alterations associated with interactions involving grapefruit juice are often subject to a high degree of interpatient variability. MANAGEMENT: Patients who regularly consume grapefruits and grapefruit juice should be monitored for adverse effects and altered plasma concentrations of drugs that are metabolized by CYP450 3A4. Grapefruits and grapefruit juice should be avoided if an interaction is suspected. Orange juice is not expected to interact with these drugs. alprazolam (moderate Drug-Food) Description: GENERALLY AVOID: The pharmacologic activity of oral midazolam, triazolam, and alprazolam may be increased if taken after drinking grapefruit juice. The proposed mechanism is CYP450 3A4 enzyme inhibition. MANAGEMENT: The manufacturer recommends that grapefruit juice should not be taken with oral midazolam. Patients taking triazolam or alprazolam should be monitored for excessive sedation. Alternatively, the patient could consume orange juice which does not interact with these drugs. caffeine-ergotamine (minor Drug-Food) Description: The effect of grapefruit juice on the pharmacologic activity of caffeine is controversial. One report suggests that grapefruit juice increases the effect of caffeine. The proposed mechanism is inhibition of cytochrome P-450 metabolism of caffeine. However, a well-conducted pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study did not demonstrate this effect. The clinical significance of this potential interaction is unknown. Answered by Graham Laguerre 1 year ago.


My migraine always attack either before or after my menstrual. Each attacks will cause me vomiting?
and sometimes with shivering hands, unable to sleep and concentrate. Have been taking "cafergot", (hope the spelling is correct) at least for the past 15 years. Will there be any side effects? Is there any other medication, suppliment/diet or exercise that I can try? Asked by Marcelle Mote 1 year ago.

I'm sorry you suffer migranes. Cafergot has been one of the favorite drugs for treating vascular migraines for decades now, and it does have some long term possible effects, but they are more likely if you are taking large dosages on a daily basis. There should be a drug insert with your prescription which tells you the whole list, and if you don't have it, your pharmacist should be able to provide you with one. Migraines can be managed using multiple strategies to help control their frequency and sometimes their strength. Medication is only one strategy, and your doctor should have gone over the other things you can do or try. Since yours seem to be hormonally triggered, I would think the doctor would have suggested birth control pills as a means of controlling at least some of the influence. Other things would be to look at the diet, as there are some foods which can and do trigger migraines. The Cafergot you take is a compound of caffeine and egotimine. Ergotimine is a drug derived from a fungus which attacks rye grain in particular, and is a hallucinogenic in it's pure form. In the middle ages, bread made from the contaminated grain used to cause miscarriages, psychotic behavior, and even death. The dangers of overdose with the ergotamine remain the same today- which is why you should not be taking it daily, or in high doses. Again, you should have gotten these warnings from your doctor and pharmacist. In the prescribed dosages it is safe, just don't ever decide to take "just one more", and don't take it every day. When you do take it, you would definitely want any doctor treating you to know that you have, and how much. There are other drugs that you should not get while you are taking the Cafergot. The doctors will know which, and can avoid them, if they know you are taking cafergot. I highly suggest you discuss methods of treating and controlling your migranes with your doctor before you try any kind of supplements or herbal treatments. Some of them are harmless, some would not be, especially in combination with the medications you are taking. It would also help if you do a web search for the various migraine support groups/information. As I said, there are lots of different things you could consider and try, if you would like to change your migraine pattern. I'm sorry there isn't any better advice I can offer. My mother suffers from migraines as a result of a nerve disorder, and I have watched her suffer the same as you describe all my life. She has had to resort to injections of Demerol and had to be admitted to the hospital to manage the pain of some of her attacks. So I have a great deal of empathy for your suffering. There doesn't seem to be any magic solutions or perfect treatments out there, but there are things you can try to find the one that will work best for you. Good luck with the search, I hope you find yours soon. Answered by Evelia Finkler 1 year ago.

I too have migraines and they seem to happen just like yours. Imitrex works for me but there are certain "tiggers" that can set off a migraine. These include aged cheese, chocolate, and many processed foods. During the attack, try lying quietly in a darkened room with head slightly elevated, drinking something with lots of caffeine like coffee or tea. Also if I have time before the attack happens, I take 3 Excedrin Migraine Tabs that you can get over the counter and sometimes that will prevent an actual migraine. Good luck from one who has suffered the pain of a migraine. Answered by Lyndon Henley 1 year ago.

There is a point where one gets passionate about their beliefs, so it's not unusual to see some heat here. But there is also a point where such heat undermines the e.g. Christian belief in things like loving one's enemies or not paying evil with evil, etc. The best way to counter angry responses is to: 1) Respond by focusing purely on the issue, not the behaviour 2) Avoid use of 'I' or 'You' in responses, stick to third-person or less emotive, action-oriented (e.g. don't tell me this) and academic language 3) Avoid responding on the internet while you're angry. Sure, it's only natural to feel angry when you read something inflammatory, but it's not a good time to post when you're angry - allow time to cool off andn think it through, sort out what's behind it all 4) If you need to address the behaviour, do it with a private message if possible rather than in public on the net. 5) Agree with the other person's points if they are in fact valid in any way - be honest but give credit regardless of whether they deserve it by the way they said it. It helps to diffuse a few things sometimes. 6) Accept that some people will simply debate in a heated way and that it's not personal, just debating language - understanding this will mean a person can avoid taking things personally when they're not intended to be. Hope that helps. There will always be some angry responses and immature responses. The answer is that respectful etiquette begins with you, and when it keeps persisting it can lead to others doing the same. It also begins when one goes to God for being whole again so that they have an endless strength to give, even greater than anything people can bite off us when they respond like piranhas. When we are rich in God, we can afford to be generous and gracious and it overflows to others. Answered by Li Spinale 1 year ago.

I suffered from migraines when I was little. When I felt them coming on, I would take 2 Excedrin and drink a can of Mountain Dew, or eat a Hershey's Bar (caffine is a pain killer). This is what my doctor told me to do. If possible, I would lay down in a dark, quiet place. This always would help and I would avoided throwing up. However, if I didn't do anything I would always end up throwing up before I would feel better. Definitely ask your doctor though too! Answered by Lesley Maltais 1 year ago.

Honey? T OMG! I get the shivers so bad, the palms of my hands burn and nothing can make me warm. Only time can. That is where the phrase "sick headache" comes from. If you have migraines, you need to stay under your doctor's care and make sure you have the proper medication on hand when it happens. It is your hormones that cause this horrible headache. Good luck honey, and believe me, get a doctor's prescription for something stronger than aspirin. Make sure you are not menopausal. Good luck Sweetie. Answered by Granville Ahlemeyer 1 year ago.

Try taking fish oil capsules as directed on the bottle, and take a calcium-magnesium pill 2-3 times daily with meals. The week before your period take one cal-mag-zinc pill 3 times a day and double it to two pills 3 times daily if you have cramps or headache during the period. Ginger root is good for nausea. Peppermint oil can be applied to the forehead and temples for headache relief too. A high potency mulivitamin taken daily would be a good idea too. Answered by Reagan Doyal 1 year ago.

There is an herbal supplement called fermalite. It was formulated specifically for migraines and the other symptoms that go along with the female cycle. Works excellent Answered by Stuart Hy 1 year ago.

My grilfriend always take2 2 tylenol & 2 advil at the same time, just when she feels the migraine is coming. This is the cheaper & better remedy. Answered by Dinorah Santaana 1 year ago.

Imitrex (sp?) has been very successful in treating migranes. Ask your doctor, it may be an option for you. Answered by Genia Deporter 1 year ago.


CAN HERBS AND ANTIBIOTICS TOGETHER CAUSE THESE !!!!!!!!!!!!?
i wonder how much damage i might have done to my system, Asked by Leatrice Parsi 1 year ago.

a pimple like normal colour of taste buds on my tongue and light white not thick coating or patches on the tongue. brushable but due to the pimple i don't. and if i do i injure it but initially it seems like the organism feeds whenever i take something sugary because i feel it and a burning sensation but after gargling with saltwater and mouthwash it stopped n i didnt treat it on time, when i first noticed it was when i was taking herbs(combination for typhoid and malaria) in the morning, cafegot at night and i mixed it once with erythromycin and didnt get myself then later blood pressure med . after this medication, i noticed this on my tongue and thought it was malaria and typhoid and took full dose of luterine and artemine 4 tab twice daily and deoxycyclin one tab twice daily together with azithromycin once a dy 4 6dys with just a spoon of blood medicine per dy but i wasnt sick. after which i had blurry vision after the medication and if i dont eat on time, i feel shaky. for a month i haven't use a medication for the tongue but for 6dys now am on nystatin suspension thrice per dy. the coating has reduced but i want both the coating and pimple like to go off immediately. i wasn't sick when i took all these just constant headache when i couldn't stop thinking. i know the drugs i took where much and crazy but staying off drugs for a month was to allow my system adjust after so much drugs which made me unable to treat the tongue for that long. i dnt know if nystatin is enough for it since it has stayed long without treatment. Answered by Cleopatra Vanwart 1 year ago.

its cafergot for migraine, during then i took it together with erythromycin and i didnt get myself that night. the drug was artemether and lumefantrine together with deoxycycline and azithromycin. i want to know if the combination of herbs and cafergot together with one tab of erythromycin and bp med with cough syrup would cause this on my tongue and if by taking those additional tab will make it resistant to nystatin. Answered by Martin Loyborg 1 year ago.

Goodness knows what you have taken. I can't find a cafegot, there is cafergot which contains caffeine, that would keep you awake (you say you took it at night). It also has the side effect of causing headaches. I can't find anything called luterine or artemine. Who on earth prescribed these? Erythromycin is a prescription only antibiotic. Doxocycline and azithromycin are prescription only antibiotics. You should have had instructions from your doctor and also you need to read the leaflets in the packs. Goodness knows what the blood pressure medicine was. Bumps on the surface of your tongue are called papillae. In some people, they get long, rather than being worn down by daily activities. They can harbor bacteria. Nystatin is an antifungal medicine used to treat infections with fungi and yeasts. And you can get a fungal infection - thrush - from taking antibiotics orally. The nystatin should cope with that. You can get sort of pimples on the tongue with thrush as well. That's all I can find to try and answer your question. I hope you haven't been self medicating. If so, go and discuss all this with a doctor and if the thrush doesn't clear up, go back and see your doctor. Stop taking so much stuff unless you are being advised/supervised by a good, medically qualified doctor. EDIT That dreadful combination you took will not make thrush resistant to nystatin. Cafergot is for migraine, but it also has a dide effect - dizziness, headaches, and it shouldn't be taken with erythromycin. Artemether and lumefantrine can cause headaches and dizziness, nausea, fatigue. Answered by Normand Briggman 1 year ago.


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