AZTREONAM Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 065286/001.

Names and composition

"AZTREONAM" is the commercial name of a drug composed of AZTREONAM.
It belongs to the class Other antibiotics and is used in Bacterial infections (Infections and Infestations)

Answered questions

Which of the following is the drug combination of choice when treating tuberculosis?
vancomycin, imipenem, aztreonam methicillin, teicoplanin, isoniazid polymyxin B, ethambutol, erythromycin isoniazid, ethambutol, rifampin tetracycline, rifamycin, ciprofloxacin Asked by Dario Newcombe 3 months ago.

Tetracycline, rifamycin, ciprofloxacin. Answered by Bryon Hufstetler 3 months ago.

Isoniazid, ethambutol, rifampin. The standard "short" course treatment for TB is isoniazid, rifampicin (also known as rifampin in the United States), pyrazinamide, and ethambutol for two months, then isoniazid and rifampicin alone for a further four months. The patient is considered cured at six months (although there is still a relapse rate of 2 to 3%). For latent tuberculosis, the standard treatment is six to nine months of isoniazid alone. Answered by Shery Emeru 3 months ago.

TB treatment is known as "RIPE" therapy: Rifampin Isoniazid (INH) Pyridoxine (a vitamin) Ethambutol Answered by Antonetta Sarr 3 months ago.

Third choice I believe. Answered by Margurite Trego 3 months ago.


I am read about ESBL (Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase) and gene TEM HSV CTX. what is the mechanism of it?
Asked by Barrie Delcarlo 3 months ago.

The ESBL enzymes are plasmid-mediated enzymes capable of hydrolyzing and inactivating a wide variety of ß-Lactams, including third-generation cephalosporins, penicillins, and aztreonam. These enzymes are the result of mutations of TEM1, TEM2 and SHV1, all of which are ß-Lactamase enzymes commonly found in the Enterobacteriaceae family. Normally TEM1, TEM2, and SHV1 enzymes confer high-level resistance to early penicillins and low-level resistance to first-generation cephalosporins.The widespread use of third-generation cephalosporins and aztreonam is believed to be the major cause of the mutations in these enzymes that have led to the emergence of ESBLs.[ The ESBL enzymes can be further classified into a variety of groups according to the classifications by Bush and Ambler The most common types found in the United States are the TEM and SHV groups. More than 100 subtypes of these enzymes have been reported worldwide.[11] The distribution of ESBL subtypes varies widely in different geographical areas.[6,8,12-14] A distinction must be made between AmpC ß-Lactamases and ESBL enzymes. The AmpC ß-Lactamases are encoded by genes located on chromosomes, are often inducible, and are commonly found in Enterobacter sp, Citrobacter freundii, Morganella morganii, Serratia marcescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since genes encoding these enzymes are located on chromosomes, they are not easily transferable to other bacterial species. Resistance patterns associated with AmpC ß-Lactamase enzymes are strikingly similar to those of ESBLs; however, AmpC ß-Lactamases are only weakly inhibited by ß-Lactamase inhibitors and usually confer resistance to cephamycins. In contrast, ESBLs are generally well inhibited by ß-Lactamase inhibitors and usually retain sensitivity to the cephamycins.The ESBLs are encoded by genes located on plasmids, resulting in easy transfer to other bacterial species. Answered by Lashaunda Krauth 3 months ago.


Please classify the following antimicrobials into broad or narrow spectrum?
I've been looking on the internet but I get contradictory answers from different sources.Ampicillin Aztreonam Bacitracin Ceftazidime Chloramphenicol Ciprofloxacin Erythromycin GentamicinImipenem Penicillin G Streptomycin Sulfisoxazole Tetracyclines Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole Vancomycin Asked by Creola Dyess 3 months ago.

I've been looking on the internet but I get contradictory answers from different sources. Ampicillin Aztreonam Bacitracin Ceftazidime Chloramphenicol Ciprofloxacin Erythromycin Gentamicin Imipenem Penicillin G Streptomycin Sulfisoxazole Tetracyclines Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole Vancomycin Answered by Micheal Sevillano 3 months ago.

Those with relatively limited spectra are ampicillin, erythromycin, gentamycin, penicillin G, streptomycin and vancomycin. The rest are broad-spectrum. Answered by Barney Wageman 3 months ago.

Depends upon the bacteria or the combination of bacteria that is being treated. Answered by Rufina Capati 3 months ago.


My husband is in ICU with pneumonia?
I should add that they do have him on other meds...pulmicort, steroids {solumedrol?} xopenex, dilauded, ativan, toradol, symbicort and I think maybe spiriva. He is also on a Bi-Pap. Asked by Sylvester Fuhs 3 months ago.

He was admitted Friday night with a WBC of 16.5. They started him on vancomycin and aztreonam {not sure if I spelled those right}. That makes almost 72 hours of antibiotics when they took another blood test this afternoon. Now his WBC is 32,000 and he is in excruciating pain on his right upper side. They have him on so many heavy pain meds he is completely out of it. This is his third bout of pneumonia since January and no one can figure out what is wrong with him. I don't know where else to turn, how worried should I be? He is almost 52 years old. Answered by Shirlee Bronw 3 months ago.

A high WBC is taken to be "bad" because it shows there is in infection in the body. But it is actually good, because it shows the body's natural defences are in good working order. The white blood cells multiply to attack the invading organism that is causing the infection. They have probably taken samples from his lungs, to test which anti-biotics are the most effective against whatever he has. Now he has had the same problem so often, I am sure when he is a bit better they will do a full investigation into what is causing it to recur. One possibility is that earlier treatments were not continued long enough, leaving a few resistant bacteria to mulitply again. They are not going to start doing biospies and other tests until he is better, as the first priority is to get him healthy again. Then they can look for preventing the problem from recurring. He could also have an underlying other lung problem, such as mild emphysema, which is making the lungs more susceptible to infections. It is normal to be worried when your husband is so sick. But he's getting expert care in a good modern hospital, so he will get better. The doctors there know a lot more about what other things to look for, than we can guess at from looking up websites. Don't let anyone panic you based on this. Answered by Roxie Clason 3 months ago.

pneumonia can be very serious, especially since he is in ICU, his immune system must be really weak if he has had pneumonia 3 times already this year....you may want to ask the Dr if they can find out what the reason is behind him repeatly having this infection and if the repeated infections are causing permanent damage to the lungs. Answered by Elliot Schwiebert 3 months ago.

Pneumonia is really serious, and if he is in the ICU that is even worse. Try having him tested for asthma, he could have a really serious case of asthma. If he can't breath, even though there is a ton of medication going into him, try asking the doctors avout Quvar and Albuterol, they are both Inhalers that better your breathing. Quvar is a steriod that should stabalize his lungs and Albuterol should clear his lungs and expand his breathing capacity Answered by Miles Aldridge 3 months ago.

He's on a ventilator correct??? If he is, I'd say they are doing this so that his lungs don't have to work so hard right now.. if it were me, I'd ask the doctors that are over seeing his care, that would be the best advice I can give you.. GOODLUCk and hope he gets better really soon!! Answered by Tyrone Madrazo 3 months ago.

heavy doses of cayenne tea and kombucha tea asap Answered by Misti Murdaugh 3 months ago.


List the antibiotic drugs used for bacterial disease?
Asked by Torie Berardino 3 months ago.

actinomycin, amphotericin, antibacterial, antibacterial drug, bactericide, antimycin , antineoplastic antibiotic, Azactam, aztreonam, bacitracin, carbomycin, cephaloglycin, Kafocin , cephaloridine, cephalosporin, Mefoxin, chloramphenicol, Chloromycetin, Aureomycin, chlortetracycline, Cipro, ciprofloxacin, cycloserine, dihydrostreptomycin , doxorubicin, doxycycline, Vibramycin, E-Mycin, Erythrocin, erythromycin, Ethril, Ilosone, Pediamycin, Garamycin, gentamicin, gramicidin, kanamycin, Kantrex , Lincocin, lincomycin . mitomycin, Mutamycin, mycomycin, fradicin, Neobiotic, neomycin, novobiocin, Mycostatin, Nystan, nystatin, hydroxytetracycline, oxytetracycline, oxytetracycline hydrochloride, Terramycin, hydroxytetracycline, oxytetracycline, oxytetracycline hydrochloride, Terramycin, penicillin, polymyxin, Primaxin, pyocyanase Answered by Roxane Helderman 3 months ago.

you need to be more specific for which type of bacterial disease? there are too many to list. Answered by Bernard Damone 3 months ago.

i dont know why are you asking about it, but i would advice to you that you should consult a doctor first before taking any medications because it may worsen your case if there is any. Answered by Adelaide Hesse 3 months ago.

It would be to long for this purpose: but there are about fifty that most doctors use. Answered by Galen Edney 3 months ago.


Infection loved one dying ?
I should add the person has been given multiple oral antibiotics but they do not work, the family thinks it's time to use something more serious such as an IV or shots before this person loses their life. This person has very high chills and fever, and came close to death on a few occasions when persons body... Asked by Simon Killin 3 months ago.

This is a simple question, that will more than likely not get a simple answer because of internet trolls. If you, your loved one, could be husband/wife/ daughter/ son/ grandmother/ mom/ dad whoever. Had a chronic infection that was taking their life and doctors did not want to treat them and sent them home to die with this very strong hard to kill infection. What do you do ? Do you tell your loved one just prepare for death and that is that, or do you fight forcibly against the hospital and push as hard as you can ? The reason I am asking is because I have a loved one who has an ecoli infection and has lived with this infection for almost 2 years. The doctors are refusing any medical treatment at this point and have told my family member to just go home and live with the infection. The reason being is the antibiotic pills are not killing the ecoli infection. This person has been trying to get a shot or an IV and has been refused medical treatment by a total of 6 doctors at this point. This infection is very strong and is immune to many drugs including the quinolones i.e cipro,levaquin, avelox. tetracyclines , i.e doxy,tetra, minocycline etc. sulfa drugs such as trimethoprim. So I ask you what do you do in this situation, do you let the person die or fight and force your way into a hospital to make them treat the dying person. simple question Answered by Evelin Grboyan 3 months ago.

I should add the person has been given multiple oral antibiotics but they do not work, the family thinks it's time to use something more serious such as an IV or shots before this person loses their life. This person has very high chills and fever, and came close to death on a few occasions when persons body temperature dropped very low and had to set in a tub of hot water for 2 hours. Answered by Louise Atherley 3 months ago.

Some of the meds that your loved one has already received are also given IV. There are only so many classes of antibiotic, only so many ways that these drugs work against bacteria. If your loved one has an E. coli infection that is also MDR (multidrug resistant), there really isn't much that can be done. Doctors know how the medications work. If a med in one class fails, there's little point in using other drugs from the same class, understand? They will also fail. I can give you an example of cross-resistance. Penicillins are a class of antibiotic and so are Cephalosporins. If an organism is resistant to penicillins, that would include penicillin, penicillin G, penicillin V, penicillin VK, ampicillin, amoxicillin, Augmentin (a brand name med that includes amoxicillin and clavulanate), pipercillin, apalcillin, aspoxicillin, azlocillin, aztreonam, dicloxacillin and it just goes on. That's a lot of drugs that can't be used. And because Cephalosporins work in the same way (have the same mechanism of action), drugs like Cefacetrile (cephacetrile), Cefadroxil (cefadroxyl; Duricef), Cephalexin (cephalexin; Keflex), Cefaloglycin (cephaloglycin), Cefalonium (cephalonium), Cefaloridine (cephaloradine), Cefalotin (cephalothin; Keflin), Cefapirin (cephapirin; Cefadryl), Cefatrizine, Cefazaflur, Cefazedone, Cefazolin (cephazolin; Ancef, Kefzol), Cefradine (cephradine; Velosef), Cefroxadine, Ceftezole. And there are 45 more and none of these can be used. And THIS is why your loved one's doctors have stopped treatment. They know more about this than you do at this time. And there may be mitigating factors, some other co-existing conditions, that make it unwise and perhaps even dangerous to do more. This person may be very elderly and if he or she has other degenerative medical conditions, aggressive treatment may just not make sense. Unfortunately, I don't have this person's chart in front of me, so I can't know the extent of her status. However, you said something significant that caught my attention. You said "[doctors] have told my family member to just go home and live with the infection." At any time has this person been told by a physician to "go home and die with this infection"? At any time has this person been told that they are terminal and have less than 6 months to live? At any time has this person been told by a physician that the E. coli will likely be ultimately fatal? Patients and families don't always have reactions that are in proportion to the problem. Those reactions can be way over the top or way under. "This person has very high chills and fever..." -- What is your idea of a "very high fever"?? Chills aren't a big issue. "... and came close to death on a few occasions when persons body temperature dropped very low" -- And how low was that? You're making claims but not backing them up with evidence. I'm a health care professional and I work with information. I can't take your word about a temperature being very high or very low because you didn't state what it was. Some people think 102 is high when it's not or that 97.8 is abnormal when it's within the normal range. "So I ask you what do you do in this situation" -- I don't know that your family member is dying. I don't know the extent of the infection. I don't know of any co-existing or pre-existing conditions. I don't know this person's age or gender. In fact, I actually know very little other than this person has an E. coli infection and I don't even know where it is. The only suggestions I can make, the only ones that make sense, are that if this person hasn't consulted an Infectious Disease specialist, they can try that. The other suggestion is to deal with the reality that's been handed to her or him over and over again. The infection can't be treated. And I suggest your family learn to come to terms with that. It won't be easy, I can guarantee that, but it can and must be done. Some things are out of everyone's hands but are in God's hands. Answered by Kristi Wolbert 3 months ago.

Simple answer, if there is a chance that further medication will help them then never stop fighting for it. But on the other hand, if there is no hope and any further treatment won't work - then if it was me I would prefer to be at home surrounded by loved ones. Answered by Tomiko Pacini 3 months ago.

I wouldn't return to that hospital-I would scour the internet for a dr who will treat this infection-someone willing to work and take a risk! don't give up --my grandmother was told her lungs were so bad from emphysema that she wouldn't live out the year--that pissed her off so much that she lived another 15 yrs---fight the good fight! Answered by Laurine Manthei 3 months ago.

How did your cat get an contamination? Simply what number of have you ever been losing? Until you hold them indoors where they belong, feed them just right nutritious food, and give them vet care then you have got to discontinue having cats because it will be a dying sentence dwelling with you. Answered by Wilhelmina Handley 3 months ago.

e coli is in all of our intestines naturally if they are not taking over there is no need for treatment Answered by Gisele Kertesz 3 months ago.


Please HELP!!! overcome pseudomonas...?
my aunt actually. Really thank you Reddhotz, I ll try to find out the correct translation and speak with the doctor! Asked by Maryjo Blackley 3 months ago.

My uncle is in a critical health situation. She has affected by a strong virus, called "pseudomonas". Every italian antibiotic failed till now (TENACID, PRIMBCATIM, AZTREONAM e IMIPEM ) So please, please, just ask to a doctor if know one, maybe it is much less dangerous right there and the solution it s just a stupid pill that we don't have. grazie di cuore. Answered by Margurite Schreiner 3 months ago.

I do not know what antibiotics you have in Italy but none of the names you write are ones we use here in the US. He needs Tobramycin, Gentamycin, Zosyn, and those are all IV antibiotics that need close watching of his kidney function labs as he gets them. IF he is immuno-compromised from other chronic illness, he is in a bad situation. I pray for him and that you can understand what I am writing to you. Answered by Kimber Ramsdale 3 months ago.

pseudomonus is an infection. my mom had it on her legs... the dr said to her along with antibiotics to eat yogurt twice a day. Answered by Leeanna Azuma 3 months ago.

Here is a couple of links for you. It goes from mild to extreme. Heart failure is mentioned,but read for your self. Answered by Iris Nagelkirk 3 months ago.

if you are telling the truth i am sorry but i wanted to point out that you uncle would be a he not a she. Answered by Doretta Chamberlin 3 months ago.


Does this empiric antibiotic regimen sound correct?
Antimicrobials that reduce the number of the strict anaerobic component of the gut flora (i.e., metronidazole, pefloxacin ) may enhance systemic infection by aerobic or facultative bacteria thus increasing mortality . Empirical broad spectrum regimens should be based on resistance and nosocomial infection... Asked by Paris Weisheit 3 months ago.

Antimicrobials that reduce the number of the strict anaerobic component of the gut flora (i.e., metronidazole, pefloxacin ) may enhance systemic infection by aerobic or facultative bacteria thus increasing mortality . Empirical broad spectrum regimens should be based on resistance and nosocomial infection patterns with higher doses initiated when there is fever, and should contain antibiotics broadly active against Gram-negative aerobic bacteria . Addressing immediate infection risk especially for fever greater than 38.5 degrees Centigrade or with signs of infection in a granulocytic patient is critical. Common infections may include Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas in 75% of cases and Streptococcus, mostly alpha-hemolytic streptococci in 25% of cases, and Klebsiella. Antimicrobials play an essential role since there is a higher co-incidence of wounds and gastrointestinal damage whereby certain types of bacteria (Gram-negative) are translocated and enter the blood stream (leaky gut syndrome). With low immune defenses, this can be difficult to treat, and can pose potentially lethal infection risk. An example empiric antibiotic regimen used might include: •Aminoglycosides such as gentamicin +/- beta lactam amoxicillin or cephalothin and carbenicillin , changed to cefoperazone , imipenem and/or ureidopenicillin piperacillin (for Pseudomonas aeruginosa) as cultures evolve. Other antibiotics used may include: •Ceftriaxone , Cefepime •Ciprofloxacin , Levofloxacin •Aztreonam (for Gram negative bacteria) •Vancomycin •Amphoteracin B for persons with fever for more than 48-72 hours. •Antihelminths, such as mebendazole and thiabendazole based on stool examination or eosinophilia. •Acyclovir antiviral . Answered by Milford Muntean 3 months ago.

Is there a question anywhere in your immediate future? Answered by Ali Milare 3 months ago.


What are NEW MEDICINE for Cystic Fibrosis as of 2008, and dose anyone have any Trix's that works for them
Asked by Winnie Kines 3 months ago.

Well, let's see. Hypertonic saline is newer but I think it came out in 2006. Everything else I can think of is not totally out yet: dry powder inhaled TOBI (wouldn't that be nice!), denufosol (for mild CF), inhaled aztreonam (an antibiotic, which has to be nebulized with the eFlow which is a very cool nebulizer). My clinic's doing a Phase III trial with a new pancreatic enzyme that is very promising. Inhaled mannitol is being tested and is thought to work a lot like hypertonic saline and is also given by dry powder inhalation, and gene therapy is in the works, right now they're testing something for the G5551D mutation and it's also very promising. I don't have any tricks, as I'm just a CF clinic staff member not a CF'er or a family member. I learn from CFers all the time. Do your nebs during the vest therapy, and do your treatments. Answered by Melba Singeltary 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
065286/001 AZTREONAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per VIAL
065286/002 AZTREONAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL
065439/001 AZTREONAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
065439/002 AZTREONAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per VIAL
065439/003 AZTREONAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
050580/001 AZACTAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
050580/002 AZACTAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per VIAL
050580/003 AZACTAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL
050632/001 AZACTAM IN PLASTIC CONTAINER AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40MG per ML
050632/002 AZACTAM IN PLASTIC CONTAINER AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
050632/003 AZACTAM IN PLASTIC CONTAINER AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
050814/001 CAYSTON AZTREONAM FOR SOLUTION/INHALATION 75MG per VIAL
065286/001 AZTREONAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per VIAL
065286/002 AZTREONAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL
065439/001 AZTREONAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
065439/002 AZTREONAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per VIAL
065439/003 AZTREONAM AZTREONAM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Gilead Sciences

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