BUTABARBITAL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 085550/001.

Names and composition

"BUTABARBITAL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of BUTABARBITAL SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
085550/001 BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
000793/002 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
000793/003 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 50MG
000793/004 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
000793/005 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 100MG
085381/003 BUTICAPS BUTABARBITAL SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
085381/001 BUTICAPS BUTABARBITAL SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 15MG
084719/001 SARISOL NO. 1 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
084719/002 SARISOL NO. 2 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
084723/001 SARISOL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 30MG per 5ML
085381/004 BUTICAPS BUTABARBITAL SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
085873/001 BUTABARB BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 30MG per 5ML
085880/001 BUTALAN BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 33.3MG per 5ML
085381/002 BUTICAPS BUTABARBITAL SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG
085550/001 BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
083325/002 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085380/001 BUTISOL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 30MG per 5ML
083337/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
083606/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 16.2MG
083896/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 97.2MG
083897/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 48.6MG
083898/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 32.4MG
084272/002 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
084292/003 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085383/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM ELIXIR/ORAL 30MG per 5ML
085764/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085772/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
085934/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
085938/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
083484/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
088631/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
083524/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 16.2MG
088632/001 BUTABARBITAL SODIUM BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
083858/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 32.4MG
084040/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
085418/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085432/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
085849/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085866/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 30MG
085881/001 SODIUM BUTABARBITAL BUTABARBITAL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 100MG

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Answered questions

What is the biochemistry of Cyanide, Sleeping Tablets: (Butabarbital with alcohol) and Carbon Monoxide?
All I need to know is how it works in terms of biochemistry. How that affect body in a way that people use it to commit the suicides. Can you please recommend any books.....or just give me the answer:))))) Many thanks to all the people who know that answer. Asked by Ara Alameida 1 month ago.

To understand the answer reasonably well, one has to be informed about the basic working mechanism of these compounds. First of all, the most important thing in every living organism is, especially for us humans, the oxygen transport function of blood. With the help of hemoglobin and Fe++ atoms, red blood cells can bind oxygen and carbondioxide respecitvely, which they transport to the alveolae of the lungs and to the site where these gaseous compounds are needed. Cyanide and carbon monoxide inhibit the function of the red blood cells as oxygen transporters by showing a higher binding affinity to the red blood cells. Thus the cyanide/CO atoms sit on top of the red blood cells (you can really imagine it like that) and the carriers cannot take up oxygen anymore which leads to oxygen deprivation and death. This is one reason why so many people die in fires - not because they burn, but because of the CO in the fumes which binds and its binding cannot be reversed very easily Other examples: Taking cyanine is also a fast way to die, This has been used, for example, for spies and people who could carry small glass capsules with them in case they got caught by foes - they would then bite on the glass capsule with the cyanine and it would immediately reach their bloodstream and they couldn't be tortured and questioned. Barbiturates have a different mode of action, they often influence neural signalling and chloride channel opening which can lead, if they overdose, to a dysfunction in signalling cascades and oxygen deprivation of the brain. For more please see Wikipedia - barbiturates. They have a very interesting (and long) article there. Answered by Edyth Oxton 1 month ago.

well all i knowi s CO there is hemoglobin in the blood and the oxygen you breathe in bonds to that so it can carry it and then it gets changed to CO2 and you breathe it out, blah blah. but CO is even better at bonding to your hemoglobin--and it won't let go! so CO takes up all the hemoglobin and blocks the oxygen. and you know if you don't get oxygen... bad news O.o Answered by Freeda Nest 1 month ago.


Fever for over s month what does that mean?
my son is two years old and hes had a fever for over a month. his pediatrician said it was just a virus but im worried and its very hard to believe. they just did blood work and it should bacteria. does someone know what that means? please im frustrated! help. Asked by Hanh Mancos 1 month ago.

do not give your child fioricet. it has butabarbital and caffeine in it as well as tylenol. i think if he has bacteria in his bloodstream, they should put him on an antibiotic. in the meantime, give him lots of fluids. as much as he will drink. nothing with caffeine in it. does he like chicken noodle soup? or chicken and stars soup? those would be good. push the pediatrician, and if you aren't satisfied, tell him so. if you still aren't, go to someone else. i don't see that answer that said to give him fioricet. i'm glad it's gone. Answered by Gregory Budd 1 month ago.

A fever means that his body is fighting an infection of some kind. If his infection is bacterial rather than viral, it means that antibiotics should work to clear up his system. Answered by Guy Goldfine 1 month ago.


Which category do sleeping pills fall under, barbiturates?
It is Ambien 5 mg. Thank you for your answer. Asked by Jolanda Sooter 1 month ago.

Exactly what drug are you talking about? A barbiturate drug test will only detect barbiturates (eg., Luminal (phenobarbital), Nembutal (pentobarbital), Mebaral (mephobarbital), Seconal (secobarbital), Butisol (butabarbital), and Amytal (amobarbital)). Barbiturates can be used as sleeping medication and many are approved to treat insomnia. However in practice barbiturates are rarely prescribed for insomnia since they are far more dangerous and most are fare more addictive than the medications most commonly used (although not all sleeping medications are addictive). Normally a barbiturate would only be prescribed to a patient with severe insomnia that fails to respond to treatment with standard medications. "Sleeping pills" is not a category, it is a very ambiguous term that can be applied to any medication prescribed to help a person sleep. A barbiturate is a very exact chemical term and only very specific medications fall under that category. Most medications prescribed for sleep are benzodiazepines (which are commonly tested for by many drug tests) and "Z drugs" which are not typically tested for. In addition many medications including low doses of certain antidepressants, antipsychotics, and antihypertensives are commonly prescribed for insomnia despite the fact they are not approved for insomnia and most guidelines recommend against them. Why don't you just say the specific medication you are wondering about? UPDATE: Ambien (zolpidem) is what is commonly known as a "Z drug" although it is technically classified as an imidazopyridine. Officially Ambien is indicated for the short-term treatment of insomnia characterized by difficulties with sleep initiation. In some cases long-term use of Ambien may be appropriate and a couple of long-term studies have found Ambien to be safe and effective when taken continuously for up to six months (the duration of the study). Typically when hypnotics are used long term medications like Ambien (along with Ambien CR (zolpidem extended-release), Sonata (zaleplon), Imovane (zopiclone), Lunesta (eszopiclone), and Restoril (temazepam)) are the most often used since they are among the most effective hypnotics, they are safe, and they have a fairly low abuse potential compared to older hypnotics (like barbiturates). 5 mg of Ambien is a small dose (10 mg is most common), typically 5 mg is prescribed in elderly patients and in patients who are very sensitive the hypnotic medication. If you are under 18 that may also be a reason why 5 mg would be used. Just so you know if you are taking any medication legally and it is detected by a drug test you won't get into any trouble. So if you were legally taking phenobarbital for epilepsy, or butabarbital for anxiety, or secobarbital for insomnia then a barbiturate test would detect it but with a prescription you will not get into any trouble. Ambien won't be detected by any typical drug test, certainly not any home test I have heard of. Although Ambien only has a small abuse potential make sure you only take it EXACTLY as prescribed, NEVER increase the dose without talking to your doctor, only take it for as long as you need it (ideally only a short time, but some people may require it longer). It is also important that you get into bed and then take Ambien. It works very quickly and it is not the sort of medication you can take and them continue to do things for a while. Ambien only helps people fall asleep, it does NOT help people stay asleep. So if your problem is sleep onset insomnia (difficulty going to sleep) then Ambien is a good choice. Answered by Mack Renick 1 month ago.

What Drugs Are Barbiturates Answered by Ricarda Manzione 1 month ago.

Some sleeping pills are benzodiazepines. These show up differently on a drug test than barbs. Answered by Lan Yopp 1 month ago.


How dangerous is it to snort sedatives?
I have a friend who does it and I'm worried about him. I researched the ingredients in the drug he takes and it contains caffeine, acetaminophen, and barbiturates. Not sure how powerful barbiturates are...? If they are that is. Asked by Teresita Steward 1 month ago.

You're talking about Fioricet. it's a compound containing a barbiturate (fiorinal - butabarbital) used to treat headaches, among other things. What he's doing is very dangerous, and is probably destroying his lungs. Acetaminophen is widely known to cause liver damage, and is corrosive to the stomach lining. Imagine what it's doing to his lungs. Then, you have the issue that pills are made using insoluble fillers. That means that little chunks of material are sticking in his lungs. This can cause bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, collapsed lung, granulomatosis, and many other serious, deadly problems. His lungs may be destroyed, and he will be breathing like an 80 year-old with COPD/emphysema. Another issue is that barbiturates have a very narrow margin of safety. Just a little more than a therapeutic dose can result in overdose. Add to that, the fact that withdrawal from them (once tolerance begins) can result in deadly seizures, along with a host of other horrible withdrawal symptoms similar to alcohol withdrawal. Just "quitting" them can easily kill you, if he's addicted he needs medically supervised detox. If he feels he is physically (not just psychologically) addicted to them, he needs to take the prescribed dose by mouth (to prevent WD) and get to a medical detox facility immediately. There's no shame in seeking help, these kind of things can happen to anyone of any social status. Barbiturates are very dangerous and quite addictive, and that is why they aren't really prescribed anymore (especially the shorter-acting ones like Seconal) Answered by Jarod Brierly 1 month ago.

Jeeeez your friend has issues, sedative snorting sounds really bad. you need to talk to him - no wonder your worried, who snorts sedatives?! Hope things look up :) Answered by Deb Kalama 1 month ago.

thats very dangerous........... Answered by Magaret Lambeth 1 month ago.


What is the best OD killer?
Kristina...gun or jumping? This question is not about suicide really. Sorry if it seems that way but this is about drugs and the body's reaction... Asked by Wanita Holden 1 month ago.

READ> No, I am not a little emo idiot. I just like knowing random crazy things and I have an interest about things with the body and things that would suit me to be a doctor. I am just curious to what the best overdose killing method is. A really quick one too. I have been researching and household products like Tylenol seems to fail. But wouldn't a massive mixture of something would do the trick? What would the killing mixture be? (you can also add in the details like the chemical effects and the whole process, more knowledge, the better :D) Honestly idk why these topics interest me. Just seem exciting. I love science/health stuff. I am totally going to be a doctor ;) haha So people of Yahoo Answers, what is the most extraordinary, quick killing OD method? Answered by Dong Devin 1 month ago.

That is a very simple question to answer, one class of drugs are unquestionably not only externally dangerous but also not painful and have no specific "antidote" like opioids (morphine, heroin) to counteract their effects. I am talking about barbiturates, a class of drugs used primarily as sedatives, hypnotics, and aneastetics. Barbiturates include Seconal (secobarbital), Nembutal (pentobarbital), Luminal (phenobarbital), Sodium Pentothal (sodium thiopental), Butisol (butabarbital), Amytal (amobarbital), Mebaral (mephobarbital), Oramon (aprobarbital), Brevital (methohexital), and butalbital. Firstly let me say the reason I am willing to tell you about the danger of these drugs is because 1) it is well known and with a bit of study you could find it out, 2) there is no evidence that providing information increases the risk of a person attempting or completing suicide, 3) barbiturates are rarely used, highly inaccessible since most are no longer made do to lack of demand. There are a few barbiturates in particular Seconal (secobarbital), Nembutal (phenobarbital), and Sodium Pentothal (sodium thiopental) that are particularly dangerous. A now discontinued (at least in most countries) drug called Tuinal (secobarbital/amobarbital) showed to be particularly dangerous. In most countries the pill form of almost all barbiturates have been taken off the market, a few barbiturates (typically phenobarbital, thiopental, amobarbital, and methohexital) are still used in hospital and other medical facilities however if they are available it is typically only for IV use and not used outside of hospital. The major exception is for the drug phenobarbital, a much safer barbiturate because it is absorbed slowly and it has less capacity to produce respiratory depression. In The United States, unless medications have very recently changed (unlikely) phenobarbital (Luminal), mephobarbital aka methylphenobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), and butabarbital (Butisol) are still available as are combination analgesics like Fiorinal and Fioricet which contain the barbiturate butalbital along with caffeine, with acetaminophen (in Fioricet) or with Aspirin (in Fiorinal), and there is also a from of both drugs that also has codeine. Fioricet and Fiorinal are used for tension and migraine headaches (ideally short term). Barbiturates act on the brains principal inhibitory neurotransmitter known as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Barbiturates bind to specific sites on the GABA receptor where it potentiates and prolongs the inhibitory actions of GABA leading the the postsynaptic neuron to hyperpolarize so it is unable to depolarize and have an action potential (ie the nerve can't fire). As the dose increases to dangerous levels barbiturates stimulate GABA receptors directly even in the absence of GABA (this feature is what makes barbiturates so dangerous). Barbiturates also block glutamate, the brains principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Jimi Hendrix is probably one of the most famous people to die from barbiturates, he took about 9 100 mg capsules of Seconal and he had a significant amount of alcohol. That is a very small safety margin, simply getting a one month prescription for 30 capsules would be lethal for most people. But often the reason people die from any drug (including alcohol) is from mixing them causing a significant synergetic effect. Today in places where euthanasia is legal typically pentobarbital or sodium thiopental are used at a dose up to 15 grams. Once The drug Librium (chlordiazepoxide), the first benzodiazepine to be followed by Valium (diazepam) three years later, hit the market in 1960 barbiturate use dropped especially as more and more benzodiazepines were developed. Benzodiazepines have nearly identical clinical effects and in most cases they work as well as barbiturates but when taken alone is it nearly impossible to die, a dose hundreds or even millions of times the normal dose is lethal. Part of the reason benzodiazepines can't kill like barbiturates is because benzodiazepines don't act on glutamate and they need the presence of GABA for effects to occur, barbiturates do not. And for the record nearly 1,000 people die from Tylenol toxicity in North America. Odds are a suicide attempt will fail and the person will be fine or they may have some internal damage but death is not common. More often a death from Tylenol is because of long term high dose use. Answered by Marcel Meeds 1 month ago.

Drugs like Tylenol can kill you, but they don't do it quickly. They kill off your liver, and then you get to lie there and slowly, slowly die as the toxins that your liver would normally excrete build and build in your body. It's a horrible, slow, agonizing way to die. The only really fast way to go would be cyanide. It can kill in minutes. Answered by Myriam Datz 1 month ago.

Tylenol pm (the big blue and white circular ones) works. But it takes a few hrs and you gotta take like 50 of them. Theres the basics, like a gun or jumping. Idk how someone wuld get Syanide but i heard thats a pretty quick death. Answered by Willie Yung 1 month ago.

I hear most isotopes of Thorium are incredibly toxic. Even in microscopic they can be toxic I believe. Answered by Kourtney Lewton 1 month ago.

how would you know that Tylenol seems to fail? Answered by Lila Woodring 1 month ago.


What are some phsycoactive drugs?
Asked by Joeann Cavrak 1 month ago.

A psychoactive/psychotropic drug is defined as a substance of natural, semisynthetic, or synthetic origin that may or may not be legal or have medical value and affects the nervous system, primarily the central nervous system, and alters brain function, resulting in changes in cognition, perception, mood, and/or behaviour. Examples include: Benzodiazepines: Xanax (alprazolam), Librium (chlordiazepoxide), Klonopin, Rivotril (clonazepam), Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam), Rohypnol (flunitrazepam), Restoril, Normison, Euhypnos (temazepam), Halcion (triazolam), and Mogadon (nitrazepam) Barbiturates Luminal (phenobarbital), Nembutal (pentobarbital), Mebaral (mephobarbital), Seconal (secobarbital), Butisol (butabarbital), and Amytal (amobarbital) Amphetamines Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts), Desoxyn (methamphetamine), Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine), and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy). Opioids (narcotics) Codeine (Tylenol #3, Codeine Contin), Morphine (MS Contin, MS-IR), Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Lorcet), Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Oxy-IR), Oxymorphone (Opana), Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo, Hydromorph Contin), Diacetylmorphine/diamorphine (Heroin), Fentanyl (Duragesic), Pethidine/meperidine (Demerol), and Methadone (Dolophine). Antihistamines Vistaril, Atarax (hydroxyzine), Diclectin (doxylamine), and Benadryl (diphenhydramine) Hallucinogens Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), mescaline, psilocybin/psilocin mushrooms, and Salvia divinorum Antipsychotics (neuroleptics) Haldol (haloperidol), Thorazine, Largactil (chlorpromazine), Stelazine (trifluoperazine), Abilify (aripiprazole), Geodon, Zeldox (ziprasidone), Risperdal (risperidone), Seroquel (quetiapine), and Zyprexa (olanzapine). Antidepressants Elavil (amitriptyline), Tofranil (imipramine), Nardil (phenelzine), Paxil (paroxetine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Zoloft (sertraline), Effexor (venlafaxine), Desyrel (trazodone), and Wellbutrin (bupropion) Mood stabilizers/anticonvulsants/antiepilepti... (AEDs) Eskalith (lithium carbonate), PMS-Lithium Citrate (lithium citrate), Keppra (levetiracetam), Dilantin (phenytoin), Lamictal (lamotrigine), Tegretol (carbamazepine), Trileptal (oxcarbazepine), Topamax (topiramate), Neurontin (gabapentin), and Depakote (valproate semisodium, divalproex sodium) Anxiolytics/tranquilizers Miltown, Equanil (meprobamate), Lyrica (pregabalin), and most barbiturates and benzodiazepines are also anxiolytics/tranquilizers. Sedative/Hypnotics Ambien (zolpidem), Sonata, Starnoc (zaleplon), Imovane, Rhovane (zopiclone), Lunesta (eszopiclone), Heminevrin (clomethiazole, chlormethiazole), Somnote, Noctec (chloral hydrate), Rozerem (ramelteon), Placidyl (ethchlorvynol), Doriden (glutethimide), Quaalude (methaqualone) and most barbiturates and benzodiazepines are also used as sedative/hypnotics. Stimulants/ sympathomimetics Focalin (dexmethylphenidate), Ritalin, Attenta, Concerta, Methylin, Metadate CD, Metadate ER, Methylin ER, Ritalin LA, Ritalin SR, Daytrana (methylphenidate), Provigil, Alertec (modafinil), Nuvigil (armodafanil), cocaine/crack, caffeine, nicotine, and all amphetamines are also stimulants/ sympathomimetics Lastly drugs are classified either by their clinical classification or their chemical classification. Clinical classification is more commonly used and more difficult to understand- examples include antidepressants, pain killers, sleeping pills, narcotics, anti-anxiety medications, uppers, downers, stimulants, and depressants. This terminology is over simplified and does not take into account the fact that all drugs have multiple uses. Also using clinical classifications is typically ambiguous since people may define things differently- for example many people consider downers/depressants to include opioids and many believe that depressants cause depression (which is rarely true). I have listed a mix of drugs, some classified chemically (amphetamines, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, opioids) and some classified clinically to make it a bit less complicated. Answered by Amos Mourad 1 month ago.

Erowid.org. You'll find info on every known psychoactive. Answered by Otha Dorner 1 month ago.


Can a woman take birth control pills with diet pills and still have the pill be effective?
I am currently on loestrin24e and was wondering is there any research proving that the pill will not be effective if the person takes the pill also? Asked by Joella Anstey 1 month ago.

The birth control pill consists of hormones which essentially make your body think it is pregnant. Your ovaries will then not release an egg each month, meaning that sperm would have nothing to fertilize. Advantages- very effective when taken properly, can lessen PMS symptoms, lighten "period" bleedings Disadvantages- must remember to take a pill every day, at around the same time. some people experience other side effects. After you stop taking the pill, the extra hormones go away and you can become pregnant again. Your period does not go away completely, but it is more correctly called a "withdrawal bleed," since it is not a true period and is just a break in the hormone dose to allow your body to continue to regulate itself. The pill AND a condom is one of the most effective methods of preventing pregnancy! Perfect use of both methods is over 99% effective. Answered by Elna Hillsgrove 1 month ago.


What are the mechanisms when a person overdoses on sleeping pills like phenobarbital and alcohol?
by mechanism i mean what happens ot the body,the brain,how much time before the drugs take effect etc. Asked by Lashonda Ruedy 1 month ago.

Sort of an odd drug choice to write about for a university news paper. Since barbiturates are not commonly used except in hospitals for acute seizures, sedation, and anesthesia, for euthanasia (where legal), barbiturates may also be used in alcohol or benzodiazepine withdrawal, phenobarbital is occasionally used for a rapid benzodiazepine detox. Benzodiazepines can replaced most uses of barbiturates. In some cases oral barbiturates are prescribed, primarily phenobarbital for epilepsy but Butisol Sodium (butabarbital sodium) and Seconal (secobarbital) are still available. Alcohol, barbiturates, benzodiazepines (alprazolam, lorazepam, diazepam), "Z" drugs (zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone, eszopiclone), and several other drugs like chloral hydrate, meprobamate, carisoprodol are GABAnergic drugs meaning they act on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In your example of phenobarbital and alcohol the phenobarbital is more relevant. The pharmacological mechanism of action of barbiturates is due to interaction with GABAa receptors, where they bind at distinct binding sites and enhance GABA-mediated chloride currents, found in the central nervous system where they allow an influx of chloride into cell membranes and then hyperpolarize the postsynaptic neuron. GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Barbiturates reduce the ability of nerves to fine by altering a cell's membrane potential (hyperpolarization). As a result there is less neuronal activity. At high doses, barbiturates become more dangerous because they are able to stimulate GABAa receptors directly in the absence of GABA. Other sedative/hypnotics like benzodiazepines must have GABA present for the drug to work. Barbiturates also block glutamate receptors in the CNS. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter. So barbiturates have two basic actions, to slow the brain down AND to block stimulation. As a result barbiturates typically cause more sedation, are more addictive, and are very lethal. Phenobarbital is a very long acting barbiturate that can, to some extent, have a duration of action of up to two days and a half life of up to 120hrs however when taken orally 2-3 doses are typically taken per day. Thiopental, on the other hand is ultra-short-acting and has a duration of action of about 20 min. It typically takes oral phenobarbital 30-45 min to start to work, peak plasma concentrations are reached at about 7 to 12 hours. Also please note that an "overdose" is a terms almost always misused. Normally people actually mean a poisoning, barbiturate poisoning in this case. Death can be a result of complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), shock (including shallow and infrequent breathing), respiratory depression, central cardiovascular depression, hypoxia, and coma. Alcohol will synergize with the barbiturates, potentiating them. In addiction alcohol acts on a large number of neurotransmitters either directly or indirectly. Depending on how much alcohol, and more importantly phenobarbital was used along with how long it took to get medical help would determine if a person lives or dies and how quickly. Unlike benzodiazepines there is no "antidote" for barbiturate poisoning. Answered by Clinton Rabel 1 month ago.

Taking an overdose is serious. Psychiatric help is needed. People always think that its going to end things, but in reality, failed suicide attempts are something a person has to live with the rest of their lives and if its damaging enough to a persons health, they have to deal with that afterwards (brain damage etc). 10-14 sleeping pills, wouldn't do much, alcohol is never good with any medications. But most likely if they tell someone, their stomach would be pumped at the hospital. Answered by Marlin Ploskunak 1 month ago.

It's the barbiturate that is the main danger, but the alcohol increases the depressing effects on the heart and lungs. Your question is too vague on how long and what alcohol level, because it is entirely dependent on the level of barbiturate in the blood and the victim's resistance to the drugs & alcohol. A longtime feeble addict or drunk may survive a dose that would kill a healthy 21 year old. Barbiturates slow the flow of neural messages throughout the body. This includes the brain's autonomic function telling your lungs to breath and your heart to beat. If you overdose, there is a 10% chance you won't survive. If you do X amount of downers that will depress 80% of your brain function and you had enough booze with it to depress 20% of your brain function, your body turns off. You can play with different fractions, but you see what I mean. Why do you think they use barbiturates for lethal injection executions? Because it works so quickly & efficiently to make you take your last breath. Check the links. Answered by Mercedez Deshler 1 month ago.

Do you know where I can get pentobarbital in the UK? I know a forum you can go to where they disuss this. Answered by Millie Schoenemann 1 month ago.


I have a question for the older pple here on YA?
im 26 atenol made me sick as a dog Asked by Lee Rasmussen 1 month ago.

in the 60s and 70s what did pple do about anxiety problems if they had chest pains from it all the time now a days they give u xanax and adivan and terrible stuff like that they are so addicting and i'd never try street drugs like pot that's horrible i cant get rid of my chest pains and dr's keep saying it's anxiety i dont know what to do Answered by Kelsie Scungio 1 month ago.

People who eschewed marijuana often were prescribed an intermediate acting barbiturate like butabarbital. I assume your doctor is satisfied that it is not your heart, that you have had a normal EKG and stress test. I take atenolol for hypertension, and that has a secondary calming effect that ameliorates a lot of my anxiety. But only your doctor can say this is appropriate for you. Answered by Tennie Luhn 1 month ago.

true, in the 70's pot would have eased some anxiety. however in your case i would get a 2nd opinion and ask if there is a natural food or herb that might help. but dont mix pharmacy drugs with the natural as they could have an interaction and cause more harm. how old are you and do you have any other symptoms? try tea tree oil under your nose 3 times a day, it might help some. chest pain could be a lot of causes. Answered by Roxann Zeiger 1 month ago.

Back in the 70's and 80's we smoked pot...sorry hun that's what we did Answered by Liana Farney 1 month ago.


What are some sleeping pills that really work?
my boyfriend took a different shift at work and now has trouble sleeping at night. he's had the schedule for 2 weks and still isnt used to it. his body isnt coping with it... any sleeping pills out there that really work? he wants something stronger than 50mg Asked by Danyelle Stops 1 month ago.

heres a list of some that you might want to look up to see whats best for you:ambien, atarax, buspar, butabarbital, compazine, lunesta, rozerem, seconal, sonata, vistaril, and zaleplon. h ambien, lunesta, benzodiazepines- these sleeping aids work fast, and you can definatly feel drowsy with them, but they also can make you feel groggy when you wake up antidepressants- like trazadone, can make you sleepy, but not the full effects of drowsiness as the medications above rozerem- works differently, mainly helps you sleep and to get you back to your right sleep/wake cycle hope this helps! Answered by Carolee Trevor 1 month ago.

Ambien! That's what I take and it's AMAZING. XD Don't let the doctor try to convince you to take a sleep aid instead of a sleeping pill if you have hardcore insomnia because chances are it's not gonna work. It would just make you feel groggy and exhausted hours earlier then you would and still not be able to sleep. Answered by Terrence Mallette 1 month ago.

Has he ever tried taking Melatonin? its a vitamin that really helps with sleep. If it doesn't work, or anything OTC(over the counter), I suggest speaking to a doctor. Answered by Mickie Diep 1 month ago.

2 Tylenol PM's are better than any prescriptions out there in my experience. They make you groggy if you take them and dont go to sleep right away. You gotta go to sleep right when you take them and wait for them to kick in, or youll wake up tired as hell if you dont. Answered by Wanetta Troyer 1 month ago.

Homeopathic Treatment for Sleeplessness / Insomnia, due to different reason and with different set of symptoms (No side effects or interaction with conventional drugs and totally non addictive) :- Sleeplessness during menopausal stage Senecio Aur 30X, 4 hourly Cannot sleep in the early hours of night; utterly wide awake, mind active; sleeplessness due to excitement Coffea Cruda 30X 6, hourly Cannot sleep after 3 A.M.; sleeplessness due to mental strain or sedentary habits; sleep dreamy and restless Nux Vomica 30X, at bed times for 7 days Due to fear or panic; insomnia after shock or fright; restlessness and tossing in bed Aconite Nap 30X 4 hourly Due to tiredness; either physical or mental; bed feels too hard; must keep moving in search of soft portion for relief in bed Arnica Montana 30X or 200X, 1/2 hourly (3 Doses) Sleeplessness after midnight from anxiety and restlessness; has to get up and walk Belladonna 30X, 4 hourly Sleepy yet unable to sleep; child tosses, kicks clothes off, twitches; restless sleep with frightful dreams Arsenic Album 30X or 200X, 4 hourly (3 Doses) Sleeplessness and restlessness; specially in first part of night; gets up and walks on the floor, as soon as the bed time comes patient is wide awake Chamomilla 30X or 200X, 4 hourly Sleeplessness due to old grief; after dreams of thieves or robbers Natrum Mur 200X or 1M, 10 min (3 Doses) Sleeplessness due to sudden shock; disappointment Ignatia 200X or 1M, 10 min (3 Doses) Feels sleepy but cannot sleep; clocks striking at a distance keep him awake; bed feels hot; moves about in vain to find a cool spot in bed Pulsatilla 30X or 200X, 4 hourly Restlessness during early part of sleep; sound sleep when it is turns to rise; gets too hot in bed; throws off covers, gets chilly and puts them on again; puts arms above the head during sleep Opium 30X or 200X, 4 hourly Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge. Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine Take Care and God Bless you. Answered by Dianna Kelchner 1 month ago.

He should see a doctor and ask for ambian. Answered by Terrie Waye 1 month ago.


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