ATENOLOL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 072303/001.

Names and composition

"ATENOLOL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ATENOLOL.
It belongs to the class Beta-blockers and is used in MI, LVD (Cardiovascular System)

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
072303/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
072304/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073025/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073026/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073315/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073316/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073317/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073318/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073352/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073353/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073457/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073457/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
073457/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073475/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073476/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073542/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073543/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073646/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
073676/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073676/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074052/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074056/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074056/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074056/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074099/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074101/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074101/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074101/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074120/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074120/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074126/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074126/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074126/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074127/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074127/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074265/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074265/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074265/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074499/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
076900/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
076900/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
076900/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
076907/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
076907/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
076907/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
077443/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
077443/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
077443/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
077877/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
077877/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
077877/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078210/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
078210/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
078210/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078254/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
078254/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
078254/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078512/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
078512/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
078512/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018240/001 TENORMIN ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
018240/002 TENORMIN ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018240/004 TENORMIN ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
072303/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
072304/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073025/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073026/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073315/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073316/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073317/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073318/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073352/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073353/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073457/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073457/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
073457/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073475/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073476/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073542/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
019058/001 TENORMIN ATENOLOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
073543/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073646/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
073676/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073676/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074052/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074056/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074056/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074056/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074099/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074101/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074101/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074101/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074120/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074120/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074126/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074126/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074126/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074127/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074127/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074265/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074265/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074265/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074499/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
076900/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
076900/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
076900/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
076907/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
076907/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
076907/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
077443/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
077443/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
077443/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
077877/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
077877/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
077877/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078210/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
078210/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
078210/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078254/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
078254/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
078254/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078512/001 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
078512/002 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
078512/003 ATENOLOL ATENOLOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
AstraZeneca UK Ltd

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

I just got prescribed to atenolol..?
just wondering if anyone else has taken it and what did it do for you? is it safe?? i know my doc wouldnt give it to me if she didnt think so but im worried that it will slow down my heart too much..i only have a fast heartbeat sometimes..sometimes its normal..is it okay to take?? im only taking 25 MG a day...but... Asked by Heath Garfinkle 1 month ago.

just wondering if anyone else has taken it and what did it do for you? is it safe?? i know my doc wouldnt give it to me if she didnt think so but im worried that it will slow down my heart too much..i only have a fast heartbeat sometimes..sometimes its normal..is it okay to take?? im only taking 25 MG a day...but still worried??..if you have taken it please tell me about it! Answered by Jarrod Sedtal 1 month ago.

ATENOLOL is a wonder medicine given for Heart problems and I have been on this drug for the past 10 years. I take 50 mg daily. Now let us see what is Atenolol and how it works. Atenolol is a beta-adrenergic blocking agent. Atenolol blocks the action of the sympathetic nervous system, a portion of the involuntary nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system stimulates the pace of the heart beat. By blocking the action of these nerves, atenolol reduces the heart rate and is useful in treating abnormally rapid heart rhythms. Atenolol also reduces the force of heart muscle contraction and lowers blood pressure. By reducing the heart rate and the force of muscle contraction, atenolol reduces heart muscle oxygen demand. Since angina occurs when oxygen demand of the heart exceeds supply, atenolol is helpful in treating angina. Atenolol is prescribed for patients with high blood pressure (hypertension). It is also used to treat chest pain (angina pectoris) related to coronary artery disease. Atenolol is also useful in slowing and regulating certain types of abnormally rapid heart rates (tachycardias). Other uses for atenolol include the prevention of migraine headaches and the treatment of certain types of tremors (familial or hereditary essential tremors). So please continue to take Atenolol as prescribed by your physician and yu need not at all worry.- Answered by Shawana Bankes 1 month ago.

I haven't taken it (yet!) but have prescibed it to MANY patients.Since I still work... don't worry! :-) Answered by Moira Weakland 1 month ago.


Isn't 100mg of Atenolol (beta blocker) A little too much for a 19 year old boy?
My son was prescribed 25mg of atenolol and the doctor said to take 2 in the morning and 2 after 8 hours from taking the other 2. He has anxiety because his heart was always racing so the doc put him on this. Im conerned because what if theres a day if he dosnt have anxiety would his heart rate get too... Asked by Cinderella Suydam 1 month ago.

My son was prescribed 25mg of atenolol and the doctor said to take 2 in the morning and 2 after 8 hours from taking the other 2. He has anxiety because his heart was always racing so the doc put him on this. Im conerned because what if theres a day if he dosnt have anxiety would his heart rate get too low.? **also Does this medication constrict blood vessels?..that is what my wife has said, and im VERY WORRIED because he smokes too.** Answered by Laquita Lacerte 1 month ago.

GENERIC NAME: atenolol BRAND NAME: Tenormin DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Atenolol is a beta-adrenergic blocking agent. Atenolol blocks the action of the sympathetic nervous system, a portion of the involuntary nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system stimulates the pace of the heart beat. By blocking the action of these nerves, atenolol reduces the heart rate and is useful in treating abnormally rapid heart rhythms. Atenolol also reduces the force of heart muscle contraction and lowers blood pressure. By reducing the heart rate and the force of muscle contraction, atenolol reduces heart muscle oxygen demand. Since angina occurs when oxygen demand of the heart exceeds supply, atenolol is helpful in treating angina. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg. STORAGE: Tablets should be stored at room temperature in a tightly closed container. PRESCRIBED FOR: Atenolol is prescribed for patients with high blood pressure (hypertension). It is also used to treat chest pain (angina pectoris) related to coronary artery disease. Atenolol is also useful in slowing and regulating certain types of abnormally rapid heart rates (tachycardias). Other uses for atenolol include the prevention of migraine headaches and the treatment of certain types of tremors (familial or hereditary essential tremors). DOSING: Should be taken before meals or at bedtime. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Atenolol can aggravate breathing difficulties in patients with asthma, chronic bronchitis, or emphysema. In patients with existing slow heart rates (bradycardias) and heart blocks (defects in the electrical conduction of the heart), atenolol can cause dangerously slow heart rates, and even shock. Atenolol reduces the force of heart muscle contraction and can aggravate symptoms of heart failure. Calcium channel blockers, and digoxin (Lanoxin) can cause lowering of blood pressure and heart rate to dangerous levels when administered together with atenolol. In patients with coronary artery disease, abruptly stopping atenolol can suddenly worsen angina, and occasionally precipitate heart attacks. If it is necessary to discontinue atenolol, its dosage can be reduced gradually over several weeks. Atenolol can mask the early warning symptoms of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), and should be used with caution in patients receiving treatment for diabetes. It is not habit forming. PREGNANCY: Atenolol may cause harm and growth retardation in the fetus when given to pregnant women. SIDE EFFECTS: Atenolol is generally well tolerated, and side effects are mild and transient. Rare side effects include abdominal cramps, diarrhea, constipation, fatigue, insomnia, nausea, depression, dreaming, memory loss, fever, impotence, lightheadedness, slow heart rate, low blood pressure, numbness, tingling, cold extremities, sore throat, and shortness of breath or wheezing. Answered by Gilbert Gamberg 1 month ago.

If that's what his doctor prescribed, then it's unlikely to be too much. If your son told his doctor that he smokes, he was seriously advised to quit and offered help to do so. But the doctor would have taken that into account before writing a prescription. My question, though, is why a doctor would prescribe a beta blocker instead of helping your son to deal with this anxiety problems. Your son should get a second opinion, being absolutely honest with his doctor and asking if he should instead be treating his possible anxiety disorder. Answered by Pam Raczak 1 month ago.

Naw He Will Be Ok...Im 19 with anxiety too, And i aint gonna jus copy and paste nothing from the net cus dat dont help.Imma tell you whut i know, Ive been smoking weed since 11 yrs. and smokin newports since i was 15, I also am taking anxiety pills; and about not having anxiety his heart rate will be slow but he will be alright he jus will be dragging pretty much high of medication..lol I quit smoking and drinking for new years. And no it dont construct blood vessels it actually It helps The Vessels. Answered by Adaline Messervy 1 month ago.

i thought this drug was for heart problems, not anxiety. Answered by Eugenia Arcement 1 month ago.


Atenolol and Metoprolol?
what is the difference between Atenolol and Metoprolol? Asked by Gwyn Streeper 1 month ago.

Atenolol is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. It also is used to prevent angina (chest pain) and improve survival after a heart attack. Atenolol is in a class of medications called beta blockers. It works by relaxing blood vessels and slowing heart rate to improve blood flow and decrease blood pressure. Metoprolol is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. It also is used to prevent angina (chest pain) and to improve survival after a heart attack. Extended-release (long-acting) metoprolol also is used in combination with other medications to treat heart failure. Metoprolol is in a class of medications called beta blockers. It works by relaxing blood vessels and slowing heart rate to improve blood flow and decrease blood pressure Both drugs are β1-Selective agents. Answered by Audry Mastenbrook 1 month ago.

They are basically the same thing and serve the same purpose, a form of blood pressure control and angina preventative. You can google each one for more information and side effects. Answered by Elicia Viscia 1 month ago.


Atenolol 50mg this is makeing me tired,lightheaded
I had a heartattach Atenolol was given to me starting with 25mg & it was increased to 50mg. Other than Atenolol what can be given in its place. This is too much for me. It makes me dizzy,legs feel week,I have no energy and I want to sleep all the time. I don't like this feeling of leslessness. What can the Doctor... Asked by Janyce Bradner 1 month ago.

I had a heartattach Atenolol was given to me starting with 25mg & it was increased to 50mg. Other than Atenolol what can be given in its place. This is too much for me. It makes me dizzy,legs feel week,I have no energy and I want to sleep all the time. I don't like this feeling of leslessness. What can the Doctor give me in place of the Atenolol that will NOT make feel this way. Any suggestions? Thank you, Answered by Leticia Zentz 1 month ago.

Atenolol is a beta blocker that lowers blood pressure, slows heart rate and is often used in post heart attack treatment and is usually well tolerated. The symptoms you describe are most likely a consequence of lowered blood pressure due to the atenolol -- reduced blood pressure is not a side effect but the desired result after someone has experienced a heart attack. However blood pressure should not be lowered to a degree that causes serious problems. If you just started this medication your symptoms may diminish with time, but if they haven't there is no reason other drug treatments can not be considered. One option is to ask your doctor if he can lower the dosage to 25mg, the lowest dosage available for this medication. Your doctor should be able to suggest other alternatives than atenolol - there are many medications that can be used for post heart attack management based on the severity and type of infarction, your current physical condition and what course of treatment your doctor has decided is best for you. You are taking a relatively small dosage of atenolol, so it's possible your symptoms are not medication related, consult with your md about this. DO NOT stop this medication without first consulting with your physician. Answered by Lena Llorens 1 month ago.

Atenolol Makes Me Tired Answered by Shayna Taibi 1 month ago.

Side effects found in patients taking atenolol are: dizziness, lightheadedness, excessive tiredness, cold hands and feet, upset stomach and diarrhea. Most people do not get these symptoms and the drug is quite safe for the treatment of hypertension. There are other beta-blockers in the market such as Propranolol, Metoprolol, etc. However, only your attending doctor can determine which drug would be best to replace atenolol. Answered by Euna Mrotek 1 month ago.

One or two peg is ok best is avoid to drink with any heart medicine Answered by Cletus Mundhenk 1 month ago.

it could be to low of blood preasure see a doctor eat well and drink well untill then Answered by Tandy Varnedore 1 month ago.


Atenolol dangers is this serious?
A freind of mine complained of high blood pressure and they gave her atenol and verapamil and tylenol. why tylenol i don't know. the 4th morning of this combo put her on the floor in the bathroom vomiting and fainting. 4 days of icu brought her heart rythm back to normal. Why dont these drs monitor their... Asked by Emma Vivolo 1 month ago.

A freind of mine complained of high blood pressure and they gave her atenol and verapamil and tylenol. why tylenol i don't know. the 4th morning of this combo put her on the floor in the bathroom vomiting and fainting. 4 days of icu brought her heart rythm back to normal. Why dont these drs monitor their patients more , bc the first day she complained of lightheadness and low blood pressure and 45 heart rate to the dr and he or she did nothing. Why are these drugs so powerful to kill you if you don't have someone around watching you Answered by Yuriko Collons 1 month ago.

Both atenolol and verapamil are longer acting drugs. Atenolol is a beta-blocker and verapamil is a calcium channel antagonist. So, they lower blood pressure by separate mechanisms. When given together they are synergistic which means that they lower BP a lot more than either agent alone and even more than the additive effects one would expect. For example: If atenolol alone would lower SBP by 20 and verapamil alone would lower SBP by 30, then one would think that the combination would lower it by 20+30 or 50. However due to synergism, the actual BP lowering effect might be 80 or more causing the patient to bottom out. The doctor probably should have started one drug first to see how it worked, then increased the doses gradually over a couple of weeks until the desired results. If the results are not obtained at the max dose of the first drug, then the doc should start a second drug at the lower end of it's dosing scale and gradually increase it from there. So, I do not agree with the therapy of starting both drugs and sending the patient home without monitoring. The Tylenol has basically no effect on BP and there isn't any reason to take a scheduled dose of Tylenol unless it is some pre-treatment for blood in a hospital setting...never should be done at home. It should always only be taken as needed for pain or temp. Answered by Kraig Katos 1 month ago.

You know the internet is great, but it is dangerous too, if he does not have your address or phone number you should be okay! But, if you even have the tiniest bit of concern, you might want to talk to a family friend or your parents... you need to be careful and never ever give a stranger your important and private information. No matter how they draw you in on the internet... Don't do it! Answered by Grady Sheasby 1 month ago.

Atenolol is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. It also is used to prevent angina (chest pain) and treat heart attacks. Atenolol is in a class of medications called beta blockers. It works by slowing the heart rate and relaxing the blood vessels so the heart does not have to pump as hard. Verapamil is used to treat irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias) and high blood pressure. It relaxes your blood vessels so your heart does not have to pump as hard. It also increases the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart to control chest pain (angina). If taken regularly, verapamil controls chest pain, but it does not stop chest pain once it starts. Your doctor may give you a different medication to take when you have chest pain. Her doctor should have changed the doses of your medications or monitor his patient carefully for side effects. Answered by Carli Heffren 1 month ago.


Should I continue taking Atenolol?
Ok, so I took a home pregnancy test last night and it was positive. I called to get an appointment with a doc but I can't get in until next week or maybe the week after. I take atenolol because I had a heart arrhythmia a few years ago. Should I keep taking it until I see the doctor or stop? If I stop... Asked by Denae Mierow 1 month ago.

Ok, so I took a home pregnancy test last night and it was positive. I called to get an appointment with a doc but I can't get in until next week or maybe the week after. I take atenolol because I had a heart arrhythmia a few years ago. Should I keep taking it until I see the doctor or stop? If I stop I'm scared I will have the arrhythmia again but if I keep taking it I'm scared it will hurt the baby. I did some research on the drug and some sites say it has no proven effect on pregnancy and some say it does. It is pregnancy class D but I don't know what that means. Answered by Valrie Scholtz 1 month ago.

it should be alright for the time being. Class A: Controlled human studies have demonstrated no risks to the fetus. Class B: Presumed safe, based on animal studies; no well-controlled human studies are available. Class C: Safety is uncertain; data from human studies do not exist, and animal studies have shown some question of risk to the fetus. Pregnant women may take these medicines if they clearly need them. Class D: Evidence suggests the possibility of the medication causing birth defects or other problems, but a pregnant woman still might need to take it for her own medical needs. Class X: Proven risks to the fetus outweigh any possible benefits to the mother and congrats on the baby =] Answered by Tiera Bradeen 1 month ago.

Yes you'll be able to. I take atenolol with different medicinal drugs for my middle. I don't, nevertheless, take my nutrients even as as I take my cure. I wait a few hours then take them. Answered by Magdalene Feaster 1 month ago.

contact NHS direct 0845 46 47 Answered by Terica Corkum 1 month ago.


I wondering bottle atenolol suppose to take one time and if not enough should have 2 time atenolol can be?
I wondering bottle atenolol suppose to take one time and if not enough should have 2 time atenolol can be overdose? Asked by Talitha Kopacz 1 month ago.

Atenolol is a once a day drug. You should not take a 2nd atenolol without your doctor advising it. It is not uncommon for the dose to be doubled by the doctor, from 25 mg to 50 mg or from 50 mg to 100 mg, so, a second atenolol is unlikely to be an overdose, but you should not do this yourself. Get the help of whoever prescribed it to you. There would be no reason to take a second dose anyway. It's used for high blood pressure and other things. If your blood pressure is high, unless it is sky high, it can wait until Monday when you can call your doctor. If it is alarmingly high (and you really can't judge that), don't try to treat it yourself - get emergency help Yes, it is possible to have too much atenolol. The major indication of that would be a very slow heart rate. Answered by Jarvis Menk 1 month ago.

how would you know not enough, have checked you blood pressure or gotten it checked by someone who knows how to do it. Only person who knows can let you increase the medicine, otherwise your blood pressure can fall very low and you will have problems. Answered by Corie Brummet 1 month ago.


My doctor precribed me Atenolol (betablocker) for my anxiety....?
But the info paper that comes with this doesn't say anything about controlling anxiety.. Now he was concerned about my pulse being high, but he didn't say anything about taking a med to help it.. So can beteblocker's be used to control anxiety? Asked by Nancee Hayhurst 1 month ago.

Your doctor is using the atenolol (brand name Tenormin) "off label." What that means is that although Atenolol is not FDA approved to treat anxiety there are many studies that indicate that Atenolol can help anxiety. Nearly half of the prescription written are "off label" and with older drugs like Atenolol no one would spend the millions to get it approved to treat anxiety (which has only been figured out fairly recently). I'm a little confused about exactly what you mean- do you know if your doctor thinks anxiety is causing your pulse to be high? Atenolol is an antihypertensive and it should also lower your pulse. So Atenolol should help with your pulse, will it help with anxiety? That is hard to say. Atenolol and other beta-blockers (propranolol more than anything else) have been shown to be helpful for treating performance anxiety (before a test, before a presentation in front of many people) and there is also some evidence it can help with social anxiety disorder and to a much smaller extent panic disorder without agoraphobia and individual panic attacks. There is no evidence it helps treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) nor is there any evidence that taking it daily provides any benefit. What is truly can help is taking it before something that is anxiety provoking. And atenolol will reduce the physical symptoms of anxiety like increased heart rate, sweating, chest tightness, nausea, and many other PHYSICAL effects of anxiety. However the feeling of anxiety is exactly the same. The reason it is helpful for things like stage fright is that it provides the appearance (to everyone else) of being calm. I do like using beta-blockers and I think using them can benefit many people but unless a person is just going to take it once or twice for a major presentation it is not enough. Typically it is used as an adjacent drug to antidepressants (which are approved to treat anxiety) and/or benzodiazepines which are fast acting "tranquilizers." You should call your doctor so you know what he is doing. He may be hoping that Atenolol will treat the anxiety and your elevated pulse. If he is not a psychiatrist there is a good chance he does not know how to best treat anxiety or how to best use beta-blockers for anxiety. Answered by Josiah Michaux 1 month ago.

Atenolol Anxiety Answered by Alysa Thimmesch 1 month ago.

Beta blockers will slow your heart rate down, which will help the PHYSICAL symptoms of panic. I personally found that they made me too groggy and dizzy for every day use, but if I take them before an exam or interview or a situation where I know I will feel anxious then they help. Basically, anxiety is a series of triggers, and the fast heartbeat is something that makes you think you have CAUSE to be panicked, rather than that you are causing it yourself. To be fair, Propanolol is the beta blocker usually used. Try googling MOOD GYM which is a free site that helps you to identify where the anxiety stems from and fives you way to control it. Otherwise though, I found my doctor prescribed me too high a dose of beta blockers and all they did was dull my emotions and make me breathless. Take them as he said for a few weeks, and if they aren't helping, then go back and ask for more options. Hope it goes well for you! Answered by Carlos Spacht 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My doctor precribed me Atenolol (betablocker) for my anxiety....? But the info paper that comes with this doesn't say anything about controlling anxiety.. Now he was concerned about my pulse being high, but he didn't say anything about taking a med to help it.. So can beteblocker's be used to control anxiety? Answered by Breann Rubalcave 1 month ago.


How will atenolol make me feel?
Im 20 female have high blood pressure and a anxiety disorder. My doctor just put me on atenolol and I was just wandering how will it make me feel? Tell everything you know about it... Asked by Melonie Asar 1 month ago.

Atenolol is generally well tolerated, but there are potential side effects just like with any other medication. The most common side effect is fatigue in my experience. Other less common side effects include dizziness, insomnia, depression, nausea and constipation. Atenolol does decrease the heart rate and the blood pressure, therefore you should have these monitored while on the medication. These side effects are common of all beta blockers and Atenolol in my experience is associated with less side effects when compared to some of the other beta blockers. Most likely it will not make you feel much different except maybe fatigue. Atenolol can help reduce your anxiety also. Answered by Toshia Fjetland 1 month ago.

Atenolol High Answered by Beulah Licause 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How will atenolol make me feel? Im 20 female have high blood pressure and a anxiety disorder. My doctor just put me on atenolol and I was just wandering how will it make me feel? Tell everything you know about it... Answered by Gisele Waddle 1 month ago.

The more common side effects include indigestion and constipation. Other possible side effects include dry mouth, hair loss, depression, fatigue, difficulty sleeping, nightmares, dizziness, confusion, and cold extremities. Keep in mind, side effects happen only sometimes, they aren't too common. However, these next side effects are considered serious and you would need to tell your doctor IMMEDIATELY if you have any of these symptoms: hallucinations low blood pressure (hypotension) skin reactions, eg. rash, hives, flaking of skin, worsening of psoriasis sensation of 'pins and needles' in your hands or feet irritated eyes, visual disturbances difficulty hearing or speaking unsteadiness when walking zombie-like feeling - you are trapped in slow motion and unable to function normally. Again, these side effects are especially rare, so you most likely won't have a problem with them. Just remember to take your medication as the doctor prescribed, and if you skip a dose do NOT double-up on the next dose. Your prescription came with instructions, make sure you keep them so you can always refer back to them if you have a question. If you have any concerns or questions, write them down and put them in your purse so you'll remember to ask the doctor at your next visit. Answered by Rico Cano 1 month ago.


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