Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018642/001.

Names and composition

"BETA-VAL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of BETAMETHASONE VALERATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018642/001 BETA-VAL BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070069/001 BETA-VAL BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070072/001 BETA-VAL BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016322/001 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
016322/002 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.01% BASE
016740/001 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
016932/001 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018642/001 BETA-VAL BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018839/001 BETADERM BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018860/002 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018861/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018862/001 BETATREX BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018863/001 BETATREX BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018864/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018865/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018866/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018867/001 BETATREX BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018870/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
020934/001 LUXIQ BETAMETHASONE VALERATE AEROSOL, FOAM/TOPICAL 0.12%
070050/001 VALNAC BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070051/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070052/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070053/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070062/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070069/001 BETA-VAL BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070072/001 BETA-VAL BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070484/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070485/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070486/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
071478/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
071883/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
072041/001 DERMABET BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
078337/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE AEROSOL, FOAM/TOPICAL 0.12%
207144/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE AEROSOL, FOAM/TOPICAL 0.12%
208204/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE AEROSOL, FOAM/TOPICAL 0.12%

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

What will naturally help my scalp eczema?
i have beta-val that my doctor gave me a while back, and even through a whole bottle, it doesn't really seem to work anymore...weird. i was wondering if anyone has this condition, what they are doing to help it not be so noticeable.my eczema is really bad when not medicated, i scratch and pick until my hair... Asked by Fritz Harcum 1 year ago.

i have beta-val that my doctor gave me a while back, and even through a whole bottle, it doesn't really seem to work anymore...weird. i was wondering if anyone has this condition, what they are doing to help it not be so noticeable. my eczema is really bad when not medicated, i scratch and pick until my hair is extremely oily and my scalp hurts. i feel so ugly with this and i know it isn't treatable and will never go away, but i know medicine can work, just which ones? Answered by Merideth Blust 1 year ago.

Beside using Beta-val (a topical steroid), you can try the following for your scalp eczema: 1. Use a medicated shampoo which contains Zinc, Salicylic acid, Sulfur, Coal tar. Leave the shampoo on hair after gentle massage for 3-5 minutes before rinsing off thoroughly. 2. Use lukewarm water (not hot water) when shower 3. Take a balanced diet with lots of fruits and green vegetables Answered by Ehtel Mcgavisk 1 year ago.

Ringworm is a fungus that grows, usually, in a circular pattern. Did you have any hair loss on your head before you shaved it? If not, it most likely isn't ringworm. If it were ringworm, you would most likely treat it with an anti-fungal cream, which you can get over the counter (athlete's foot cream can work). However the best thing is to go to the doctor and get an oral anti-fungal. Ringworm can spread all over your entire body, and can become very painful. You can get ringworm from contact with the fungus, usually it is from stray cats or outdoor cats, or children who play in sandboxes or dig in dirt. It doesn't sound like this is your problem, however, because ringworm doesn't usually flake. It does, however, sound like sebboriac dermatitus. (That may be spelled wrong.) It could also be Psoriasis. These are both conditions that need to be treated with special medicated shampoos that are only available through your doctor. Over the counter medications do not help, despite the label claims. I recommend seeing a doctor or a dermatologist to get a definative diagnosis. Google search can help you find images of the above conditions to help you determine for yourself what your condition may be. Good luck! Answered by Claretta Lamphiear 1 year ago.

Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments for eczema from the Internet – some of them do work. For my eczema I use herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they stay clear for months on end. Try it: champori comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free. Mol Answered by Maryellen Feierman 1 year ago.


Do you think my eczema will go away?
its very mild on my palms and i started using beta-val and i dont know if it will go away Asked by Markita Baros 1 year ago.

no, but it can be controlled to the point where you would only get minor flare ups every so often. just make sure you are wary of this condition and not to expose your skin to too much harsh elements Answered by Odell Werlinger 1 year ago.

I have had eczema all my life, and sometimes it can be quite bad, and other times i can go 4-6 months without too much problems, but unless they come up with a cure, No you will never get rid of it, you will always have it, heat for me seems to really make it flare up, or certain kinds of soap, i can't use sunlight clothes soap, cause its too harsh, i use dove or a baby soap, when it gets bad, you can control it by cream,,,. Every one is different, and every case is different, some are so servere that some has to wear gloves on their hands, after they put cream. But , like i said it won't ever go away but it can be controlled, especially if like you said , its mild case Good luck Answered by Lauretta Chaffey 1 year ago.

Unfortunately it will never go away. I've had it for a few years and it's been getting worse with time. The best thing to do is find out what causes it. Once you find that out, it's a lot easier not to have flare ups. I can't figure out what causes mine. I've tried everything. Lotions for dry skin make mine worse. And I've tried every detergent for my clothes, yet no results. So hopefully you won't be as unlucky as me and can find something to help you! Answered by Dot Sirk 1 year ago.

Eczema is very tough to deal with. Use only products for sensitive skin - fragrance-free soaps, laundry detergents, and hand lotions. If it doesn't clear up by switching to sensitive skin products, and if it is bothersome to you, see a dermatologist. They have treatments that might help. Answered by Anneliese Boateng 1 year ago.

Try things like calomine. It's good inside and out, like we can drink it in tea and everything. Also, avoid stress. Answered by Ryann Feisthamel 1 year ago.

it won't go away completely . it will just be out of site Answered by Serena Wass 1 year ago.

yes it will go away and then it will return some night when your sleeping Answered by Melania Devan 1 year ago.

God knows best... Hope you get well soon Answered by Velvet Higgens 1 year ago.


Can nail fungus transfer to the eyes?
I have nail fungus - well, might be nail fungus. I have little itchy, contagious spots around my skin, including my elbow, wrist, behind my ears, on my scalp, etc. My doctor told me to treat it with Betamethasome Valerate (beta-val). It treats it. However, i think it is under my nails now, but it might be... Asked by Herb Dols 1 year ago.

I have nail fungus - well, might be nail fungus. I have little itchy, contagious spots around my skin, including my elbow, wrist, behind my ears, on my scalp, etc. My doctor told me to treat it with Betamethasome Valerate (beta-val). It treats it. However, i think it is under my nails now, but it might be straight up nail fungus. My question is - I wear contacts (yes, I wash with warm soapy water before I put in/take out...), could this transfer to my eyes? What could be the consequences? Blindness? Later-down-the-road blindness? Answered by Alfred Sarden 1 year ago.

Well dont get me wrong or anything, but yes and I am not trying to scare you. I have had this before and if and only if you get to the doctor ask him if it is true, and if you do have it, get this medicine (it does not burn, just stings a little) and put it in your eyes every day twice a day and also, it will lead to blind ness of the eyes so make sure you get to the doctor and see if you have it and follow my instuctions. Answered by Lee Monford 1 year ago.

It will get onto your contact. washing your fingers with soapy water could infect your contacts. Wash your fingers, then get some contact solution onto your finger to. this will help a bunch. every time you take out your contacts wash them in solution and all SHOULD (not guaranteed) be well Answered by Claudie Feldmeier 1 year ago.


Dealing with Seborrheic Dermatitis. Please Help?
I'm 18 years old, female. Back in October I got a keratin treatment from a reputable salon. Terrible mistake. About a week later, my hair started falling out. I developed a rash. I finally got to the dermatologist, and he said it was Seborrheic Dermatitis. He prescribed me Beta-Val lotion drops and Ketoconazole... Asked by Corrina Echavarria 1 year ago.

I'm 18 years old, female. Back in October I got a keratin treatment from a reputable salon. Terrible mistake. About a week later, my hair started falling out. I developed a rash. I finally got to the dermatologist, and he said it was Seborrheic Dermatitis. He prescribed me Beta-Val lotion drops and Ketoconazole shampoo. Both seemed to help at first, and the hair loss slowed but never stopped. The only place I have a rash is toward the nape of my neck. I noticed that one side of the scalp would break out, and the other would be fine. Then it would switch. I never got my scalp completely healed. As of lately, my scalp has gotten really bad again! It's both sides now, and it's really irritating. The hair loss has picked up again. Please tell me how I can make this Sebborheic Dermatitis go away! Any experiences would help! Answered by Bambi Sze 1 year ago.

Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments available on the Internet. Some of them do actually work. For my seb. dermatitis on scalp I use psoriasis herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they then stay clear for months on end. Try it: Champori is available online without prescription and comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free. Best, Gus Answered by Ariana Rutheford 1 year ago.

Try alternating between the Ketoconazole and Denorex medicated shampoo (available without prescription). Denorex contains coal tar which is extremely nasty stuff, but if works miracles on seborrheic dermatitis Answered by Jacquie Sparrow 1 year ago.

Heredity, hormones, stress, diet, illness, poor hair care – all are factors in hair loss. Stress, diet and illness are more temporary conditions and usually the hair loss is reversed when the anxiety-producing conditions dissipate, when the diet is improved, when hair care improves and when an illness is cured or gotten under control. Heredity and hormones are different matters, however. Heredity is an irreversible condition. You are a product of your parents, and hair loss is often inherited. Hormones are tricky, hidden things, however, and they have different effects on an individual basis. In a male, testosterone abides abundantly. There are also enzymes working on testosterone which product a substance called DHT. DHT is now known to circulate in the blood and cause other conditions, one of which is the shrinking of hair follicles. When hair follicles shrink enough, they are unable to produce and push a new hair through. As old hair dies, it is then not replaced. In women, hormonal imbalances can also cause hair loss. Pregnancy, childbirth and menopause all cause significant hormonal change and imbalances with both physical and mental effects. These changes can also cause hair loss, both temporary and permanent. Hair loss and re-growth products have been around for centuries. In ancient times, a variety of herbal and oil-based remedies were concocted and used by Egyptians, Aztecs, Mayans, and American Indians, all with some degree of effectiveness for some people. Modern medical research has focused on ways to re-open and stimulate “dead” hair follicles, so that hair growth can re-occur naturally, as well as keep the healthy follicles healthy. Thus, a number of products have become available, both by prescription and over-the-counter. They are advertised on radio and television and all over the Internet. One need only do a “google” search on hair loss, and there are literally thousands of sites and products for investigation. One ingredient in many hair loss products is minoxidil. Research studies have shown that in about 80% of the participants, products containing this ingredient are effective in slowing hair loss and, in some, causing re-growth to occur. Probably the most well known is Rogaine, available at any drug store, in varieties for both men and women. Most scientifically-produced products do have separate products for males and females, because, of course, hormones in each are different and of different levels. An additional product containing minoxidil is Provillus, and, again, studies have shown it to be effective. The difference between Provillus and other similar products is that the makes have added Azelaic Acid, an additional ingredient which appears to enhance the follicle repair in both men and women. Provillus has been the subject of many studies, just as the other products, and level of effectiveness may be higher. Provillus is available for both men and women, and the treatment is a combination of a topical liquid applied to the balding areas, as well as a pill or capsule to be taken in conjunction with the liquid. The critical key to effectiveness, according to its makers, is the addition of the azelaic acid, however, the correct amount of this acid is most important piece of this treatment. As with most hair loss products, the makers recommend patience. It may take from 3-6 months for improvement to occur, however, there is a money-back guarantee up to 180 days if one is not satisfied that it is working for him/her. Medical research is far from finished in its exploration of products which will stop hair loss and promote re-growth of “permanent” loss. As this research continues, existing producers will undoubtedly alter their products accordingly. Fortunately, a lot of money is being poured into the research, so hair loss sufferers, take heart! Answered by Nohemi Marsland 1 year ago.


Calling all eczema victims!?
If you could answer any one of my questions, I'd be forever grateful! I have vaginal eczema in particular and I am trying EVERYTHING I can to make it go away!1. Has anyone tried using Protopic?My first try left me with severe burning and itching for over 2 hours. Is this normal? Did it work for you in the... Asked by Dania Hasenbeck 1 year ago.

If you could answer any one of my questions, I'd be forever grateful! I have vaginal eczema in particular and I am trying EVERYTHING I can to make it go away! 1. Has anyone tried using Protopic? My first try left me with severe burning and itching for over 2 hours. Is this normal? Did it work for you in the long run? Any other experiences with Protopic are helpful. And any knowledge you have about it. 2. Has anyone tried POLYSPORIN? It sounds weird, seeing as it's antibiotic, but where my biopsy was done I had eczema (obviously) and now it is totally gone in that area! The only thing I did different to that area was put polysporin on it. Do you think it's worth a shot putting it everywhere else? I only put it on for 12 days then my stitches were removed and I didn't have to anymore. I can't believe this area is eczema free now. It was rapidly spreading around there and then POOF! 3. What other things have you tried? Is lemon/bleach a bad thing to try on such a sensitive area? I've heard it works miracles... I have heard vitamin E, but my mom's eczema on her ankles reacted horribly to it, so I'm scared to try it. I am also taking 1200 mg of fish oil daily, One-A-Day Woman's Vitamins, I'm cooking with coconut oil, I'm prescribed to Allegra for 1 month (I don't really understand what it does - anyone know?). As far as topical things, I'm using Aveeno all natural lotion 2-3 times daily (try this if you can't find a good lotion, it's treating me well), hydro cortisone cream occasionally, and the steroidal Beta-Val cream when I'm desperate only. 4. Has anyone's eczema moved to another area? (not spread, but literally moved - packed up and went somewhere else) This is what I'm desperately and consciously irrationally hoping for. My mom's moved from her wrists to her feet to her ankles where it now resides. This was over a 30-40 year span though. 5. If you'd like, share your story. It's nice to know I'm not alone, statistics say 10% of the world's population has eczema, but I still feel all alone. & THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR HELP. Unlike most people, my eczema developed at 16. I'm now 18, and I was misdiagnosed by 3 doctors up until the fourth diagnosed me correctly about a month ago. So I'm still an eczema newbie and all your help is appreciated. Answered by Chantal Mammenga 1 year ago.

I've had eczema since I was around 2 days old. At first it was just the more obvious cracks, like the back of my legs on the knees, on the front of my elbows, and on the wrists. The ones on the wrists went away when I was 6 or 7. I used to use Vaseline and Eucerin, and I hated it because they're so sticky. My doctor recommended those steroids, and I think they ruined me even more. I don't trust the family doctors anymore. Then when I hit puberty, my face started to flare up a little, and I got bloody spots on my neck. I went to an acupuncture (Dr. Kei in San Mateo, but I don't know the address), and it got A LOT better. It didn't work after a few months though. And my whole neck has mild eczema, and it's itchy at night. Also, my wrists started to flare up again because one day I was stupid and wore two hairbands that were TOO TIGHT on my wrists. So I started exercising more, and it's great because the sweat will wash off all the bad stuff. But sweat also makes me itchy, so I need to hurriedly wash my arms before my plan backfires. My dance teacher told me that she had eczema when she was little, all the way until last year (She's 28 now) when she found a product called Cerave. She doesn't even look like she had eczema at all. Cerave seems to work well, but doesn't completely cure it. Her eczema was a lot worse though, and she sometimes had to go to the emergency room because of the horrible flare ups that made her bleed. And she said she had it everywhere, literally. So Cerave is worth a try :) Answered by Shirly Piekarski 1 year ago.

The cause of eczema is overreaction of the immune system. Identifying certain foods, chemicals, etc can be very helpful in battling this disease. I try to avoid soy and milk products which trigger my flare-ups. After using number of prescription drugs I've turned to the natural treatments. Now I use serenaskin herbal remedies. After about 2 weeks of using ointment and spray my skin has been cleared up, and I continue with eczema extract, which controls the immune system. My skin has been clear for months. It is the only treatment I have found that provides me complete relief when I use it as directed. Answered by Sherry Pantoja 1 year ago.

when you find a good answer let me know please i hate it Answered by Beulah Tannery 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Mario Mcclement 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by Benita Lopiccalo 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Rosina Kocur 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Blythe Spraberry 1 year ago.


What will naturally help my scalp eczema?
i have beta-val that my doctor gave me a while back, and even through a whole bottle, it doesn't really seem to work anymore...weird. i was wondering if anyone has this condition, what they are doing to help it not be so noticeable.my eczema is really bad when not medicated, i scratch and pick until my hair... Asked by Tessie Tohill 1 year ago.

i have beta-val that my doctor gave me a while back, and even through a whole bottle, it doesn't really seem to work anymore...weird. i was wondering if anyone has this condition, what they are doing to help it not be so noticeable. my eczema is really bad when not medicated, i scratch and pick until my hair is extremely oily and my scalp hurts. i feel so ugly with this and i know it isn't treatable and will never go away, but i know medicine can work, just which ones? Answered by Elisha Mckerrow 1 year ago.

Beside using Beta-val (a topical steroid), you can try the following for your scalp eczema: 1. Use a medicated shampoo which contains Zinc, Salicylic acid, Sulfur, Coal tar. Leave the shampoo on hair after gentle massage for 3-5 minutes before rinsing off thoroughly. 2. Use lukewarm water (not hot water) when shower 3. Take a balanced diet with lots of fruits and green vegetables Answered by Armida Iacopino 1 year ago.

Ringworm is a fungus that grows, usually, in a circular pattern. Did you have any hair loss on your head before you shaved it? If not, it most likely isn't ringworm. If it were ringworm, you would most likely treat it with an anti-fungal cream, which you can get over the counter (athlete's foot cream can work). However the best thing is to go to the doctor and get an oral anti-fungal. Ringworm can spread all over your entire body, and can become very painful. You can get ringworm from contact with the fungus, usually it is from stray cats or outdoor cats, or children who play in sandboxes or dig in dirt. It doesn't sound like this is your problem, however, because ringworm doesn't usually flake. It does, however, sound like sebboriac dermatitus. (That may be spelled wrong.) It could also be Psoriasis. These are both conditions that need to be treated with special medicated shampoos that are only available through your doctor. Over the counter medications do not help, despite the label claims. I recommend seeing a doctor or a dermatologist to get a definative diagnosis. Google search can help you find images of the above conditions to help you determine for yourself what your condition may be. Good luck! Answered by Danae Odome 1 year ago.

Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments for eczema from the Internet – some of them do work. For my eczema I use herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they stay clear for months on end. Try it: champori comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free. Mol Answered by Bari Rippon 1 year ago.


Do you think my eczema will go away?
its very mild on my palms and i started using beta-val and i dont know if it will go away Asked by Macie Speckman 1 year ago.

no, but it can be controlled to the point where you would only get minor flare ups every so often. just make sure you are wary of this condition and not to expose your skin to too much harsh elements Answered by Belkis Binette 1 year ago.

I have had eczema all my life, and sometimes it can be quite bad, and other times i can go 4-6 months without too much problems, but unless they come up with a cure, No you will never get rid of it, you will always have it, heat for me seems to really make it flare up, or certain kinds of soap, i can't use sunlight clothes soap, cause its too harsh, i use dove or a baby soap, when it gets bad, you can control it by cream,,,. Every one is different, and every case is different, some are so servere that some has to wear gloves on their hands, after they put cream. But , like i said it won't ever go away but it can be controlled, especially if like you said , its mild case Good luck Answered by Linette Winn 1 year ago.

Unfortunately it will never go away. I've had it for a few years and it's been getting worse with time. The best thing to do is find out what causes it. Once you find that out, it's a lot easier not to have flare ups. I can't figure out what causes mine. I've tried everything. Lotions for dry skin make mine worse. And I've tried every detergent for my clothes, yet no results. So hopefully you won't be as unlucky as me and can find something to help you! Answered by Chas Waterson 1 year ago.

Eczema is very tough to deal with. Use only products for sensitive skin - fragrance-free soaps, laundry detergents, and hand lotions. If it doesn't clear up by switching to sensitive skin products, and if it is bothersome to you, see a dermatologist. They have treatments that might help. Answered by Brigette Gorter 1 year ago.

Try things like calomine. It's good inside and out, like we can drink it in tea and everything. Also, avoid stress. Answered by Zack Desloge 1 year ago.

it won't go away completely . it will just be out of site Answered by Chauncey Langman 1 year ago.

yes it will go away and then it will return some night when your sleeping Answered by Luciano Marietta 1 year ago.

God knows best... Hope you get well soon Answered by Darnell Ruggs 1 year ago.


Can nail fungus transfer to the eyes?
I have nail fungus - well, might be nail fungus. I have little itchy, contagious spots around my skin, including my elbow, wrist, behind my ears, on my scalp, etc. My doctor told me to treat it with Betamethasome Valerate (beta-val). It treats it. However, i think it is under my nails now, but it might be... Asked by Tegan Nimmer 1 year ago.

I have nail fungus - well, might be nail fungus. I have little itchy, contagious spots around my skin, including my elbow, wrist, behind my ears, on my scalp, etc. My doctor told me to treat it with Betamethasome Valerate (beta-val). It treats it. However, i think it is under my nails now, but it might be straight up nail fungus. My question is - I wear contacts (yes, I wash with warm soapy water before I put in/take out...), could this transfer to my eyes? What could be the consequences? Blindness? Later-down-the-road blindness? Answered by Mayme Pasco 1 year ago.

Well dont get me wrong or anything, but yes and I am not trying to scare you. I have had this before and if and only if you get to the doctor ask him if it is true, and if you do have it, get this medicine (it does not burn, just stings a little) and put it in your eyes every day twice a day and also, it will lead to blind ness of the eyes so make sure you get to the doctor and see if you have it and follow my instuctions. Answered by Darrell Sleva 1 year ago.

It will get onto your contact. washing your fingers with soapy water could infect your contacts. Wash your fingers, then get some contact solution onto your finger to. this will help a bunch. every time you take out your contacts wash them in solution and all SHOULD (not guaranteed) be well Answered by Gertie Jave 1 year ago.


Dealing with Seborrheic Dermatitis. Please Help?
I'm 18 years old, female. Back in October I got a keratin treatment from a reputable salon. Terrible mistake. About a week later, my hair started falling out. I developed a rash. I finally got to the dermatologist, and he said it was Seborrheic Dermatitis. He prescribed me Beta-Val lotion drops and Ketoconazole... Asked by Richie Poppema 1 year ago.

I'm 18 years old, female. Back in October I got a keratin treatment from a reputable salon. Terrible mistake. About a week later, my hair started falling out. I developed a rash. I finally got to the dermatologist, and he said it was Seborrheic Dermatitis. He prescribed me Beta-Val lotion drops and Ketoconazole shampoo. Both seemed to help at first, and the hair loss slowed but never stopped. The only place I have a rash is toward the nape of my neck. I noticed that one side of the scalp would break out, and the other would be fine. Then it would switch. I never got my scalp completely healed. As of lately, my scalp has gotten really bad again! It's both sides now, and it's really irritating. The hair loss has picked up again. Please tell me how I can make this Sebborheic Dermatitis go away! Any experiences would help! Answered by Byron Eddy 1 year ago.

Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments available on the Internet. Some of them do actually work. For my seb. dermatitis on scalp I use psoriasis herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they then stay clear for months on end. Try it: Champori is available online without prescription and comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free. Best, Gus Answered by Bambi Mcalphin 1 year ago.

Try alternating between the Ketoconazole and Denorex medicated shampoo (available without prescription). Denorex contains coal tar which is extremely nasty stuff, but if works miracles on seborrheic dermatitis Answered by Trevor Swaisgood 1 year ago.

Heredity, hormones, stress, diet, illness, poor hair care – all are factors in hair loss. Stress, diet and illness are more temporary conditions and usually the hair loss is reversed when the anxiety-producing conditions dissipate, when the diet is improved, when hair care improves and when an illness is cured or gotten under control. Heredity and hormones are different matters, however. Heredity is an irreversible condition. You are a product of your parents, and hair loss is often inherited. Hormones are tricky, hidden things, however, and they have different effects on an individual basis. In a male, testosterone abides abundantly. There are also enzymes working on testosterone which product a substance called DHT. DHT is now known to circulate in the blood and cause other conditions, one of which is the shrinking of hair follicles. When hair follicles shrink enough, they are unable to produce and push a new hair through. As old hair dies, it is then not replaced. In women, hormonal imbalances can also cause hair loss. Pregnancy, childbirth and menopause all cause significant hormonal change and imbalances with both physical and mental effects. These changes can also cause hair loss, both temporary and permanent. Hair loss and re-growth products have been around for centuries. In ancient times, a variety of herbal and oil-based remedies were concocted and used by Egyptians, Aztecs, Mayans, and American Indians, all with some degree of effectiveness for some people. Modern medical research has focused on ways to re-open and stimulate “dead” hair follicles, so that hair growth can re-occur naturally, as well as keep the healthy follicles healthy. Thus, a number of products have become available, both by prescription and over-the-counter. They are advertised on radio and television and all over the Internet. One need only do a “google” search on hair loss, and there are literally thousands of sites and products for investigation. One ingredient in many hair loss products is minoxidil. Research studies have shown that in about 80% of the participants, products containing this ingredient are effective in slowing hair loss and, in some, causing re-growth to occur. Probably the most well known is Rogaine, available at any drug store, in varieties for both men and women. Most scientifically-produced products do have separate products for males and females, because, of course, hormones in each are different and of different levels. An additional product containing minoxidil is Provillus, and, again, studies have shown it to be effective. The difference between Provillus and other similar products is that the makes have added Azelaic Acid, an additional ingredient which appears to enhance the follicle repair in both men and women. Provillus has been the subject of many studies, just as the other products, and level of effectiveness may be higher. Provillus is available for both men and women, and the treatment is a combination of a topical liquid applied to the balding areas, as well as a pill or capsule to be taken in conjunction with the liquid. The critical key to effectiveness, according to its makers, is the addition of the azelaic acid, however, the correct amount of this acid is most important piece of this treatment. As with most hair loss products, the makers recommend patience. It may take from 3-6 months for improvement to occur, however, there is a money-back guarantee up to 180 days if one is not satisfied that it is working for him/her. Medical research is far from finished in its exploration of products which will stop hair loss and promote re-growth of “permanent” loss. As this research continues, existing producers will undoubtedly alter their products accordingly. Fortunately, a lot of money is being poured into the research, so hair loss sufferers, take heart! Answered by Sparkle Camak 1 year ago.


Calling all eczema victims!?
If you could answer any one of my questions, I'd be forever grateful! I have vaginal eczema in particular and I am trying EVERYTHING I can to make it go away!1. Has anyone tried using Protopic?My first try left me with severe burning and itching for over 2 hours. Is this normal? Did it work for you in the... Asked by Elmira Javarone 1 year ago.

If you could answer any one of my questions, I'd be forever grateful! I have vaginal eczema in particular and I am trying EVERYTHING I can to make it go away! 1. Has anyone tried using Protopic? My first try left me with severe burning and itching for over 2 hours. Is this normal? Did it work for you in the long run? Any other experiences with Protopic are helpful. And any knowledge you have about it. 2. Has anyone tried POLYSPORIN? It sounds weird, seeing as it's antibiotic, but where my biopsy was done I had eczema (obviously) and now it is totally gone in that area! The only thing I did different to that area was put polysporin on it. Do you think it's worth a shot putting it everywhere else? I only put it on for 12 days then my stitches were removed and I didn't have to anymore. I can't believe this area is eczema free now. It was rapidly spreading around there and then POOF! 3. What other things have you tried? Is lemon/bleach a bad thing to try on such a sensitive area? I've heard it works miracles... I have heard vitamin E, but my mom's eczema on her ankles reacted horribly to it, so I'm scared to try it. I am also taking 1200 mg of fish oil daily, One-A-Day Woman's Vitamins, I'm cooking with coconut oil, I'm prescribed to Allegra for 1 month (I don't really understand what it does - anyone know?). As far as topical things, I'm using Aveeno all natural lotion 2-3 times daily (try this if you can't find a good lotion, it's treating me well), hydro cortisone cream occasionally, and the steroidal Beta-Val cream when I'm desperate only. 4. Has anyone's eczema moved to another area? (not spread, but literally moved - packed up and went somewhere else) This is what I'm desperately and consciously irrationally hoping for. My mom's moved from her wrists to her feet to her ankles where it now resides. This was over a 30-40 year span though. 5. If you'd like, share your story. It's nice to know I'm not alone, statistics say 10% of the world's population has eczema, but I still feel all alone. & THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR HELP. Unlike most people, my eczema developed at 16. I'm now 18, and I was misdiagnosed by 3 doctors up until the fourth diagnosed me correctly about a month ago. So I'm still an eczema newbie and all your help is appreciated. Answered by Tabitha Keliihoomalu 1 year ago.

I've had eczema since I was around 2 days old. At first it was just the more obvious cracks, like the back of my legs on the knees, on the front of my elbows, and on the wrists. The ones on the wrists went away when I was 6 or 7. I used to use Vaseline and Eucerin, and I hated it because they're so sticky. My doctor recommended those steroids, and I think they ruined me even more. I don't trust the family doctors anymore. Then when I hit puberty, my face started to flare up a little, and I got bloody spots on my neck. I went to an acupuncture (Dr. Kei in San Mateo, but I don't know the address), and it got A LOT better. It didn't work after a few months though. And my whole neck has mild eczema, and it's itchy at night. Also, my wrists started to flare up again because one day I was stupid and wore two hairbands that were TOO TIGHT on my wrists. So I started exercising more, and it's great because the sweat will wash off all the bad stuff. But sweat also makes me itchy, so I need to hurriedly wash my arms before my plan backfires. My dance teacher told me that she had eczema when she was little, all the way until last year (She's 28 now) when she found a product called Cerave. She doesn't even look like she had eczema at all. Cerave seems to work well, but doesn't completely cure it. Her eczema was a lot worse though, and she sometimes had to go to the emergency room because of the horrible flare ups that made her bleed. And she said she had it everywhere, literally. So Cerave is worth a try :) Answered by Rene Pangilinan 1 year ago.

The cause of eczema is overreaction of the immune system. Identifying certain foods, chemicals, etc can be very helpful in battling this disease. I try to avoid soy and milk products which trigger my flare-ups. After using number of prescription drugs I've turned to the natural treatments. Now I use serenaskin herbal remedies. After about 2 weeks of using ointment and spray my skin has been cleared up, and I continue with eczema extract, which controls the immune system. My skin has been clear for months. It is the only treatment I have found that provides me complete relief when I use it as directed. Answered by Boris Heitmuller 1 year ago.

when you find a good answer let me know please i hate it Answered by Art Guetierrez 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Arica Dimling 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by Barabara Hammang 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Patience Akande 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Laverna Saba 1 year ago.


What will naturally help my scalp eczema?
i have beta-val that my doctor gave me a while back, and even through a whole bottle, it doesn't really seem to work anymore...weird. i was wondering if anyone has this condition, what they are doing to help it not be so noticeable.my eczema is really bad when not medicated, i scratch and pick until my hair... Asked by Fernanda Tote 1 year ago.

i have beta-val that my doctor gave me a while back, and even through a whole bottle, it doesn't really seem to work anymore...weird. i was wondering if anyone has this condition, what they are doing to help it not be so noticeable. my eczema is really bad when not medicated, i scratch and pick until my hair is extremely oily and my scalp hurts. i feel so ugly with this and i know it isn't treatable and will never go away, but i know medicine can work, just which ones? Answered by Emmaline Berbes 1 year ago.

Beside using Beta-val (a topical steroid), you can try the following for your scalp eczema: 1. Use a medicated shampoo which contains Zinc, Salicylic acid, Sulfur, Coal tar. Leave the shampoo on hair after gentle massage for 3-5 minutes before rinsing off thoroughly. 2. Use lukewarm water (not hot water) when shower 3. Take a balanced diet with lots of fruits and green vegetables Answered by Terisa Welder 1 year ago.

Ringworm is a fungus that grows, usually, in a circular pattern. Did you have any hair loss on your head before you shaved it? If not, it most likely isn't ringworm. If it were ringworm, you would most likely treat it with an anti-fungal cream, which you can get over the counter (athlete's foot cream can work). However the best thing is to go to the doctor and get an oral anti-fungal. Ringworm can spread all over your entire body, and can become very painful. You can get ringworm from contact with the fungus, usually it is from stray cats or outdoor cats, or children who play in sandboxes or dig in dirt. It doesn't sound like this is your problem, however, because ringworm doesn't usually flake. It does, however, sound like sebboriac dermatitus. (That may be spelled wrong.) It could also be Psoriasis. These are both conditions that need to be treated with special medicated shampoos that are only available through your doctor. Over the counter medications do not help, despite the label claims. I recommend seeing a doctor or a dermatologist to get a definative diagnosis. Google search can help you find images of the above conditions to help you determine for yourself what your condition may be. Good luck! Answered by Carmelita Renicker 1 year ago.

Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments for eczema from the Internet – some of them do work. For my eczema I use herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they stay clear for months on end. Try it: champori comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free. Mol Answered by Erika Sopata 1 year ago.


Do you think my eczema will go away?
its very mild on my palms and i started using beta-val and i dont know if it will go away Asked by Drucilla During 1 year ago.

no, but it can be controlled to the point where you would only get minor flare ups every so often. just make sure you are wary of this condition and not to expose your skin to too much harsh elements Answered by Farah Crist 1 year ago.

I have had eczema all my life, and sometimes it can be quite bad, and other times i can go 4-6 months without too much problems, but unless they come up with a cure, No you will never get rid of it, you will always have it, heat for me seems to really make it flare up, or certain kinds of soap, i can't use sunlight clothes soap, cause its too harsh, i use dove or a baby soap, when it gets bad, you can control it by cream,,,. Every one is different, and every case is different, some are so servere that some has to wear gloves on their hands, after they put cream. But , like i said it won't ever go away but it can be controlled, especially if like you said , its mild case Good luck Answered by Glynda Epifano 1 year ago.

Unfortunately it will never go away. I've had it for a few years and it's been getting worse with time. The best thing to do is find out what causes it. Once you find that out, it's a lot easier not to have flare ups. I can't figure out what causes mine. I've tried everything. Lotions for dry skin make mine worse. And I've tried every detergent for my clothes, yet no results. So hopefully you won't be as unlucky as me and can find something to help you! Answered by Hulda Alison 1 year ago.

Eczema is very tough to deal with. Use only products for sensitive skin - fragrance-free soaps, laundry detergents, and hand lotions. If it doesn't clear up by switching to sensitive skin products, and if it is bothersome to you, see a dermatologist. They have treatments that might help. Answered by Ellie Marasciulo 1 year ago.

Try things like calomine. It's good inside and out, like we can drink it in tea and everything. Also, avoid stress. Answered by Samual Moretta 1 year ago.

it won't go away completely . it will just be out of site Answered by Mel Trojak 1 year ago.

yes it will go away and then it will return some night when your sleeping Answered by Melvin Sidley 1 year ago.

God knows best... Hope you get well soon Answered by Carlotta Wariner 1 year ago.


Can nail fungus transfer to the eyes?
I have nail fungus - well, might be nail fungus. I have little itchy, contagious spots around my skin, including my elbow, wrist, behind my ears, on my scalp, etc. My doctor told me to treat it with Betamethasome Valerate (beta-val). It treats it. However, i think it is under my nails now, but it might be... Asked by Stephine Dais 1 year ago.

I have nail fungus - well, might be nail fungus. I have little itchy, contagious spots around my skin, including my elbow, wrist, behind my ears, on my scalp, etc. My doctor told me to treat it with Betamethasome Valerate (beta-val). It treats it. However, i think it is under my nails now, but it might be straight up nail fungus. My question is - I wear contacts (yes, I wash with warm soapy water before I put in/take out...), could this transfer to my eyes? What could be the consequences? Blindness? Later-down-the-road blindness? Answered by Pauline Reaollano 1 year ago.

Well dont get me wrong or anything, but yes and I am not trying to scare you. I have had this before and if and only if you get to the doctor ask him if it is true, and if you do have it, get this medicine (it does not burn, just stings a little) and put it in your eyes every day twice a day and also, it will lead to blind ness of the eyes so make sure you get to the doctor and see if you have it and follow my instuctions. Answered by Jeanene Hiscox 1 year ago.

It will get onto your contact. washing your fingers with soapy water could infect your contacts. Wash your fingers, then get some contact solution onto your finger to. this will help a bunch. every time you take out your contacts wash them in solution and all SHOULD (not guaranteed) be well Answered by Clement Berti 1 year ago.


Dealing with Seborrheic Dermatitis. Please Help?
I'm 18 years old, female. Back in October I got a keratin treatment from a reputable salon. Terrible mistake. About a week later, my hair started falling out. I developed a rash. I finally got to the dermatologist, and he said it was Seborrheic Dermatitis. He prescribed me Beta-Val lotion drops and Ketoconazole... Asked by Season Kahae 1 year ago.

I'm 18 years old, female. Back in October I got a keratin treatment from a reputable salon. Terrible mistake. About a week later, my hair started falling out. I developed a rash. I finally got to the dermatologist, and he said it was Seborrheic Dermatitis. He prescribed me Beta-Val lotion drops and Ketoconazole shampoo. Both seemed to help at first, and the hair loss slowed but never stopped. The only place I have a rash is toward the nape of my neck. I noticed that one side of the scalp would break out, and the other would be fine. Then it would switch. I never got my scalp completely healed. As of lately, my scalp has gotten really bad again! It's both sides now, and it's really irritating. The hair loss has picked up again. Please tell me how I can make this Sebborheic Dermatitis go away! Any experiences would help! Answered by Francis Kessel 1 year ago.

Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments available on the Internet. Some of them do actually work. For my seb. dermatitis on scalp I use psoriasis herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they then stay clear for months on end. Try it: Champori is available online without prescription and comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free. Best, Gus Answered by Mafalda Dilmore 1 year ago.

Try alternating between the Ketoconazole and Denorex medicated shampoo (available without prescription). Denorex contains coal tar which is extremely nasty stuff, but if works miracles on seborrheic dermatitis Answered by Rosella Surgeon 1 year ago.

Heredity, hormones, stress, diet, illness, poor hair care – all are factors in hair loss. Stress, diet and illness are more temporary conditions and usually the hair loss is reversed when the anxiety-producing conditions dissipate, when the diet is improved, when hair care improves and when an illness is cured or gotten under control. Heredity and hormones are different matters, however. Heredity is an irreversible condition. You are a product of your parents, and hair loss is often inherited. Hormones are tricky, hidden things, however, and they have different effects on an individual basis. In a male, testosterone abides abundantly. There are also enzymes working on testosterone which product a substance called DHT. DHT is now known to circulate in the blood and cause other conditions, one of which is the shrinking of hair follicles. When hair follicles shrink enough, they are unable to produce and push a new hair through. As old hair dies, it is then not replaced. In women, hormonal imbalances can also cause hair loss. Pregnancy, childbirth and menopause all cause significant hormonal change and imbalances with both physical and mental effects. These changes can also cause hair loss, both temporary and permanent. Hair loss and re-growth products have been around for centuries. In ancient times, a variety of herbal and oil-based remedies were concocted and used by Egyptians, Aztecs, Mayans, and American Indians, all with some degree of effectiveness for some people. Modern medical research has focused on ways to re-open and stimulate “dead” hair follicles, so that hair growth can re-occur naturally, as well as keep the healthy follicles healthy. Thus, a number of products have become available, both by prescription and over-the-counter. They are advertised on radio and television and all over the Internet. One need only do a “google” search on hair loss, and there are literally thousands of sites and products for investigation. One ingredient in many hair loss products is minoxidil. Research studies have shown that in about 80% of the participants, products containing this ingredient are effective in slowing hair loss and, in some, causing re-growth to occur. Probably the most well known is Rogaine, available at any drug store, in varieties for both men and women. Most scientifically-produced products do have separate products for males and females, because, of course, hormones in each are different and of different levels. An additional product containing minoxidil is Provillus, and, again, studies have shown it to be effective. The difference between Provillus and other similar products is that the makes have added Azelaic Acid, an additional ingredient which appears to enhance the follicle repair in both men and women. Provillus has been the subject of many studies, just as the other products, and level of effectiveness may be higher. Provillus is available for both men and women, and the treatment is a combination of a topical liquid applied to the balding areas, as well as a pill or capsule to be taken in conjunction with the liquid. The critical key to effectiveness, according to its makers, is the addition of the azelaic acid, however, the correct amount of this acid is most important piece of this treatment. As with most hair loss products, the makers recommend patience. It may take from 3-6 months for improvement to occur, however, there is a money-back guarantee up to 180 days if one is not satisfied that it is working for him/her. Medical research is far from finished in its exploration of products which will stop hair loss and promote re-growth of “permanent” loss. As this research continues, existing producers will undoubtedly alter their products accordingly. Fortunately, a lot of money is being poured into the research, so hair loss sufferers, take heart! Answered by Contessa Shusterman 1 year ago.


Calling all eczema victims!?
If you could answer any one of my questions, I'd be forever grateful! I have vaginal eczema in particular and I am trying EVERYTHING I can to make it go away!1. Has anyone tried using Protopic?My first try left me with severe burning and itching for over 2 hours. Is this normal? Did it work for you in the... Asked by Mattie Daring 1 year ago.

If you could answer any one of my questions, I'd be forever grateful! I have vaginal eczema in particular and I am trying EVERYTHING I can to make it go away! 1. Has anyone tried using Protopic? My first try left me with severe burning and itching for over 2 hours. Is this normal? Did it work for you in the long run? Any other experiences with Protopic are helpful. And any knowledge you have about it. 2. Has anyone tried POLYSPORIN? It sounds weird, seeing as it's antibiotic, but where my biopsy was done I had eczema (obviously) and now it is totally gone in that area! The only thing I did different to that area was put polysporin on it. Do you think it's worth a shot putting it everywhere else? I only put it on for 12 days then my stitches were removed and I didn't have to anymore. I can't believe this area is eczema free now. It was rapidly spreading around there and then POOF! 3. What other things have you tried? Is lemon/bleach a bad thing to try on such a sensitive area? I've heard it works miracles... I have heard vitamin E, but my mom's eczema on her ankles reacted horribly to it, so I'm scared to try it. I am also taking 1200 mg of fish oil daily, One-A-Day Woman's Vitamins, I'm cooking with coconut oil, I'm prescribed to Allegra for 1 month (I don't really understand what it does - anyone know?). As far as topical things, I'm using Aveeno all natural lotion 2-3 times daily (try this if you can't find a good lotion, it's treating me well), hydro cortisone cream occasionally, and the steroidal Beta-Val cream when I'm desperate only. 4. Has anyone's eczema moved to another area? (not spread, but literally moved - packed up and went somewhere else) This is what I'm desperately and consciously irrationally hoping for. My mom's moved from her wrists to her feet to her ankles where it now resides. This was over a 30-40 year span though. 5. If you'd like, share your story. It's nice to know I'm not alone, statistics say 10% of the world's population has eczema, but I still feel all alone. & THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR HELP. Unlike most people, my eczema developed at 16. I'm now 18, and I was misdiagnosed by 3 doctors up until the fourth diagnosed me correctly about a month ago. So I'm still an eczema newbie and all your help is appreciated. Answered by Angel Kuehler 1 year ago.

I've had eczema since I was around 2 days old. At first it was just the more obvious cracks, like the back of my legs on the knees, on the front of my elbows, and on the wrists. The ones on the wrists went away when I was 6 or 7. I used to use Vaseline and Eucerin, and I hated it because they're so sticky. My doctor recommended those steroids, and I think they ruined me even more. I don't trust the family doctors anymore. Then when I hit puberty, my face started to flare up a little, and I got bloody spots on my neck. I went to an acupuncture (Dr. Kei in San Mateo, but I don't know the address), and it got A LOT better. It didn't work after a few months though. And my whole neck has mild eczema, and it's itchy at night. Also, my wrists started to flare up again because one day I was stupid and wore two hairbands that were TOO TIGHT on my wrists. So I started exercising more, and it's great because the sweat will wash off all the bad stuff. But sweat also makes me itchy, so I need to hurriedly wash my arms before my plan backfires. My dance teacher told me that she had eczema when she was little, all the way until last year (She's 28 now) when she found a product called Cerave. She doesn't even look like she had eczema at all. Cerave seems to work well, but doesn't completely cure it. Her eczema was a lot worse though, and she sometimes had to go to the emergency room because of the horrible flare ups that made her bleed. And she said she had it everywhere, literally. So Cerave is worth a try :) Answered by Clint Saracino 1 year ago.

The cause of eczema is overreaction of the immune system. Identifying certain foods, chemicals, etc can be very helpful in battling this disease. I try to avoid soy and milk products which trigger my flare-ups. After using number of prescription drugs I've turned to the natural treatments. Now I use serenaskin herbal remedies. After about 2 weeks of using ointment and spray my skin has been cleared up, and I continue with eczema extract, which controls the immune system. My skin has been clear for months. It is the only treatment I have found that provides me complete relief when I use it as directed. Answered by Hugh Norcross 1 year ago.

when you find a good answer let me know please i hate it Answered by Rodrick Babine 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Odelia Venzeio 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by Paulita Poskey 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Newton Kaina 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Kelsey Newton 1 year ago.


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