Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 007409/001.

Names and composition

"BENTYL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007409/001 BENTYL DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
007409/003 BENTYL DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
007961/002 BENTYL DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008370/001 BENTYL DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007409/001 BENTYL DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
007409/003 BENTYL DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
007961/002 BENTYL DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008370/001 BENTYL DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
008370/002 BENTYL PRESERVATIVE FREE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
040161/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040169/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
040204/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
040230/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040317/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040319/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
040465/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE (PRESERVATIVE FREE) DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
080614/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
083179/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
084285/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
084361/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084479/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
084505/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
084600/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085082/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
085223/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
088585/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089361/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
208353/001 DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DICYCLOMINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML

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Answered questions

Question about Bentyl Irritable Bowel Syndrome...?
Hello. I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome yesterday and my gastroenterologist prescribed me Bentyl. I have sometimes nausea, diarreah, and abdominal pain. I have no appetite and it's been like this for over 1 month. I am eating very little and its stuff like rice, pasta, and crackers. No meat or... Asked by Myrna Samaroo 1 year ago.

Hello. I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome yesterday and my gastroenterologist prescribed me Bentyl. I have sometimes nausea, diarreah, and abdominal pain. I have no appetite and it's been like this for over 1 month. I am eating very little and its stuff like rice, pasta, and crackers. No meat or anything like that. I am scared of that what I have is not this and this pill, I don't know what it does and what is it supposed to do and make me feel. I am weak and tired, but I am drinking as much water as possible, so no I am not dehydrated. He said to give the pill 2 weeks and then if it doesn't work, we will go from there... What would you do?? Any advice to feel better?? Answered by Roland Shariff 1 year ago.

You must be having cramps. Bentyl works good for these. I tried it but had some minor side effects so I stopped it. I used Pepto Bismol and occasionally Imodium. These have fewer side effects and work well. Look up Irritable bowel so you can learn about it. It isn't a life threatening syndrome. You should keep a food diary to see if there are certain foods that bother you more than others Also, stress makes it worse. You'll find when you are in a stressful situation you will have more symptoms. Try doing Yoga for a few minutes everyday. Carry Pepto Bismol and Imodium with you so you can access it if you start having diarrhea or cramps. I used PB for cramps and minor diarrhea and Imodium if diarrhea was severe. You will learn by trial and error how much to take of each. If you take too much imodium you will be constipated, so next time take less. The basic thing you need to learn is how to control your symptoms. This will come in time. Part of controlling them is learning to recognize situations that produce stress and to avoid or deal with them early. You can eat normally for the most part. You'll find you can eat ice cream one time but the next it will give you diarrhea and cramps. You may be able to eat small portions but not large. When you start with cramps and diarrhea, eat potatoes, rice, crackers, (see you've already learned to do this), jello, toast with jelly. As soon as, the episode is over go back to eating regular as you need the nutrients. Try the Bentyl. You can start off taking a half tablet and only take it twice a day then increase if you don't have bad side effects. Sometimes side effects go away after a few days. You should write down any changes so you can tell your MD in two weeks. When you are trying Bentyl, try not to use the Pepto at the same time as it can interfer with the absorbtion of Bentyl. Here is some info on Bentyl. Good luck. What is the most important information I should know about dicyclomine? Dicyclomine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of dicyclomine. Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Dicyclomine can decrease your sweating, which can lead to heat stroke in a hot environment. Stop using dicyclomine and call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects such as confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior, fast or uneven heart rate, or if you urinate less than usual or not at all. There are many other medicines that can interact with dicyclomine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. What is dicyclomine? Dicyclomine relieves spasms of the muscles in the stomach and intestines by blocking the actions of certain chemicals in the body. Dicyclomine is used to treat functional bowel or irritable bowel syndrome. Dicyclomine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking dicyclomine? Do not take this medication if you are allergic to dicyclomine, or if you have: problems with urination; a blockage in your digestive tract; an intestinal disorder such as ulcerative colitis; gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); a serious heart condition or active bleeding; glaucoma; myasthenia gravis; or if you are breast-feeding a baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: an ileostomy or colostomy; a nerve problem (such as numbness or tingling); liver disease; kidney disease; ulcerative colitis; thyroid disorder; heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, or a heart rhythm disorder; hiatal hernia; or an enlarged prostate. If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustments or special tests to safely take dicyclomine. FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Dicyclomine can pass into breast milk and can cause breathing problems or death in infants younger than 6 months of age. Do not take dicyclomine if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take dicyclomine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take this medicine with a full glas Answered by Corey Redig 1 year ago.

There are quite a few things that help with general digestion and may help with IBS. Many customers get benefits from Probiotics, Fiber, or Enzymes. If you are allergic to lactose, you should make sure that any probiotics you get are either lactose free or milk free (they are more expensive that way)... OR you could try some Lactase Enzyme (it helps digest lactose, so it may help reduce the reaction). There are a few people that get benefits from stomach soothers like Ginger, Peppermint Oil, or Aloe Vera..... but that's just to calm the stomach, not the intestines or bowels (which is where Irritable Bowel Syndrome is based). For any of those, I would recommend checking with a doctor that knows about supplements or an allergist, just to make sure you won't have a problem with any of those (standard warning for anyone with a medical condition). ....but you could try them if you don't have a very severe reaction and are willing to risk it ;-) Answered by Clarence Ganong 1 year ago.

Side Effects Of Bentyl Answered by Dominic Burkleo 1 year ago.

Bentyl Side Effects Answered by Alvin Schuit 1 year ago.

An interesting side effect of Bentyl is auditory hallucinations. Dr Oliver Sacks writes about this in his book MUSICOPHILIA. Those of us who have this hear music, usually recognizable tunes, very faintly. It isn't constant; it begins after taking Bentyl (pill form) and gradually goes away until it's time for another pill. Answered by Evelina Fleischner 1 year ago.

can you take Imodium if you are taking Bentyl? Answered by Marti Lightbourne 1 year ago.


Is there an OTC substitute for Bentyl?
Asked by Samara Corson 1 year ago.

Bentyl combines an anticholinergic (bronchodilator) with an antispasmodic, used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In alternative medicine the solution is to get to the source of the problem, not take a pill to alleviate symptoms. Enteric coated peppermint oil is sometimes used to treat IBS. It is available at health food stores. It is antispasmodic. Ginkgo is a bronchodilator, although I've never heard or read about it being used for IBS. Bentyl has a long list of serious side effects, so it is doubtful that anything similar will be released as a generic or OTC anytime soon. Answered by Alverta Drones 1 year ago.

This is not the place to be looking for safe, knowledgeable and reliable medical advice. For you own good, direct this (and other health care questions) to your physician. I am speaking from sad experience; learn from my mistake. These people may be well-intentioned but they do not have the background or training to address these issues. You could end up worse off than you are now. Again, I am speaking from experience and regret the day I accepted medical advice from a site like this. FGS, consult your physician. I wish I had. Answered by Lakeisha Czerwinski 1 year ago.

What about Librex forIBS? Answered by Quentin Zarrillo 1 year ago.


Can u die off a bentyl overdose? how much would it take? and would it be painful?
Asked by Leighann Finseth 1 year ago.

Bentyl is an antispasmodic and anticholinergic used to calm a nervous stomach and reduce the motility of the GI track and NO you can't die from a Bentyl OD. You may wish that you could if you took an OD but you won't die from an OD. Answered by Larisa Mcmicheal 1 year ago.


Does the drug "Bentyl" (Dicyclomine) help with nausea?
Asked by Chong Jennrich 1 year ago.

"Gentle Bentyl" is generally prescribed for irritable bowl syndrome which results in pain in the abdomen and relief from an irritated colon and its side-effects, such as diarrhea. It is not an anti-emetic, or a condition such as nausea. However, one of its side effects is the reduction of nausea resulting from Crohns disease. So it may help, possibly not. Nausea can be helped by avoiding food for awhile, drinking non-acidic, or caffeinated beverages. Pepto-Bismol, is one of the old standard treatments for an upset stomach. If it continues for several hours, you need to be checked out because dehydration is a serious problem caused by this constant loss of fluids from your body. Answered by Sylvie Gautam 1 year ago.

The only way the medicine will help with nausea is if your on a medicine that gives you a nausea side effect but if your sick just go to the store and get Dramamine it will make you tired but it works fabulously for nausea I know all this because my doctor prescribed bentyl to me because i suffer from IBS and i take another medicine that quite often make me wanna through up and usually bentyl helps will i hope this helps but usually it is only prescribed to IBS patients. Don't take it if you suffer from really bad anxiety and depression because inless your on medication that helps anxiety if you have anxiety then dont take it. Hope this helps somewhat Answered by Obdulia Stadther 1 year ago.

Bentyl Medicine Answered by Lashonda Moehring 1 year ago.


Is bentyl prescribed for nausea?
I have IBS . Before I was diagnosed with IBS, I would get very nauseous during PMS and my doctor prescribed Bentyl 20mg. It always seems to help, but during a recent visit to the E.R., the on-duty doctor said she had never heard of Bentyl being used to treat nausea. I... Asked by Lolita Zuleger 1 year ago.

I have IBS . Before I was diagnosed with IBS, I would get very nauseous during PMS and my doctor prescribed Bentyl 20mg. It always seems to help, but during a recent visit to the E.R., the on-duty doctor said she had never heard of Bentyl being used to treat nausea. I am curious if anyone else has taken Bentyl for nausea and if it's commonly used to treat it. Thanks! LisaJ Answered by Kristi Britnell 1 year ago.

The bentyl basically helps with stomach spasms and cramping. Sometimes those symptoms can cause the nausea, so by alleviating those it may help the nausea. I know it sounds a little simple but Chamomile tea (a good quality, preferably loose tea works best) can really help nausea. As for the gerd, I never knew you shouldn't take the Bentyl if you had it, but it's never caused the gerd to be worse. Hope this helps, and I hope you get some relief! Answered by Crista Lavecchia 1 year ago.

Bentyl Used For Answered by Yong Sama 1 year ago.


What are your experiences with Bentyl?
I recently had my Gall Bladder out and my doctor thinks I may have IBS. So he has prescribed to take Bentyl. Has anyone had experience with this medicine, or have any suggestions of help. I hate taking pills but I also hate going to the bathroom 12 times a day. HELP!! Asked by Steffanie Book 1 year ago.

bentyl is pretty good drug for IBS IT IS A NEW GENERATION CALLED ANTI-CHOLINERGIC DRUGS that causes your intestinal muscle to relax so i think it would be suitable for u removing gall bladder is not apig deal it is ok Answered by Julee Lori 1 year ago.


Could this be irritable bowel.. Bentyl medication?
I have a severe pain in my upper right side, I was in the hospital for it. They said that the CT scan showed a thickening of the intestines, but that that's not uncommon and 9 out of 10 times the colonoscopy shows nothing. Could my IBS be causing this pain? I am in my early 20's and don't want a... Asked by Deedee Bumpaus 1 year ago.

I have a severe pain in my upper right side, I was in the hospital for it. They said that the CT scan showed a thickening of the intestines, but that that's not uncommon and 9 out of 10 times the colonoscopy shows nothing. Could my IBS be causing this pain? I am in my early 20's and don't want a colonoscopy. I'm really worried about the pain, it's affecting my job, and life in general. Any advice? Also I was prescribed bentyl to see if it would help, anyone else on this, how long does it take to adjust to it? I'm constantly tired and don't feel "right" ? thanks! Answered by Jeneva Bumbrey 1 year ago.

It could well be IBS, I went thru much the same thing as you describe, including the colonoscopy, and yes, they gave me Bentyl as well. The Bentyl is a smooth muscle relaxer and has the side effect of making you tired, can also cause dry mouth. But it is better, in my opinion, than the pain caused by the spasming of the bowel. I simply take the Bentyl at night before bed. With IBS, be aware that dietary patterns are usually the culprits that bring on pain, found out my triggers were chocolate and nuts. So, I don't eat that stuff any more. Might take some detective work on your part, but would give serious consideration to monitoring and altering your diet to prevent future attacks. Answered by Rubi Polintan 1 year ago.

A colonoscopy is no big deal. They give you medication so you are asleep (usually Fentanyl and Versed) so you will have no discomfort. You can go back to work right away. Bentyl will make you very tired. It's used to stop the spasms in your intestines and is a relaxant. Answered by Carlos Conradt 1 year ago.

I had similar symptons. Please make your doctor check you for Celiac Sprue disease. One out of every 133 people have it. It sometimes is masked as IBS - it is very important that you have a colonscopy. They will drug you and you won't feel a thing. I swear to God. The prep for the colonscopy is far worse than the exam. Far, far worse! You have to drink this icky stuff that is the most nasty taste in the world to clean your system out. Have the colonoscopy - don't suffer! Answered by Alvera Bayliff 1 year ago.


Cant get hold of doctor but i just started taking bentyl for ibs and now im getting very nervous shaky and?
Weak anyone know if these are serious side effects im also getting sinking feeling in stomache medical professionals only please Asked by Blair Reginal 1 year ago.

Common Side Effects There are some common side effects of Bentyl. These side effects are not usually considered to be serious, since they usually go away as the body adjusts to the medicine. If the side effects do not go away, however, you should consult your doctor. Side effects include sweating less, blurry vision, taste loss, anxiety, nervousness, nausea, feeling lightheaded, dry mouth, drowsiness, headache, problems sleeping, constipation and dizziness. Serious Side Effects Serious side effects are also a possibility with Bentyl. In situations of serious side effects, it is necessary to seek emergency medical help. Some potentially harmful side effects of the medicine include hallucinations, passing out, problems with focusing of the eyes, trouble speaking, rapid heartbeat, abnormal weakness, throwing up, chest pounding, loss of memory for a brief time, disorientation, problems with urinating, difficulty moving, confusion, diarrhea and agitation. If you feel much worse, and cannot get hold of the doctor, you should go to the ER. Answered by Olivia Monroy 1 year ago.


Question about Bentyl Irritable Bowel Syndrome...?
Hello. I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome yesterday and my gastroenterologist prescribed me Bentyl. I have sometimes nausea, diarreah, and abdominal pain. I have no appetite and it's been like this for over 1 month. I am eating very little and its stuff like rice, pasta, and crackers. No meat or... Asked by Melanie Demian 1 year ago.

Hello. I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome yesterday and my gastroenterologist prescribed me Bentyl. I have sometimes nausea, diarreah, and abdominal pain. I have no appetite and it's been like this for over 1 month. I am eating very little and its stuff like rice, pasta, and crackers. No meat or anything like that. I am scared of that what I have is not this and this pill, I don't know what it does and what is it supposed to do and make me feel. I am weak and tired, but I am drinking as much water as possible, so no I am not dehydrated. He said to give the pill 2 weeks and then if it doesn't work, we will go from there... What would you do?? Any advice to feel better?? Answered by Angelic Kaufhold 1 year ago.

You must be having cramps. Bentyl works good for these. I tried it but had some minor side effects so I stopped it. I used Pepto Bismol and occasionally Imodium. These have fewer side effects and work well. Look up Irritable bowel so you can learn about it. It isn't a life threatening syndrome. You should keep a food diary to see if there are certain foods that bother you more than others Also, stress makes it worse. You'll find when you are in a stressful situation you will have more symptoms. Try doing Yoga for a few minutes everyday. Carry Pepto Bismol and Imodium with you so you can access it if you start having diarrhea or cramps. I used PB for cramps and minor diarrhea and Imodium if diarrhea was severe. You will learn by trial and error how much to take of each. If you take too much imodium you will be constipated, so next time take less. The basic thing you need to learn is how to control your symptoms. This will come in time. Part of controlling them is learning to recognize situations that produce stress and to avoid or deal with them early. You can eat normally for the most part. You'll find you can eat ice cream one time but the next it will give you diarrhea and cramps. You may be able to eat small portions but not large. When you start with cramps and diarrhea, eat potatoes, rice, crackers, (see you've already learned to do this), jello, toast with jelly. As soon as, the episode is over go back to eating regular as you need the nutrients. Try the Bentyl. You can start off taking a half tablet and only take it twice a day then increase if you don't have bad side effects. Sometimes side effects go away after a few days. You should write down any changes so you can tell your MD in two weeks. When you are trying Bentyl, try not to use the Pepto at the same time as it can interfer with the absorbtion of Bentyl. Here is some info on Bentyl. Good luck. What is the most important information I should know about dicyclomine? Dicyclomine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of dicyclomine. Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Dicyclomine can decrease your sweating, which can lead to heat stroke in a hot environment. Stop using dicyclomine and call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects such as confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior, fast or uneven heart rate, or if you urinate less than usual or not at all. There are many other medicines that can interact with dicyclomine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. What is dicyclomine? Dicyclomine relieves spasms of the muscles in the stomach and intestines by blocking the actions of certain chemicals in the body. Dicyclomine is used to treat functional bowel or irritable bowel syndrome. Dicyclomine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking dicyclomine? Do not take this medication if you are allergic to dicyclomine, or if you have: problems with urination; a blockage in your digestive tract; an intestinal disorder such as ulcerative colitis; gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); a serious heart condition or active bleeding; glaucoma; myasthenia gravis; or if you are breast-feeding a baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: an ileostomy or colostomy; a nerve problem (such as numbness or tingling); liver disease; kidney disease; ulcerative colitis; thyroid disorder; heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, or a heart rhythm disorder; hiatal hernia; or an enlarged prostate. If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustments or special tests to safely take dicyclomine. FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Dicyclomine can pass into breast milk and can cause breathing problems or death in infants younger than 6 months of age. Do not take dicyclomine if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take dicyclomine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take this medicine with a full glas Answered by Collen Stiefel 1 year ago.

There are quite a few things that help with general digestion and may help with IBS. Many customers get benefits from Probiotics, Fiber, or Enzymes. If you are allergic to lactose, you should make sure that any probiotics you get are either lactose free or milk free (they are more expensive that way)... OR you could try some Lactase Enzyme (it helps digest lactose, so it may help reduce the reaction). There are a few people that get benefits from stomach soothers like Ginger, Peppermint Oil, or Aloe Vera..... but that's just to calm the stomach, not the intestines or bowels (which is where Irritable Bowel Syndrome is based). For any of those, I would recommend checking with a doctor that knows about supplements or an allergist, just to make sure you won't have a problem with any of those (standard warning for anyone with a medical condition). ....but you could try them if you don't have a very severe reaction and are willing to risk it ;-) Answered by Providencia Glucksman 1 year ago.

Side Effects Of Bentyl Answered by Magali Baraw 1 year ago.

Bentyl Side Effects Answered by Monserrate Blackburn 1 year ago.

An interesting side effect of Bentyl is auditory hallucinations. Dr Oliver Sacks writes about this in his book MUSICOPHILIA. Those of us who have this hear music, usually recognizable tunes, very faintly. It isn't constant; it begins after taking Bentyl (pill form) and gradually goes away until it's time for another pill. Answered by Nakisha Heddlesten 1 year ago.

can you take Imodium if you are taking Bentyl? Answered by Lesley Minford 1 year ago.


Is there an OTC substitute for Bentyl?
Asked by Annamarie Macdougald 1 year ago.

Bentyl combines an anticholinergic (bronchodilator) with an antispasmodic, used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In alternative medicine the solution is to get to the source of the problem, not take a pill to alleviate symptoms. Enteric coated peppermint oil is sometimes used to treat IBS. It is available at health food stores. It is antispasmodic. Ginkgo is a bronchodilator, although I've never heard or read about it being used for IBS. Bentyl has a long list of serious side effects, so it is doubtful that anything similar will be released as a generic or OTC anytime soon. Answered by Jerilyn Ferenz 1 year ago.

This is not the place to be looking for safe, knowledgeable and reliable medical advice. For you own good, direct this (and other health care questions) to your physician. I am speaking from sad experience; learn from my mistake. These people may be well-intentioned but they do not have the background or training to address these issues. You could end up worse off than you are now. Again, I am speaking from experience and regret the day I accepted medical advice from a site like this. FGS, consult your physician. I wish I had. Answered by Towanda Gechas 1 year ago.

What about Librex forIBS? Answered by Jenise Haddow 1 year ago.


Can u die off a bentyl overdose? how much would it take? and would it be painful?
Asked by Jaleesa Manasares 1 year ago.

Bentyl is an antispasmodic and anticholinergic used to calm a nervous stomach and reduce the motility of the GI track and NO you can't die from a Bentyl OD. You may wish that you could if you took an OD but you won't die from an OD. Answered by Madeleine Tepperberg 1 year ago.


Does the drug "Bentyl" (Dicyclomine) help with nausea?
Asked by Sidney Hufana 1 year ago.

"Gentle Bentyl" is generally prescribed for irritable bowl syndrome which results in pain in the abdomen and relief from an irritated colon and its side-effects, such as diarrhea. It is not an anti-emetic, or a condition such as nausea. However, one of its side effects is the reduction of nausea resulting from Crohns disease. So it may help, possibly not. Nausea can be helped by avoiding food for awhile, drinking non-acidic, or caffeinated beverages. Pepto-Bismol, is one of the old standard treatments for an upset stomach. If it continues for several hours, you need to be checked out because dehydration is a serious problem caused by this constant loss of fluids from your body. Answered by Nieves Zimmerer 1 year ago.

The only way the medicine will help with nausea is if your on a medicine that gives you a nausea side effect but if your sick just go to the store and get Dramamine it will make you tired but it works fabulously for nausea I know all this because my doctor prescribed bentyl to me because i suffer from IBS and i take another medicine that quite often make me wanna through up and usually bentyl helps will i hope this helps but usually it is only prescribed to IBS patients. Don't take it if you suffer from really bad anxiety and depression because inless your on medication that helps anxiety if you have anxiety then dont take it. Hope this helps somewhat Answered by Amiee Vannuland 1 year ago.

Bentyl Medicine Answered by Norene Hallet 1 year ago.


Is bentyl prescribed for nausea?
I have IBS . Before I was diagnosed with IBS, I would get very nauseous during PMS and my doctor prescribed Bentyl 20mg. It always seems to help, but during a recent visit to the E.R., the on-duty doctor said she had never heard of Bentyl being used to treat nausea. I... Asked by Anglea Sansouci 1 year ago.

I have IBS . Before I was diagnosed with IBS, I would get very nauseous during PMS and my doctor prescribed Bentyl 20mg. It always seems to help, but during a recent visit to the E.R., the on-duty doctor said she had never heard of Bentyl being used to treat nausea. I am curious if anyone else has taken Bentyl for nausea and if it's commonly used to treat it. Thanks! LisaJ Answered by Sid Bree 1 year ago.

The bentyl basically helps with stomach spasms and cramping. Sometimes those symptoms can cause the nausea, so by alleviating those it may help the nausea. I know it sounds a little simple but Chamomile tea (a good quality, preferably loose tea works best) can really help nausea. As for the gerd, I never knew you shouldn't take the Bentyl if you had it, but it's never caused the gerd to be worse. Hope this helps, and I hope you get some relief! Answered by Damian Lescano 1 year ago.

Bentyl Used For Answered by Loan Fauci 1 year ago.


What are your experiences with Bentyl?
I recently had my Gall Bladder out and my doctor thinks I may have IBS. So he has prescribed to take Bentyl. Has anyone had experience with this medicine, or have any suggestions of help. I hate taking pills but I also hate going to the bathroom 12 times a day. HELP!! Asked by Gaye Seliba 1 year ago.

bentyl is pretty good drug for IBS IT IS A NEW GENERATION CALLED ANTI-CHOLINERGIC DRUGS that causes your intestinal muscle to relax so i think it would be suitable for u removing gall bladder is not apig deal it is ok Answered by Susanne Herta 1 year ago.


Could this be irritable bowel.. Bentyl medication?
I have a severe pain in my upper right side, I was in the hospital for it. They said that the CT scan showed a thickening of the intestines, but that that's not uncommon and 9 out of 10 times the colonoscopy shows nothing. Could my IBS be causing this pain? I am in my early 20's and don't want a... Asked by Grace Blore 1 year ago.

I have a severe pain in my upper right side, I was in the hospital for it. They said that the CT scan showed a thickening of the intestines, but that that's not uncommon and 9 out of 10 times the colonoscopy shows nothing. Could my IBS be causing this pain? I am in my early 20's and don't want a colonoscopy. I'm really worried about the pain, it's affecting my job, and life in general. Any advice? Also I was prescribed bentyl to see if it would help, anyone else on this, how long does it take to adjust to it? I'm constantly tired and don't feel "right" ? thanks! Answered by Twyla Selover 1 year ago.

It could well be IBS, I went thru much the same thing as you describe, including the colonoscopy, and yes, they gave me Bentyl as well. The Bentyl is a smooth muscle relaxer and has the side effect of making you tired, can also cause dry mouth. But it is better, in my opinion, than the pain caused by the spasming of the bowel. I simply take the Bentyl at night before bed. With IBS, be aware that dietary patterns are usually the culprits that bring on pain, found out my triggers were chocolate and nuts. So, I don't eat that stuff any more. Might take some detective work on your part, but would give serious consideration to monitoring and altering your diet to prevent future attacks. Answered by Wanita Stalter 1 year ago.

A colonoscopy is no big deal. They give you medication so you are asleep (usually Fentanyl and Versed) so you will have no discomfort. You can go back to work right away. Bentyl will make you very tired. It's used to stop the spasms in your intestines and is a relaxant. Answered by Flo Reller 1 year ago.

I had similar symptons. Please make your doctor check you for Celiac Sprue disease. One out of every 133 people have it. It sometimes is masked as IBS - it is very important that you have a colonscopy. They will drug you and you won't feel a thing. I swear to God. The prep for the colonscopy is far worse than the exam. Far, far worse! You have to drink this icky stuff that is the most nasty taste in the world to clean your system out. Have the colonoscopy - don't suffer! Answered by Leon Birkenhead 1 year ago.


Cant get hold of doctor but i just started taking bentyl for ibs and now im getting very nervous shaky and?
Weak anyone know if these are serious side effects im also getting sinking feeling in stomache medical professionals only please Asked by Spencer Esquerra 1 year ago.

Common Side Effects There are some common side effects of Bentyl. These side effects are not usually considered to be serious, since they usually go away as the body adjusts to the medicine. If the side effects do not go away, however, you should consult your doctor. Side effects include sweating less, blurry vision, taste loss, anxiety, nervousness, nausea, feeling lightheaded, dry mouth, drowsiness, headache, problems sleeping, constipation and dizziness. Serious Side Effects Serious side effects are also a possibility with Bentyl. In situations of serious side effects, it is necessary to seek emergency medical help. Some potentially harmful side effects of the medicine include hallucinations, passing out, problems with focusing of the eyes, trouble speaking, rapid heartbeat, abnormal weakness, throwing up, chest pounding, loss of memory for a brief time, disorientation, problems with urinating, difficulty moving, confusion, diarrhea and agitation. If you feel much worse, and cannot get hold of the doctor, you should go to the ER. Answered by Charlesetta Baison 1 year ago.


Question about Bentyl Irritable Bowel Syndrome...?
Hello. I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome yesterday and my gastroenterologist prescribed me Bentyl. I have sometimes nausea, diarreah, and abdominal pain. I have no appetite and it's been like this for over 1 month. I am eating very little and its stuff like rice, pasta, and crackers. No meat or... Asked by Lourdes Waight 1 year ago.

Hello. I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome yesterday and my gastroenterologist prescribed me Bentyl. I have sometimes nausea, diarreah, and abdominal pain. I have no appetite and it's been like this for over 1 month. I am eating very little and its stuff like rice, pasta, and crackers. No meat or anything like that. I am scared of that what I have is not this and this pill, I don't know what it does and what is it supposed to do and make me feel. I am weak and tired, but I am drinking as much water as possible, so no I am not dehydrated. He said to give the pill 2 weeks and then if it doesn't work, we will go from there... What would you do?? Any advice to feel better?? Answered by Alberta Rosenthall 1 year ago.

You must be having cramps. Bentyl works good for these. I tried it but had some minor side effects so I stopped it. I used Pepto Bismol and occasionally Imodium. These have fewer side effects and work well. Look up Irritable bowel so you can learn about it. It isn't a life threatening syndrome. You should keep a food diary to see if there are certain foods that bother you more than others Also, stress makes it worse. You'll find when you are in a stressful situation you will have more symptoms. Try doing Yoga for a few minutes everyday. Carry Pepto Bismol and Imodium with you so you can access it if you start having diarrhea or cramps. I used PB for cramps and minor diarrhea and Imodium if diarrhea was severe. You will learn by trial and error how much to take of each. If you take too much imodium you will be constipated, so next time take less. The basic thing you need to learn is how to control your symptoms. This will come in time. Part of controlling them is learning to recognize situations that produce stress and to avoid or deal with them early. You can eat normally for the most part. You'll find you can eat ice cream one time but the next it will give you diarrhea and cramps. You may be able to eat small portions but not large. When you start with cramps and diarrhea, eat potatoes, rice, crackers, (see you've already learned to do this), jello, toast with jelly. As soon as, the episode is over go back to eating regular as you need the nutrients. Try the Bentyl. You can start off taking a half tablet and only take it twice a day then increase if you don't have bad side effects. Sometimes side effects go away after a few days. You should write down any changes so you can tell your MD in two weeks. When you are trying Bentyl, try not to use the Pepto at the same time as it can interfer with the absorbtion of Bentyl. Here is some info on Bentyl. Good luck. What is the most important information I should know about dicyclomine? Dicyclomine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of dicyclomine. Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Dicyclomine can decrease your sweating, which can lead to heat stroke in a hot environment. Stop using dicyclomine and call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects such as confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior, fast or uneven heart rate, or if you urinate less than usual or not at all. There are many other medicines that can interact with dicyclomine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. What is dicyclomine? Dicyclomine relieves spasms of the muscles in the stomach and intestines by blocking the actions of certain chemicals in the body. Dicyclomine is used to treat functional bowel or irritable bowel syndrome. Dicyclomine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking dicyclomine? Do not take this medication if you are allergic to dicyclomine, or if you have: problems with urination; a blockage in your digestive tract; an intestinal disorder such as ulcerative colitis; gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); a serious heart condition or active bleeding; glaucoma; myasthenia gravis; or if you are breast-feeding a baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: an ileostomy or colostomy; a nerve problem (such as numbness or tingling); liver disease; kidney disease; ulcerative colitis; thyroid disorder; heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, or a heart rhythm disorder; hiatal hernia; or an enlarged prostate. If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustments or special tests to safely take dicyclomine. FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Dicyclomine can pass into breast milk and can cause breathing problems or death in infants younger than 6 months of age. Do not take dicyclomine if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take dicyclomine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take this medicine with a full glas Answered by Zaida Rubert 1 year ago.

There are quite a few things that help with general digestion and may help with IBS. Many customers get benefits from Probiotics, Fiber, or Enzymes. If you are allergic to lactose, you should make sure that any probiotics you get are either lactose free or milk free (they are more expensive that way)... OR you could try some Lactase Enzyme (it helps digest lactose, so it may help reduce the reaction). There are a few people that get benefits from stomach soothers like Ginger, Peppermint Oil, or Aloe Vera..... but that's just to calm the stomach, not the intestines or bowels (which is where Irritable Bowel Syndrome is based). For any of those, I would recommend checking with a doctor that knows about supplements or an allergist, just to make sure you won't have a problem with any of those (standard warning for anyone with a medical condition). ....but you could try them if you don't have a very severe reaction and are willing to risk it ;-) Answered by Tressa Clary 1 year ago.

Side Effects Of Bentyl Answered by Kathyrn Marandi 1 year ago.

Bentyl Side Effects Answered by Honey Vero 1 year ago.

An interesting side effect of Bentyl is auditory hallucinations. Dr Oliver Sacks writes about this in his book MUSICOPHILIA. Those of us who have this hear music, usually recognizable tunes, very faintly. It isn't constant; it begins after taking Bentyl (pill form) and gradually goes away until it's time for another pill. Answered by Denyse Eagar 1 year ago.

can you take Imodium if you are taking Bentyl? Answered by Helaine Ledebuhr 1 year ago.


Is there an OTC substitute for Bentyl?
Asked by Terresa Luecht 1 year ago.

Bentyl combines an anticholinergic (bronchodilator) with an antispasmodic, used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In alternative medicine the solution is to get to the source of the problem, not take a pill to alleviate symptoms. Enteric coated peppermint oil is sometimes used to treat IBS. It is available at health food stores. It is antispasmodic. Ginkgo is a bronchodilator, although I've never heard or read about it being used for IBS. Bentyl has a long list of serious side effects, so it is doubtful that anything similar will be released as a generic or OTC anytime soon. Answered by Freddy Garren 1 year ago.

This is not the place to be looking for safe, knowledgeable and reliable medical advice. For you own good, direct this (and other health care questions) to your physician. I am speaking from sad experience; learn from my mistake. These people may be well-intentioned but they do not have the background or training to address these issues. You could end up worse off than you are now. Again, I am speaking from experience and regret the day I accepted medical advice from a site like this. FGS, consult your physician. I wish I had. Answered by Bette Lofaro 1 year ago.

What about Librex forIBS? Answered by Annett Mabins 1 year ago.


Can u die off a bentyl overdose? how much would it take? and would it be painful?
Asked by Cathey Marburger 1 year ago.

Bentyl is an antispasmodic and anticholinergic used to calm a nervous stomach and reduce the motility of the GI track and NO you can't die from a Bentyl OD. You may wish that you could if you took an OD but you won't die from an OD. Answered by Lyndsey Whittaker 1 year ago.


Does the drug "Bentyl" (Dicyclomine) help with nausea?
Asked by Michell Vorce 1 year ago.

"Gentle Bentyl" is generally prescribed for irritable bowl syndrome which results in pain in the abdomen and relief from an irritated colon and its side-effects, such as diarrhea. It is not an anti-emetic, or a condition such as nausea. However, one of its side effects is the reduction of nausea resulting from Crohns disease. So it may help, possibly not. Nausea can be helped by avoiding food for awhile, drinking non-acidic, or caffeinated beverages. Pepto-Bismol, is one of the old standard treatments for an upset stomach. If it continues for several hours, you need to be checked out because dehydration is a serious problem caused by this constant loss of fluids from your body. Answered by Edythe Theall 1 year ago.

The only way the medicine will help with nausea is if your on a medicine that gives you a nausea side effect but if your sick just go to the store and get Dramamine it will make you tired but it works fabulously for nausea I know all this because my doctor prescribed bentyl to me because i suffer from IBS and i take another medicine that quite often make me wanna through up and usually bentyl helps will i hope this helps but usually it is only prescribed to IBS patients. Don't take it if you suffer from really bad anxiety and depression because inless your on medication that helps anxiety if you have anxiety then dont take it. Hope this helps somewhat Answered by Oneida Yampolsky 1 year ago.

Bentyl Medicine Answered by Francis Attles 1 year ago.


Is bentyl prescribed for nausea?
I have IBS . Before I was diagnosed with IBS, I would get very nauseous during PMS and my doctor prescribed Bentyl 20mg. It always seems to help, but during a recent visit to the E.R., the on-duty doctor said she had never heard of Bentyl being used to treat nausea. I... Asked by Mora Mytych 1 year ago.

I have IBS . Before I was diagnosed with IBS, I would get very nauseous during PMS and my doctor prescribed Bentyl 20mg. It always seems to help, but during a recent visit to the E.R., the on-duty doctor said she had never heard of Bentyl being used to treat nausea. I am curious if anyone else has taken Bentyl for nausea and if it's commonly used to treat it. Thanks! LisaJ Answered by Rolanda Astolfi 1 year ago.

The bentyl basically helps with stomach spasms and cramping. Sometimes those symptoms can cause the nausea, so by alleviating those it may help the nausea. I know it sounds a little simple but Chamomile tea (a good quality, preferably loose tea works best) can really help nausea. As for the gerd, I never knew you shouldn't take the Bentyl if you had it, but it's never caused the gerd to be worse. Hope this helps, and I hope you get some relief! Answered by Bao Martine 1 year ago.

Bentyl Used For Answered by Thomasina Lach 1 year ago.


What are your experiences with Bentyl?
I recently had my Gall Bladder out and my doctor thinks I may have IBS. So he has prescribed to take Bentyl. Has anyone had experience with this medicine, or have any suggestions of help. I hate taking pills but I also hate going to the bathroom 12 times a day. HELP!! Asked by Eileen Haviland 1 year ago.

bentyl is pretty good drug for IBS IT IS A NEW GENERATION CALLED ANTI-CHOLINERGIC DRUGS that causes your intestinal muscle to relax so i think it would be suitable for u removing gall bladder is not apig deal it is ok Answered by Norman Dorothy 1 year ago.


Could this be irritable bowel.. Bentyl medication?
I have a severe pain in my upper right side, I was in the hospital for it. They said that the CT scan showed a thickening of the intestines, but that that's not uncommon and 9 out of 10 times the colonoscopy shows nothing. Could my IBS be causing this pain? I am in my early 20's and don't want a... Asked by Claudia Nehring 1 year ago.

I have a severe pain in my upper right side, I was in the hospital for it. They said that the CT scan showed a thickening of the intestines, but that that's not uncommon and 9 out of 10 times the colonoscopy shows nothing. Could my IBS be causing this pain? I am in my early 20's and don't want a colonoscopy. I'm really worried about the pain, it's affecting my job, and life in general. Any advice? Also I was prescribed bentyl to see if it would help, anyone else on this, how long does it take to adjust to it? I'm constantly tired and don't feel "right" ? thanks! Answered by Yolande Courier 1 year ago.

It could well be IBS, I went thru much the same thing as you describe, including the colonoscopy, and yes, they gave me Bentyl as well. The Bentyl is a smooth muscle relaxer and has the side effect of making you tired, can also cause dry mouth. But it is better, in my opinion, than the pain caused by the spasming of the bowel. I simply take the Bentyl at night before bed. With IBS, be aware that dietary patterns are usually the culprits that bring on pain, found out my triggers were chocolate and nuts. So, I don't eat that stuff any more. Might take some detective work on your part, but would give serious consideration to monitoring and altering your diet to prevent future attacks. Answered by Debby Taboada 1 year ago.

A colonoscopy is no big deal. They give you medication so you are asleep (usually Fentanyl and Versed) so you will have no discomfort. You can go back to work right away. Bentyl will make you very tired. It's used to stop the spasms in your intestines and is a relaxant. Answered by Angela Minnema 1 year ago.

I had similar symptons. Please make your doctor check you for Celiac Sprue disease. One out of every 133 people have it. It sometimes is masked as IBS - it is very important that you have a colonscopy. They will drug you and you won't feel a thing. I swear to God. The prep for the colonscopy is far worse than the exam. Far, far worse! You have to drink this icky stuff that is the most nasty taste in the world to clean your system out. Have the colonoscopy - don't suffer! Answered by Sarah Swiggum 1 year ago.


Cant get hold of doctor but i just started taking bentyl for ibs and now im getting very nervous shaky and?
Weak anyone know if these are serious side effects im also getting sinking feeling in stomache medical professionals only please Asked by Mariel Bringle 1 year ago.

Common Side Effects There are some common side effects of Bentyl. These side effects are not usually considered to be serious, since they usually go away as the body adjusts to the medicine. If the side effects do not go away, however, you should consult your doctor. Side effects include sweating less, blurry vision, taste loss, anxiety, nervousness, nausea, feeling lightheaded, dry mouth, drowsiness, headache, problems sleeping, constipation and dizziness. Serious Side Effects Serious side effects are also a possibility with Bentyl. In situations of serious side effects, it is necessary to seek emergency medical help. Some potentially harmful side effects of the medicine include hallucinations, passing out, problems with focusing of the eyes, trouble speaking, rapid heartbeat, abnormal weakness, throwing up, chest pounding, loss of memory for a brief time, disorientation, problems with urinating, difficulty moving, confusion, diarrhea and agitation. If you feel much worse, and cannot get hold of the doctor, you should go to the ER. Answered by Jamar Daves 1 year ago.


Question about Bentyl Irritable Bowel Syndrome...?
Hello. I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome yesterday and my gastroenterologist prescribed me Bentyl. I have sometimes nausea, diarreah, and abdominal pain. I have no appetite and it's been like this for over 1 month. I am eating very little and its stuff like rice, pasta, and crackers. No meat or... Asked by Bernarda Waskiewicz 1 year ago.

Hello. I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome yesterday and my gastroenterologist prescribed me Bentyl. I have sometimes nausea, diarreah, and abdominal pain. I have no appetite and it's been like this for over 1 month. I am eating very little and its stuff like rice, pasta, and crackers. No meat or anything like that. I am scared of that what I have is not this and this pill, I don't know what it does and what is it supposed to do and make me feel. I am weak and tired, but I am drinking as much water as possible, so no I am not dehydrated. He said to give the pill 2 weeks and then if it doesn't work, we will go from there... What would you do?? Any advice to feel better?? Answered by Francis Grohs 1 year ago.

You must be having cramps. Bentyl works good for these. I tried it but had some minor side effects so I stopped it. I used Pepto Bismol and occasionally Imodium. These have fewer side effects and work well. Look up Irritable bowel so you can learn about it. It isn't a life threatening syndrome. You should keep a food diary to see if there are certain foods that bother you more than others Also, stress makes it worse. You'll find when you are in a stressful situation you will have more symptoms. Try doing Yoga for a few minutes everyday. Carry Pepto Bismol and Imodium with you so you can access it if you start having diarrhea or cramps. I used PB for cramps and minor diarrhea and Imodium if diarrhea was severe. You will learn by trial and error how much to take of each. If you take too much imodium you will be constipated, so next time take less. The basic thing you need to learn is how to control your symptoms. This will come in time. Part of controlling them is learning to recognize situations that produce stress and to avoid or deal with them early. You can eat normally for the most part. You'll find you can eat ice cream one time but the next it will give you diarrhea and cramps. You may be able to eat small portions but not large. When you start with cramps and diarrhea, eat potatoes, rice, crackers, (see you've already learned to do this), jello, toast with jelly. As soon as, the episode is over go back to eating regular as you need the nutrients. Try the Bentyl. You can start off taking a half tablet and only take it twice a day then increase if you don't have bad side effects. Sometimes side effects go away after a few days. You should write down any changes so you can tell your MD in two weeks. When you are trying Bentyl, try not to use the Pepto at the same time as it can interfer with the absorbtion of Bentyl. Here is some info on Bentyl. Good luck. What is the most important information I should know about dicyclomine? Dicyclomine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of dicyclomine. Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Dicyclomine can decrease your sweating, which can lead to heat stroke in a hot environment. Stop using dicyclomine and call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects such as confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior, fast or uneven heart rate, or if you urinate less than usual or not at all. There are many other medicines that can interact with dicyclomine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. What is dicyclomine? Dicyclomine relieves spasms of the muscles in the stomach and intestines by blocking the actions of certain chemicals in the body. Dicyclomine is used to treat functional bowel or irritable bowel syndrome. Dicyclomine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking dicyclomine? Do not take this medication if you are allergic to dicyclomine, or if you have: problems with urination; a blockage in your digestive tract; an intestinal disorder such as ulcerative colitis; gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); a serious heart condition or active bleeding; glaucoma; myasthenia gravis; or if you are breast-feeding a baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: an ileostomy or colostomy; a nerve problem (such as numbness or tingling); liver disease; kidney disease; ulcerative colitis; thyroid disorder; heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, or a heart rhythm disorder; hiatal hernia; or an enlarged prostate. If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustments or special tests to safely take dicyclomine. FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Dicyclomine can pass into breast milk and can cause breathing problems or death in infants younger than 6 months of age. Do not take dicyclomine if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take dicyclomine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take this medicine with a full glas Answered by Nickie Yazzie 1 year ago.

There are quite a few things that help with general digestion and may help with IBS. Many customers get benefits from Probiotics, Fiber, or Enzymes. If you are allergic to lactose, you should make sure that any probiotics you get are either lactose free or milk free (they are more expensive that way)... OR you could try some Lactase Enzyme (it helps digest lactose, so it may help reduce the reaction). There are a few people that get benefits from stomach soothers like Ginger, Peppermint Oil, or Aloe Vera..... but that's just to calm the stomach, not the intestines or bowels (which is where Irritable Bowel Syndrome is based). For any of those, I would recommend checking with a doctor that knows about supplements or an allergist, just to make sure you won't have a problem with any of those (standard warning for anyone with a medical condition). ....but you could try them if you don't have a very severe reaction and are willing to risk it ;-) Answered by Lucien Speers 1 year ago.

Side Effects Of Bentyl Answered by Pearlie Pealer 1 year ago.

Bentyl Side Effects Answered by Tai Brott 1 year ago.

An interesting side effect of Bentyl is auditory hallucinations. Dr Oliver Sacks writes about this in his book MUSICOPHILIA. Those of us who have this hear music, usually recognizable tunes, very faintly. It isn't constant; it begins after taking Bentyl (pill form) and gradually goes away until it's time for another pill. Answered by Sylvie Varlas 1 year ago.

can you take Imodium if you are taking Bentyl? Answered by Kyoko Matthiesen 1 year ago.


Is there an OTC substitute for Bentyl?
Asked by Carmina Siebel 1 year ago.

Bentyl combines an anticholinergic (bronchodilator) with an antispasmodic, used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In alternative medicine the solution is to get to the source of the problem, not take a pill to alleviate symptoms. Enteric coated peppermint oil is sometimes used to treat IBS. It is available at health food stores. It is antispasmodic. Ginkgo is a bronchodilator, although I've never heard or read about it being used for IBS. Bentyl has a long list of serious side effects, so it is doubtful that anything similar will be released as a generic or OTC anytime soon. Answered by Dallas Cremeans 1 year ago.

This is not the place to be looking for safe, knowledgeable and reliable medical advice. For you own good, direct this (and other health care questions) to your physician. I am speaking from sad experience; learn from my mistake. These people may be well-intentioned but they do not have the background or training to address these issues. You could end up worse off than you are now. Again, I am speaking from experience and regret the day I accepted medical advice from a site like this. FGS, consult your physician. I wish I had. Answered by Sun Sampsel 1 year ago.

What about Librex forIBS? Answered by Nelle Brazen 1 year ago.


Can u die off a bentyl overdose? how much would it take? and would it be painful?
Asked by Valeria Matero 1 year ago.

Bentyl is an antispasmodic and anticholinergic used to calm a nervous stomach and reduce the motility of the GI track and NO you can't die from a Bentyl OD. You may wish that you could if you took an OD but you won't die from an OD. Answered by Marlys Kristof 1 year ago.


Does the drug "Bentyl" (Dicyclomine) help with nausea?
Asked by Xochitl Langlinais 1 year ago.

"Gentle Bentyl" is generally prescribed for irritable bowl syndrome which results in pain in the abdomen and relief from an irritated colon and its side-effects, such as diarrhea. It is not an anti-emetic, or a condition such as nausea. However, one of its side effects is the reduction of nausea resulting from Crohns disease. So it may help, possibly not. Nausea can be helped by avoiding food for awhile, drinking non-acidic, or caffeinated beverages. Pepto-Bismol, is one of the old standard treatments for an upset stomach. If it continues for several hours, you need to be checked out because dehydration is a serious problem caused by this constant loss of fluids from your body. Answered by Jackeline Sabean 1 year ago.

The only way the medicine will help with nausea is if your on a medicine that gives you a nausea side effect but if your sick just go to the store and get Dramamine it will make you tired but it works fabulously for nausea I know all this because my doctor prescribed bentyl to me because i suffer from IBS and i take another medicine that quite often make me wanna through up and usually bentyl helps will i hope this helps but usually it is only prescribed to IBS patients. Don't take it if you suffer from really bad anxiety and depression because inless your on medication that helps anxiety if you have anxiety then dont take it. Hope this helps somewhat Answered by Carmel Okumoto 1 year ago.

Bentyl Medicine Answered by Hilario Hancox 1 year ago.


Is bentyl prescribed for nausea?
I have IBS . Before I was diagnosed with IBS, I would get very nauseous during PMS and my doctor prescribed Bentyl 20mg. It always seems to help, but during a recent visit to the E.R., the on-duty doctor said she had never heard of Bentyl being used to treat nausea. I... Asked by Gina Cutler 1 year ago.

I have IBS . Before I was diagnosed with IBS, I would get very nauseous during PMS and my doctor prescribed Bentyl 20mg. It always seems to help, but during a recent visit to the E.R., the on-duty doctor said she had never heard of Bentyl being used to treat nausea. I am curious if anyone else has taken Bentyl for nausea and if it's commonly used to treat it. Thanks! LisaJ Answered by Lillia Overbeek 1 year ago.

The bentyl basically helps with stomach spasms and cramping. Sometimes those symptoms can cause the nausea, so by alleviating those it may help the nausea. I know it sounds a little simple but Chamomile tea (a good quality, preferably loose tea works best) can really help nausea. As for the gerd, I never knew you shouldn't take the Bentyl if you had it, but it's never caused the gerd to be worse. Hope this helps, and I hope you get some relief! Answered by Agripina Arview 1 year ago.

Bentyl Used For Answered by Carie Berrospe 1 year ago.


What are your experiences with Bentyl?
I recently had my Gall Bladder out and my doctor thinks I may have IBS. So he has prescribed to take Bentyl. Has anyone had experience with this medicine, or have any suggestions of help. I hate taking pills but I also hate going to the bathroom 12 times a day. HELP!! Asked by Dominick Schiltz 1 year ago.

bentyl is pretty good drug for IBS IT IS A NEW GENERATION CALLED ANTI-CHOLINERGIC DRUGS that causes your intestinal muscle to relax so i think it would be suitable for u removing gall bladder is not apig deal it is ok Answered by Kimbery Souers 1 year ago.


Could this be irritable bowel.. Bentyl medication?
I have a severe pain in my upper right side, I was in the hospital for it. They said that the CT scan showed a thickening of the intestines, but that that's not uncommon and 9 out of 10 times the colonoscopy shows nothing. Could my IBS be causing this pain? I am in my early 20's and don't want a... Asked by Francesco Kammerer 1 year ago.

I have a severe pain in my upper right side, I was in the hospital for it. They said that the CT scan showed a thickening of the intestines, but that that's not uncommon and 9 out of 10 times the colonoscopy shows nothing. Could my IBS be causing this pain? I am in my early 20's and don't want a colonoscopy. I'm really worried about the pain, it's affecting my job, and life in general. Any advice? Also I was prescribed bentyl to see if it would help, anyone else on this, how long does it take to adjust to it? I'm constantly tired and don't feel "right" ? thanks! Answered by Vida Hizkiya 1 year ago.

It could well be IBS, I went thru much the same thing as you describe, including the colonoscopy, and yes, they gave me Bentyl as well. The Bentyl is a smooth muscle relaxer and has the side effect of making you tired, can also cause dry mouth. But it is better, in my opinion, than the pain caused by the spasming of the bowel. I simply take the Bentyl at night before bed. With IBS, be aware that dietary patterns are usually the culprits that bring on pain, found out my triggers were chocolate and nuts. So, I don't eat that stuff any more. Might take some detective work on your part, but would give serious consideration to monitoring and altering your diet to prevent future attacks. Answered by Damaris Rocheford 1 year ago.

A colonoscopy is no big deal. They give you medication so you are asleep (usually Fentanyl and Versed) so you will have no discomfort. You can go back to work right away. Bentyl will make you very tired. It's used to stop the spasms in your intestines and is a relaxant. Answered by Ira Erber 1 year ago.

I had similar symptons. Please make your doctor check you for Celiac Sprue disease. One out of every 133 people have it. It sometimes is masked as IBS - it is very important that you have a colonscopy. They will drug you and you won't feel a thing. I swear to God. The prep for the colonscopy is far worse than the exam. Far, far worse! You have to drink this icky stuff that is the most nasty taste in the world to clean your system out. Have the colonoscopy - don't suffer! Answered by Barbar Leerar 1 year ago.


Cant get hold of doctor but i just started taking bentyl for ibs and now im getting very nervous shaky and?
Weak anyone know if these are serious side effects im also getting sinking feeling in stomache medical professionals only please Asked by Alita Poet 1 year ago.

Common Side Effects There are some common side effects of Bentyl. These side effects are not usually considered to be serious, since they usually go away as the body adjusts to the medicine. If the side effects do not go away, however, you should consult your doctor. Side effects include sweating less, blurry vision, taste loss, anxiety, nervousness, nausea, feeling lightheaded, dry mouth, drowsiness, headache, problems sleeping, constipation and dizziness. Serious Side Effects Serious side effects are also a possibility with Bentyl. In situations of serious side effects, it is necessary to seek emergency medical help. Some potentially harmful side effects of the medicine include hallucinations, passing out, problems with focusing of the eyes, trouble speaking, rapid heartbeat, abnormal weakness, throwing up, chest pounding, loss of memory for a brief time, disorientation, problems with urinating, difficulty moving, confusion, diarrhea and agitation. If you feel much worse, and cannot get hold of the doctor, you should go to the ER. Answered by Geraldine Duplechin 1 year ago.


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