ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 072301/001.

Names and composition

"ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ATENOLOL and CHLORTHALIDONE.

Answered questions

If taking chlorthalidone and atenolol, should they always be taken together?
Asked by Joye Ohaver 3 months ago.

Yes and No.... Atenolol can be taken alone. It is also used in combination with other medications Your provider gave you that combination for a reason based on medical concerns they have about you. Atenolol and chlorthalidone are prescription medications used to treat heart problems. Atenolol is a beta-blocker that acts to normalize the heartbeat to help lower blood pressure. Atenolol is also used to treat angina by regulating the heartbeat. Chlorthalidone helps to reduce water retention. Atenolol and chlorthalidone are used together to help keep blood pressure down. Answered by Hae Lamacchia 3 months ago.

Not necessarily together, but in 24 hr. period. Chlorthalidone=diuretic with antihipertense properties. Atenolol= Beta blocker ( action intensified w. diuretic). Answered by Jesusita Litchmore 3 months ago.


Blood pressure meds stopped working,why?
My grandmothers high blood pressure meds stopped working. She has already had 2 strokes. Why does the medicine stop working and should she try another? Will the strokes eventualy lead to her death since she is 89? Asked by Prince Spenner 3 months ago.

There are many different kinds of High Blood Pressure medications with a whole lot of different range of generics of them. For example: - Diuretics; chlorthalidone, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide and indapamide. - Beta-blockers; acebutolol, atenolol, carvedilol, metoprolol, nadolol, propranolol and timolol. - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors); benazepril, enalapril, lisinopril, quinapril, ramipril and trandolapril. - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs); candesartan, irbesartan, losartan, olmesartan, telmisartan and valsartan. - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs); amlodipine, diltiazem, felodipine, nicardipine, nifedipine and verapamil. - Alpha-blockers; doxazosin, prazosin and terazosin. - Centrally acting drugs; clonidine and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators; hydralazine and minoxidil. Your grandmother must be given the suitable medication (or combination of some drugs as listed above) which will work for her. It is important that She be receiving and remain taking these high blood pressure medicine in order to avoid any stroke from taking place. Please discuss some of the medications mentioned with Her specialist. Good Health ! Answered by Elsa Rosenquist 3 months ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Dani Klakowicz 3 months ago.

This could mean that the medication stopped working or that she is developing some other problem to raise her bp. Aspirin is not reccomende for a stroke unless you are 100% positive the stroke is not hemmorhagic. In other words if she is ahving a bleed in her brain and you give her aspirin you will make it worse. Answered by Isidra Hinesley 3 months ago.

I am so sorry to say yes it could. I have very high BP and take several different types of meds. Sometimes when your body gets use to the medication and you will either need to add something else or increase what she is already taking. Do you have any idea what her BP is running? Do you have a BP machine? Interested to know what it runs. I hope she takes asprin or something to thin her blood..... Answered by Renata Kwasny 3 months ago.


Is my doctor controlling my blood pressure well enough?
If it helps, my dosages are: atenolol/chlorthalidone at 50/25 once daily, amlodipine at 10mg once daily. I had an extensive workup in my 20s to try to find a cause. Blood tests, urine tests, cardiologist, endocrinologist. No cause was found. Asked by Jacquelyne Betzig 3 months ago.

I had to change internists a year ago when my former one moved her practice. I have had high blood pressure since I was 18; now I am 40. My old doctor had me on metoprolol, HCTZ, verapamil, and lisinopril and my BP was controlled around 120/80. My new doctor didn't like this regimen, and switched me to atenolol/chlorthalidone and amlodipine. I am unclear on why these drugs are better since they are from the same drug classes as before, but he insisted. He failed to prescribe an ACE inhibitor to replace the lisinopril, and my BP has consistently been about 150/90 for the last year. I ask him to adjust my medication to bring it to 120/80, but he says that 150/90 is not dangerous and I am better off not taking so many medications. Every thing I read on medical websites and books says BP should be maintained at 120/80 or lower. Any opinions? Answered by Garth Nannini 3 months ago.

NO - your BP is NOT adequately controlled at that level. - find another doctor. 1. Are EACH of your BP meds at their max doses? As a rule (there ARE exceptions) you get started on ONE agent at the starting dose, then increase that med until the MAX dose is reached and then - if still not adequate - either switch to a different class OR add another drug from a different class and then repeat the process. 2. what is the cause of your elevated BP at such a young age? The answer to this question really dictates what course is correct. Answered by Alverta Frevert 3 months ago.

What about your diastolic bp? the bottom reading. you just need to have a good diet plan. Include a lot of Potassium rich food in your diet, like bananas and potatoes. Avoid too much Sodium and make sure that coffee doesn't raise your blood pressure. Some people are affected by coffee others are not. If you are overweight then lose that extra weight. Exercise is also a great way to lower blood pressure, I think that you will need a small dose of medication if your blood pressure is always 140/80 or 140/85. BP is bad, it cause damage the heart - brain and arteries. Anyway, the damage is caused by very high blood pressure. Yours is not that high, but why take the risk? maybe with only 2.5mg of Norvasc your blood pressure will be 120/80. Listen, there are many drug classes for treating BP and you can find a medicine that causes no side effects for you. Let me know if you have any questions. Good luck, Good luck Answered by Daina Pahk 3 months ago.

Hi, i suffered from high blood pressure for a long time and all the doctors wanted to put me on statins and other pills which can have terrible side effects. After alot of research i found a natural way to lower my blood pressure and keep it there. High Blood pressure is often called the silent killer because a third of people with it are unaware of the fact. It offers no signs ... no symptoms ...and no warnings Some of the things you will learn are 14 diet tips that are proven to help you lower your blood pressure - and quickly improve your health! Tasty healthy recipes - use these to ensure you are eating the right blood pressure lowering meals! How to reduce stress - this is a main cause of high blood pressure and must be dealt with effectively! Why stress raises blood pressure - plus 13 symptoms that indicate your stress level is too high! 6 tips for managing stress - and lowering your blood pressure! How to lower your high blood pressure with exercise - you don't have to exercise like a mad man, regular activity can do a you world of good ...learn more here! 5 tips for starting an exercise program - and ensuring you stick with it! 11 great types of exercise that you can use to lower your blood pressure - you may be very surprised (and happy) to see what types of activities made this list! 7 ways to make exercise a part of your regular everyday life - have a busy schedule? Here are seven ways you can exercise without interfering with any of your current responsibilities and commitments! Answered by Wallace Brulotte 3 months ago.

150/90 is good bp ??!!!!!!! are you sure he is a doctor ? you must change him he knows nothing the normal range is 110-130/70-90 the increase or decrease is due to physiological variations Answered by Margo Mcginnity 3 months ago.

YOU are the one who controls your blood pressure. try meditation, it will help alot. you obviously have trouble relaxing properly. watching t.v. increases blood pressure. eat more fruit. try drinking rosemary tea. Answered by Catharine Stthomas 3 months ago.


Drug Testing and the work place?
We have several Random drug test where I currently work and They evern bring a Canine to give the permission for vehicel both on and off the property. You don't so, you have options either that you adhere of you leave the job site.I don't mind all this stuff as long as it gets results. I am curious now... Asked by Josephine Altmiller 3 months ago.

We have several Random drug test where I currently work and They evern bring a Canine to give the permission for vehicel both on and off the property. You don't so, you have options either that you adhere of you leave the job site. I don't mind all this stuff as long as it gets results. I am curious now several Scripts that I take are all items I know I would burn hot on, and I have even told them so with they would know my Doctors - BUPROPION HCL XL 300 MG-- CYMBALTA 60 MG CAPSULE---,FEXOFENADINE HCL 180 MG ----ATENOLOL-CHLORTHALIDONE 100-25 1-per dsyday.---ALPRAZOLAM 0.5 MG TABLET-- METFORMIN HCL 500 MG TABLET-- LISINOPRIL 20 MG TABLET--HYDROCODONE-APAP 10-500 TABLET--MORPHINE SULF 30 MG TAB ER --TESTOSTERONE CYP 200 MG/ML -- Answered by Arletha Konefal 3 months ago.

The Alprazolam (Xanax) Hydrocodone/Apap(Vicodin)and Morphine tabs will show up. The employer may want to check with your doc that the scripts are valid and current. Depending on the nature of your job, they may have the right to terminate *even if you have a legitimate script* if they render you unable to perform your work safely. Answered by Abram Eckerson 3 months ago.


What is this pill? Discription below?
Ok so i have this white round small pill it has 153 on one side and the other it has a R on it... What is this pill used for??? Does anyone know?? Asked by Mercedes Crabill 3 months ago.

Round White Pill 153 Answered by Sophie Groner 3 months ago.

Ondansetron Hydrochloride Answered by Jani Heifner 3 months ago.

Ondansetron its used for vomiting and nausea caused by surgery or chemotherapy Answered by Zita Mcginness 3 months ago.

it's possible that you've miscarried, although to be sure i would go to see your doctor, if it is a miscarriage you'll need to make sure everything has cleared itself Answered by Audrie Mainero 3 months ago.


Possible Over Medication for Hypertension?
Hi I am 27 years old and was detected with hypertension around 3 - 3.5 years ago. I had tried a couple of medicines which usually gave me headaches. Finally my doctor prescribed me 2 tablets to be taken daily in the morning. They are:Cardace 2.5 (Ramipril) and Tenoric 50 (Atenolol/Chlorthalidone).I think... Asked by Sylvester Capestany 3 months ago.

Hi I am 27 years old and was detected with hypertension around 3 - 3.5 years ago. I had tried a couple of medicines which usually gave me headaches. Finally my doctor prescribed me 2 tablets to be taken daily in the morning. They are: Cardace 2.5 (Ramipril) and Tenoric 50 (Atenolol/Chlorthalidone). I think that this is too much of a medication. Could some one shed some light on this? Thanks, Mike Answered by Tommie Gerdiman 3 months ago.

Hi Mike. First of all, I would look more at what your blood pressure reading are now that you are on these medications rather than the fact you are taking 2 different prescriptions. If you are passing out when you stand up, sure, I'd say there's a problem. I hope whatever the doc placed you on is keeping your blood pressure in normal range (120/70 range). It's important for your heart, kidneys, and brain. Answered by Tyrone Redfearn 3 months ago.

The ramapril is a good choice however the beta blocker/diuretic combo isn't. Chlorthalidone is old long acting diutetic that causes low potassium levels. I would talk to your doc abour stopping this and if necessary increasing the Ramapril (HOPE study showed 10mg gave best cardio-protection). Recent study in New England Jounral Med suggested beta blockers were poor choice for uncomplicated hypertension. Answered by Jason Schopp 3 months ago.

Osteo Bi-Flex is a combination of vitamins and minerals that seem to work, but it takes about a month before you see any results. You can purchase it in the vitamin section of any drug store or department store - like Wal-Mart and Sam's. Also, a very old remedy is to soak white raisins in clear gin for 7 days, then eat 9 gin-soaked raisins every night before you go to bed. Don't laugh. I know several people who swear by this. Answered by Eugenie Schulle 3 months ago.

Do you mean "Tenoretic"? Ramipril is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. It is also used to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke in patients at risk for these problems and to improve survival in patients with heart failure after a heart attack. Ramipril is in a class of medications called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. It works by decreasing certain chemicals that tighten the blood vessels, so blood flows more smoothly and the heart can pump blood more efficiently. Atenolol is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. It also is used to prevent angina (chest pain) and improve survival after a heart attack. Atenolol is in a class of medications called beta blockers. It works by relaxing blood vessels and slowing heart rate to improve blood flow and decrease blood pressure. Tenoretic is a combination of two drugs prescribed for hypertension - atenolol and chlorthalidone. Atenolol is a cardio-selective beta-blocker. Chlorthalidone is a diuretic. Tenoretic is not indicated for the initial treatment of hypertension but combines two effective drugs in a convenient once-a-day dosage for individuals who have been prescribed atenolol and chlorthalidone. Control hypertension by diet, exercise and medications. Check the function of your kidney (for microalbuminuria, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen), heart (for hypertensive heart disease) and retina (for hypertensive retinopathy). Adopt DASH diet. Answered by Meryl Elwood 3 months ago.


What are the 38 drugs that can cause drug-induced lupus?
I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest.From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could... Asked by Leeanne Colcher 3 months ago.

I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest. From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could tell me the 38 drugs that can cause lupus. Thank you! Answered by Otelia Mankowski 3 months ago.

can it be cause by Keppra or Lamictal . I used to take Dilantin and tegretol as well as mysoline. But haven't taken them for years. I have been on Lamictal since it came out on the market with tegretol for most of it till 2005 Then in 2007 I began the keppra. I was diagnosed with Lupus back in 2013, after they found I had hyper thyroidism/ Graves Disease, RA and a few other problems. They told me they're all connected and can stem from the anti seizure drugs. i don't see them on any lists but do see anti seizure drugs. I'm concerned. As the combination or the 2 drugs have given me control of my seizures. BUt At what price must i live with if I want to keep control. As stopping them to stop the lupus could cause me to spiral back into the dark pit pof no control and leave me homebound again. Answered by Sylvia Mammano 3 months ago.

Drug Induced Lupus Answered by Nellie Munaz 3 months ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Marshall Fosson 3 months ago.

Her rheumatologist will certainly look over her list of medications. S/he will spot any that can cause drug induced lupus. If the lupus is drug induced, it will go away when the medication is withdrawn. Some of the medications listed by femmina matt are high blood pressure meds and anti TB meds. Answered by Chung Dieball 3 months ago.


What does a postive ana mean?
I was pregnant in 10/05 and my ana blood test came back postive i was tested for lupus because my titer came back high what else could i have? Doctore doesnt seem to be too concerned. Should i be Asked by Catharine Mccollister 3 months ago.

An antinuclear antibody (ANA) test measures the amount and pattern of abnormal antibody that work against the body's tissues (autoantibody). Everyone has a small amount of autoantibody, but about 5% of people have a larger amount. About half of these 5% have an autoimmune disease, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis. An ANA test alone cannot diagnose a specific disease. It is used in combination with an evaluation of symptoms and other tests. The body's immune system normally attacks and destroys foreign substances such as bacteria and viruses. However, in disorders known as autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks and destroys the body's normal tissues. When a person has an autoimmune disease, the immune system produces antibodies that attach to the body's own cells as though they were foreign substances, often causing them to be damaged or destroyed. A thorough medical history, physical examination, and other tests besides an ANA test are needed confirm a suspected autoimmune disease. A test for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is done to help diagnose conditions that include: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Rheumatoid arthritis Sjögren's syndrome. Scleroderma. Hashimoto's thyroid disease. A reaction to a medication. High values A high ANA titer may indicate systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE can be present with titers from 1 to 40 and higher. Almost all people with SLE have a high ANA titer. However, most people with a high ANA titer do not have SLE. Only about one-third of people who are referred to a rheumatologist for high ANA titers are diagnosed with SLE. Other conditions may cause a high ANA titer. About 30% to 40% of people with rheumatoid arthritis have a high ANA titer. Many conditions may result in a high ANA titer. These conditions include autoimmune diseases, such as scleroderma, Sjögren's syndrome, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and myositis. Other conditions with a high ANA titer include Raynaud's syndrome, viral infections, and liver disease. Although an ANA titer may help support a diagnosis for these conditions, it is not used by itself to confirm a diagnosis. A thorough medical history, physical examination, and other tests are needed to confirm a suspected autoimmune disease. Some apparently healthy individuals have high levels of antinuclear antibodies. For instance, some people with a family history of autoimmune disease may have a high ANA titer. The higher the titer, however, the more likely it is that the person has an autoimmune disease. What Affects the Test Factors that can interfere with your test and the accuracy of the results include: Medications, such as hydralazine (Apresoline), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl, Promine), and certain anticonvulsants (such as Dilantin, Mysoline). These medications can cause a form of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) called drug-induced lupus. Lupus resulting from these medications may cause a high antinuclear antibody (ANA) titer. Medications, such as antibiotics (isoniazid, penicillin, and tetracycline), birth control pills, lithium, and some diuretics, such as chlorthalidone (Hygroton). Heart or blood pressure medications, such as acebutolol (Sectral), captopril (Capoten), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), lovastatin (Mevacor), and quinidine. Aging. Some older adults (5% to 40%) may have mildly elevated levels. Older women appear to have higher ANA titers than older men. Steroids, which may cause a false-negative result. Answered by Aleida Mento 3 months ago.

Ana Titer Levels Answered by Vanessa Tonnesen 3 months ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Nohemi Chango 3 months ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Gennie Kniesel 3 months ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Tania Degen 3 months ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Shannon Boynes 3 months ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Guy Share 3 months ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Jerrell Kinnear 3 months ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Myrtis Muyskens 3 months ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Elza Crawford 3 months ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Lynna Darsow 3 months ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Jarrett Revels 3 months ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Mariella Fleury 3 months ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Rudy Near 3 months ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Carlie Lothspeich 3 months ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Zita Hatala 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
072301/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
072302/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
073581/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
073582/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
073665/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
073665/002 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
074107/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074107/002 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
074203/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074203/002 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
074404/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074404/002 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018760/001 TENORETIC 100 ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
018760/002 TENORETIC 50 ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
072301/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
072302/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
073581/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
073582/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
073665/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
073665/002 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
074107/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074107/002 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
074203/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074203/002 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG
074404/001 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074404/002 ATENOLOL AND CHLORTHALIDONE ATENOLOL; CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG and 25MG

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