Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 014685/001.

Names and composition

"AVENTYL " is the commercial name of a drug composed of NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014685/001 AVENTYL NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014684/001 AVENTYL HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
014684/002 AVENTYL HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
014685/001 AVENTYL NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018012/001 PAMELOR NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE per 5ML
018013/001 PAMELOR NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
018013/002 PAMELOR NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
018013/003 PAMELOR NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
018013/004 PAMELOR NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
073553/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
073554/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
073555/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
073556/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
073667/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
073667/002 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
073667/003 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
073667/004 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
074054/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
074054/002 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
074054/003 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
074054/004 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
074132/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
074132/002 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
074132/003 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
074132/004 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
074234/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
074234/002 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
074234/003 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
074234/004 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
074835/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
074835/002 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
074835/003 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
074835/004 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
075520/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
075520/002 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
075520/003 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
075520/004 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
075606/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE per 5ML
077965/001 NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE NORTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE per 5ML

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Answered questions

Has anybody been on or know someone who's been on nortriptyline?
I was just put on it today, but i've never heard of it so i'm alittle concerned. please tell me about your expriences with it. Asked by Kelli Deems 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: nortriptyline BRAND NAME: Pamelor, Aventyl DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Nortriptyline is an antidepressant medication of the tricyclic class. Medications in this class are often referred to as tricyclic antidepressants, or TCAs. Depression is an all-pervasive sense of sadness and gloom. In some patients with depression, abnormal levels of brain neurotransmitters (chemicals that the nerve cells use to communicate with each other) may be responsible for the depression. Nortriptyline elevates the mood ("anti-depresses") by raising the level of neurotransmitters in brain tissue. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Capsules: 10mg, 25mg, 50mg, 75mg. STORAGE: Nortriptyline should be stored below 86°F (30°C) in a tight, light resistant container. PRESCRIBED FOR: Nortriptyline is used to elevate the mood of patients with depression. Nortriptyline is also a sedative and is useful in depressed patients with insomnia, restlessness, and nervousness. It also has been found to be helpful for treating chronic pain and the pain of neuralgia. DOSING: The dose of nortriptyline is tailored to the patient's needs. Sometimes, physicians will start with relatively low doses, such as 25mg, given three times a day, to reduce the risk of excessive sedation early in the course of therapy; doses then will be increased slowly upwards. It may take several weeks after starting to take nortriptyline until the full effects of a dose to be seen. Other physicians prefer to give nortriptyline once daily, in which case it is generally given at bedtime to take advantage of its sedating properties. Elderly persons and patients with advanced liver disease may need lower doses. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Nortriptyline exaggerates the effects of other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes, such as alcohol, barbiturates, benzodiazepines (e.g. lorazepam, Ativan), and narcotics. Reserpine, given to patients taking TCAs, can have a stimulatory effect. Nortriptyline and other TCAs should not be used with monoamine oxidase inhibiting drugs, for example, isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and procarbazine (Matulane). High fever, convulsions and even death can occur when these drugs are used together. Cimetidine (Tagamet) can increase nortriptyline blood levels and possibly cause side effects. Other drugs which share this effect include propafenone (Rythmol), flecainide (Tonocard), quinidine (Quinidex, Quinaglute), and fluoxetine (Prozac). PREGNANCY: There is very little information about the effects on the fetus of nortriptyline given to pregnant women. Physicians may elect to use it if its benefits are deemed to outweigh potential risks. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if nortriptyline is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly encountered side effects associated with nortriptyline include fast heart rate, blurred vision, urinary retention, dry mouth, constipation, weight gain or loss, and low blood pressure on standing. Rash, hives, seizures, and hepatitis are rare side effects. Nortriptyline also can cause elevated pressure in the eyes of some patients with glaucoma. Overdose with nortriptyline can cause life-threatening abnormal heart rhythms or seizures Answered by Mira Meggison 1 year ago.

That's a bit sad that you have been given drugs instead of being given counselling to overcome it yourself. Get a book by Dr Claire Weekes as her books are like a bible for people with anxiety. Answered by Maddie Primeau 1 year ago.

Hey all u need to do is go to yahoo health and type in the name of that drug, i just did it, it tells evvverrry thing about it side affects and what it is used for also how long its been out Answered by Omega Barze 1 year ago.


If your on celexa (the medication)......?
is there anything that your not supposed to combine with it? (like vitamins, certain foods, caffeine, anything?!) Asked by Marguerite Drabek 1 year ago.

Medication (in alphabetical order); Major Interactions 5-HTP, 5-hydroxytryptophan, Actiq, Acutrim 16 Hour, Acutrim II, Maximum Strength, Acutrim Late Day, Adapin, Adipex-P, Adipost, Alfenta, alfentanil, almotriptan, Amerge, amitriptyline, amoxapine, amphetamine, Anafranil, Anorex-SR, Aplenzin, Appecon, Asendin, Atapryl, Aventyl HCl, Axert, Azilect, Babee Cof, Balminil DM, Balminil DM Pour Enfants, Balminil DM Sans Sucrose, Benadryl for the Family Dry Forte, Benylin, Benylin Adult Formula, Benylin DM, Benylin DM Pediatric, Benylin Dry Coughs, Benylin Pediatric, benzphetamine, Bisolvon Dry, Bisolvon Dry Junior, Bontril PDM, Bontril Slow Release, Buckley's Mixture Cough Suppressant, Buckleys Mixture, Budeprion SR, Budeprion XL, buPROPion, buPROPion 24 hour extended release, buPROPion extended release, BuSpar, BuSpar Dividose, busPIRone, Calmylin, Carbex, Chem Mart Tramadol, clomiPRAMINE, Contac Cough, Control, Cough Relief, Cough Syrup DM, Covonia Bronchial Balsam, Creo-Terpin, Creomulsion, Creomulsion Children, Cymbalta, D.H.E. 45, Darvon, Darvon-N, Delsym, Delsym 12 Hour Cough Relief, Delsym 12 Hour Cough Relief for Children & Adults, Demerol HCl, desipramine, Desoxyn, Desoxyn Gradumet, desvenlafaxine, Desyrel, Desyrel Dividose, DexAlone, Dexatrim, Dexatrim Caffeine Free, Dexedrine, Dexedrine Spansule, dexfenfluramine, Dexi-Tuss, dextroamphetamine, dextroamphetamine extended release, dextromethorphan, dextromethorphan extended release, Dextromethorphan HBr Adult Formula, Dextrostat, Didrex, diethylpropion, diethylpropion extended release, dihydroergotamine, dihydroergotamine nasal, Dimetapp Cold Cough & Flu Day & Night Liquid Caps, doxepin, doxepin topical, Dristan DM, Dromadol SR, Dromadol XL, Dry Cough, duloxetine, Duragesic, Duragesic-100, Duragesic-12, Duragesic-25, Duragesic-50, Duragesic-75, Effexor, Effexor XR, Elavil, Eldepryl, eletriptan, Elixsure Cough, Empro, Emsam, Endep, ephedra, Ergomar, ergotamine, Eskalith, Eskalith-CR, Fastin, fenfluramine, fentanyl, fentanyl topical, Fentora, Frova, frovatriptan, furazolidone, Furoxone, GenRx Tramadol, GHB, Hold DM, hypericum perforatum, imipramine, imipramine pamoate, Imitrex, Imitrex Nasal, Imitrex Statdose, Imitrex Statdose Refill, iohexol, Ionamin, Ionsys, iopamidol, Iopamidol-370, isocarboxazid, Isovue-128, Isovue-200, Isovue-250, Isovue-300, Isovue-370, Isovue-M-200, Isovue-M-300, Jack & Jill Thin Strips Cough, Jumex, l-tryptophan, Larapam SR, levomethadyl acetate, linezolid, lisdexamfetamine, lithium, lithium carbonate, lithium carbonate extended release, lithium citrate, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lloydspharmacy Dry Adult Cough, ma huang, Marplan, Matulane, Maxalt, Maxalt-MLT, Mazanor, mazindol, Mega-Trim, Melfiat, Mellaril, Mellaril-S, meperidine, Meridia, methamphetamine, methamphetamine extended release, metrizamide, Migranal, milnacipran, mirtazapine, Myelo-Kit, naratriptan, Nardil, nefazodone, Neocitran Thin Strips Cough, Norpramin, nortriptyline, Novahistine DM, Nucosef DM, Obephen, Obezine, Oby-Cap, Oby-Trim, Omnipaque 140, Omnipaque 180, Omnipaque 180 Redi-Unit, Omnipaque 210, Omnipaque 240, Omnipaque 240 Redi-Unit, Omnipaque 300, Omnipaque 350, Omnipaque Flexipak, Orap, Orlaam, Pamelor, Panshape M, Parnate, Pedia Relief, Pediacare, pentazocine, Pertussin CS Childrens, Pertussin DM, Pertussin ES, Phendiet, Phendiet-105, phendimetrazine, phendimetrazine extended release, phenelzine, Phentercot, phentermine, phentermine hydrochloride, phentermine hydrochloride extended release, phentermine resin extended release, Phentride, Phenyldrine, phenylpropanolamine, pimozide, Plegine, Pondimin, PP-Cap, Prelu-2, Pristiq, Pro-Fast HS, Pro-Fast SA, Pro-Fast SR, procarbazine, Propagest, Propan, propoxyphene, propoxyphene hydrochloride, propoxyphene napsylate, protriptyline, Prudoxin, rasagiline, Redux, Relpax, Remeron, Remeron SolTab, remifentanil, Rhindecon, rizatriptan, Robafen Cough Liquidgels, Robafen Pediatric Cough & Cold, Robitussin Cough Calmers, Robitussin CoughGels, Robitussin Dry Cough, Robitussin DX Cough Control, Robitussin DX Cough Control Forte, Robitussin DX Dry Cough Forte, Robitussin Honey Cough, Robitussin Junior Persistent Cough, Robitussin Maximum Strength, Robitussin Pediatric Cough Long-Acting, Robitussin Pediatric Cough Suppressant, Robitussin Soft Pastilles, Ryzolt, Sanorex, Savella, Scot-Tussin Diabetic, Scot-Tussin DM Cough Chasers, selegiline, Selgene, Serzone, sibutramine, Silphen DM, Sinequan, sodium biphosphate, sodium oxybate, St. John's wort, St. Joseph Cough Suppressant, Statobex, Strepsils Cough, Strepsils Cough Relief, Sublimaze, Sucrets DM Cough, Sufenta, sufentanil, sumatriptan, sumatriptan nasal, Surmontil, T-Diet, Talwin, Talwin Lactate, Tenuate, Tenuate Dospan, Teramine, Teramine ER, Terry White Chemists Tramadol, Theraflu Thin Strips Cough, thioridazine, Tofranil, Tofranil-PM, traMADOL, traMADOL extended release, Tramahexal, Tramahexal SR, Tramake, Tramake Insts, Tramal, Tramal SR, Tramedo, tranylcypromine Answered by Annelle Szwarc 1 year ago.

There are no side effects at all. I have gone off of it several times and had no issues, although if you do decide to go back on, all that headache and stuff will come back. If the issue is not being able to pay for them I would like to suggest that i am taking a generic version of celexa called citralopram that only costs 20 dollars for 30 pills at 40mg. I hope i helped you, Answered by Beatrice Rabil 1 year ago.

Tramahexal Sr 100 Answered by Inez Termeer 1 year ago.


How come sleeping pills don't make me sleepy?
I take a medication to prevent my migraines & that medication is also given to people for Insomnia. I have been having trouble sleeping lately my doctor suggest that I stop all caffeine well I tried that & it hasn't helped. I have been taking sleeping pills & they don't even make me sleepy.Why is that? Asked by Yolanda Protano 1 year ago.

I take a medication to prevent my migraines & that medication is also given to people for Insomnia. I have been having trouble sleeping lately my doctor suggest that I stop all caffeine well I tried that & it hasn't helped. I have been taking sleeping pills & they don't even make me sleepy.Why is that? Answered by Janella Nailor 1 year ago.

What EXACTLY are you taking for migraine? Is what you take listed below? Midrin, Duradrin (isometheptene/dichloralphenazone/acetam... Fioricet, Esgic, Esgic Plus (acetaminophen/butalbital/caffeine) Phrenilin, Phrenilin Forte, Butapap (acetaminophen/butalbital) Fiorinal (aspirin/butalbital/caffeine) Elavil (amitriptyline) Aventyl, Pamelor (nortriptyline) Seroquel (quetiapine) Neurontin (gabapentin) Desyrel (trazodone) Remeron (mirtazapine) Adapin, Sinequan (doxepin) Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine) Vistaril, Atarax (hydroxyzine) Phenergan, Sominex (promethazine) Many of the medications prescribed (including all medications I list) for sleep are NOT approved for insomnia or for any sleep issue. Amitriptyline is, for example, one of the most effective medications for migraine and it is also one of the five most prescribed medications for insomnia however there is almost no evidence it is an effective sleeping medication, especially in people without depression. Also people can develop tolerance to hypnotics and since you have been taking this medication for migraines, it is likely any sedating effects have gone. If your insomnia is causing significant problems then go back to your doctor. If you are in pain that may be the reason you can't sleep. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine guidelines recommendations first-line treatment for insomnia to be using short- or intermediate-acting benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BzRAs), whether a benzodiazepine such as Restoril (temazepam), Doral (quazepam), Halcion (triazolam) Mogadon, Alodorm (nitrazepam)*, Dalmane (flurazepam), or ProSom (estazolam) or a newer BzRAs such as Ambien, Stilnox, Zolpimist (zolpidem), Ambien CR (zolpidem extended-release), Edluar (zolpidem sublingual), Sonata, Starnoc (zaleplon), Imovane, Rhovane, Zimovane (zopiclone)*, or Lunesta (eszopiclone). Drugs with a * are not commercially available in The United States. Answered by Mamie Coplin 1 year ago.

From my own personal experience... sleeping pills don't work for me. I have this horrible problem with staying asleep. Once I'm awake, I'm awake. I get, on average, about 5 hours of sleep a night. It doesn't matter if I took 2 Benadryl or a Unisom or anything. I just can't stay asleep. The only thing that has worked for me was Ambien CR. I hate to take it(and don't while I'm prego), but I will break down and have one every few weeks so I can just get some sleep. Are you having trouble going to sleep or staying asleep? You might want to google your problems and get a check list together. Once you've gone through all those options it may be time to talk to your doctor about a prescription to take OCCASIONALLY. I've tried EVERYTHING under the sun and nothing else has helped. I've been this way since I was a young teen. Good luck. Answered by Danyell Strenke 1 year ago.

Sleeping pills block dreams and prevent restful sleep. Don't go down that path. Figure out why you cannot sleep and treat the cause, not the symptom. If you are older, you may not have enough melatonine to allow you to sleep. You can buy supplements called melatonine. If you drank coffee or other stimulants, lay off. If your roommates complain about your snoring, you may have sleep apena. Check with your doctor. Are there noises or light in your bedroom? Address that problem. Do you sleep too much? Try going to bed only when you are tired and sleep a moderate amount. Are you stressed about your life or profession? Deal with this. The list goes on. Please identify the cause of the sleep problem and then address it. Don't try to take a shortcut that may lead to more problems later. Answered by Lissa Kotte 1 year ago.

Some medications affect people differently. I would suggest trying melatonin. My husband and I switched from Tylenol PM to that and it works great. It's not habit forming like the other stuff, it's cheap, it's safe, it doesn't make you feel groggy in the morning like sleeping pills do, and it works great. Answered by Christia Deloatch 1 year ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Erika Burkley 1 year ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Alfonso Rubsam 1 year ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Kevin Speis 1 year ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Danyelle Doyan 1 year ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Corrine Suydan 1 year ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Nicol Flugence 1 year ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Becky Tumbleston 1 year ago.


Antidepresents?
Can someone tell me all the kinds of brands of antidepressents? Its important to me :) Thank you sooo much! You can also give me a link as to wehre I can find them. I need all sorts of information on them all. :) Asked by Ermelinda Scheitlin 1 year ago.

Here are some of the more common ones and a little info on them. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) citalopram (brand name: Celexa) escitalopram (brand name: Lexapro) fluoxetine (brand name: Prozac) paroxetine (brand names: Paxil, Pexeva) sertraline (brand name: Zoloft) These medicines tend to have fewer side effects than other antidepressants. Some of the side effects that can be caused by SSRIs include dry mouth, nausea, nervousness, insomnia, sexual problems and headache. Tricyclics amitriptyline (brand name: Elavil) desipramine (brand name: Norpramin) imipramine (brand name: Tofranil) nortriptyline (brand name: Aventyl, Pamelor) Common side effects caused by these medicines include dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, difficulty urinating, worsening of glaucoma, impaired thinking and tiredness. These antidepressants can also affect a person's blood pressure and heart rate. Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) venlafaxine (brand name: Effexor) duloxetine (brand name: Cymbalta) Some common side effects caused by these medicines include nausea and loss of appetite, anxiety and nervousness, headache, insomnia and tiredness. Dry mouth, constipation, weight loss, sexual problems, increased heart rate and increased cholesterol levels can also occur. Norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitors (NDRIs) bupropion (brand name: Wellbutrin) Some of the common side effects in people taking NDRIs include agitation, nausea, headache, loss of appetite and insomnia. It can also cause increase blood pressure in some people. Combined reuptake inhibitors and receptor blockers trazodone (brand name: Desyrel) nefazodone (brand name: Serzone) maprotiline mirtazpine (brand name: Remeron) Common side effects of these medicines are drowsiness, dry mouth, nausea and dizziness. If you have liver problems, you should not take nefazodone. If you have seizures, you should not take maprotiline. Monamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) isocarboxazid (brand name: Marplan) phenelzine (brand name: Nardil) tranlcypromine (brand name: Parnate) MAOIs are used less commonly than the other antidepressants. They can have serious side effects, including weakness, dizziness, headaches and trembling. Taking an MAOI antidepressant while you're taking another antidepressant or certain over-the-counter medicines for colds and flu can cause a dangerous reaction. Your doctor will also tell you what foods and alcoholic beverages you should avoid while you are taking an MAOI. You should not take an MAOI unless you clearly understand what medications and foods to avoid. If you are taking an MAOI and your doctor wants you to start taking one of the other antidepressants, he or she will have you stop taking the MAOI for a while before you start the new medicine. This gives the MAOI time to clear out of your body. Answered by Breanna Poirer 1 year ago.

You should go to the library and see the Physicians Desk Reference. I believe that lists all medications. Just one thing, before you take any antidepressants, be sure you really need them, they are for severe cases. The vast majority of depression can be taken care of with talk therapy with a counselor, much more safe for your body...and mind. Answered by Marcelina Sturdivant 1 year ago.

You need to talk to your doctor if you are thinking of taking antidepressents. Some brands I know of, are Lexapro and Zoloft. Just look them up on google :) Answered by Dagmar Stevison 1 year ago.

Tide's giving away presents? No seriously, call up your doctor. Even if you just talk to a nurse, they can chat to you about options and what the difference is between each one. Or look it up on wikipedia, because usually they have great information. Answered by Willie Szmidt 1 year ago.

You can get a lot of info on different psych drugs and their side effects from the website for the Citizen's Commission on Human Rights at www.cchr.org. Answered by Marinda Henrity 1 year ago.

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Do i need outpatient pych help..?
I took myself off my meds 2 months ago because I thought I was fine..but recently I have been cutting, picking and scratching. I saw my doctor and he started me on 2 meds..but I can't get the meds till they are pre-authorized. So I'm still hurting myself and I wish I were dead, I also sleep a lot more, cry,... Asked by Junior Zambrano 1 year ago.

I took myself off my meds 2 months ago because I thought I was fine..but recently I have been cutting, picking and scratching. I saw my doctor and he started me on 2 meds..but I can't get the meds till they are pre-authorized. So I'm still hurting myself and I wish I were dead, I also sleep a lot more, cry, and don't have much motivation. I'm 18 and have been struggling for years. Answered by Ruby Laverriere 1 year ago.

Only if the ones sufferers are a hazard to themselves or a danger to different ones. It approach: Either the ones sufferers threaten to injure or to kill anyone or to dedicate suicide. That is the one approach to ship anyone into psychiatry with out consent. With consent every person can also be despatched to a psychiatric ward however could also be unfastened to go away at any time.Everything else violates the elemental code of moral clinical behavior and in practically each state additionally is unlawful. Answered by Vesta Mcright 1 year ago.

Ask your pharmacist if he/sh can give you the pills you need until the pre-authorization goe through. if not go to the hospital ER. Answered by Eloisa Taylor 1 year ago.


What medication would doctor prescribe?
I found myself having no energy, loss of appetite, loss of motivation, memory loss, also i lost interest of sex. What medication do you think my doctor would prescribe me? I am 20 years old i don't know why i just started feeling these symptoms. I am seeing the doctor tomorrow but want to hear your opinion on... Asked by Ying Jobin 1 year ago.

I found myself having no energy, loss of appetite, loss of motivation, memory loss, also i lost interest of sex. What medication do you think my doctor would prescribe me? I am 20 years old i don't know why i just started feeling these symptoms. I am seeing the doctor tomorrow but want to hear your opinion on what could be wrong with me? Answered by Cedrick Montello 1 year ago.

Celexa Lexapro Prozac Paxil Pexeva Zolof Elavil Norpramin Tofranil Aventyl Pamelor those are just some that they could prescribe. Answered by Allyson Shelstad 1 year ago.

depression. there are many drugs they could describe... prozac, celexa, zoloft.... just to name a few. good luck. be happy. Answered by Marceline Schomaker 1 year ago.


Does anyone know of any anti depressants that doesn't have weigh gain as a side effect?
I know that Wellbutrin can have a weight loss effect but are there any other anti depressants that don't have that weight gain effect? Asked by Lonna Loegering 1 year ago.

In a side by side comparison based on a scale of 0 (least likely) to 4+(very likely). Tricyclics: Of the 10 drugs within this class, those that ranked the lowest (1+) were: Desipramine (Norpramin); Nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor); and Protriptyline (Vivactil) Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRI's): Of the 6 drugs within this class (ie: Celexa, Zoloft, Prozac, ect), all rate a 1+ except Paroxetine (Paxil)- this rated a 2+ Dopamine-Reuptake Blocking compounds: Bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban) rated a 0 Serotonin/Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors: Venlafaxine (Effexor) rated a 0 5HT2 Receptor Antagonists: Nefazodone (Serzone) rated a 0 while Trazodone (Desyrel) rated a 2+ There are two other classes; MAOI's- too many nasty side effects- 3 drugs within this class rated 2+/3+; and finally, Noradrenergic Antagonist- Mirtazapine (Remeron) which rated a 3+. Not surprisingly the majority of those that scored best (lowest) on weight gain also showed less prevalence of drowsiness- even amoung the snooze inducing tricyclics- with Protriptyline rated the best (lowest) for drowsiness within this class (1+). Answered by Marlene Ronzoni 1 year ago.

My boss took Effexor and lost 30 lbs. The description of the drug does claim weight gain as a side effect though. Answered by Wade Mattews 1 year ago.


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