Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012339/008.

Names and composition

"BRONKOSOL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012339/008 BRONKOSOL ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 1%
012339/009 BRONKOSOL ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.25%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012339/008 BRONKOSOL ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 1%
012339/009 BRONKOSOL ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.25%
085889/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 1%
085997/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.5%
086651/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.077%
086651/002 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.08%
086651/003 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.1%
086651/004 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.143%
086651/005 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.167%
086651/006 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.2%
086651/007 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.25%
086651/008 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 1%
086711/001 BETA-2 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 1%
086763/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 1%
086899/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 1%
087025/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.125%
087101/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 1%
087324/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.2%
087389/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.1%
087390/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.17%
087396/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.1%
087937/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.062%
087938/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.125%
088144/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.08%
088145/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.14%
088146/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.25%
088187/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.08%
088188/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.25%
088226/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.167%
088275/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.25%
088470/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.167%
088471/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.2%
088472/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.25%
089252/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE S/F ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 1%
089614/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.062%
089615/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.125%
089616/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.167%
089617/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.2%
089618/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.25%
089817/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE S/F ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.08%
089818/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE S/F ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.1%
089819/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE S/F ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.17%
089820/001 ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE S/F ISOETHARINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.25%

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Answered questions

Will sympathomimetic drug help a person with asthma?
Asked by Joe Pirner 1 year ago.

A sympathomimetic drug is the bronchodilators doctors prescribe for people with asthma or conditions with asthmatic components to it. These include, Isuprel, Bronkosol, Alupent, Albuterol etc. The body has two systems of autonomic nerves. Sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Where one does one thing the other does the opposite. The term sympathomimetic means something that will "mimic" the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics dilate or relax the bronchial muscles so you can see it would be very useful in asthmatic patients. As I said there are two systems so another approach some doctors use is to give the patient a parasympatholytic medicine (Atrovent) to reduce the influence of the parasympathetic system.They will give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time. God bless. Answered by Alissa Schleider 1 year ago.

idk, do BITCHES EAT 'SCREAM? (ice cream) listen, dont ask on yahoo answers. no one here has a medical degree, save 1 or 2 Answered by Pauletta Hallo 1 year ago.


Asthma results in the constriction of bronchioles. What chemical will reverse it?
Asked by Rudolf Ikenberry 1 year ago.

All brochodilalators are derivative of epinephrine. They started by trying to limit the Beat 1 agonists with Isuprel. Then further refinement led to Bronkosol, Alupent and now Albuterol sulfate. This is a Beta 2 agonists with very few side effects that were seen with earlier preparations. But these are all bronchodilators, a muscle relaxant for the bronchial airway muscles. That's not the only cause of constriction though. You have to consider the inflammation and consequent swelling of the bronchial walls. Also increased production of thick viscous mucous is a major contributing factor. Answered by Josephina Stankowitz 1 year ago.

Medications can reverse the constriction caused by asthma that in turn causes inflamed airways. There are several medications used to treat asthma: -Bronchodliators: these medications contain a drug that opens the airways and come in short-acting or long-acting forms. Short acting bronchodliators such as salbutamol/albuterol [Ventolin] are taken when symptoms occur and begin working immediately and peak within 5-15 minutes to relieve symptoms. Short acting bronchodilators are also used by many asthmatics before exercise to prevent exercise induced asthma flares. In asthma treatment, except for in mild intermittent asthma, controller medications are usually needed, and are taken daily. This is where long acting bronchodilators can come into play: Long-acting bronchodilators are used in combination with corticosteroids [Advair is a combination inhaler, Serevent just contains a long acting bronchodilator]. These peak within 15-20 minutes, and their effects last for 12 hours to control asthma symptoms. These should not be used during an asthma flare, that's what the short-acting bronchodilator is for. -Corticosteroids come in either an inhaled, oral or injected form, but for maintenance therapy typically are used in the inhaled form through a puffer or 'diskus' device. Examples of inhaled corticosteroids are FloVent, QVar, Alvesco and Symbicort. These are typically inhaled twice a day, except for Alvesco, which has once-daily dosing. Oral corticosteroids [Prednisone] contain much higher doses and have much higher risk for side effects than inhaled corticosteroids. They are typically used in asthma emergencies or to head off a serious asthma attack that's already started. Injected corticosteroids are typically used when a patient is unresponsive, undergoing respiratory distress, in an emergency situation to bring down serious inflammation in the airways. -Leukotriene receptor antagonists aka leukotriene modifiers are taken in pill form and work differently than corticosteroids to reduce inflammation in the airways. Leukotriene receptor antagonists [Singulair] work to block leukotrienes released in the airways that cause inflammation, specifically in allergic asthma. Leukotriene modifiers can also be taken 2 hours prior to exercise to prevent exercise induced asthma. Either an inhaled corticosteroid or a leukotriene modifier is first-line asthma controller treatment. If a person is using their fast-acting bronchodilator [ventolin] more than 3 times a week except for before exercise, they should be on a controller medication. If adequate control isn't achieved after adding an inhaled corticosteroid, a leukotriene modifier may be added, or vice versa. Next up is the long-acting bronchodilator, then, if need be and typically only in severe cases, oral corticosteroids to get a flare under control. Answered by Sommer Sutley 1 year ago.

asthma results constriction bronchioles chemical reverse Answered by Elda Bishop 1 year ago.

The Chinese way of curing the asthma is to consume bird nest soup. For more detail please log on to www.qqbirdnest.com Answered by Jack Garnand 1 year ago.

Albuterol a bronchodilater. atrovent sometimes. albuterol is the emergency bronchodilater. Answered by Milan Woodall 1 year ago.


Why does the bronchodilator exaggerate the tachycardia?
Asked by Vern Canel 1 year ago.

Bronchodilators were originally alpha or beta agonists. The grandfather of all of them is epinephrine.(Norepinephrine was primarily an alpha agonist and used mostly to treat kids with Croup.) Both of which would relax the bronchial muscles but had the side effect of increasing the heart rate. Through research it was found the the beta receptors were of two types, Beta 1 and beta 2. Beta 1 increased the heart rate while beta 2 relaxed the bronchial muscles. The pharmaceutical companies further refined the epinephrine to stimulate only the beta 2 receptors. They also refined it to block the beta 1 effects becoming the class of drugs known as beta blockers.This was used in tachyarrythmnias. Isuprel was the first beta agonist and it was very effective and fast acting but there was still a lot of beta 1 activity. Then came Bronkosol(Isoetharine) which seemed to have solved the problem. Alupent was next. Finally Albuterol was introduced which had virtually no beta 1 activity. The onset of activity was longer(up to 5 min.) but the effect on heart rate was much less. Some people still get an increase in heart rate with Albuterol but the percentage is very small. You still have to monitor the patient for heart rate increase but the likelihood is much less. I should have explained at the beginning that there are two types of nerves in the peripheral nervous system. Sympathetic and parasympathetic. While one has one effect the other has the opposite effect. Epinepherine is a sympathomimetic or "mimics" the sympathetic nerves. A drug which stimulates the parasympathetic system would be a parasympathomimetic. Any drug that reduces the effect of one of these is said to "lyse" the effect. So a drug which reduced the parasympathetic system would be called a parasympatholytic. The sympathetic system dilates or relaxes the bronchial muscles and the parasympathetic system constricts them. If you were to give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time you would be attacking the problem from two sides. Atrovent is a parasympatholytic drug often given with Albuterol and is called Combivent. Studies have shown that in certain patients the bronchodilator effect is enhanced by the addition of Atrovent. God bless. Answered by Elisha Guzman 1 year ago.

because it has beta 1 receptor effect at the heart...which when stimulated caused an increased in heart beat Answered by Ira Hellams 1 year ago.


What would they use against asthma in the 1940s-50s?
Asked by Carl Basley 1 year ago.

they had little-they used shots of epi, a nebulized drug called Bronkosol, having patient breath in steam off of hot water, also because of air hunger would drive fast with the persons head out of window.Warm compress to chest was also used Answered by Yun Mcmeekin 1 year ago.


Why should one use a bronchodilator before a corticosteroid?
A Bronchodilator opens up the airway so that the steroid can travel deeper into the lungs to clear the inflammation. Bronchodilators open up and relax constricted airways making it easier to breathe. Steroids are used to reduce inflammation and swelling in the airways. Hence why we use the bronchodilator first,... Asked by Britt Bozzi 1 year ago.

A Bronchodilator opens up the airway so that the steroid can travel deeper into the lungs to clear the inflammation. Bronchodilators open up and relax constricted airways making it easier to breathe. Steroids are used to reduce inflammation and swelling in the airways. Hence why we use the bronchodilator first, then the steroid inhaler. -Rekha, RN/BSN Answered by Katheryn Valesquez 1 year ago.

Bronchodilators work systemically. They have no local effect. It's absorbed into the mucosa and thereby the blood vessels. Don't forget it has to be absorbed through the mucous layer and then the inflamed mucosa before it gets anywhere near the bronchial musculature. And, being Beta 2 agonists they only relax the bronchial muscles. They do not relieve inflammation. The saline is a mucolytic and works faster and locally. Of course, this is when you are taking the unit dose. If you are using the metered dose inhaler (MDI) there is no saline so it's best to wait 5 minutes for the full effect before taking the steroid. Once you cough the mucous out the bronchodilator can get to the membrane and be absorbed into the circulation faster. It is doing no good being absorbed by the mucous itself. Albuterol is the chemical evolutionary end product of epinephrine for the relief of bronchospasm. Epinephrine, of course, has primarily beta 1 and beta 2 effects. and it's very fast acting but it only lasts for maybe an hour. Isuprel was the next step. It's onset of effect was about 2 minutes but it remained effective for about two hours and the dose, as with epinephrine, had to be titred to the patient's heart rate. Bronkosol was the next in line. It's peak effect was achieved in 3-4 minutes but only lasted 3 hours. Alupent was about the same. Albuterol achieves it's maximum effect in 5 minutes and lasts for about 4 hours. All these meds were created in an attempt to mitigate the cardiac side effects by making them less beta 1 and more beta 2 agonists. Norepinephrine is primarily an alpha agonist and used, in titred doses, for acute laryngotracheobronchitis in children providing a fast acting anti inflammatory. Now once the bronchodilator is absorbed you can get maximum penetration of the steroid for it's localized effect on the inflammation and swelling. Also, a good tip is, if you are ordered to take two puffs from the MDI, wait 5 minutes between puffs so you get maximum effect from the first puff and the second one will get deeper. I know it's hard to wait but I always told my patients this and they all remarked what a difference it makes. Answered by Timothy Czaplicki 1 year ago.

Because if you relax and open the airways first, then the steriod can better penetrate the lungs to reduce inflammation. Answered by Dale Miggins 1 year ago.

ASKED AND ANSWERED. THANKS FOR THE POINTS! Answered by Todd File 1 year ago.


I have Glaucoma. What medications should I avoid using?
Asked by Malcom Rebholz 1 year ago.

Many Rx & OTC meds say do not take if you have glaucoma. However, it is best to check with your ophthalmologist or pharmacist because you can use some meds even if they say no. Answered by Stan Haverstick 1 year ago.

Pantoprazole Answered by Sheba Samona 1 year ago.


My kitty has had a cold for two weeks now. She's on amoxicillin & eye meds. Should I take her back to vet?
She has been sneezing, has runny eyes, and has had a snotty runny nose. She also has coughing fits at night due to her nasal congestion. She's been on amoxicillin for a week now. She never lost her appetite but did seem to be more tired at the beginning. She's now running around and very active, but... Asked by Sarita Eschenbrenner 1 year ago.

She has been sneezing, has runny eyes, and has had a snotty runny nose. She also has coughing fits at night due to her nasal congestion. She's been on amoxicillin for a week now. She never lost her appetite but did seem to be more tired at the beginning. She's now running around and very active, but still has sneezing spells and has a very snotty nose. Should I take her back to the vet to get checked out again? Answered by Pei Raley 1 year ago.

When I was in RT school, there was a picture of a white cat with a signature "I can breath now! Thanks, RT".. The story is that this cat had pneumonia and was dying. The nurse that had the cat, told the RTs at her work that her cat was dying because it too had a snotty nose, and was having difficulty breathing.... Well, to make a long story short, they gave the cat an adult sized breathing treatment [with bronkosol, for all you who are curious]. I am told that the cat sneezed, not once but several times, started running around like her tail was on fire, and after 15 minutes, settled down and went to sleep....She woke up feeling much better and survived the pneumonia.... Your cat MAY need a breathing treatment [but prolly not!], but if she is eating, and active, I would say that she is well on her way to recovery.... Answered by Lona Stangarone 1 year ago.

yes take her back as soon as you can Answered by Eileen Gove 1 year ago.


Will sympathomimetic drug help a person with asthma?
Asked by Yulanda Katcsmorak 1 year ago.

A sympathomimetic drug is the bronchodilators doctors prescribe for people with asthma or conditions with asthmatic components to it. These include, Isuprel, Bronkosol, Alupent, Albuterol etc. The body has two systems of autonomic nerves. Sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Where one does one thing the other does the opposite. The term sympathomimetic means something that will "mimic" the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics dilate or relax the bronchial muscles so you can see it would be very useful in asthmatic patients. As I said there are two systems so another approach some doctors use is to give the patient a parasympatholytic medicine (Atrovent) to reduce the influence of the parasympathetic system.They will give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time. God bless. Answered by Omega Viafara 1 year ago.

idk, do BITCHES EAT 'SCREAM? (ice cream) listen, dont ask on yahoo answers. no one here has a medical degree, save 1 or 2 Answered by Brigette Polston 1 year ago.


Asthma results in the constriction of bronchioles. What chemical will reverse it?
Asked by Karmen Clenney 1 year ago.

All brochodilalators are derivative of epinephrine. They started by trying to limit the Beat 1 agonists with Isuprel. Then further refinement led to Bronkosol, Alupent and now Albuterol sulfate. This is a Beta 2 agonists with very few side effects that were seen with earlier preparations. But these are all bronchodilators, a muscle relaxant for the bronchial airway muscles. That's not the only cause of constriction though. You have to consider the inflammation and consequent swelling of the bronchial walls. Also increased production of thick viscous mucous is a major contributing factor. Answered by Adam Campell 1 year ago.

Medications can reverse the constriction caused by asthma that in turn causes inflamed airways. There are several medications used to treat asthma: -Bronchodliators: these medications contain a drug that opens the airways and come in short-acting or long-acting forms. Short acting bronchodliators such as salbutamol/albuterol [Ventolin] are taken when symptoms occur and begin working immediately and peak within 5-15 minutes to relieve symptoms. Short acting bronchodilators are also used by many asthmatics before exercise to prevent exercise induced asthma flares. In asthma treatment, except for in mild intermittent asthma, controller medications are usually needed, and are taken daily. This is where long acting bronchodilators can come into play: Long-acting bronchodilators are used in combination with corticosteroids [Advair is a combination inhaler, Serevent just contains a long acting bronchodilator]. These peak within 15-20 minutes, and their effects last for 12 hours to control asthma symptoms. These should not be used during an asthma flare, that's what the short-acting bronchodilator is for. -Corticosteroids come in either an inhaled, oral or injected form, but for maintenance therapy typically are used in the inhaled form through a puffer or 'diskus' device. Examples of inhaled corticosteroids are FloVent, QVar, Alvesco and Symbicort. These are typically inhaled twice a day, except for Alvesco, which has once-daily dosing. Oral corticosteroids [Prednisone] contain much higher doses and have much higher risk for side effects than inhaled corticosteroids. They are typically used in asthma emergencies or to head off a serious asthma attack that's already started. Injected corticosteroids are typically used when a patient is unresponsive, undergoing respiratory distress, in an emergency situation to bring down serious inflammation in the airways. -Leukotriene receptor antagonists aka leukotriene modifiers are taken in pill form and work differently than corticosteroids to reduce inflammation in the airways. Leukotriene receptor antagonists [Singulair] work to block leukotrienes released in the airways that cause inflammation, specifically in allergic asthma. Leukotriene modifiers can also be taken 2 hours prior to exercise to prevent exercise induced asthma. Either an inhaled corticosteroid or a leukotriene modifier is first-line asthma controller treatment. If a person is using their fast-acting bronchodilator [ventolin] more than 3 times a week except for before exercise, they should be on a controller medication. If adequate control isn't achieved after adding an inhaled corticosteroid, a leukotriene modifier may be added, or vice versa. Next up is the long-acting bronchodilator, then, if need be and typically only in severe cases, oral corticosteroids to get a flare under control. Answered by Glenna Boisseau 1 year ago.

asthma results constriction bronchioles chemical reverse Answered by Olevia Rviz 1 year ago.

The Chinese way of curing the asthma is to consume bird nest soup. For more detail please log on to www.qqbirdnest.com Answered by Xochitl Duprey 1 year ago.

Albuterol a bronchodilater. atrovent sometimes. albuterol is the emergency bronchodilater. Answered by Kraig Laguire 1 year ago.


Why does the bronchodilator exaggerate the tachycardia?
Asked by Shawanda Pitzen 1 year ago.

Bronchodilators were originally alpha or beta agonists. The grandfather of all of them is epinephrine.(Norepinephrine was primarily an alpha agonist and used mostly to treat kids with Croup.) Both of which would relax the bronchial muscles but had the side effect of increasing the heart rate. Through research it was found the the beta receptors were of two types, Beta 1 and beta 2. Beta 1 increased the heart rate while beta 2 relaxed the bronchial muscles. The pharmaceutical companies further refined the epinephrine to stimulate only the beta 2 receptors. They also refined it to block the beta 1 effects becoming the class of drugs known as beta blockers.This was used in tachyarrythmnias. Isuprel was the first beta agonist and it was very effective and fast acting but there was still a lot of beta 1 activity. Then came Bronkosol(Isoetharine) which seemed to have solved the problem. Alupent was next. Finally Albuterol was introduced which had virtually no beta 1 activity. The onset of activity was longer(up to 5 min.) but the effect on heart rate was much less. Some people still get an increase in heart rate with Albuterol but the percentage is very small. You still have to monitor the patient for heart rate increase but the likelihood is much less. I should have explained at the beginning that there are two types of nerves in the peripheral nervous system. Sympathetic and parasympathetic. While one has one effect the other has the opposite effect. Epinepherine is a sympathomimetic or "mimics" the sympathetic nerves. A drug which stimulates the parasympathetic system would be a parasympathomimetic. Any drug that reduces the effect of one of these is said to "lyse" the effect. So a drug which reduced the parasympathetic system would be called a parasympatholytic. The sympathetic system dilates or relaxes the bronchial muscles and the parasympathetic system constricts them. If you were to give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time you would be attacking the problem from two sides. Atrovent is a parasympatholytic drug often given with Albuterol and is called Combivent. Studies have shown that in certain patients the bronchodilator effect is enhanced by the addition of Atrovent. God bless. Answered by June Steinkuehler 1 year ago.

because it has beta 1 receptor effect at the heart...which when stimulated caused an increased in heart beat Answered by Donnie Medrano 1 year ago.


What would they use against asthma in the 1940s-50s?
Asked by Lisha Pierceall 1 year ago.

they had little-they used shots of epi, a nebulized drug called Bronkosol, having patient breath in steam off of hot water, also because of air hunger would drive fast with the persons head out of window.Warm compress to chest was also used Answered by Rosetta Phetsanghane 1 year ago.


Why should one use a bronchodilator before a corticosteroid?
A Bronchodilator opens up the airway so that the steroid can travel deeper into the lungs to clear the inflammation. Bronchodilators open up and relax constricted airways making it easier to breathe. Steroids are used to reduce inflammation and swelling in the airways. Hence why we use the bronchodilator first,... Asked by Alanna Sallis 1 year ago.

A Bronchodilator opens up the airway so that the steroid can travel deeper into the lungs to clear the inflammation. Bronchodilators open up and relax constricted airways making it easier to breathe. Steroids are used to reduce inflammation and swelling in the airways. Hence why we use the bronchodilator first, then the steroid inhaler. -Rekha, RN/BSN Answered by Deonna Bassett 1 year ago.

Bronchodilators work systemically. They have no local effect. It's absorbed into the mucosa and thereby the blood vessels. Don't forget it has to be absorbed through the mucous layer and then the inflamed mucosa before it gets anywhere near the bronchial musculature. And, being Beta 2 agonists they only relax the bronchial muscles. They do not relieve inflammation. The saline is a mucolytic and works faster and locally. Of course, this is when you are taking the unit dose. If you are using the metered dose inhaler (MDI) there is no saline so it's best to wait 5 minutes for the full effect before taking the steroid. Once you cough the mucous out the bronchodilator can get to the membrane and be absorbed into the circulation faster. It is doing no good being absorbed by the mucous itself. Albuterol is the chemical evolutionary end product of epinephrine for the relief of bronchospasm. Epinephrine, of course, has primarily beta 1 and beta 2 effects. and it's very fast acting but it only lasts for maybe an hour. Isuprel was the next step. It's onset of effect was about 2 minutes but it remained effective for about two hours and the dose, as with epinephrine, had to be titred to the patient's heart rate. Bronkosol was the next in line. It's peak effect was achieved in 3-4 minutes but only lasted 3 hours. Alupent was about the same. Albuterol achieves it's maximum effect in 5 minutes and lasts for about 4 hours. All these meds were created in an attempt to mitigate the cardiac side effects by making them less beta 1 and more beta 2 agonists. Norepinephrine is primarily an alpha agonist and used, in titred doses, for acute laryngotracheobronchitis in children providing a fast acting anti inflammatory. Now once the bronchodilator is absorbed you can get maximum penetration of the steroid for it's localized effect on the inflammation and swelling. Also, a good tip is, if you are ordered to take two puffs from the MDI, wait 5 minutes between puffs so you get maximum effect from the first puff and the second one will get deeper. I know it's hard to wait but I always told my patients this and they all remarked what a difference it makes. Answered by Shirely Scales 1 year ago.

Because if you relax and open the airways first, then the steriod can better penetrate the lungs to reduce inflammation. Answered by Norman Saadd 1 year ago.

ASKED AND ANSWERED. THANKS FOR THE POINTS! Answered by Lonnie Fioranelli 1 year ago.


I have Glaucoma. What medications should I avoid using?
Asked by Alona Greenlow 1 year ago.

Many Rx & OTC meds say do not take if you have glaucoma. However, it is best to check with your ophthalmologist or pharmacist because you can use some meds even if they say no. Answered by Maricela Durkee 1 year ago.

Pantoprazole Answered by Shirley Landsaw 1 year ago.


My kitty has had a cold for two weeks now. She's on amoxicillin & eye meds. Should I take her back to vet?
She has been sneezing, has runny eyes, and has had a snotty runny nose. She also has coughing fits at night due to her nasal congestion. She's been on amoxicillin for a week now. She never lost her appetite but did seem to be more tired at the beginning. She's now running around and very active, but... Asked by Darnell Slovacek 1 year ago.

She has been sneezing, has runny eyes, and has had a snotty runny nose. She also has coughing fits at night due to her nasal congestion. She's been on amoxicillin for a week now. She never lost her appetite but did seem to be more tired at the beginning. She's now running around and very active, but still has sneezing spells and has a very snotty nose. Should I take her back to the vet to get checked out again? Answered by Tammy Chernesky 1 year ago.

When I was in RT school, there was a picture of a white cat with a signature "I can breath now! Thanks, RT".. The story is that this cat had pneumonia and was dying. The nurse that had the cat, told the RTs at her work that her cat was dying because it too had a snotty nose, and was having difficulty breathing.... Well, to make a long story short, they gave the cat an adult sized breathing treatment [with bronkosol, for all you who are curious]. I am told that the cat sneezed, not once but several times, started running around like her tail was on fire, and after 15 minutes, settled down and went to sleep....She woke up feeling much better and survived the pneumonia.... Your cat MAY need a breathing treatment [but prolly not!], but if she is eating, and active, I would say that she is well on her way to recovery.... Answered by Dean Rehor 1 year ago.

yes take her back as soon as you can Answered by Melony Williford 1 year ago.


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