Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 007898/004.

Names and composition

"BENEMID" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROBENECID.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007898/004 BENEMID PROBENECID TABLET/ORAL 500MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007898/004 BENEMID PROBENECID TABLET/ORAL 500MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
080966/001 PROBALAN PROBENECID TABLET/ORAL 500MG
083740/001 PROBENECID PROBENECID TABLET/ORAL 500MG
084211/002 PROBENECID PROBENECID TABLET/ORAL 500MG
084442/004 PROBENECID PROBENECID TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086150/002 PROBENECID PROBENECID TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086917/001 PROBENECID PROBENECID TABLET/ORAL 500MG

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Answered questions

What is best cure for ghout?
its christmas i have ghout, gp will only give me painkillers as says some medication is dangerous now .I understand cranberry juice is a good remedy? is there any other remedies good for relieving ghout Asked by Sparkle Whaite 1 year ago.

There is no cure for gout, as the tendency to have an elevated uric acid level in the blood stream is inherited as an autosomal dominant genetic trait. Although the tendency toward an elevated uric acid level is equally common in men and women, men develop gout approximately 20 times more frequently than women. The very best approach is prevention of attacks. To prevent attacks of gout, one should eat very little meat, avoid alcoholic beverages, and drink plenty of water. These tend to keep the uric acid level low, whereas eating meat tends to increase uric acid levels. Gout was formerly though of as a malady of the rich, but that was because to poor ate very little meat. and the rich indulged excessively in meat, preferring that to things that were grown in the lowly earth! Before we go any further, I am providing this information for informational purposes only, not for you to use as a tool to try to get your gp to prescribe anything he feels may be inappropriate for you to take. After all, he has met you and treated you in the past, and I do not know you nor any particulars about your medical situation. I would not object to your printing it our and showing it to him, but you should be aware that there differences in medical practices from one area to another, and the current trend is to base our practices upon the best medical evidence available. If you have an attack of gout, DO NOT TAKE ASPIRIN OR IBUPROFEN, as it may make the attack worse. I suspect the "dangerous" medication to which your GP is referring is indomethacin. It is effective, but I no longer use it to treat my patients, since it has a fairly high risk of complications such as gastrointestinal ulceration and bleeding. Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication (so are aspirin and ibuprofen, but their effect in gout is different). I have prescribed other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications at times for gouty patients, most often sulindac, with good results. I have no experience using naproxen, diclofenac or etodolac in treating gout, and cannot tell you whether they might be beneficial or not. Some physicians use an older remedy, colchicine, for treatment of acute gout, and it is a tried and true remedy that can work well if begun promptly, but colchicine also has side effects which your gp may think make it not a good choice for you. There is a uricosuric medication called "Benemid" or generically, probenecid, which causes increased excretion of uric acid through the kidneys. This lowers blood levels of urinc acid and may reduce the risk of attacks of gout. Colchicine and Benemid have been, and I believe continue to be available, at least in the United States, in a combination called ColBenemid, which can be used to treat either acute gout or to help maintain gout-free intervals. If a patient presents in my clinic with acute gout, I usually treat with prednisone, starting with a dose of 20 mg twice daily and tapering the dose over a few days once symptoms are under control. Prednisone is not without risks and side effects, either, and it should only be used under medical supervision; indeed, your gp may well have reaons for not prescribing this medication for you, and I do not wish to second-guess him/her. Once the patient is symptom-free, if the patient has had recurrent attacks of gout, I will prescribe allopurinol, 100 mg daily for one week, 200 mg daily for the second week, and 300 mg daily thereafter indefinitely. It is important not to start allopurinol while there is gout activity, since that could make the symptoms of gout worse. Answered by Joel Tortorelli 1 year ago.

Ok, I have had gout for years but haven't had any flare ups in a long time. You can't eat or drink anything that causes your system to be more acid (soft drinks, tea, coffee, meats, breads or alcohol). You need to eat things that are more alkaline (fruits (not tomatoes), veggies (not beans, califlower or spinach), cottage cheese, sour cream and yogurt. Water and black cherry fruit (not cocktail form) Just Black Cherry from Knudson or concentrate from Dynamic Health are great choices. I literally walk around with quart jars of water to drink, it flushes the uric acid from your system. Do not take asprin or ibuprophin for the pain as it can actually add to your problem. Bromelaain (obtained from a health food store) is an enzyne that reduces swelling in the joint also Cherry Fruit Extract (from Enzymatic Therapy) is also very useful. I take about 12 capsules of the Cherry Fruit Extract the first day and 6 the following and then maintain on 3 a day for about a week after the attack. I also drink at least a gallon and a half of water a day and a quart of Black Cherry Juice during the attack and most of the time the symptoms leave on the second day but I still drink lots of water and take the extract and choose Black Cherry juice if I want something different for a few days following. I don't now nor have ever taken any prescriptions for this as the side affects outweighed the pain for me and I have had some swelling so bad I couldn't wear jeans only shorts. I was diagnosed by a gp but I choose to do things the more natural approach and so far it's been a success. Answered by Malena Halliman 1 year ago.

Urea in the blood comes from foods like seafood, shrimp--or other things--it settles low in the body--often in the foot or toes. Stop eating whatever gave you the gout--think real hard--what did you eat that was different?? REAL cranberry juice is a good start--NOT OCEAN SPRAY--that is NOT real cranberry juice--you need to go to a GNC store or a health food store for REAL cranberry juice. The store stuff is red dye with trace cranberry color from concentrate---that is NOT what you want. Take the shoes and socks off or wear loose clothes that touch the gout--raise the feet if you can. Sit down--be quiet --gout will hurt and complaining won't help a bit. Gout can affect all joints--so anti inflammatory tablets are your best hope. NO ALCOHOL, ever---that is another cause. It is just like arthritis in your joints so take care of yourself---and it can give you painful kidney stones, too !! Answered by Estela Paronto 1 year ago.

Gout is a disorder of urate levels within the blood. The Excess urate crystallises inside the joints causing intense pain. Lifetsyle treatments for gout include: Cut down on alcohol intake Reduce intake of purine rich foodst- Beer, oily fish, organ meat Medical treatment for chronic gout: Allopurinol Answered by Antwan Glenn 1 year ago.

cherries in any form are the best, safest and most effective way to treat the pain of gout. twelve will do the trick. more is fine, but not necessary. do it every day until it subsides. make sure there isn't an underlying, more serious problem causing the gout attacks.. the health food store sells a black cherry concentrate that is very convenient and works quite well. Answered by Melissa Lattus 1 year ago.

Drink at least eight glasses of water a day to dilute the urine and help lower uric acid levels. Stay away from alcohol, which can trigger attacks. Keep weight down. Obesity may play an important role in gout attacks. Avoid fats, refined carbohydrates, excess protein, and, if you're sensitive to purines, foods containing them (including organ meats, anchovies, legumes, oatmeal, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower, and mushrooms). One of the oldest known remedies for gout - a drug called colchicine -- is derived from the autumn crocus, also known as meadow saffron. Unfortunately, colchicine in pill form causes severe cramping and diarrhea in up to 80% of those who take it in the high doses needed to combat gout attacks. An injectable form of colchicine administered by your doctor, however, appears to work quickly and without side effects. Eating fresh or canned cherries (a half pound a day) may help keep gout at bay by reducing levels of uric acid. Some people swear by them; and a small study conducted many years ago found that eating cherries may indeed lower uric acid levels. An easier way to get the benefits of cherries is to take 1,000 mg daily of cherry fruit extract pills (available at health-food stores). Strawberries, blueberries, celery, or celery seed extracts may have a similar beneficial effect. Bromelain: 500 mg every 3 hours during an attack; reduce to twice a day to help prevent further attacks. Each dose should provide 2,000 GDU or 3,000 MCU. Quercetin : 500 mg twice a day between meals.Take with bromelain to help prevent gout attacks. Cherry Fruit Extract : 1,000 mg 3 times a day following an acute attack. Reduce dosage to 1,000 mg a day for maintenance. Vitamin C : 500 mg a day. Add 500 mg every 5 days until you reach 1,000 mg twice a day. Reduce dose if diarrhea develops. Nettle : 250 mg standardized extract 3 times a day. Also effective as a nettle tea compress applied to sore joints. (Use 1 or 2 tsp. dried herb per cup of hot water.) Flaxseed Oil : 1 tbsp. (14 grams) a day. Can be mixed with food; take in the morning. Answered by Gonzalo Welden 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what is best cure for ghout? its christmas i have ghout, gp will only give me painkillers as says some medication is dangerous now .I understand cranberry juice is a good remedy? is there any other remedies good for relieving ghout Answered by Lettie Cavness 1 year ago.

Eliminate gout, arthritis and fibromyalgia pain FAST with 3 natural home remedies: Baking soda Baking soda mixed in water can relieve gout joint pain almost instantly and reduce high uric acid. In some cases it may take up to two days to experience relief; however, if taken regularly, it will prevent attacks before they occur. Mix 1/2 teaspoon baking soda in 8 oz. of water and drink it all at once. The maximum recommended dose is 4 teaspoons divided up throughout the day during an acute attack. Then reduce the dose as the pain subsides. Baking soda can raise the blood pressure. Persons taking medication for hypertension should consult a health practitioner before using baking soda in this manner. Apple cider vinegar Anecdotal evidence and clinical reports indicate that apple cider vinegar relieves joint pain, acid stomach, headaches, gout, muscle spasms and arthritis. ACV acts to help create an alkaline-forming state in the body by stimulating digestive juices, including bicarbonate, that's released by the pancreas. This highly alkaline substance neutralizes the acidic vinegar and stomach acids, helping to balance the pH. Mix 1 to 2 tablespoons of vinegar with 8 oz. of water and drink all at once. Some people prefer to sip on it; however, it seems to be more effective when consumed at one time. If it's too strong use less vinegar and work up to a full dose. Apple cider vinegar is known to be especially helpful in relieving acute gout attacks. Always use organic vinegar with the mother intact. Lemon juice and baking soda Another alkalizing drink that works miracles for some people is a lemon juice and baking soda cocktail. Mixing the highly acidic lemon juice with the highly alkaline baking soda creates a perfectly balanced pH that matches the body's natural healthy pH, which helps to restore balance almost instantaneously. Pour the juice of one lemon - about 2 oz. - into a tall glass. Add 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and allow it to fizz and bubble until it is completely flat -- about two minutes. It can also be stirred. Add 8 oz. of water and drink immediately. It should taste like flat water. Answered by Taneka Tolman 1 year ago.

You may never get rid of your gout, but you can do a lot to make it less apparent, and bothersome. Don't drink alcohol, no hot dog or most lunch meats eat Cherry's, and or cram-berry juice {not the flavored drink}, just watch what you eat and you can make gout less of a problem. Answered by Julienne Spalding 1 year ago.

cherries are good if you eat a few every day. I too have gout and I also take a medication called allopurinol which keeps my uric acid level normal and that helps to keep an attack of gout from occurring. Answered by Elke Tewolde 1 year ago.

Cherrys,strawberries,and lay off the booze. You're not alone,I've got it for xmas too. Left foot. Dosing up on Ibuprofen. Answered by Scotty Gounder 1 year ago.


How can i cure my gout or at least control it?
Asked by Lanora Filla 1 year ago.

Treatment The goals of treatment for gout consist of alleviating pain, avoiding severe attacks in the future, and preventing long-term joint damage. In addition to taking pain medications as prescribed by their doctors, people having gout attacks are encouraged to rest and to increase the amount of fluids that they drink. Acute attacks of gout can be treated with nonaspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as naproxen sodium (Aleve), ibuprofen (Advil), or indomethacin (Indocin). In some cases, these drugs can aggravate a peptic ulcer or existing kidney disease and cannot be used. Doctors sometimes also use colchicine (Colbenemid), especially in cases where nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cannot be used. Colchicine may cause diarrhea, which tends to go away once the patient stops taking it. Corticosteroids such as prednisone (Deltasone) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acthar) may be given orally or may be injected directly into the joint for a more concentrated effect. While all of these drugs have the potential to cause side effects, they are used for only about 48 hours and are not likely to cause major problems. However, aspirin and closely related drugs (salicylates) should be avoided because they can ultimately worsen gout. Once an acute attack has been successfully treated, doctors try to prevent future attacks of gout and long-term joint damage by lowering uric acid levels in the blood. There are two types of drugs for correcting hyperuricemia. Uricosuric drugs, such as probenecid (Benemid) and sulfinpyrazone (Anturane), lower the levels of urate in the blood by increasing its removal from the body (excretion) through the urine. These drugs may promote the formation of kidney stones, and they may not work for all patients, especially those with kidney disease. Allopurinol (Zyloprim), a type of drug called a xanthine-oxidase inhibitor, blocks the production of urate in the body, and can dissolve kidney stones as well as treating gout. The potential side effects of allopurinol include rash, a skin condition known as dermatitis, and liver dysfunction. Once people begin taking these medications, they must take them for life or the gout will continue to return. Alternative treatment The alternative medicine approach to gout focuses on correcting hyperuricemia by losing weight and limiting the intake of alcohol and purine-rich foods. In addition, consuming garlic (Allium sativum) has been recommended to help prevent gout. Increasing fluid intake, especially by drinking water, is also recommended. During an acute attack, contrast hydrotherapy (alternating three-minute hot compresses with 30-second cold compresses) can help dissolve the crystals and resolve the pain faster. Answered by Damaris Ennes 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Anthony Gates 1 year ago.

Recommendations and treatments for Gout 1.Bromelain :500 mg every 3 hours during an attack; reduce to twice a day to help prevent further attacks. 2.Quercetin : 500 mg twice a day between meals.Take with bromelain to help prevent gout attacks. Cherry Fruit Extract: 1,000 mg 3 times a day following an acute attack.Reduce dosage to 1,000 mg a day for maintenance. Vitamin C: 500 mg a day. Add 500 mg every 5 days until you reach 1,000 mg twice a day. Reduce dose if diarrhea develops. Nettle: 250 mg standardized extract 3 times a day. Also effective as a nettle tea compress applied to sore joints. (Use 1 or 2 tsp. dried herb per cup of hot water.) Flaxseed Oil : 1 tbsp. (14 grams) a day. Can be mixed with food; take in the morning. I-WATER INTAKE If you are under an attack and do not consume enough non-chlorinated water, it can and most likely will get worse. The crystals are being dissolved into a soluble form and the levels of uric acid in the blood will rise significantly. If you do not keep the blood hydrated, the uric acid can and most likely will re-crystallize. You should consume at least 30% more than you expel. If you are under an attack , it is imperative that you drink about 96oz of non-chlorinated distilled or bottled water to relieve the attack as quickly as possible. After this attack, you should consume at least 64oz a day with the capsules to remain gout free. II- Maintain a diet of low purines at all times. Eat very little meat red or pork, no organ meats at all (Hot dogs, bologna, etc.) Consume no alcohol. Do not eat any fried foods, roasted nuts, or any foods containing of cooked with oil that has been subjected to heat. Avoid rich foods such as cakes and pies. Limit white flour and sugar products in your diet. Avoid the amino acid glycine. Limit your intake of caffeine, cauliflower, dried beans, lentils, fish, eggs, oatmeal, peas, poultry, spinach, and yeast products. If you are overweight, lose excessive pounds but avoid crash diets because they will bring on an attack as well. CAUTION: Do not use Acetaminophen in any form during a gout attack. It can also be found in liquid cold formula medications and capsules. Acetaminophen may cause the gout attack to more severe and prevent a gout attack from subsiding. Answered by Lynda Yokota 1 year ago.

Gout is a form of Arthritis and it is cuase by uric acid build up in the system The first step wherever possible, must be to correct those factors mentioned above which give rise to high uric acid levels. Purines are substances found in food, which, when broken down produce a lot of uric acid. Therefore the following foods which are high in Purines should be restricted or avoided: # Offal foods such as liver, kidneys, tripe, sweetbreads and tongue. # Excessive amounts of red meat. # Shellfish, fish roe and scallops. # Peas. lentils and beans. # Alcohol intake should be reduced. Two glasses of beer a day or less is sensible. On special occasions you can drink more. # Weight loss may be very important. # Medication for high blood pressure may need to be altered Here is a good link Answered by Laverne Grajek 1 year ago.

well my husband has gout and believe me he has tried everything. We was told not to eat processed meats, stay away from tomatoes, alcohol is the worst, and milk don't drink allot of it. We have found that Black Cherries are good for it, He also goes to GNC store and buys the juice and adds it to water. mix it in a bottle of water and drink everyday and it helps keep his under control. Good Luck Answered by Shirlene Tullock 1 year ago.

gout is disease in which uric acid level in body exceeds above normal range; then it causes pan in body specially in joints; you can control it by helopethic drug . zyloric tabs 300 mg once a day;and also avoid red meats. and use plenty of water; Answered by Karleen Shelenberger 1 year ago.


Question about Ciprofloxacin and its side effects?
Hello! I have been prescribed to take Ciprofloxacin 500 MG twice daily to treat my UTI. Today is my 5-th day taking this medicine,however I still feel pain and burning feeling when urinating. But what concerns me more, I started to sweat a loooooot (especially last night) Also skin on my hands looks like it was... Asked by Randa Ascencio 1 year ago.

Hello! I have been prescribed to take Ciprofloxacin 500 MG twice daily to treat my UTI. Today is my 5-th day taking this medicine,however I still feel pain and burning feeling when urinating. But what concerns me more, I started to sweat a loooooot (especially last night) Also skin on my hands looks like it was burned under the sun. I read those can be Cipro side effects. Is that true? Should I continue taking Cipro for couple more days and finish the course, since it's directed for 5-7 day period. Any help would be appreciated! Answered by David Camarillo 1 year ago.

What you describe are serious side effects that require you stop the Cipro and contact your physician. Do so immediately. Here is the formal list Cipro side effects Stop using Cipro and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Cipro and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeat; sudden pain or swelling near your joints (especially in your arm or ankle); diarrhea that is watery or bloody; confusion, hallucinations, depression, unusual thoughts or behavior; seizure (convulsions); pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, weakness; urinating less than usual or not at all; easy bruising or bleeding; numbness, tingling, or unusual pain anywhere in your body; fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild. Less serious Cipro side effects may include: nausea, vomiting; dizziness or drowsiness; blurred vision; feeling nervous, anxious, or agitated; sleep problems (insomnia or nightmares); or increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. What other drugs will affect Cipro? Do not take Cipro together with tizanidine (Zanaflex). Before taking Cipro, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin); clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth, such as glyburide (Micronase, Diabeta, Glynase); methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall); metoclopramide (Reglan); phenytoin (Dilantin); probenecid (Benemid); ropinirole (Requip); tacrine (Cognex); theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theolair, Slo-Phyllin, Slo-Bid, Elixophyllin); a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin, others), etodolac (Lodine), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), meloxicam (Mobic), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Anaprox), piroxicam (Feldene), and others; or an oral steroid medication such as betamethasone (Celestone), dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexpak), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Orapred), prednisone (Meticorten, Sterapred), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Cipro. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Angie Pedersen 1 year ago.

Are you drinking plenty of fluids? Not drinking enough even with out an infection will cause burning. I would call your doctor though. The antibiotic should have gave some relief by now. The Cipro could be resistant to your infection, and you could possibly need a different infection. As far as the 'skin burns' have you been in the sunlight? Generally you should avoid sunlight with antibiotics. Answered by Sebastian Macchione 1 year ago.


Can i take any over the counter medicine for pain while im taking ciprofloxacin?
Asked by Edmond Huba 1 year ago.

Cipro may interact with many other medicines to make them less effective or increase their side effects. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about whether Cipro interacts with other medicines you are taking. Examples of drugs that may interact with Cipro include theophylline (brand names: Theo-Dur, Uniphyl), warfarin (Coumadin), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), didanosine (Videx), sucralfate (Carafate), iron supplements, caffeine and antacids (Tums, Maalox, Gaviscon). Tell your healthcare provider the names of all of the medicines you are taking, including over-the-counter and herbal medicines. Drug interactions not included but in other sources: tizanidine (Zanaflex); chewable/buffered tablets or pediatric powder, other highly buffered drugs, sulfonylurea glyburide probenecid (Benemid) methotrexate nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) but not acetyl salicylic acid. phenytoin (Dilantin) Some quinolones, including ciprofloxacin, have also been shown to interfere with the metabolism of caffeine. This may lead to reduced clearance of caffeine and a prolongation of its serum half-life. So from the above, note that NSAIDS for pain can have drug interaction with Cipro. Answered by Rosalva Dalba 1 year ago.


Can anyone tell me ,is there any traditional medicine to help cure Gout or at least reduce the pain?
Asked by Lessie Walthall 1 year ago.

Gout is caused by an accumulation of uric acid in the joint tissues. Currently, there is no cure for gout, but through proper diet, a healthy lifestyle and medications, the symptoms of gout can be relieved and further episodes eliminated. *Proper diet Avoid or restrict foods high in purine (a substance that produces uric acid when broken down). These foods include: sardines, anchovies, brains, liver, kidneys, tripe, sweetbreads, tongue, shellfish (mussels and oysters), fish roe, scallops, peas, lentils, beans and an excessive amount of red meat. Drink 10 to 12 eight-ounce glasses of non-alcoholic fluids daily. *Healthy lifestyle Reduce alcohol consumption Lose weight *Medications Using medications for gout can be complicated, because the treatment needs to be tailored for each person and may need to be changed from time to time. To relieve the pain and swelling of an acute attack, the doctor may prescribe nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, corticosteroid drugs, and/or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). To prevent future attacks, the doctor may recommend colchicine, probenecid (Benemid, Parbenem or Probalan), sulfinpyrazone (Anturane), or allopurinol (Lopurin, Zurinol or Zyloprim). All of these drugs are powerful, so the patient needs to understand why they are taking them, what side effects may occur and what to do if they have problems with the medication. *Prevention of Gout -To lower risk factors, consider: supervised weight-loss program with exercise (if the patient is overweight) avoiding a purine-rich diet avoiding alcohol consumption, especially binge drinking changing to another drug, if taking diuretics for hypertension Answered by Nicholle Khalsa 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Kimi Finnemore 1 year ago.

Gout can also be managed through lifestyle and diet changes. Weight loss, staying hydrated, limiting alcohol consumption, and restricting intake of foods high in purines (which the human body converts into uric acid) can all prevent a gout outbreak. Food extremely high in purines include: Organ meats like hearts and brains Herring Mussels Sardines Yeast Foods moderately high in purines include: Anchovies Bacon Liver Salmon Turkey Scallops Haddock Kidneys Goose Vegetables like peas, beans, spinach, cauliflower, and mushrooms are all high in purines; however, studies have shown that gout sufferers don’t experience an increased risk of outbreaks if they consume these foods. Additionally, though most foods associated with gout have a high protein content, studies have shown that a high-protein diet like Atkins or South Beach has no effect on gout outbreaks. Ultimately, the diet associated with the development of gout is the same diet associated with heart disease. Answered by Delisa Beauchesne 1 year ago.

No, I dont believe this is a miracle. I have had leukemia, twice. And there are several things that could show bad lab results, but nothing be wrong once you do the biopsy. I have actually been in that position before. A lab showed outragously high white blood cell counts and a lot of blast cells, but when they did the biopsy to double check and some more lab work, I just has a really bad infection. No cancer. Answered by Penny Orzel 1 year ago.


Is there any drug or food interactions you need to be aware of while taking nitrofurantoin-micro?
Asked by Hector Gamons 1 year ago.

Nitrofurantoin is an antibiotic that fights bacteria in the body. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath (even with mild exertion), fever, chills, cough, chest pain, yellowing of the skin or eyes; pale skin, unusual weakness, numbness or tingling, or diarrhea that is watery or bloody. Avoid using antacids without your doctor's advice Take each dose with a full glass of water. Take nitrofurantoin with food or milk Before taking nitrofurantoin, tell your doctor if you are taking: magnesium salicylate (Doan's Pills, Mobidin, Momentum); choline magnesium salicylate (Tricosal, Trilisate); probenecid (Benemid); or sulfinpyrazone (Anturane). Answered by Vance Shade 1 year ago.

Probenecid may increase the effect of Nitrofurantoin and too much can possibly cause toxicity. Space the dosing with antacids by at least 3 hours apart. Take with meals to slow the rate of absorption and decrease side effects. Answered by Odessa Mcneary 1 year ago.

Also probably watch out for Neurontin, Avonex. There are dozens of adverse reports that involved nitrofurantoin and each (or more) of these drugs. Answered by Rich Duenwald 1 year ago.

pickles and Paxil. sorry, I'm retarded. Answered by Felica Barimah 1 year ago.


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