BETAPACE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019865/001.

Names and composition

"BETAPACE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019865/001 BETAPACE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
019865/002 BETAPACE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
019865/003 BETAPACE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
019865/004 BETAPACE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 320MG
019865/005 BETAPACE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
075500/003 SORINE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
075500/004 SORINE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
205108/001 SOTYLIZE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per ML (5MG per ML)
075500/002 SORINE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
075500/001 SORINE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
019865/001 BETAPACE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
021151/001 BETAPACE AF SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
019865/002 BETAPACE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
021151/002 BETAPACE AF SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
019865/003 BETAPACE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
021151/003 BETAPACE AF SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
019865/004 BETAPACE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 320MG
021151/005 BETAPACE AF SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
019865/005 BETAPACE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
021151/006 BETAPACE AF SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
021151/007 BETAPACE AF SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
022306/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 150MG per 10ML (15MG per ML)
075237/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
075237/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
075237/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
075237/004 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
075238/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
075238/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
075238/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
075238/004 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
075366/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
075366/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
075366/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
075366/004 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
075429/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
075429/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
075429/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
075429/004 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
075515/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
075515/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
075515/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
075515/004 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
075563/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
075563/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
075563/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
075563/004 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
075663/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
075663/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
075663/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
075663/004 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
075725/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
075725/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
075725/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
075725/004 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
076140/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
076140/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
076140/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
076140/004 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 240MG
076214/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
076214/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
076214/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
076576/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
076576/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
076576/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
076883/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
076883/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
076883/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
077070/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
077070/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
077070/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
077616/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
077616/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
077616/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
207428/001 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
207428/002 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
207428/003 SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOTALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

I am taking betapace and my legs seem to "tighten up" when I walk and I get short of breath is the medication
this does not happen all of the time. but I can't do a lot of things that I have done in the past (mowing the lawn) Asked by Ross Saglimbeni 1 month ago.

Betapace is sotalol, an antiarrhythmic agent with beta adrenoreceptor blocking effect as well as a Class III antiarrhythmic effect. Shortness of breath could be very well due to your underlying cardiac problem. Tightening of legs as you walk could be due to a mildly diminished blood supply to your legs. Rarely a beta blocker can contribute to these, when there is an underlying disease causing it. Please get evaluated by your doctor. Answered by Carlee Vanfleet 1 month ago.


My husband has just been diagnosed with a-fib & high heart beat & taking betapace,zorcor,digoxin,coumad...
what are more natural alternatives to all these meds? Asked by Winfred Buysse 1 month ago.

Your husband's heart arrhythmia cannot be treated with so-called "naturals". Coumadin is a blood thinner that blocks the clotting mechanisms to prevent a thrombus (clot) from forming in the upper chamber of his heart and potentially causing a stroke. DO NOT believe anyone or anything you read which recommends an alternative to coumadin (generic is warfarin) as there is none. Zocor is a statin. There is a "natural" statin known as red yeast rice. However, this is the same as lovastatin except it is not processed. Red yeast rice, the "natural" alternative has been associated with kidney failure from the extra natural junk not filtered away. This is where the original statins were produced from. Digoxin is actually a natural substance, taken directly from a plant in the southwest USA and in some brands chemically reproduced. If he is on digoxin that means his heart rate is always in the atrial arrhythmia. Betapace (Sotalol) is an antiarrhythmic. I am not quite clear why he would be on both an antiarrhythmic and digoxin to be honest, so i advise you speak further with your cardiologist to clarify if the digoxin is needed. However, if he has heart failure as well, then he may be on digoxin for that, but i would then be suspect of continuing the sotalol. Finally, when it comes to your heart - you are much more likely to cause serious life-threatening complications in the quest of homeopathic alternatives. Arthritis, GI symptoms, headaches, skin disorders - fine. But your heart, I'd advise you to follow your physician's guidance. Answered by Vickey Bremme 1 month ago.

The natural alternative is death. Sean has explained the details of the drugs. Your husband does need them. Answered by Cinthia Guinan 1 month ago.


My mom takes a certain medicine called betapace…..?
My mom takes a certain medicine called betapace…..i read on http://www.drugdelivery.ca/s3346-s-BETAPACE.aspx that this medicine is taken when one has irregular heart beat problem. Is it possible that my mom has this disease? Asked by Beckie Kaya 1 month ago.

if she is taking this medication then she has the disease!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Answered by Candie Klink 1 month ago.

Arrythmias (irregular heart beats) is a symptom of something, not a disease. It can be caused by anything. Yes, Betapace is used to treat it. Speak with her, it can be something that's easily managed with meds but she must go to her doctor at least every 6 months, for check-ups, EKG's, and annual Echocardiograms. Answered by Stefanie Sieve 1 month ago.

Not necessarily, lots of people have irregular heart beats and are placed on beta-blockers. Its actually quite common. Answered by Tracey Guffanti 1 month ago.

its a beta blocker, that family of drugs is used to treat tons of conditions most commonly blood pressure but also including palpitations, fast irregular rhythms, migraines, anxiety, etc. so yes she might have an irregular rhythm. Answered by Celsa Yoshioka 1 month ago.


How do I become familiar with this medication list?
Like a week before school my prof. emailed me this medication list to be familiar with and write up....Is there an easier way to look up all these meds and not have to write them out? She wants me to do a drug sheet for each...Medications ListTypeMedicationAnalgesic/ UrinaryPhenazopyridine... Asked by Melonie Lamoureaux 1 month ago.

Like a week before school my prof. emailed me this medication list to be familiar with and write up....Is there an easier way to look up all these meds and not have to write them out? She wants me to do a drug sheet for each... Medications List TypeMedication Analgesic/ UrinaryPhenazopyridine (Pyridium) Ditropan Detrol AntibioticAmikain Amoxicillin Amoxicillin/ Clavulanic Acid Amhotericin B Ampicillin Ampicillin/ Sulbactam (Unasym) Azthromycin Bactracin Cefazolin Cefazolin 1/ Metronidazole Ceftazidime Cefuroxime Ciprofloxacin Clindamycin Clotrimazole Trouche Demeclocycline Dicloxacillin Doxycycline Erythromycin Fluconazole Gentamicin AntibioticIsoniazid (INH) Ketoconazole Levofloxacin Linezolid (Zyvox) Metronidazole (Flagyl) Miconazole Neomycin Sulfate (Bacitracin) Nystatin Oxacillin Penicillin G Benz/ Procaine Penicillin G Benzathine Penicillin G Potassium Penicillin G Procaine Penicillin V Potassium Piperacillin Piperacillin/ Tazobactam (Zosyn) Polymyxin B Sulfate (Neosporin) Pyrazinamide Rifampin Tetracycline Tobramycin Tygacil Unasym Vancomycin AnticoagulantEnoxaparin Heparin Warfarin Vitamin K Antiemetic-5- HT3- AntagonistCompazine, Zofran Class II Controlled SubstanceHaldol Codiene Fentanyl Hydromorphone Meperidine HCL (Demerol) Methadone HCL Methylphenidate HCL (Ritalin) Morphine Oxycodone Oxycodone 5 mg/APAP 325 mg Class III-V Controlled SubstanceAcetaminophen/ Codeine 120/12 Acetaminophen/ Codeine 300/30 Alprazolam Clonazepam Codeine/ Calcium Iodide Diazepam Diphenoxylate 2.5 mg/ Atrophine (Lomotil) Guifenesine/ Codeine 200/20 Hydrocodone 5mg/ APAP 500mg Lorazepam Midazolam Class III-V Controlled SubstancePhenobarbital Propoxyphene (Darvon) Temazepam (Restoril) Zolpidem CorticosteroidsBetamethasone Cortisone Acetate Dexamethasone Hydrocortisone Methylprednisolone Predinisolone Prednisone Flu Prophylaxis& Pneumonia vaccine IV Nutritional AgentsTPN/PPN LaxativesColace Senikot S Lactulose Citrate of Magnesia M.O.M. Lasix& Bumex Spironolactone (Aldactone) Quinapril (Accupril) Metoprolol XL (Toprol) Diltiazem CD (Tazar) Digixon (Lanoxin) Atenolol (Tenormin) Amiodarone (Cordorone)Coreg Nadolol (Corgard) Betapace (Altace) Respiratory MedsXopenex Albuterol Atrovent Beclomethasone Budisonide (Pulmicort) Mucomyst Olanzcypine (Zyprexa) Fluctretine (Prozac)& Zoloft, Buspar Alprazolan (Xanax)& Wellbutrin Lecothyroxine (Synthroid) Ferrous Sulfate Calcium Carbonate Aldentronate Updates were made by staff and I didn’t have time to check for doubles. Please add the following: Pancreas? Kayexalate Megace Phoslo Iron (Feosol) MVI (multivitamin) Actos Namenda Metformin Insulin all types Sinemet Narcan Romazicone Nulytely Librium Answered by Dagmar Gowers 1 month ago.

That's a hell of a list. Honestly the only way you're going to get them memorized is either to give them regularly (if you're a nurse) or to write them all down. Write down what they are for, dosages, side effects, etc. Literally doing it helps you get them down. You already have many of them separated by their effects which is good and is a starting point. Answered by Elsy Leitao 1 month ago.

OMG this is a dream come true for me! I used to be a CPht and I miss it. I don't know if *you* have ever worked in a pharmacy but they keep a giant brown book that includes the information on every single drug known to man. It's the stuff you'd find in the folded pamphlet that accompanies drugs inside the bottles. I worked for Walgreens, but it's been a couple of years. I'm not sure if they still keep it around, call the Pharmacist on duty and ask about it. See if it's available anywhere else, like a medical library you might have access to? Answered by Danyell Lamarsh 1 month ago.

Yes, it can turn into a mental ilness. Don't listen to the other two people who responded. An overactive imagination about success and wealth and other things of that nature can lead to frustration and possibly into a serious mental condition. You need to focus on reasonable and real things, and It doesn't help you are on anti-depressants. Answered by Lolita Moradian 1 month ago.


What is an anterior infarct?
is this treated with medication, it scares me. Asked by Rosemarie Shinners 1 month ago.

I am a 51 year old female, with a history of heart problems that runs in the family. My parents passed in 2008. And i have a brother 65 and another brother that is 62. Now i was sent for a routine ekg from the family doctor, which came back abnormal, possible anterior infarct. I have atril fibulation, which my late mother had. Have read that an infarct is death of tissue, where once oxygen riched blood can flow freely. Possible that i had a silent heart attack, . I am on blood thinners Coumidin , and have been since 2007. My doctor changed my beta blocker from betapace to lopressor which i will start tomorrow. Now coming up this week , is a nuclear stress test ,and an echo test. Any one have any feedback on this. Also i have been waiting on a test, from the breathing dept of our hospital. Its hard to take a breath in and i am not getting enough air ,out due to neuropathy. Of which i have in my legs. from a trauma to my broken ankle from 25 yrs ago. My cardiac doc agreed that this can happened, nothing has been confirmed on the breathing test, but i take 3 vaporizer treatments daily. Does all this spell blockage, or cardiac cath, or that the fact that i am scared to death. I am about 290 pounds and have chol, issues. the stress part of this study is bugging me cause i do not know what to expect and it only lasts about a half and hour. information from youtube. I will be having these test next monday and tuesday after the superbowl. Please help, i am scared. is this ever just treated with medication. Answered by Verona Jawad 1 month ago.

if this is true and my doctor has said this was a silent heart attack, the word possible was used what is the next course of treatment, i am coumadin, and the lopressor is working great. Does this spell out a cardiac cath, or bypass surgery, no one here wants to tell me. The tech at the doctors office said after the echo that what he could see looked good. Answered by Fredric Mcclement 1 month ago.

Anterior Infarct Ecg Answered by Claudie Onell 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what is an anterior infarct? I am a 51 year old female, with a history of heart problems that runs in the family. My parents passed in 2008. And i have a brother 65 and another brother that is 62. Now i was sent for a routine ekg from the family doctor, which came back abnormal, possible anterior infarct. I have atril... Answered by Julieta Dumes 1 month ago.

I am a heart surgeon. The left anterior descending artery is the artery which feeds the anterior wall. The LAD is also the most common artery to be diseased. The diagonal branches arise from the LAD and together they deliver blood to the anterior wall. Answered by Myles Glancy 1 month ago.

Healthy eating is especially important to ensure that you get essential vitamins and minerals. Emphasize low-fat meats and dairy products and include lots of fruits, vegetables and whole grains in your diet. Answered by My Loia 1 month ago.


Is a heartbeat of 43 beats per min too slow?
and not athlete thanks Asked by Damion Underdue 1 month ago.

Yes it is too slow. Normal Heart Beat for adult ranges from 60-100 beats per min. It is called bradycardia. Bradycardia is an abnormally slow heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. A normal heartbeat is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. Here's what happens during a normal heartbeat: The electrical signal that starts a heartbeat comes from the heart's sinus node, the natural pacemaker located in the upper portion of the right atrium. From the sinus node, the heartbeat signal travels to the atrioventricular (A-V) node, located between the atria, and then through the bundle of His (pronounced "hiss") — a series of modified heart-muscle fibers located between the ventricles to the muscles of the ventricles. This triggers a contraction of the ventricles and produces a heartbeat. Bradycardia, even as low as 50 beats per minute, can be normal in athletes and other people who are physically active. In these people, regular exercise improves the heart's ability to pump blood efficiently, so fewer heart contractions are required to supply the body's needs. In other cases, bradycardia can be a form of cardiac arrhythmia, a heart-rate abnormality. Cardiac arrhythmia can be caused by a problem in the sinus node, or it can be related to some disturbance in the passage of heartbeat signals through the A-V node and bundle of His. Also, bradycardia sometimes is a side effect of certain medications, including propranolol (Inderal), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Toprol-XL), sotalol (Betapace), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) and diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor-XR). Bradycardia also occurs in some people who have certain medical illnesses not related to the heart, such as: Abnormally low level of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism) Severe liver disease An abnormally low body temperature (hypothermia) Typhoid fever Brucellosis, an infectious disease marked by fever, sweating and weakness that is transmitted to humans by direct contact with diseased animals or through ingestion of contaminated meat, milk or cheese Symptoms Bradycardia can cause dizziness, weakness, lack of energy, or fainting spells. If bradycardia is caused by a medical illness, there will be additional symptoms that are specific to that illness. For example, people whose bradycardia is due to severe hypothyroidism also can have constipation, muscle cramps, weight gain (often despite poor appetite), very dry skin, hair that is thin and dry, an abnormal sensitivity to cold temperatures and other symptoms related to low levels of thyroid hormones. Diagnosis Your doctor will ask about your family history of heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias and fainting spells. He or she also will review your current symptoms and your personal medical history, including your use of medications that may cause bradycardia. During the physical examination, your doctor will check your heart rate and rhythm, and your pulse. You may be asked to do some sit-ups or other exercise so that your doctor can see if your heart rate rises normally when your heart is asked to do more work. Your doctor also will check for physical signs of thyroid abnormalities, including an enlarged thyroid gland, very dry skin, and hair that is thin and dry. To further evaluate your bradycardia, your doctor will order an electrocardiogram (EKG). However, because some forms of bradycardia come and go, a one-time office EKG may be normal. If this is the case, a test called ambulatory electrocardiography may be done. During this test, the patient wears a portable EKG machine called a Holter monitor, usually for 24 hours. If your symptoms are infrequent, you may wear a monitor for longer. You will be taught to press a button to record your EKG reading when your symptoms occur. Depending on the results of your physical examination, other tests may be necessary to check for medical illnesses that produce bradycardia. For example, if you have symptoms and physical signs of hypothyroidism, your doctor may order blood tests to measure levels of thyroid hormones and TSH, a pituitary gland hormone that stimulates the thyroid. Your doctor also may order blood tests for cholesterol and certain liver enzymes, which often are elevated in people with hypothyroidism. Expected Duration How long bradycardia lasts depends on its cause. For example, normal bradycardia in a well-trained athlete will last as long as the athlete maintains his or her usual level of exercise. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, it usually will go away as soon as the drug that triggered the bradycardia is used by the body or excreted in the urine. Bradycardia caused by hypothyroidism will go away quickly after treatment with thyroid hormones. Certain forms of bradycardia resulting from cardiac arrhythmias can be cured with a permanent pacemaker. Prevention There are no general guidelines to prevent all forms of bradycardia. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, the problem can be prevented by either switching the drug or reducing its dose. Treatment In most cases, bradycardia in healthy, well-trained athletes does not need to be treated. In fact, in most people, bradycardia does not require treatment unless patients have symptoms that are clearly due to a slow heartbeat. The following are conditions that produce bradycardia that requires treatment: Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from sinus-node dysfunction — In people with frequent, severe symptoms of sinus-node dysfunction, the main treatment is usually a permanent pacemaker, an implanted device that generates electrical impulses to regulate the heartbeat. Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from A-V node problems — In people with A-V node problems, the passage of heartbeat signals may be blocked to different degrees. Some patients with less severe degrees of A-V block do not need treatment. Others may simply be monitored with frequent EKGs, especially if they don't have any symptoms and have a heart rate that is adequate for their daily activities. People with the most severe form of A-V block (called third-degree A-V block) can be treated with a special dual-chambered permanent pacemaker, a pacemaker with one electrode in the atrium and one in the ventricle. Hypothyroidism — Hypothyroidism is treated with replacement doses of thyroid hormones. Synthetic forms of these hormones are available — llevothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid and others), liothyronine (Cytomel, Triostat) or liotrix (Thyrolar) — as well as thyroid extract. When To Call A Professional Call your doctor if your pulse is less than 60 beats per minute. This is especially important if you have had dizziness, weakness, lack of energy or fainting spells. Prognosis In well-trained athletes with normal bradycardia, the slow heartbeat is often a sign of overall good health. In other people with bradycardia, the outlook depends on the underlying disorder. For example, the prognosis is usually good in people with hypothyroidism, since treatment with thyroid hormones can relieve bradycardia and other symptoms related to low hormone levels. In some elderly patients, hormone dosages may need to be increased very slowly over several weeks to prevent straining the heart. At one time, the prognosis for people with third-degree A-V block was poor, with 50% of patients dying within one year of diagnosis. Now, however, the availability of permanent pacemakers has improved the prognosis for many people with cardiac arrhythmias. Answered by Elane Argrave 1 month ago.

That is a pretty slow heartbeat, but evidently you are still conscious. If you were passing out frequently then of course you would be very concerned. How long has it been since you have seen a doctor? You should see one if you see black when you rise suddenly from a chair. I would exercise, like run up the stairs and down again and take the pulse again. It should then be more than 43 beats per minute. Like maybe 80 or 100. Is it just 43 first thing in the morning before you get out of bed? You might want to take it during the middle of the day or when you are moderately active. Answered by Shira Miyake 1 month ago.

Yes, definitley. Only well trained athletes have low hear rates, and I'm not sure if that low is even normal for them. You should be experienciing some fatigue with walking, or strenuous excerise. If you are taking meds, then something needs to be adjusted. It's important to have your doctor give you a thorough exam.asap! You can also experience dizziness, so don't delay getting a doctor's appt. Take Care! Answered by Tiffiny Feger 1 month ago.

Very, very few healthy, normal people will have a resting HR in the 40's (usually in a deep sleep). I work in an ICU and all of our patients are monitored so I see I wide range of heart rates but, this definitely falls out of "normal range" (60-100bpm). As previous posters have mentioned the cause could be a medication (this is the most frequent cause that I personally see). If you suspect it is medication related, do not stop your medication suddenly as this could cause severe side effects. Discuss this with your physician. Answered by Roseanne Douce 1 month ago.

yes this is considerably low and should be evaluated quickly. normal heartrate is a healthy adult is 60-80. some people (mostly athletes) run low naturally and some run high (like me-my norm is about 110). if you're currently on medication for blood pressure-this could lower your heartrate. dehydration could lower it as well (it's the body's way of preserving energy and trying to keep itself alive) make sure to have this checked out asap (24-48 hours max). it could be an indication of a serious problem. Answered by Anisa Matzinger 1 month ago.

No, the more in shape you are, the slower your resting heart rate will be. There are some athletes that have resting heart rates as slow as 16 Beats per minute. Answered by Elease Rigg 1 month ago.

It depends! when you are resting for example sleeping a heart beat rate of 43per minute might not be too slow. but if it is while you are active it might be seen as low. the average is about 70per minute. Answered by Vanda Derring 1 month ago.


My mom has a pacemaker why would she still need to take 80 mg of beta pace 3 times a day?
she had pacemaker put in early december but still takes 80 mg beta pace 3 times a day, on top of other meds all she wants to do is sleep. Asked by Sacha Izatt 1 month ago.

The pacemaker keeps her heart rate from going too low. The betapace is to keep her heart in a normal rhythm. If she's having fatigue, let her family doc AND cardiologist know. Answered by Shanae Morrales 1 month ago.


Management of chronic PVC's in healthy 50 yo WF?
I'm a retired physician and my anxious wife is beset by chronic recurrent PVCs for 5 years but worsening. Despite intermittent periods where her beta blocker Toprol has seemed effective, there is a clear progression of symptomatology wherein she experiences palpatation and sense of impending syncope. She... Asked by Ali Filpo 1 month ago.

I'm a retired physician and my anxious wife is beset by chronic recurrent PVCs for 5 years but worsening. Despite intermittent periods where her beta blocker Toprol has seemed effective, there is a clear progression of symptomatology wherein she experiences palpatation and sense of impending syncope. She throws up to 6 a minute on a bad day with a few bigeminals but no coupling. Holter studies, CXR, 'lytes and T4/TSH have added little. She is on Xanax. My friend in cardiology saw her a year back and did a thorough evaluation, but offered only reassurance. She accepts reassurance from all sources philosophically: she now wants relief from the symptom, which is far from trivial in this slender normotensive smoker. She's eliminated caffeine from her diet and tried H2 blockers at my urging. I doubt she's been checked for hypomagnesemia ... is this a plausible avenue to pursue? What about anti-arrhythmics like Betapace or Multaq? Thanks! Answered by Fairy Pineau 1 month ago.

sir, i think your wife needs another cardiology evaluation, they can find out the focii and advice your wife with latest treatments(i mean like cardiac ablation) thank you sir Answered by Eufemia Marante 1 month ago.

Is she a candidate for ablation? Maybe that can put a stop to them if she wants relief. Answered by Thaddeus Krienke 1 month ago.


Avelox and magnesium,aluminum?
im taking avelox antibiotic for my thorat bacterial infection....i brought guava juice today but i think it contains magnesium or aluminum....how long after taking avelox can i drink the guava juice???? Asked by Michaela Milo 1 month ago.

It's difficult question, but i am trying to answer... Should avoid while taking Avelox: Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Avelox may make your skin more sensitive to sunburn. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen if you must be out in the sun while using Avelox. Call your doctor if you have severe burning, redness, itching, rash, or swelling after being in the sun. Avelox can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. If this happens, avoid driving or doing anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Important information about Avelox: Take this medication for as many days as it has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated. Avelox will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu. Do not use Avelox without first talking to your doctor if you or any member of your family have a heart condition known as long QT syndrome. Also, do not use Avelox if you are also using a heart rhythm medicine such as quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), sotalol (Betapace), and others. Certain other drugs can make Avelox less effective when taken at the same time. The following medicines should be taken at least 4 hours after or 8 hours before you take Avelox: antacids that contain magnesium, calcium, or aluminum (such as Tums, Rolaids, Maalox); the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate); vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc; didanosine chewable/buffered tablets or pediatric powder for oral solution (ddI, Videx, Videx Pediatric, and others). Avelox may make your skin more sensitive to sunburn. Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight or tanning beds, and wear protective clothing and sunscreen when you are outdoors. Call your doctor if you have severe burning, redness, itching, rash, or swelling after being in the sun. Answered by Lenny Gjorven 1 month ago.


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