BUTISOL SODIUM Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 000793/002.

Names and composition

"BUTISOL SODIUM" is the commercial name of a drug composed of BUTABARBITAL SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
000793/002 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
000793/003 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 50MG
000793/004 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
000793/005 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 100MG
085380/001 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 30MG per 5ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
000793/002 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
000793/003 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 50MG
000793/004 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
000793/005 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 100MG
085381/003 BUTICAPS BUTABARBITAL SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
085381/001 BUTICAPS BUTABARBITAL SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 15MG
084719/001 SARISOL NO. 1 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
084719/002 SARISOL NO. 2 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
084723/001 SARISOL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 30MG per 5ML
085381/004 BUTICAPS BUTABARBITAL SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
085873/001 BUTABARB BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 30MG per 5ML
085880/001 BUTALAN BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 33.3MG per 5ML
085381/002 BUTICAPS BUTABARBITAL SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG
085550/001 BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
083325/002 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085380/001 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 30MG per 5ML
083337/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
083606/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 16.2MG
083896/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 97.2MG
083897/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 48.6MG
083898/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 32.4MG
084272/002 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
084292/003 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085383/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 30MG per 5ML
085764/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085772/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
085934/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
085938/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
083484/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
088631/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
083524/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 16.2MG
088632/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
083858/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 32.4MG
084040/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
085418/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085432/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
085849/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085866/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
085881/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 100MG

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Answered questions

What is a good prescription sleeping pill?
I have tried Lunesta with no luck AT all and Ambien helped some what for about a month. Now I am back to not sleeping. I know they all effect people different but I am hoping to find something that doesn't make me groggy the next day but knocks me out at night! I have tried natural remedies, avoiding caffeine,... Asked by Cayla Knippel 1 month ago.

I have tried Lunesta with no luck AT all and Ambien helped some what for about a month. Now I am back to not sleeping. I know they all effect people different but I am hoping to find something that doesn't make me groggy the next day but knocks me out at night! I have tried natural remedies, avoiding caffeine, getting exercise. Nothing helps! I am tired when I go to bed but I just lay there and when I do fall asleep it isn't continuous. Answered by Roscoe Mcquarrie 1 month ago.

here's a list that might be useful: ambien, butisol sodium, carbrital, dalmane, coral, halcion, placidyl, prosom, restoril, rozerem, seconal, and sonata. you can look those up to see what's best for you, but here's some info on some of them. rozerem- it's not only a sleeping aid, but the main point is to correct your sleep/wake cycle sonata- this is an aid that stay in your system in the shortest amount of time, so you fall asleep when YOU feel drowsy, and doesn't have that groggy feeling in the morning benzodiazepines-stays in your system longer, kinda like ambien antidepressants- such as trazadone. makes you sleepy, but not the "punch" or strong effect like ambien has I hope this helps!! I know what you're going thru:/ sometimes I only get like 1 or 2 hours of sleep, but I hope you find something that helps. good luck!! Answered by Jerald Siebeneck 1 month ago.

Relaxed, peaceful sleep is as important to your health and productivity as food. If you aren't getting at least seven hours of sleep every night, you're not promoting optimal health and well-being. You just don't perform as well, the next day. Frankly, you'll just plain be grouchy. Melatrol Natural Sleep Aid is made with Melatonin and other natural ingredients. Melatonin works with your own body to support its natural sleep cycle It's combined with natural herbs to encourage relaxation. Answered by Moises Wessell 1 month ago.

With my recent battle with Lymphoma, the best sleeping pill I was prescribed was and still is : Zopiclone 7.5mg. Small bean shaped and are blue. Trouble is they are quite addictive after long term use. They get you to sleep and you wake up not drowsy. Hope this helps. Answered by Ron Hamada 1 month ago.


What are the mechanisms when a person overdoses on sleeping pills like phenobarbital and alcohol?
by mechanism i mean what happens ot the body,the brain,how much time before the drugs take effect etc. Asked by Ewa Buike 1 month ago.

Sort of an odd drug choice to write about for a university news paper. Since barbiturates are not commonly used except in hospitals for acute seizures, sedation, and anesthesia, for euthanasia (where legal), barbiturates may also be used in alcohol or benzodiazepine withdrawal, phenobarbital is occasionally used for a rapid benzodiazepine detox. Benzodiazepines can replaced most uses of barbiturates. In some cases oral barbiturates are prescribed, primarily phenobarbital for epilepsy but Butisol Sodium (butabarbital sodium) and Seconal (secobarbital) are still available. Alcohol, barbiturates, benzodiazepines (alprazolam, lorazepam, diazepam), "Z" drugs (zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone, eszopiclone), and several other drugs like chloral hydrate, meprobamate, carisoprodol are GABAnergic drugs meaning they act on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In your example of phenobarbital and alcohol the phenobarbital is more relevant. The pharmacological mechanism of action of barbiturates is due to interaction with GABAa receptors, where they bind at distinct binding sites and enhance GABA-mediated chloride currents, found in the central nervous system where they allow an influx of chloride into cell membranes and then hyperpolarize the postsynaptic neuron. GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Barbiturates reduce the ability of nerves to fine by altering a cell's membrane potential (hyperpolarization). As a result there is less neuronal activity. At high doses, barbiturates become more dangerous because they are able to stimulate GABAa receptors directly in the absence of GABA. Other sedative/hypnotics like benzodiazepines must have GABA present for the drug to work. Barbiturates also block glutamate receptors in the CNS. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter. So barbiturates have two basic actions, to slow the brain down AND to block stimulation. As a result barbiturates typically cause more sedation, are more addictive, and are very lethal. Phenobarbital is a very long acting barbiturate that can, to some extent, have a duration of action of up to two days and a half life of up to 120hrs however when taken orally 2-3 doses are typically taken per day. Thiopental, on the other hand is ultra-short-acting and has a duration of action of about 20 min. It typically takes oral phenobarbital 30-45 min to start to work, peak plasma concentrations are reached at about 7 to 12 hours. Also please note that an "overdose" is a terms almost always misused. Normally people actually mean a poisoning, barbiturate poisoning in this case. Death can be a result of complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), shock (including shallow and infrequent breathing), respiratory depression, central cardiovascular depression, hypoxia, and coma. Alcohol will synergize with the barbiturates, potentiating them. In addiction alcohol acts on a large number of neurotransmitters either directly or indirectly. Depending on how much alcohol, and more importantly phenobarbital was used along with how long it took to get medical help would determine if a person lives or dies and how quickly. Unlike benzodiazepines there is no "antidote" for barbiturate poisoning. Answered by Yuonne Volle 1 month ago.

Taking an overdose is serious. Psychiatric help is needed. People always think that its going to end things, but in reality, failed suicide attempts are something a person has to live with the rest of their lives and if its damaging enough to a persons health, they have to deal with that afterwards (brain damage etc). 10-14 sleeping pills, wouldn't do much, alcohol is never good with any medications. But most likely if they tell someone, their stomach would be pumped at the hospital. Answered by Odessa Rhump 1 month ago.

It's the barbiturate that is the main danger, but the alcohol increases the depressing effects on the heart and lungs. Your question is too vague on how long and what alcohol level, because it is entirely dependent on the level of barbiturate in the blood and the victim's resistance to the drugs & alcohol. A longtime feeble addict or drunk may survive a dose that would kill a healthy 21 year old. Barbiturates slow the flow of neural messages throughout the body. This includes the brain's autonomic function telling your lungs to breath and your heart to beat. If you overdose, there is a 10% chance you won't survive. If you do X amount of downers that will depress 80% of your brain function and you had enough booze with it to depress 20% of your brain function, your body turns off. You can play with different fractions, but you see what I mean. Why do you think they use barbiturates for lethal injection executions? Because it works so quickly & efficiently to make you take your last breath. Check the links. Answered by Gracie Dahman 1 month ago.

Do you know where I can get pentobarbital in the UK? I know a forum you can go to where they disuss this. Answered by Janetta Leash 1 month ago.


Do you know which sleeping pills may work as Nembutal and Seconal? or any strong sleeping pill?
Powerfull sleeping pill. Asked by Cristen Steffel 1 month ago.

Nembutal Availability Answered by Sydney Valentia 1 month ago.

Seconal Drug Answered by Valda Hackmann 1 month ago.

ha ha ha funny thanks for a laugh 10/10 Answered by Etha Beauliev 1 month ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Jeni Shean 1 month ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Monica Zolman 1 month ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Hildegarde Zamborano 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Minda Quinnett 1 month ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Edwin Blankinship 1 month ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Odessa Laracuente 1 month ago.


How long do barbituates stay in your system?
Asked by Felice Spaw 1 month ago.

It depends on the barbiturate, Luminal (phenobarbital) has a half-life of 50-100hrs and it can often be detected for 2 weeks or more. Butisol Sodium (butabarbital sodium) may be detected for up to one week (typically less). However most barbiturates, especially the most commonly abused, are ultra-short acting or short-intermediate acting and are only detectable for 1-4 days. These are common examples of ultra-short or short acting drugs: Sodium Pentothal (thiopental), Amytal (amobarbital), Nembutal (pentobarbital), Seconal (secobarbital), Butalbital, and Tuinal (amobarbital/secobarbital). Answered by Yetta Pokswinski 1 month ago.

These drugs (Barbiturates) are central nervous system depressants. They are typically used as sedatives, hypnotics and anticonvulsants. The usual method of ingestion is by oral capsules or tablets. The symptoms seen when someone is taking these drugs looks like those of being intoxicated with alcohol. Chronic use of barbiturates will lead to physical dependence and higher levels of tolerance. There are short-acting barbiturates such as Secobarbital (Seconal) which when taken for 2 to 3 months can produce physical dependence. There are also long-acting barbiturates such as Phenobarbital (Nembutal and Luminal). Some other terms for barbiturates are: Amobabital (Amytal), Yellow Jackets, Reds, Blues, Amy's, and Rainbows. Answered by Carmen Obas 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How long do barbituates stay in your system? Answered by Birgit Watts 1 month ago.

Butalbital has an elimination half life of about 35 hours so you'll test positive for barbituates for about 10 days. Answered by Alice Cayce 1 month ago.


Help I'm writing a book and i need a poison? (details inside)?
It needs to be colorless, orderless, and tasteless, and also kill within an hour.its symptoms need to be easily confused with a drunk man's symptoms.(the character who will drink it is believed to die from drinking too much but the autopsy will show poison.)iv looked for one but i could never find... Asked by Sylvie Troller 1 month ago.

It needs to be colorless, orderless, and tasteless, and also kill within an hour. its symptoms need to be easily confused with a drunk man's symptoms. (the character who will drink it is believed to die from drinking too much but the autopsy will show poison.) iv looked for one but i could never find any. So can you please help me? Answered by Beatris Dicharry 1 month ago.

To have a substance to cause symptoms similar to alcohol intoxication basically there is only one type of medication- barbiturates. Basically barbiturates work on most of the same neurotransmitters as alcohol including GABA, which is what produces the majority of alcohols effects. Barbiturates are also extremely lethal when a large dose is given. Depending on what the barbiturates are given with they may have little, if any taste. Here are some examples of barbiturates: Amytal (amobarbital) Butisol (butabarbital) Nembutal (pentobarbital) Seconal (secobarbital) Tuinal (amobarbital/secobarbital) Sodium Pentothal (sodium thiopental) Barbiturates are the types of drugs used for euthanasia of animals and people (where legal), execution, and many people have died from accidental and intentional barbiturate poising. These types of drugs are not commonly used anymore because they are so dangerous. A newer class of drugs called benzodiazepines which includes Xanax (alprazolam), Ativan (lorazepam), Valium (diazepam), Rivotril/Klonopin (clonazepam), and Serax (oxazepam) is typically used. Benzodiazepines are equally as effective as barbiturates for most things, they also can cause a person took act like they would during alcohol intoxication however these drugs are only lethal in vast amounts. So it is not at all reasonable to use them. One thing that could work is if a the person has already had several alcoholic drunks and then someone empties a syringe of thiopental into a shot glass which would be drunk so quickly any taste would not be noticed and alcohol can reduce taste sensitivity. I would not worry about the taste, colour, or oder since that will not be much of a problem with barbiturates and if the character has already had some alcohol it won't be noticed. And barbiturates would certainly show up in an autopsy. Answered by Risa Truby 1 month ago.

Cyanide kills faster but has that pesky "bitter almond" smell which of course you could put in the alcohol so he wouldn't notice.Usually causes seizures, foaming at the mouth, etc. which might raise suspicions early though. Antifreeze has no taste, no smell, and is tasteless so that's a good one & it acts fairly fast, a few hours.No real symptoms that would indicate antifreeze unless you were looking for it. Only a really good coroner who looked at lab results would pick up on abnormals and and order further lab work to look for it specifically (since it's not looked for routinely). That's my pick. Answered by Dimple Corrick 1 month ago.


If you had to legalize one drug besides weed which one would you choose?
Your choices are: mdma heroin dmt or... ghb and tell me why? Asked by Brant Marconi 1 month ago.

Firstly are you talking about legal for medical use (like morphine or amphetamine) or legal for recreational use (like alcohol)? In general you would have to determine what risks a drug has (physical harm, abuse potential, harm to community and individual) and benefits the drug has (medical use). GHB is already a prescription drug called Xyrem (sodium oxybate). It uses the name sodium oxybate to avoid the stigma of GHB. And I certainly support the legality of Xyrem when treating narcolepsy especially with cataplexy. I would not want this to be available for recreational use largely due to the fact that mixing it with alcohol or prescription benzodiazepines (Xanax, Valium, Ativan) or barbiturates (Seconal, Butisol, Phenobarbital) is very likely to result in death without immediate medical assistance. Almost all, if not all, GHB deaths have been from respiratory depression associated with alcohol and other drugs. In terms of abuse, physical harm, and harm to society it is fairly safe (more so than alcohol or smoking). Information about it is at www.xyrem.com DMT is not something I would legalize because it has no significant medical value however compared to other drugs its abuse potential is low, it really needs to be taken with a MAOI-A which is a reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase like minaprine. Due to the additional requirement of obtaining an MAOI (which is a type of antidepressant) the abuse potential is reduced. There are also potential risks when using an MAOI. It is becoming more and more evident that MDMA is actually a very safe drug, more so than marijuana, alcohol, or tobacco when it is pure. Most MDMA used recreationally is NOT pure and death from using ecstasy is almost always a result of other substances in the tablet or prescription drug interactions. Use of MDMA with an MAOI is often lethal without very rapid medical attention. Medically MDMA has been used in psychotherapy and it was actually very effective. Heroin (diacetylmorphine) is the big stand out of the group, it is the "hard" drug and heroin is almost universally considered the most dangerous drug of abuse. However heroin does indeed have a well known medical use as an analgesic (pain killer). Heroin, used under the name diamorphine is a legal medication in The United Kingdom and it is used much in the same way as morphine is used. Many countries such as Canada have allowed limited access programmes to permit people with severe pain (typically from cancer or AIDS) that is not well controlled with other opioids to use heroin. In countries where heroin is used medically it is typically only used in hospitals other in-patient heath care facilities, under significant supervision, and diversion is extremely rare. Also dozens of studies have shown that use of full (aka pure) opioid agonists like morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydromorphone, fentanyl, or methadone have the SAME risks of physical harm, harm to society, and risk of addiction. For example IV heroin addicts are not able to distinguish a difference when another opioid is used in equivalent amounts. Additionally oxymorphone, hydromorphone, and especially fentanyl are more potent than heroin. Heroin is a prodrug meaning it has no pharmacological actions instead it breaks down into the active substance which is primarily morphine. Heroin is for all intensive purposes morphine but heroin enters the brain a bit faster, then it turns into morphine for a faster, "bigger" high. However when an equal amount of morphine is given there is no difference in the high. Having said all of that I would say I want heroin made legal for medical use. The reason being that it has a very significant medical use and despite all the hysteria about heroin it is no more dangerous as legal opioids. In fact methadone and dextropropoxyphene are both prescription and both have absurdly high mortality rates. Dextropropoxyphene has been withdrawn from medical use in The UK and a FDA board has recommended it be withdrawn in the US because it is only slightly more effective than Aspirin, it is always abused in very large amounts, it is cardiotoxic, and mortality is highly disproportionate to use. If it was a drug for recreational (and potentially medical) use I would say MDMA simply because it has some medical use and recreational use of it is safer than any of the other drug you list. MDMA is the only drug I have ever herd people talk about what a positive experience it was, sometimes life changing, without leading to any abuse or negative consequences. Answered by Antoine Granzin 1 month ago.

DMT because it is a molecule that our body is producing by the pineal gland every time you are having a dream. So... since our body creates and experience DMT from time to time it is safe to say that DMT is the safest drug of them all... Personally i would legalize ALL drugs because that would make the cartels go bankrupt... There wouldn't be any dealers on the street because the legal places you can buy the drugs are a lot cheaper because it is regulated in the normal market and not the underground market. People think ... LEGAL heroin!!!! that would create chaos!... but ask yourself or any other person this question "If heroin was legal, would you try it?... probably 99,5% would say No... so what's the difference then ?(the only ones that would buy it would be people already addicted to heroin)... And of course heroin is a very hard drug so I would suggest that you'd have to inject it where you buy it, and with medical supervision (This way there wouldn't be overdoses either, because you would know the potency of the heroin, And the government made heroin wouldn't have cutting agents in it... so there wouldn't be any rat poison in them (Because that's what kills heroin abusers most of the time, not the heroin itself). after 80 years with such a policy when the heroin addicts have died ... there wouldn't be any new heroin abusers in that 80-year period... Soooo heroin abuse and addicition wouldn't exist. Violence would be GREATLY reduced with such a policy Also I believe that you own your own body, so you can put anything in it as long as it's not harming anyone else or their property Answered by Frederic Glowka 1 month ago.

I do! i've got in basic terms tried weed perhaps an entire of thrice in my existence. the clarification you ask? i'm a stable supporter of constrained government. i don't comprehend why human beings smoke weed - i don't comprehend it, yet those motives do not benefit me to ask government to surrender them from it. a number of it probable has to do with my lack of self assurance in media comments. Crimes up 50% simply by smoking weed? Ya top, regularly because of the fact the act has develop right into a criminal offense in itself. Violating others intentionally is the only crime in my e book - of which smoking weed has not something to do with violating others intentionally. Answered by Larissa Kleinhans 1 month ago.


What is the best OD killer?
Kristina...gun or jumping? This question is not about suicide really. Sorry if it seems that way but this is about drugs and the body's reaction... Asked by Ina Waymire 1 month ago.

READ> No, I am not a little emo idiot. I just like knowing random crazy things and I have an interest about things with the body and things that would suit me to be a doctor. I am just curious to what the best overdose killing method is. A really quick one too. I have been researching and household products like Tylenol seems to fail. But wouldn't a massive mixture of something would do the trick? What would the killing mixture be? (you can also add in the details like the chemical effects and the whole process, more knowledge, the better :D) Honestly idk why these topics interest me. Just seem exciting. I love science/health stuff. I am totally going to be a doctor ;) haha So people of Yahoo Answers, what is the most extraordinary, quick killing OD method? Answered by Nubia Mcguirl 1 month ago.

That is a very simple question to answer, one class of drugs are unquestionably not only externally dangerous but also not painful and have no specific "antidote" like opioids (morphine, heroin) to counteract their effects. I am talking about barbiturates, a class of drugs used primarily as sedatives, hypnotics, and aneastetics. Barbiturates include Seconal (secobarbital), Nembutal (pentobarbital), Luminal (phenobarbital), Sodium Pentothal (sodium thiopental), Butisol (butabarbital), Amytal (amobarbital), Mebaral (mephobarbital), Oramon (aprobarbital), Brevital (methohexital), and butalbital. Firstly let me say the reason I am willing to tell you about the danger of these drugs is because 1) it is well known and with a bit of study you could find it out, 2) there is no evidence that providing information increases the risk of a person attempting or completing suicide, 3) barbiturates are rarely used, highly inaccessible since most are no longer made do to lack of demand. There are a few barbiturates in particular Seconal (secobarbital), Nembutal (phenobarbital), and Sodium Pentothal (sodium thiopental) that are particularly dangerous. A now discontinued (at least in most countries) drug called Tuinal (secobarbital/amobarbital) showed to be particularly dangerous. In most countries the pill form of almost all barbiturates have been taken off the market, a few barbiturates (typically phenobarbital, thiopental, amobarbital, and methohexital) are still used in hospital and other medical facilities however if they are available it is typically only for IV use and not used outside of hospital. The major exception is for the drug phenobarbital, a much safer barbiturate because it is absorbed slowly and it has less capacity to produce respiratory depression. In The United States, unless medications have very recently changed (unlikely) phenobarbital (Luminal), mephobarbital aka methylphenobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), and butabarbital (Butisol) are still available as are combination analgesics like Fiorinal and Fioricet which contain the barbiturate butalbital along with caffeine, with acetaminophen (in Fioricet) or with Aspirin (in Fiorinal), and there is also a from of both drugs that also has codeine. Fioricet and Fiorinal are used for tension and migraine headaches (ideally short term). Barbiturates act on the brains principal inhibitory neurotransmitter known as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Barbiturates bind to specific sites on the GABA receptor where it potentiates and prolongs the inhibitory actions of GABA leading the the postsynaptic neuron to hyperpolarize so it is unable to depolarize and have an action potential (ie the nerve can't fire). As the dose increases to dangerous levels barbiturates stimulate GABA receptors directly even in the absence of GABA (this feature is what makes barbiturates so dangerous). Barbiturates also block glutamate, the brains principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Jimi Hendrix is probably one of the most famous people to die from barbiturates, he took about 9 100 mg capsules of Seconal and he had a significant amount of alcohol. That is a very small safety margin, simply getting a one month prescription for 30 capsules would be lethal for most people. But often the reason people die from any drug (including alcohol) is from mixing them causing a significant synergetic effect. Today in places where euthanasia is legal typically pentobarbital or sodium thiopental are used at a dose up to 15 grams. Once The drug Librium (chlordiazepoxide), the first benzodiazepine to be followed by Valium (diazepam) three years later, hit the market in 1960 barbiturate use dropped especially as more and more benzodiazepines were developed. Benzodiazepines have nearly identical clinical effects and in most cases they work as well as barbiturates but when taken alone is it nearly impossible to die, a dose hundreds or even millions of times the normal dose is lethal. Part of the reason benzodiazepines can't kill like barbiturates is because benzodiazepines don't act on glutamate and they need the presence of GABA for effects to occur, barbiturates do not. And for the record nearly 1,000 people die from Tylenol toxicity in North America. Odds are a suicide attempt will fail and the person will be fine or they may have some internal damage but death is not common. More often a death from Tylenol is because of long term high dose use. Answered by Daphne Tokkesdal 1 month ago.

Drugs like Tylenol can kill you, but they don't do it quickly. They kill off your liver, and then you get to lie there and slowly, slowly die as the toxins that your liver would normally excrete build and build in your body. It's a horrible, slow, agonizing way to die. The only really fast way to go would be cyanide. It can kill in minutes. Answered by Mindy Wuellenweber 1 month ago.

Tylenol pm (the big blue and white circular ones) works. But it takes a few hrs and you gotta take like 50 of them. Theres the basics, like a gun or jumping. Idk how someone wuld get Syanide but i heard thats a pretty quick death. Answered by Chauncey Sabala 1 month ago.

I hear most isotopes of Thorium are incredibly toxic. Even in microscopic they can be toxic I believe. Answered by Gerald Alkins 1 month ago.

how would you know that Tylenol seems to fail? Answered by Malinda Toppa 1 month ago.


What are some phsycoactive drugs?
Asked by Deidra Vanderhorst 1 month ago.

A psychoactive/psychotropic drug is defined as a substance of natural, semisynthetic, or synthetic origin that may or may not be legal or have medical value and affects the nervous system, primarily the central nervous system, and alters brain function, resulting in changes in cognition, perception, mood, and/or behaviour. Examples include: Benzodiazepines: Xanax (alprazolam), Librium (chlordiazepoxide), Klonopin, Rivotril (clonazepam), Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam), Rohypnol (flunitrazepam), Restoril, Normison, Euhypnos (temazepam), Halcion (triazolam), and Mogadon (nitrazepam) Barbiturates Luminal (phenobarbital), Nembutal (pentobarbital), Mebaral (mephobarbital), Seconal (secobarbital), Butisol (butabarbital), and Amytal (amobarbital) Amphetamines Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts), Desoxyn (methamphetamine), Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine), and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy). Opioids (narcotics) Codeine (Tylenol #3, Codeine Contin), Morphine (MS Contin, MS-IR), Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Lorcet), Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Oxy-IR), Oxymorphone (Opana), Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo, Hydromorph Contin), Diacetylmorphine/diamorphine (Heroin), Fentanyl (Duragesic), Pethidine/meperidine (Demerol), and Methadone (Dolophine). Antihistamines Vistaril, Atarax (hydroxyzine), Diclectin (doxylamine), and Benadryl (diphenhydramine) Hallucinogens Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), mescaline, psilocybin/psilocin mushrooms, and Salvia divinorum Antipsychotics (neuroleptics) Haldol (haloperidol), Thorazine, Largactil (chlorpromazine), Stelazine (trifluoperazine), Abilify (aripiprazole), Geodon, Zeldox (ziprasidone), Risperdal (risperidone), Seroquel (quetiapine), and Zyprexa (olanzapine). Antidepressants Elavil (amitriptyline), Tofranil (imipramine), Nardil (phenelzine), Paxil (paroxetine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Zoloft (sertraline), Effexor (venlafaxine), Desyrel (trazodone), and Wellbutrin (bupropion) Mood stabilizers/anticonvulsants/antiepilepti... (AEDs) Eskalith (lithium carbonate), PMS-Lithium Citrate (lithium citrate), Keppra (levetiracetam), Dilantin (phenytoin), Lamictal (lamotrigine), Tegretol (carbamazepine), Trileptal (oxcarbazepine), Topamax (topiramate), Neurontin (gabapentin), and Depakote (valproate semisodium, divalproex sodium) Anxiolytics/tranquilizers Miltown, Equanil (meprobamate), Lyrica (pregabalin), and most barbiturates and benzodiazepines are also anxiolytics/tranquilizers. Sedative/Hypnotics Ambien (zolpidem), Sonata, Starnoc (zaleplon), Imovane, Rhovane (zopiclone), Lunesta (eszopiclone), Heminevrin (clomethiazole, chlormethiazole), Somnote, Noctec (chloral hydrate), Rozerem (ramelteon), Placidyl (ethchlorvynol), Doriden (glutethimide), Quaalude (methaqualone) and most barbiturates and benzodiazepines are also used as sedative/hypnotics. Stimulants/ sympathomimetics Focalin (dexmethylphenidate), Ritalin, Attenta, Concerta, Methylin, Metadate CD, Metadate ER, Methylin ER, Ritalin LA, Ritalin SR, Daytrana (methylphenidate), Provigil, Alertec (modafinil), Nuvigil (armodafanil), cocaine/crack, caffeine, nicotine, and all amphetamines are also stimulants/ sympathomimetics Lastly drugs are classified either by their clinical classification or their chemical classification. Clinical classification is more commonly used and more difficult to understand- examples include antidepressants, pain killers, sleeping pills, narcotics, anti-anxiety medications, uppers, downers, stimulants, and depressants. This terminology is over simplified and does not take into account the fact that all drugs have multiple uses. Also using clinical classifications is typically ambiguous since people may define things differently- for example many people consider downers/depressants to include opioids and many believe that depressants cause depression (which is rarely true). I have listed a mix of drugs, some classified chemically (amphetamines, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, opioids) and some classified clinically to make it a bit less complicated. Answered by Wynona Figiel 1 month ago.

Erowid.org. You'll find info on every known psychoactive. Answered by Elisabeth Siegrist 1 month ago.


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