BANTHINE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 007390/001.

Names and composition

"BANTHINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of METHANTHELINE BROMIDE.

Answered questions

What do these medication orders mean?
No. I am not a nurse, nor am I going to be a nurse. But thank you for your concern, :D Asked by Mack Pistoresi 3 months ago.

bumetanide 0.5mg PO tid today, then 0.5mg bid x 1 day, then D/C ciprofloxacin 200mg IV q 12 hr furosemide 40mg IV push now, then 20mg po q day Pro-Banthine tabs 15mg i a.c. Keflex 250mg #20 Sig: tab i qid with food Humulin-R insulin Sig: U-30 q am 30 min ac breakfast and U-20 30 min ac evening meal Answered by Rebecca Assalone 3 months ago.

Bumetanide 0.5mg by mouth three times daily today, then 0.5mg twice daily for one day then discontinue Ciprofloxacin 200mg by IV every 12 hours Furosemide 40mg through IV push now then 20mg daily Pro-Banthine 15mg before meals Keflex 250mg one tablet four times daily with food Humulin-R 30units every morning 1/2 hour before breakfast and 20units every evening 1/2 before dinner. Insulin is injected subcutaneously and usually is in a concentration of 100units/mL Answered by Bruce Vallangeon 3 months ago.

The Pharm tech is correct with 2 exceptions. furosemide 40mg IV push now then 20mg by mouth daily Keflex 250mg dispense 20 tabs. Directions: Take 1 tablet 4 times a day with food Answered by Dennise Betak 3 months ago.

I hope you're not a nurse. And I really hope those aren't your medication orders. You're one sick puppy if they are. Answered by Kenton Hoefle 3 months ago.


Can i take an anti nausea medicine while taking percocet?
Are there any anti nausea medicines that i can take while on percocet? (its too late in the evening to ask my doctor or a pharmacist) Asked by Britney Zukowski 3 months ago.

With respect to certain drugs, here is a partial list of things NOT to take with oxycodone (percocet). As you see, Dramamine is on this list. Also, please note that BENADRYL has moderate interaction with Percocet and they shouldn't be taken togther (not on this list, it is available in a PDR - Physician's Desk Reference) BTW - Benadryl is for allergic reactions, not anti-nausea : Cold or allergy medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by oxycodone. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other narcotic pain medicine. Before taking Percocet, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * glycopyrrolate (Robinul); * mepenzolate (Cantil); * atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop); * bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare); * a bronchodilator such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva); or * irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine). I'd recommend eating ginger. You won't have drug interactions and will reduce the wear and tear on your liver/kidneys from taking medicine (which, of course, is sometimes necessary, but best to avoid if possible). Medicinal Uses and Indications (for ginger): Today, health care professionals commonly recommend to help prevent or treat nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness, pregnancy, and cancer chemotherapy. It is also used as a digestive aid for mild stomach upset, as support in inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, and may even be used in heart disease or cancer. In addition to providing relief from nausea and vomiting, ginger extract has long been used in traditional medical practices to reduce inflammation. In fact, many health care professionals use ginger to help treat health problems associated with inflammation, such as arthritis and ulcerative colitis. In a study of 261 people with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, those who received a ginger extract twice daily experienced less pain and required fewer pain-killing medications compared to those who received placebo. Although a few studies have shown a benefit of ginger for arthritis, one trial found that the herb was no more effective than ibuprofen (a medication frequently used to treat OA) or placebo in reducing symptoms of OA. Motion Sickness Several studies suggest that ginger may be more effective than placebo in reducing symptoms associated with motion sickness. In one trial of 80 novice sailors (prone to motion sickness), those who took powdered ginger experienced a significant reduction in vomiting and cold sweating compared to those who took placebo. Similar results were found in a study with healthy volunteers. While these results are promising, other studies suggest that ginger is not as effective as medications in reducing symptoms associated with motion sickness. In a small study of volunteers who were given ginger (fresh root and powder form), scopolamine (a medication commonly prescribed for motion sickness), or placebo, those receiving the medication experienced significantly fewer symptoms compared to those who received ginger. Conventional prescription and nonprescription medicines that decrease nausea may also cause unwanted side effects, such as dry mouth and drowsiness. Given the safety of ginger, many people find it a welcome alternative to these medications to relieve motion sickness. Answered by Ellis Cheverton 3 months ago.

Medicine Percocet Answered by Polly Oja 3 months ago.

Nausea Medicine Phenergan Answered by Rosario Janicki 3 months ago.

If this condition you have is Chronic, then I would certainly be asking your doctor for a referral to a Pain Management Centre. At these centres they specialise in treating long term pain. As a result of that they are far more proficient than the average GP You will usually find one associated with any hospital that has a dedicated Orthopaedic and Spinal Centre. For example here in Sydney Australia there is an excellent one attached to The Royal North Shore Hospital. I'm assuming from what you've said the underlying condition is also being looked at from a treatment point. If its treatable then there must be a concentration on doing so along with the pain management ( Research shows better recovery when pain is properly managed). If the condition is not treatable then that is even greater reason to have a more professional approach to the management of the resulting pain. Answered by Lydia Thompsom 3 months ago.

there are a number of anti-nausea medicines you can take on Percocet. The good ones are all prescription though. It's 9 pm on a Sunday. It's too late unless you can get the on-call doctor and convince them to call something in to the 24 hour Walgreen's. Answered by Grant Symmes 3 months ago.

over the counter meds will be of NO help whatsoever. as a matter...my experience...anti acid med will actually prolong the misery. I know the last thing you feel like doing is eating but this will work. If you drink ANY alcohol you can be in for some serious nausea. Last time this happened to me I ate one piece of whole wheat bread dry and it was like magic. Should add forget the Pepto...does zero. Answered by Russell Ochsenbein 3 months ago.

You can take Benedryl. A lot of the time, phenergan is prescribed with pain meds to avoid vomiting. Benedryl and phenergan both are antihistamines Answered by Marx Rugama 3 months ago.


Urinary Retention Problem?
My Dad has given up drinking, and the main problem is, he cannot urinate. He has no urge or feeling to urinate, and when he does it is in very small amounts and it is of a very dark yellow colour. He also has no desire for thirst. There is no pain. I REPEAT: There is no pain- anywhere. No discomfort. Does anyone... Asked by Lorette Hinsey 3 months ago.

My Dad has given up drinking, and the main problem is, he cannot urinate. He has no urge or feeling to urinate, and when he does it is in very small amounts and it is of a very dark yellow colour. He also has no desire for thirst. There is no pain. I REPEAT: There is no pain- anywhere. No discomfort. Does anyone here know what could be causing the urinary retention? You know that feeling when your busting to go for a whiz? That means your bladder is full. He does not get that feeling. What is going on? Please Help! Answered by Kymberly Lattanzi 3 months ago.

Urinary retention can be caused by an obstruction in the urinary tract or by nerve problems that interfere with signals between the brain and the bladder. If the nerves aren't working properly, the brain may not get the message that the bladder is full. Even if you know that your bladder is full, the bladder muscle that squeezes urine out may not get the signal that it is time to push, or the sphincter muscles may not get the signal that it is time to relax. A weak bladder muscle can also cause retention. -Nerve Disease or Spinal Cord Injury: Many events or conditions can damage nerves and nerve pathways. Some of the most common causes are: vaginal childbirth infections of the brain or spinal cord diabetes stroke accidents that injure the brain or spinal cord multiple sclerosis heavy metal poisoning pelvic injury or trauma -Prostate Enlargement: As a man ages, his prostate gland may enlarge. Doctors call the condition benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or benign prostatic hypertrophy.As the prostate enlarges, the layer of tissue surrounding it stops it from expanding, causing the gland to press against the urethra like a clamp on a garden hose. As a result, the bladder wall becomes thicker and irritable. The bladder begins to contract even when it contains small amounts of urine, causing more frequent urination. Eventually, the bladder weakens and loses the ability to empty itself, so urine remains in the bladder. -Infection: Infections cause swelling and irritation, or inflammation. A urinary tract infection (UTI) may cause retention if the urethra becomes inflamed and swells shut. -Surgery: During surgery, anesthesia is often administered to block pain signals, and fluid is given intravenously to compensate for possible blood loss. The combination may result in a full bladder with impaired nerve function. Consequently, many patients have urinary retention after surgery. -Medication: Many medicines work by calming overactive nerve signals. Various classes of drugs that block various signals may be used to treat allergies, stomach cramps, muscle spasms, anxiety, or depression. The drugs that may cause urinary retention include: antihistamines to treat allergies: fexofenadine (Allegra) diphenhydramine (Benadryl) chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton) cetirizine (Zyrtec) anticholinergics/antispasmodics to treat stomach cramps, muscle spasms, and urinary incontinence: hyoscyamine (Levbid, Cystospaz, Anaspaz, Gastrosed) oxybutynin (Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol) tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA) propantheline (Pro-Banthine) tricyclic antidepressants to treat anxiety and depression: imipramine (Tofranil) amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor) doxepin (Novo-Doxepin, Sinequan) -Bladder Stone: A stone formed anywhere in the urinary tract may become lodged in the bladder. If the stone is large enough, it can block the opening to the urethra like a bathtub plug. -Cystocele and Rectocele: A cystocele occurs when the wall between a woman's bladder and her vagina weakens and allows the bladder to droop into the vagina. The abnormal position of the bladder may cause urine to remain trapped. In a rectocele, the rectum droops into the back wall of the vagina. -Urethral Strictur: A stricture is a narrowing or closure of a tube. Men may have a narrowing of the urethra, usually caused by scarring after a trauma to the penis. Infection is a less common cause of scarring and closure in the urethra. Answered by Hubert Bruun 3 months ago.


Bed Wet!!!?
I am feeling very shy to ask this but any way I have to get a solution for this. I am 21 yrs old. but still i use to bed wet sometimes. I need to know how i can overcome this problem. PLease help me!!! Its very important for me since i use to go out a lot. Please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Asked by Jeniffer Lasane 3 months ago.

One of the main causes of bed wetting in adults is alcohol abuse. Being too drunk to get out of bed, or respond to the signal the body sends when one's bladder is full. Often all these people need to do is not drink as much. Of course, there are also many people who don't abuse alcohol but suffer from nocturnal urination. There can be many causes, from anatomical reasons, to sleep problems. The inability to control the bladder is a very common condition in a lot of adults. There are even medications available by prescription like darifenacin (Enablex), dicyclomine (Antispas, Bentyl), flavoxate (Urispas), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Levbid, Levsin), methantheline (Banthine, Pro-Banthine), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol), solifenacin (VESIcare), tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA), and trospium (Sanctura). Please don't be shy about asking your doctor. With so many medications available, it should be pretty apparent that doctors have heard of the problem often. P.S. Don't even consider the answer that tells you to take Amitriptyline. It is a seditive used to treat depression and anxiety, and will only make you less aware of the need to empty your bladder during sleep. Answered by Holly Chhoun 3 months ago.

Take amytryptyline 10mg tab at bed time for 45 days. Answered by Alfredia Werthman 3 months ago.

try not to drink to much water before you go to bed. force yourself to go to the bathroom before you go to bed. I don't know. see your doctor. Good luck! Answered by Donald Masaracchia 3 months ago.

Do your dong in a knot if you've been drinking Answered by Scot Vanderwood 3 months ago.

Go see your doctor. He might be able to help!!!! Answered by Myrtle Reynaldo 3 months ago.

see a doc there is pills for that Answered by Lynda Hickingbotham 3 months ago.


What medicine dries saliva?
I don't know the names of the 2 meds the doctor gave her but both caused bad side effects. She has had ALS since 2011.She is a real fighter and is praying for a miracle. The doctors want to reduce her saliva, so she doesn't choke. She is posting daily on facebook. She can't use her hands and has a... Asked by Ronnie Hereford 3 months ago.

I don't know the names of the 2 meds the doctor gave her but both caused bad side effects. She has had ALS since 2011.She is a real fighter and is praying for a miracle. The doctors want to reduce her saliva, so she doesn't choke. She is posting daily on facebook. She can't use her hands and has a suction machine and hospice as of a few days age. She has excellent care. i cut and pasted your answers to her private messages. Thank you for the answers! Answered by Garfield Arrollo 3 months ago.

I wish you'd listed which medications she's already tried, that's what people posting here usually do. I'll start with meds I'm familiar with. There's glycopyrrolate (Robinul). This has been ordered for and administered to patients with MS and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease with no side effects. We also use it for trach patients who have excessive secretions. It's hasn't caused a problem yet. It should work for some one with ALS. Glycoprryolate can be taken by mouth or by injection. Glycopyrrolate shouldn't be used by people with certain conditions but I don't believe ALS is one of them. Some more that I'm familiar with are atropine oral drops (Sal-Tropine), amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor) and the scopolamine transdermal patch (Transderm Scop). Along with one of these medicaitons, adding imipramine (Tofranil) given at bedtime, reduces anxiety and saliva and promotes sleep. One med I'm not as familiar with is propantheline (Pro-Banthine), I've never given this to a patient. I also need to know how advanced her condition is. If she can swallow or spit out/wipe away the extra saliva, she should do so. If she's reached the point where it's gotten to be too much, she should have a suction machine at home with a canister and a few Yankauer suction catheters. Answered by Mariette Humphery 3 months ago.

Weed. Not trying to be a smartass. But Weed. Answered by Marine Agnew 3 months ago.


Gastritis symptoms, how to relieve them?
I have heartburn and my stomach is gurgling. How can I make this stop from bothering me the rest of the schoolday? I took an omeprazole pill but it isn't for immediate relief Asked by Sherley Omalley 3 months ago.

I had TMJ for the longest time. About a year ago I went to the orthodontist and got braces. After about 6 months or so it went away. Moral of the story? Go to your dentist. Answered by Mafalda Houtkooper 3 months ago.


Will taking vicodin......?
will takin vicodin while on medication for a bacterial infection lesson the effects of my antibacterial meds? Asked by Leeanne Mattie 3 months ago.

It shouldn't. Vicodin has no published interactions with antibacterial medications. Vicodin has known interaction issues with: * antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), clomipramine (Anafranil), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), and others * an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) * atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), glycopyrrolate (Robinul), mepenzolate (Cantil), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop) * bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare) * a bronchodilator such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva); or * irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Answered by Zina Kurihara 3 months ago.

I was taking Vicodin for shingles pain at the same time I was taking meds for diverticulitis (it hasn't been the best year for me... lol) and I didn't have a problem. Answered by Albina Cuadrado 3 months ago.

my mom takes it all of the time alongside with percs,morphine,zanex,oxy,darvoset,tyleno... I say greater & no she has no physcial ailment-she's a junky. I won't even take regularly used asprin because of the fact of her i'm scared Answered by Milissa Schwartzer 3 months ago.

since you are supposed to have been prescribed vicodin your doc would have surely advised you....if not then ask them Answered by Candi Dolejsi 3 months ago.


What medications can cause Urinary retention (difficulty peeing) as a Side Effect?
Asked by Mamie Enockson 3 months ago.

•antihistamines to treat allergies ◦fexofenadine (Allegra) ◦diphenhydramine (Benadryl) ◦chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton) ◦cetirizine (Zyrtec) •anticholinergics/antispasmodics to treat stomach cramps, muscle spasms, and urinary incontinence ◦hyoscyamine (Levbid, Cystospaz, Anaspaz, Gastrosed) ◦oxybutynin (Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol) ◦tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA) ◦propantheline (Pro-Banthine) •tricyclic antidepressants to treat anxiety and depression ◦imipramine (Tofranil) ◦amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) ◦nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor) ◦doxepin (Novo-Doxepin, Sinequan) Answered by Kayce Deignan 3 months ago.

Any drug that has anticholinergic side effects (gives you dry mouth) may Answered by Leandra Stampe 3 months ago.

hmm good quesdtion Answered by Agustin Nuntaray 3 months ago.


Palmar hyperhidrosis?
I have hyperhidrosis in my hands and I've had it for as long as I can remember,it's greatly affecting my life,I play flute and it always slips out of my hand,I'm afraid to hold hands with boys,I can't do so many things with people for fear they will touch my hands and feel how wet they are!!How do I... Asked by Izetta Cantella 3 months ago.

I have hyperhidrosis in my hands and I've had it for as long as I can remember,it's greatly affecting my life,I play flute and it always slips out of my hand,I'm afraid to hold hands with boys,I can't do so many things with people for fear they will touch my hands and feel how wet they are!!How do I stop the sweating?!It's only in my hands,everywhere else in my body is perfectly fine!! Answered by Cristy Burlett 3 months ago.

I also suffer from hyperhidrosis. Gah it sucks and you feel scared to touch stuff and people and everyone thinks your a snob cuz you dont want to touch them! Anyways, I went to my doc told him i had hyperhydrosis and that it was really effecting me, he sent my for a blood test to make sure it wasnt something serious, and then perscribed me to pro-banthine. It says take it 3 times a day but i get too dehydrated. I take mine once a day and after about 10-20 minutes my hands are nice and dry! xxx good luck Answered by Garfield Bunker 3 months ago.


To the person who works at the children's hospital in Cinn. He has never had a problem like this before.?
he drinks a lot of water, and he has no problem going to the bathroom anywhere, and he is not going when I'm not looking. Is meatal stenosis something that can come on suddenly. He will be at the Drs. in 5 hours. Will he be ok till then? Asked by Caron Landesberg 3 months ago.

Urge Incontinence- this is the most common of all types of incontinence, it accounts for about 65% of all cases. In these instances there is an uninhibited contraction of the bladder resulting in a leakage of urine, even though the internal and external sphincter may be contracted to oppose the outflow of urine. In a sense, the detrussor muscle works against the sphincter muscles and if the pressure of contraction of the detrussor muscle exceeds the pressure of contraction of the sphincter muscles then leakage occurs. The signs and symptoms are a sudden urge to urinate and if one is unable to void immediately, a leakage of urine. This type of incontinence can occur secondary to bladder stones, cystitis, neoplasms, or because of decreased cortical inhibition as might occur in cases of dementia. The pharmacological treatment approach is to try override the contraction of the detrussor muscle by giving a bladder relaxant. Since cholinergic stimulation causes bladder contraction, the drug of choice would be an anticholinergic drug such as Ditropan or Pro-Banthine or Bentyl or Urispas. SURE HE WILL BE FINE. Answered by Dean Shumski 3 months ago.

Mitral stenosis (MS) is narrowing of the mitral orifice impeding blood flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle. The most common cause is rheumatic fever. Common complications are pulmonary hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and thromboembolism. Symptoms are those of heart failure; signs include an opening snap and a diastolic murmur. Diagnosis is by physical examination and echocardiography. Prognosis is good. Medical treatment includes diuretics, β-blockers or rate-limiting Ca channel blockers, and anticoagulants; surgical treatment for more severe disease consists of balloon valvotomy, commissurotomy, or valve replacement. Please see the web pages for more details on Mitral stenosis. Answered by Jannie Visosky 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007390/001 BANTHINE METHANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007390/001 BANTHINE METHANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG

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