Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018017/001.

Names and composition

"BLOCADREN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TIMOLOL MALEATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018017/001 BLOCADREN TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
018017/002 BLOCADREN TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
018017/004 BLOCADREN TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018017/001 BLOCADREN TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
018017/002 BLOCADREN TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
018017/004 BLOCADREN TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
018086/001 TIMOPTIC TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
018086/002 TIMOPTIC TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
019463/001 TIMOPTIC IN OCUDOSE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
019463/002 TIMOPTIC IN OCUDOSE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
020330/001 TIMOPTIC-XE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION, GEL FORMING/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
020330/002 TIMOPTIC-XE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION, GEL FORMING/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
020963/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION, GEL FORMING/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
020963/002 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION, GEL FORMING/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
021516/001 ISTALOL TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
072001/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
072002/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072003/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
072269/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
072270/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072271/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
072466/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
072467/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072468/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
072550/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
072551/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072552/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
072648/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
072649/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072650/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
072668/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
072668/002 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
072668/003 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072917/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
072918/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072919/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
074261/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
074262/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
074465/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
074466/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
074515/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
074516/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
074667/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
074668/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
074746/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
074747/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
074776/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
074778/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
075163/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
075411/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
075412/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
077259/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
077259/002 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
078771/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
078771/002 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
204912/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/OPHTHALMIC 0.5%
204936/001 TIMOLOL MALEATE TIMOLOL MALEATE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE

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Answered questions

Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Pearly Frasso 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Karren Keirstead 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Pinkie Silmon 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Lissette Fast 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Maile Zellman 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Rogelio Kalafarski 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Onie Lecourt 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Shenna Bashara 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Kendrick Kalkbrenner 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Michiko Pjetrovic 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Neely Zozaya 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Eugenia Krystofiak 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Lavada Drumm 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Sondra Silao 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Magaly Fixari 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Page Cumens 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Arnoldo Vanliew 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Marcus Scarborough 1 year ago.


Inderal (Propranolol) -- what drug is the most similiar to Inderal?
Asked by Jamey Yonkers 1 year ago.

Inderal (propranolol) is a non-selective beta-blocker. Meaning it blocks both beta-1 and beta-2 adrenoceptors. Any of the other non-selectives would be similar, ie. nadolol (Corgard), timolol (Blocadren), sotalol (Betapace) and labetalol (Normodyne). Atenolol (Tenormin), and metoprolol (Lopressor) are not similar, they are beta-1 specific. Answered by Eden Willmore 1 year ago.

inderal is the brand name for propranaolol which is a beta blocker. It is very similar to Lopressor (Metoprolol) or Atenolol Answered by Emeline Pecue 1 year ago.


Aspirin and sudafed together?
Asked by Nikia Thuesen 1 year ago.

Combining aspirin and Sudafed should not be a problem. One is an NSAID painkiller / fever reducer / anti-inflammatory; the other is a decongestant. Combination cold medicines often include both the active ingredient in Sudafed, and an NSAID (usually acetaminophen or ibuprofen, not aspirin). But aspirin should not be a problem. When in doubt, read the package instructions. Answered by Jonathon Corkron 1 year ago.

i've got faith all and sundry putting jointly a equipment like this... probable is acquainted with what is going in a single, and the thank you to apply them. That individual would additionally comprehend how ridiculous it would be to get a visual reveal unit/defib unit in a usual help equipment. That individual would in all probability be waiting to spell defibrillator as nicely. **Rant aside...** in case you rather desire to place jointly your "dream" equipment, you are able to as nicely merely purchase an ALS First-In bag, with equipment lined. save the Edison drugs right down to an AED, and word of the incredibly some rules concerning administering drugs. supply up and study your affected person inhabitants. previous, youthful, scientific background? probability of suffering reasonable-to-extreme trauma? that would desire to lead your judgements to your equipment. reliable success. Answered by Dwain Hinchliffe 1 year ago.

Yes, it's ok. Answered by Sharilyn Checca 1 year ago.


What does a beta blocker do?
Asked by Edwardo Kamara 1 year ago.

By blocking the action of the involuntary nervous system on the heart, beta blockers relieve stress on the heart. They slow the heart beat, lessen the force with which the heart muscle contracts and reduce blood vessel contraction in the heart, brain, and throughout the body. Beta blockers can serve to treat abnormal heart rhythms (cardiac arrhythmias). They are used specifically to prevent abnormally fast heart rates (tachycardias) or irregular heart rhythms such as premature ventricular Since beta blockers reduce the demand of the heart muscle for oxygen and the chest pain of angina pectoris occurs when the oxygen demand of the heart exceeds the supply, beta blockers can be useful in treating angina. They have also become an important drug in improving survival after a person has had a heart attack. Thanks to their effect on blood vessels, beta blockers can lower the blood pressure and be of value in the treatment of hypertension. Other uses for beta blockers include the prevention of migraine headaches and stage fright (social phobia), and the treatment of certain types of tremors (familial or hereditary essential tremors). The beta blockers (with brand names) include acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), metoprolol (Lopressor, Lopressor LA, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard) and timolol (Blocadren). Beta blockers are also available in combination with a diuretic as, for example, with bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac). Beta blockers reduce the pressure within the eye (the intraocular pressure), probably by reducing the production of the liquid (aqueous humor) within the eye, and so are used to lessen the risk of damage to the optic nerve and loss of vision in glaucoma. Beta blocker preparations for this purpose include timolol ophthalmic solution (Timoptic) and betaxolol hydrochloride (Betoptic, Betoptic. Answered by Lester Gascon 1 year ago.

What Does Beta Blocker Do Answered by Blossom Ikzda 1 year ago.

Beta-blockers "block" the effects of adrenaline on your body's beta receptors. This slows the nerve impulses that travel through the heart. As a result, your heart does not have to work as hard because it needs less blood and oxygen. Beta-blockers also block the impulses that can cause an arrhythmia. Answered by Madonna Pfeiff 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What does a beta blocker do? Answered by Meggan Harde 1 year ago.

I have been on Sotalol going on 4 weeks now and it has helped a lot. I have had a few bumps and thumps here and there, but nothing like I had 4 weeks ago and almost passed out because my heart just felt like it was quivering in my chest and not pumping. Very frightening. Needless to say, it was a trip by ambulance to the hospital and I stayed one night for observation. I also have very mild floppy valves which may or may not be a contributing factor. Anyone else on this particular med? Answered by Carissa Fieselman 1 year ago.

it blocks some adrenal chemicals in the heart, lowers puls Answered by Ricki Swires 1 year ago.

well, it actually is like being in a car accident and you feel like your going to live, but until you get in the hospital, then you know your going to be alright. Answered by Inell Goldermann 1 year ago.

does it help with blood flow Answered by Alanna Merkling 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Delfina Lopez 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Arlinda Rafidi 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Trang Corrion 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Marine Whisker 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Lucinda Hisel 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Ivelisse Lippman 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Clarice Rohowetz 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Marth Gainforth 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Ryan Schneider 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Felicita Capaccino 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Winfred Discala 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Tomas Flies 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Doug Dijulio 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Margareta Studeny 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Louis Borchert 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Lyman Lampson 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Jacquelin Palin 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Bobbi Gauron 1 year ago.


Inderal (Propranolol) -- what drug is the most similiar to Inderal?
Asked by Ola Nogle 1 year ago.

Inderal (propranolol) is a non-selective beta-blocker. Meaning it blocks both beta-1 and beta-2 adrenoceptors. Any of the other non-selectives would be similar, ie. nadolol (Corgard), timolol (Blocadren), sotalol (Betapace) and labetalol (Normodyne). Atenolol (Tenormin), and metoprolol (Lopressor) are not similar, they are beta-1 specific. Answered by Honey Reigstad 1 year ago.

inderal is the brand name for propranaolol which is a beta blocker. It is very similar to Lopressor (Metoprolol) or Atenolol Answered by Bobby Purves 1 year ago.


Aspirin and sudafed together?
Asked by Shalonda Hendrikson 1 year ago.

Combining aspirin and Sudafed should not be a problem. One is an NSAID painkiller / fever reducer / anti-inflammatory; the other is a decongestant. Combination cold medicines often include both the active ingredient in Sudafed, and an NSAID (usually acetaminophen or ibuprofen, not aspirin). But aspirin should not be a problem. When in doubt, read the package instructions. Answered by Trinh Loges 1 year ago.

i've got faith all and sundry putting jointly a equipment like this... probable is acquainted with what is going in a single, and the thank you to apply them. That individual would additionally comprehend how ridiculous it would be to get a visual reveal unit/defib unit in a usual help equipment. That individual would in all probability be waiting to spell defibrillator as nicely. **Rant aside...** in case you rather desire to place jointly your "dream" equipment, you are able to as nicely merely purchase an ALS First-In bag, with equipment lined. save the Edison drugs right down to an AED, and word of the incredibly some rules concerning administering drugs. supply up and study your affected person inhabitants. previous, youthful, scientific background? probability of suffering reasonable-to-extreme trauma? that would desire to lead your judgements to your equipment. reliable success. Answered by Marlin Mcmindes 1 year ago.

Yes, it's ok. Answered by Merissa Falterman 1 year ago.


What does a beta blocker do?
Asked by Kylee Bound 1 year ago.

By blocking the action of the involuntary nervous system on the heart, beta blockers relieve stress on the heart. They slow the heart beat, lessen the force with which the heart muscle contracts and reduce blood vessel contraction in the heart, brain, and throughout the body. Beta blockers can serve to treat abnormal heart rhythms (cardiac arrhythmias). They are used specifically to prevent abnormally fast heart rates (tachycardias) or irregular heart rhythms such as premature ventricular Since beta blockers reduce the demand of the heart muscle for oxygen and the chest pain of angina pectoris occurs when the oxygen demand of the heart exceeds the supply, beta blockers can be useful in treating angina. They have also become an important drug in improving survival after a person has had a heart attack. Thanks to their effect on blood vessels, beta blockers can lower the blood pressure and be of value in the treatment of hypertension. Other uses for beta blockers include the prevention of migraine headaches and stage fright (social phobia), and the treatment of certain types of tremors (familial or hereditary essential tremors). The beta blockers (with brand names) include acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), metoprolol (Lopressor, Lopressor LA, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard) and timolol (Blocadren). Beta blockers are also available in combination with a diuretic as, for example, with bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac). Beta blockers reduce the pressure within the eye (the intraocular pressure), probably by reducing the production of the liquid (aqueous humor) within the eye, and so are used to lessen the risk of damage to the optic nerve and loss of vision in glaucoma. Beta blocker preparations for this purpose include timolol ophthalmic solution (Timoptic) and betaxolol hydrochloride (Betoptic, Betoptic. Answered by Oscar Geronime 1 year ago.

What Does Beta Blocker Do Answered by Gordon Gasiewski 1 year ago.

Beta-blockers "block" the effects of adrenaline on your body's beta receptors. This slows the nerve impulses that travel through the heart. As a result, your heart does not have to work as hard because it needs less blood and oxygen. Beta-blockers also block the impulses that can cause an arrhythmia. Answered by Marcelene Omundson 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What does a beta blocker do? Answered by Rodger Mccash 1 year ago.

I have been on Sotalol going on 4 weeks now and it has helped a lot. I have had a few bumps and thumps here and there, but nothing like I had 4 weeks ago and almost passed out because my heart just felt like it was quivering in my chest and not pumping. Very frightening. Needless to say, it was a trip by ambulance to the hospital and I stayed one night for observation. I also have very mild floppy valves which may or may not be a contributing factor. Anyone else on this particular med? Answered by Katia Vigo 1 year ago.

it blocks some adrenal chemicals in the heart, lowers puls Answered by Flor Sorey 1 year ago.

well, it actually is like being in a car accident and you feel like your going to live, but until you get in the hospital, then you know your going to be alright. Answered by Stephen Sannella 1 year ago.

does it help with blood flow Answered by Logan Irvin 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Timothy Doffing 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Craig Roaoo 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Garrett Plamer 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Rosalee Trasher 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Mina Fowley 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Manual Conejo 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Earnest Grzesik 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Palmira Mauger 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Abram Guild 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Precious Manciel 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Jude Panagis 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Corazon Strachn 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Linnea Darmody 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Adah Achzet 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Bennett Vandekieft 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Malinda Magano 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Brandi Shamburger 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Shena Malin 1 year ago.


Inderal (Propranolol) -- what drug is the most similiar to Inderal?
Asked by Kandis Tirey 1 year ago.

Inderal (propranolol) is a non-selective beta-blocker. Meaning it blocks both beta-1 and beta-2 adrenoceptors. Any of the other non-selectives would be similar, ie. nadolol (Corgard), timolol (Blocadren), sotalol (Betapace) and labetalol (Normodyne). Atenolol (Tenormin), and metoprolol (Lopressor) are not similar, they are beta-1 specific. Answered by Iris Dronen 1 year ago.

inderal is the brand name for propranaolol which is a beta blocker. It is very similar to Lopressor (Metoprolol) or Atenolol Answered by Erinn Prejsnar 1 year ago.


Aspirin and sudafed together?
Asked by January Potters 1 year ago.

Combining aspirin and Sudafed should not be a problem. One is an NSAID painkiller / fever reducer / anti-inflammatory; the other is a decongestant. Combination cold medicines often include both the active ingredient in Sudafed, and an NSAID (usually acetaminophen or ibuprofen, not aspirin). But aspirin should not be a problem. When in doubt, read the package instructions. Answered by Arnette Skinsacos 1 year ago.

i've got faith all and sundry putting jointly a equipment like this... probable is acquainted with what is going in a single, and the thank you to apply them. That individual would additionally comprehend how ridiculous it would be to get a visual reveal unit/defib unit in a usual help equipment. That individual would in all probability be waiting to spell defibrillator as nicely. **Rant aside...** in case you rather desire to place jointly your "dream" equipment, you are able to as nicely merely purchase an ALS First-In bag, with equipment lined. save the Edison drugs right down to an AED, and word of the incredibly some rules concerning administering drugs. supply up and study your affected person inhabitants. previous, youthful, scientific background? probability of suffering reasonable-to-extreme trauma? that would desire to lead your judgements to your equipment. reliable success. Answered by Marcos Kildare 1 year ago.

Yes, it's ok. Answered by Patrina Wibeto 1 year ago.


What does a beta blocker do?
Asked by Juan Purkerson 1 year ago.

By blocking the action of the involuntary nervous system on the heart, beta blockers relieve stress on the heart. They slow the heart beat, lessen the force with which the heart muscle contracts and reduce blood vessel contraction in the heart, brain, and throughout the body. Beta blockers can serve to treat abnormal heart rhythms (cardiac arrhythmias). They are used specifically to prevent abnormally fast heart rates (tachycardias) or irregular heart rhythms such as premature ventricular Since beta blockers reduce the demand of the heart muscle for oxygen and the chest pain of angina pectoris occurs when the oxygen demand of the heart exceeds the supply, beta blockers can be useful in treating angina. They have also become an important drug in improving survival after a person has had a heart attack. Thanks to their effect on blood vessels, beta blockers can lower the blood pressure and be of value in the treatment of hypertension. Other uses for beta blockers include the prevention of migraine headaches and stage fright (social phobia), and the treatment of certain types of tremors (familial or hereditary essential tremors). The beta blockers (with brand names) include acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), metoprolol (Lopressor, Lopressor LA, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard) and timolol (Blocadren). Beta blockers are also available in combination with a diuretic as, for example, with bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac). Beta blockers reduce the pressure within the eye (the intraocular pressure), probably by reducing the production of the liquid (aqueous humor) within the eye, and so are used to lessen the risk of damage to the optic nerve and loss of vision in glaucoma. Beta blocker preparations for this purpose include timolol ophthalmic solution (Timoptic) and betaxolol hydrochloride (Betoptic, Betoptic. Answered by Genia Yousif 1 year ago.

What Does Beta Blocker Do Answered by Werner Koma 1 year ago.

Beta-blockers "block" the effects of adrenaline on your body's beta receptors. This slows the nerve impulses that travel through the heart. As a result, your heart does not have to work as hard because it needs less blood and oxygen. Beta-blockers also block the impulses that can cause an arrhythmia. Answered by Kendal Ashpole 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What does a beta blocker do? Answered by Kiera Stofflet 1 year ago.

I have been on Sotalol going on 4 weeks now and it has helped a lot. I have had a few bumps and thumps here and there, but nothing like I had 4 weeks ago and almost passed out because my heart just felt like it was quivering in my chest and not pumping. Very frightening. Needless to say, it was a trip by ambulance to the hospital and I stayed one night for observation. I also have very mild floppy valves which may or may not be a contributing factor. Anyone else on this particular med? Answered by Zita Wildeisen 1 year ago.

it blocks some adrenal chemicals in the heart, lowers puls Answered by Annamarie Fears 1 year ago.

well, it actually is like being in a car accident and you feel like your going to live, but until you get in the hospital, then you know your going to be alright. Answered by Elmer Gosse 1 year ago.

does it help with blood flow Answered by Roscoe Willms 1 year ago.


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