Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019270/001.

Names and composition

"BETOPTIC" is the commercial name of a drug composed of BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019270/001 BETOPTIC BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019270/001 BETOPTIC BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
019507/001 KERLONE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
019507/002 KERLONE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
019845/001 BETOPTIC S BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
075386/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
075446/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
075541/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075541/002 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075630/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
078694/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
078962/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078962/002 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG

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Answered questions

Whats the difference between selective and non selective beta blockers for glaucoma treatment?
I've been researching glaucoma medications, and I don't understand the diff. between selective and non selective beta blockers for glaucoma treatment. Also, there are some glaucoma medications which drain the aqueous humor out of another part of the eye; does anyone know what part that is? Asked by Matha Yadon 1 year ago.

first of all ,selective means b1 receptors in glaucoma ,like betoptic ,non selective mean both b1 and b 2 receptors ,the difference is non selective like timolol cannot be given to asthmatic and heart patients ,while selctive can be and are more selective for receptors within the eye,regarding draining ,u mean trablecular meshwork and schlemms canal Answered by Cordell Pozzobon 1 year ago.


Yikes the dog chewed it up?
just wanted to let you all know the dogs are going to be fine thanks for the help and someof you were right sons meds now in plastic box with lid hard lesson to learn but it appears i can be tought lol Asked by Louvenia Strahin 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacist if you can't get your vet...they can tell you if it's harmful...if still no help call animal poison control...check the link...good luck! Answered by Kera Kohl 1 year ago.

Call the vet ASAP. Is there a warning about injestion on the instructions? If there isn't, you'll probably be OK. If there is, keep a close eye on the dogs and get to the vet quick. Answered by Delois Vogelsberg 1 year ago.

call the vet asap. the dogs could have a different reaction to your sons medications. take both of them,and watch them until you can take them in. bring in the bottle or the case it came in to assure what type of medication and the ingredients. always be safe than sorry. to make sure this doesnt happen again i suggest you re-organize your bathroom and put medications in a higher spot. Answered by Regina Bugge 1 year ago.

You can always call the ASPCA poison control number. They may charge you for the call, however, they would definitely know if anything could potentially hurt the dogs. (888) 426-4435 Good Luck. Answered by Rudy Feather 1 year ago.

they might have a emergency number on the recording at the vet office,if not try a poison center. but i would be waiting at the vets door when they open. good luck Answered by Cristal Galen 1 year ago.

Since Animals have only our human voices to get help when in trouble, it is hard for me to understand that, like, in you're case, all it takes, of making a call to a Vet, to make sure that all is OK. THAT DOESN'T COST A DIME! Answered by Kisha Bertot 1 year ago.

I thought you where going to tell me your dog ate your sons homework i was about to giggle.... Im sure your dog will be oky just give him lots of water to drink or put your finger down his throut so he will throw it up like you do when your chocking on something. Answered by Alphonse Eichert 1 year ago.

Call the poisons hotline. Answered by Fernando Tsuzuki 1 year ago.

you really need to run this by your vet and soon and learn from this. Answered by Jane Rousselle 1 year ago.


My friend's son has Axenfeld-Reigers Anomaly.We are having a difficult time finding information..?
We are just mainly finding links to other people who are trying to find answer's too. If we do find something, it's very minimal information. If someone knows a good site for this specific anomaly please pass it on.....thank you Asked by Mafalda Mescher 1 year ago.

Signs and Symptoms Patients displaying Axenfeld-Rieger (A-R) syndrome are generally asymptomatic. The condition is diagnosed based upon findings from routine biomicroscopic and gonioscopic evaluation. Historically, this condition was incorporated under the broader heading of anterior chamber cleavage syndromes, and included Axenfeld’s anomaly, Axenfeld’s syndrome, Rieger’s anomaly, and Rieger’s syndrome. Current theory now holds that these conditions are probably a continuum of a single developmental disorder, hence the name Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. This anterior segment disorder always presents with posterior embryotoxon (a prominent, anteriorly displaced Schwalbe’s line) and one or more of the following findings: iris strands adherent to Schwalbe’s line, iris hypoplasia, focal iris atrophy with hole formation, corectopia, and ectropion uveae. Glaucoma may develop in approximately 50 percent of patients with A-R syndrome, but is more common in those with central iris changes and pronounced anterior iris insertion. Non-ocular manifestations of A-R syndrome may include developmental defects of the teeth and facial bones, pituitary anomalies, cardiac disease, oculocutaneous albinism, and redundant periumbilical skin. A-R syndrome is always bilateral but may be markedly asymmetric. The condition appears to be hereditary, displaying an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with variable expression. Pathogenesis There has been much speculation as to the embryonic pathogenesis of A-R syndrome. The current and most widely held theory suggests a developmental arrest of specific anterior segment tissues derived from neural crest cells, which apparently occurs late in gestation. It is not understood why such a developmental arrest occurs, but the result is the retention of a primordial endothelial cell layer on portions of the iris and angle structures. Contraction of these endothelial "membranes" leads to the associated abnormalities in form and function of the anterior segment structures. Presumably, this same developmental arrest can affect other organ systems, resulting in orofacial and other anomalies sometimes encountered in A-R syndrome. Management A-R syndrome, a congenital disorder, generally requires little therapeutic intervention. In those instances where iris atrophy results in pseudopolycoria, patients may be fitted with opaque, cosmetic contact lenses to improve their appearance and decrease optical aberrations. The greatest concern in patients with A-R syndrome is the development of secondary glaucoma. In most cases, those who develop glaucoma do so in childhood or early adulthood. Still, patients must be monitored throughout life for elevations in intraocular pressure and optic nerve head changes. Glaucoma therapy for patients with A-R syndrome follows the same therapeutic algorithm as for primary open angle glaucoma, however miotics are reported to be less effective in this condition. Typical therapy begins with topical -blockers (e.g., Betoptic-S) or topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (e.g., Azopt). Unfortunately, many of these glaucoma cases become recalcitrant, and surgical intervention is often necessary. Clinical Pearls Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is described as a rare, congenital ocular disorder. Still, these authors have encountered many patients with manifestations of A-R syndrome, some of which are exceedingly subtle. In general, A-R syndrome is more academically interesting than it is clinically challenging. Glaucoma must be a concern in every patient presenting with this disorder. In fact, when glaucoma does occur, it can be quite severe. In addition, patients with A-R syndrome should undergo both a comprehensive medical and dental evaluation to rule out non-ocular manifestations. Because of the known inheritance pattern and variable expression, recommend ocular evaluation for all family members when you detect A-R syndrome. Other reports in this section Primary Open Angle Glaucoma Uveitic Glaucoma & Glaucomatocyclitic Crisis Pigment Dispersion Syndrome & Pigmentary Glaucoma Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma Anterior Uveitis Hyphema Angle Recession Glaucoma Lens Induced Glaucoma Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome and Pseudoexfoliative Glaucoma Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome Neovascular Glaucoma Pars Planitis Choroidal Rupture Answered by Agustina Harbuck 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Lavera Todora 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by Claire Hasenfuss 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Hildegarde Crounse 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Luann Heiken 1 year ago.


What does a beta blocker do?
Asked by Treva Axman 1 year ago.

By blocking the action of the involuntary nervous system on the heart, beta blockers relieve stress on the heart. They slow the heart beat, lessen the force with which the heart muscle contracts and reduce blood vessel contraction in the heart, brain, and throughout the body. Beta blockers can serve to treat abnormal heart rhythms (cardiac arrhythmias). They are used specifically to prevent abnormally fast heart rates (tachycardias) or irregular heart rhythms such as premature ventricular Since beta blockers reduce the demand of the heart muscle for oxygen and the chest pain of angina pectoris occurs when the oxygen demand of the heart exceeds the supply, beta blockers can be useful in treating angina. They have also become an important drug in improving survival after a person has had a heart attack. Thanks to their effect on blood vessels, beta blockers can lower the blood pressure and be of value in the treatment of hypertension. Other uses for beta blockers include the prevention of migraine headaches and stage fright (social phobia), and the treatment of certain types of tremors (familial or hereditary essential tremors). The beta blockers (with brand names) include acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), metoprolol (Lopressor, Lopressor LA, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard) and timolol (Blocadren). Beta blockers are also available in combination with a diuretic as, for example, with bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac). Beta blockers reduce the pressure within the eye (the intraocular pressure), probably by reducing the production of the liquid (aqueous humor) within the eye, and so are used to lessen the risk of damage to the optic nerve and loss of vision in glaucoma. Beta blocker preparations for this purpose include timolol ophthalmic solution (Timoptic) and betaxolol hydrochloride (Betoptic, Betoptic. Answered by Cherryl Vanhook 1 year ago.

What Does Beta Blocker Do Answered by Kareem Dupriest 1 year ago.

Beta-blockers "block" the effects of adrenaline on your body's beta receptors. This slows the nerve impulses that travel through the heart. As a result, your heart does not have to work as hard because it needs less blood and oxygen. Beta-blockers also block the impulses that can cause an arrhythmia. Answered by Rickie Oxman 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What does a beta blocker do? Answered by Andreas Emigholz 1 year ago.

I have been on Sotalol going on 4 weeks now and it has helped a lot. I have had a few bumps and thumps here and there, but nothing like I had 4 weeks ago and almost passed out because my heart just felt like it was quivering in my chest and not pumping. Very frightening. Needless to say, it was a trip by ambulance to the hospital and I stayed one night for observation. I also have very mild floppy valves which may or may not be a contributing factor. Anyone else on this particular med? Answered by Wanda Evoy 1 year ago.

it blocks some adrenal chemicals in the heart, lowers puls Answered by Heide Tavorn 1 year ago.

well, it actually is like being in a car accident and you feel like your going to live, but until you get in the hospital, then you know your going to be alright. Answered by Nina Beaupre 1 year ago.

does it help with blood flow Answered by Cornelia Jundt 1 year ago.


How do beta blockers reduce the heart rate?
Asked by Kimberli Dice 1 year ago.

Beta blockers are medicines that affect the body's response to certain nerve impulses. This, in turn, decreases the force and rate of the heart's contractions, which lowers blood pressure and reduces the heart's demand for oxygen. The main use of beta blockers is to treat high blood pressure. Some also are used to relieve the type of chest pain called angina or to prevent heart attacks in people who already have had one heart attack. These drugs may also be prescribed for other conditions, such as migraine, tremors, and irregular heartbeat. In eye drop form, they are used to treat certain kinds of glaucoma. Beta blockers, also known as beta-adrenergic blockers, are available only with a physician's prescription. The come in capsule, tablet, liquid, and injectable forms. Some common beta blockers are atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal), and timolol (Blocadren). Timolol and certain other beta blockers are also sold in eye drop form for treating glaucoma. Eye drops that contain beta blockers include betaxolol (Betoptic), cartelol (Ocupress), and timolol (Timoptic).- Answered by Zelma Mcguinnes 1 year ago.

Beta blockade is where the drug (inderal is just one of the family, there are many) competitively interferes with the binding of adrenaline to the receptors for it. When the beta blocker is taking up the slot, the adrenaline has nowhere to bind, so it doesn't induce the fight-or-flight response. Thus, things that would normally increase the heart rate - exercise, stress, etc. don't anymore. Also, the blood pressure response is blunted as well. Answered by Carlene Rhyme 1 year ago.


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