Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 011161/004.

Names and composition

"ARISTOCORT" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TRIAMCINOLONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011161/004 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
011161/007 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
011161/009 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
011161/010 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 16MG
011161/011 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
011685/003 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE DIACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
011960/004 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE DIACETATE SYRUP/ORAL 2MG per 5ML
012802/001 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE DIACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
080745/002 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE ACETONIDE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.5% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
080750/004 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE ACETONIDE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.1%
083015/002 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE ACETONIDE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.5%
083016/004 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE ACETONIDE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.1%
083017/003 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE ACETONIDE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.025%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011161/004 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
011161/007 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
011161/009 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
011161/010 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 16MG
011161/011 ARISTOCORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
011283/003 KENACORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
011283/006 KENACORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
011283/008 KENACORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
011283/010 KENACORT TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
083750/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
084020/002 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
084020/003 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
084267/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
084268/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
084270/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
084286/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
084318/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
084319/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
084320/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
084340/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
084406/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
084707/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
084708/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
084709/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
084775/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
085601/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
085834/001 TRIAMCINOLONE TRIAMCINOLONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG

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A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

How long does it take eczema to go away after using aristocort cream or generic triamcinolone acetonide cream?
Asked by Shana Ma 1 year ago.

Hi Neighbor Not sure about creams you're reffering to but here are some other ideas to help the healing process. Here is a herb remedy that will work. 1. Take 1-3 droppersful of Echinacea Plus Tincture (at herbdoc.com or another qualified site) to strengthen the immune system. 2. Rub Garlic oil ALL over the affected area (Garlic will kill anything if you use enough of it) 3. Give 1-3 glasses of Activated Charcoal Slurry per day (to absorb the toxins out of the blood) 4. Mix equal parts of Aloe Vera Gel, Slippery Elm Powder and Activated Charcoal Powder together (absorbs the toxins externally) 5. Apply a thin layer of this mixture over the AFFECTED area(s). 6. Continue this treatment, until the desired Results are achieved. This is healing at it's highest point. Cause Eczema is often called Dermatitis, and may be a symptom of an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. Eczema can be due to allergies, allergies secondary to digestive disorders such as hydrochloric acid deficiency, rashes secondary to immune diseases, genetic metabolic disorders, and/or nutritional deficiencies, especially of niacin (vitamin B3) and B6, as well as other B vitamins. To minimize your risk of developing eczema, avoid irritating substances, wear natural nonirritating materials, use soothing ointments, and check to see if dietary, nutritional, and/or and allergy-causing factors need to be considered. Other ideas that will help: Juice Therapy: The following juice combinations can help speed healing: black currant and red grapes; carrot, beet, spinach, cucumber, and parsley; and wheat grass juice. Nutritional Supplementation: Vitamin A and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), an omega-6 essential fatty acid found in high quantities in evening primrose oil, have both been shown to improve the symptoms of eczema. Vitamin E. Other useful supplements for preventing and reversing eczema include vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc. Topical Treatment: Apply evening primrose oil directly to cracked and sore areas of the skin. A topical paste made from ginkgo and licorice root extract has also been shown to improve eczema symptoms. Best of health to you Answered by Muoi Ledl 1 year ago.


Can a steroid shot for poison ivy mess up or delay your period? mine was 2 week late and very very light.?
Also, I've taken 6 pregnancy test and all are Neg! Could my cycle just be off, or what are the chance I'm pregnant and the test aren't showing it? Asked by Arielle Nerney 1 year ago.

Yes, a one-time corticosteroid injection (such as Aristocort) for poison ivy can delay your period. And infections such as UTIs can also affect your periods. Your entire menstrual cycle depends on certain structures in your brain signaling your ovaries, which signal back to the structures in your brain. Various hormones are released during this procedure. This back-and-forth process can be easily interrupted by medications or illnesses. Of course, if you've had unprotected sex, you may still be pregnant. A very, very light "spotting" period can indicate implantation bleeding, which can occur when a fertilized egg implants in your uterus. Some women also don't excrete enough HCG ("pregnancy hormone") in their urine for it to be detectable; they must have a blood HCG test. As you've taken 6 pregnancy tests, you sound very worried. As you've also had infections and have taken various medications, you may want to see your physician for a blood HCG test. This may mean an extra trip to the doctor and some extra expense, but your peace of mind may be worth it. Answered by Norah Vanderpool 1 year ago.

See your pharmacist or Doc. A friend of mine..had the sam periods as you, and was told she had a UTI....but...later found she was actually pregnanat, and had never had a urinary tract infection... I guess her case is kinda rare though...but..just a heads-up :) x Answered by Lincoln Scrudato 1 year ago.


How do I get rid of poison ivy?
help..I have tried everything..and its still spreading.. even steroids arent working..bleach, calmine, nothing. :( Asked by Kasha Commes 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor for Aristocort cream. Also known genericly as triamcinolone acetonide cream, 0.5% strength. This stuff works on every skin condition I've ever had, and I have had a lot of skin issues. Answered by Amalia Salcedo 1 year ago.

How long have you had the rash? If it is more than 3 weeks and you just got a new line of bubbles, you might think about the clothes you were wearing. Did you wash them all, even shoes? Did you put them down anywhere? Did you touch the inside of your car? The oil could be somewhere you keep coming in contact with. You can't see it, so take precautions and clean everywhere you could have touched. It could be on the inside of the car door, on the shovel handle or that sweatshirt you were wearing. It could be on the brim of your hat. I got it from my cat one time. Thankfully, she cleans herself and it was gone and I didn't get re-infected. Answered by Sabina Vinson 1 year ago.

): i was going to say calamine! stop itching it though Answered by Neomi Sheperd 1 year ago.


Remedies for skin care?
Asked by Alverta Merlin 1 year ago.

Many pills: Accutane Acticin Aldara Aristocort Azelex Benzac Diprolene Elocon Furacin Grifulvin Ilosone Mentax Oxsoralen Renova Rheumatrex Temovate Valtrex but talk to your doctor... Answered by Lelah Belanger 1 year ago.

We need more info - what kind of skin? Natural or shop-bought remedies? What do you need to treat? Then maybe we can help you more. Answered by Francisco Rossin 1 year ago.


Heated back/belly itching?
Can anybody tell me what it is? Asked by Renay Wemple 1 year ago.

Well, throughout my life I've been getting these. It's an itch on my belly and on my back. It comes with Immense itching then once I itch it, it occurs everywhere. This normally happens when my back or belly is sweaty and my body heats up, but I do not feel it. My question, what is this? Many people I know have this unknown thing and I'm getting sick of getting it. =/ Answered by Wiley Gerba 1 year ago.

A prescription gel called "Aristocort" worked for me. In the meantime just rub aloe-vera on to the affected areas...works wonders Answered by Devon Toevs 1 year ago.


Is there a cure for Dermatitis?
I don't have severe, just a few rashes on my legs but it's kinda annoying me. I went to the Dermatalogist but I would like to hear people's experiences on this and how they cured it.... Asked by Queenie Treff 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor about TRIAMCINOLONE. Triamcinolone (Aristocort®, Triderm®, Kenalog®, Flutex®, Kenonel®) is a corticosteroid. It helps to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions on the skin. Generic triamcinolone skin cream, ointment and lotion are available, but not skin aerosol. Answered by Marlen Zeidan 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there a cure for Dermatitis? Is there a cure for Dermatitis? How long does it usually take to clear up completely? What are some great products for Dermatitis? Answered by Alishia Sgro 1 year ago.

You state that you have “Dermatitis - Excema. Treatment of dermatitis varies, depending on the cause. These are the basic forms of dermatitis, and each have a specific treatment. Contact dermatitis - It can take as long as two to four weeks for this type of dermatitis to clear up. Neurodermatitis - Getting you to stop scratching and to avoid further aggravating your skin are the treatment objectives. Seborrheic dermatitis - You'll need to frequently shampoo, then carefully rinse your scalp. Your doctor may recommend a specific shampoo. Stasis dermatitis - Treatment consists of correcting the condition that causes fluid to accumulate in your legs or ankles for extended periods. Atopic dermatitis - Treatment typically consists of applying hydrocortisone-containing lotions to ease signs and symptoms. Perioral dermatitis - Treatment for this condition is usually with the oral antibiotic tetracycline. For all types of dermatitis, occasional use of over-the-counter antihistamines can reduce itching. As this subject is extensive, you would be advised to consult your doctor or dermatologist. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Santana Limon 1 year ago.

Depends on what type of "dermatitis" you have. Sometimes this used as a generic term. You may have come into contact with something that caused the irritation (contact dermatitis) such as new soap, lotion or laundry detergent. Obviously you should stop usuing that product. You can use hydrocortizone to help with the rash as well taking Benedryl to help stop the itching (it will make you sleepy). My doctor had to prescribe a course of steroids (prednisone) for mine to finally go away. Answered by Adrianne Allshouse 1 year ago.

Always keep your skin moisturized. Reduce itching and scratching with topical medications or antihistamines. Avoid irritating and drying substances such as perfumes or harsh detergents. Topical steroids are often used to treat dermatitis. There is a new cream called pimecrolimus cream which has less side effects than the topical steroids. Also you could try cortisone-type creams. Flucloxacillin and erythromycin are antibiotics to help dermatitis. Answered by Marguerite Maupredi 1 year ago.

yes there is stop eating meat start taking super omega which comtains omega 3 omega 6 fish oil flax oil and you will see an immediate improvement although u will still have relapses if you continue to take this product and abstain from all meats it will eventually disappear i know because thats the way i cured mine. You can get the Super Omega at the Dollar General for 2 bucks so its not an expensive process and as far as not eating meat you will also see other health benefits. Answered by Karry Toledo 1 year ago.

Dove soap and Hydrocortisone 1% cream from your doctor. Always works for me! Answered by Shea Varisco 1 year ago.


What's the best treatment for a vicious case of Poison Ivy?
My skin itches so bad I feel like tearing myself apart but I know if I scratch it it gets worse so what is the best way to get some relief? Is there a shot you can get from the doctor? Asked by Kina Matsushima 1 year ago.

Your doctor can give you a shot such as Aristocort (a corticosteroid) and/or oral corticosteroids, to decrease the contact dermatitis that exposure to the poison ivy has caused. He/she may also recommend a topical hydrocortisone cream, or a diphenhydramine ("Benadryl") to help with the itching. While scratching doesn't generally cause poison ivy to spread (by the time the blisters form, the urushiol (poison ivy oil) is usually no longer on your skin), it can end up causing an infection. See your doctor. Answered by Lucila Cassone 1 year ago.

Yes there is a shot that you can get from the doctor. I am not sure what the name of it is but I have had it before. So I would recommend going to the doctor. Hope this helps. Answered by Devorah Vanauken 1 year ago.


How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away Asked by Keri Netkowicz 1 year ago.

You might have Keratosis Pilaris. There are several different types of keratosis pilaris: 1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps 2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin 3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request. Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day. Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed. An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication. As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment. Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition. exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps. Answered by Flora Rozell 1 year ago.

Go to a dermatologist to get the best results! trust me save your money! Answered by Vallie Abercombie 1 year ago.

shave it with a really sharp razor ;) Answered by Larhonda Lemone 1 year ago.

try some vaseline or even proactive :) Answered by Burma Blalock 1 year ago.


Need your help figuring out what is wrong with me...?
I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started... Asked by Gilda Griswell 1 year ago.

I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started getting what I thought was the flu. I got a mild fever (99.0), headaches, nausea, stuffy nose, post-nasal drip, sneezing, sore throat, mild dry cough, fatigue and body aches. Those symptoms lasted about 1 1/2 weeks without improvement. At the 2nd week mark, the symptoms lessened. Something new appeared: a patch of dry skin on the left side on my jaw. It wasn't itchy, just dry. 4 days after it appeared, it became red and started to itch mildly. 2 days later, I developed a non itchy rash on my upper chest and neck. It was red and in streaky patches. Keep in mind that I still have the other symptoms. On Dec 13th, I started getting what I think is a UTI. I go to urgent care for burning and urge to urinate sensation along with a pain in my back, on the right side just under my ribs. I am told that I have a bad infection and am put on Keflex. By Mon the burning and urge to urinate goes away, but the pain in my back gets worse and I go back to urgent care. My UTI is gone, I am told to stop the Keflex and told that I just have a sore muscle. On Wed, Dec 21 I feel better overall. My symptoms have lessened a lot but are still there. I start feeling better and then for about 1-2 hours I start to feel horribly sick. As soon as it started, I feel better again. By the 26th, the symptoms that I still have left are the stuffy, runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, headaches, mild fever, body aches and the rash. A doctor I saw for the rash said it was just an airborne allergy (contact dermatitis) and said it should clear up in a week with use of a cream called triamcinolone acetonide (kenalog/aristocort), sparingly of course. I started using a small dab once every other day on the 24th. As of today, it still hasn't cleared up. So all of these doctors have said that I just have a cold that I am still fighting off. The rash is an allergy. I do not have the allergy anywhere else on my body except on my jaw and neck. It is now very itchy and red and welts have developed. I still feel like I have the flu at times. My fever never goes over 99.0, I am nauseous several times throughout the day, though have never vomited. I just have a feeling overall run down. I just feel like crap. I have good days where all I have is a sore throat, runny nose, cough and the rash. Other days, all the symptoms come back. I have tried taking Benedryl- does nothing, it feels like my nose symptoms get worse. Cold-mist humidifier - nothing. Neti-pot- makes the nose symptoms, sore throat worse. Ibeuprofin eases the body aches. Lotion does nothing for the dry skin/rash. 3 pregnancy tests have come back negative. No history of diabetes in my family, all my tests have so far come back normal. The meds that I am on are: Yasmin birth control (on it for 3 months), over the counter women's one a day vitamin, OTC vitamin D, OTC Lysine. If anyone could help with ideas, I would really appreciate it. Answered by Jannette Adkison 1 year ago.


How long does it take eczema to go away after using aristocort cream or generic triamcinolone acetonide cream?
Asked by Malik Hluska 1 year ago.

Hi Neighbor Not sure about creams you're reffering to but here are some other ideas to help the healing process. Here is a herb remedy that will work. 1. Take 1-3 droppersful of Echinacea Plus Tincture (at herbdoc.com or another qualified site) to strengthen the immune system. 2. Rub Garlic oil ALL over the affected area (Garlic will kill anything if you use enough of it) 3. Give 1-3 glasses of Activated Charcoal Slurry per day (to absorb the toxins out of the blood) 4. Mix equal parts of Aloe Vera Gel, Slippery Elm Powder and Activated Charcoal Powder together (absorbs the toxins externally) 5. Apply a thin layer of this mixture over the AFFECTED area(s). 6. Continue this treatment, until the desired Results are achieved. This is healing at it's highest point. Cause Eczema is often called Dermatitis, and may be a symptom of an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. Eczema can be due to allergies, allergies secondary to digestive disorders such as hydrochloric acid deficiency, rashes secondary to immune diseases, genetic metabolic disorders, and/or nutritional deficiencies, especially of niacin (vitamin B3) and B6, as well as other B vitamins. To minimize your risk of developing eczema, avoid irritating substances, wear natural nonirritating materials, use soothing ointments, and check to see if dietary, nutritional, and/or and allergy-causing factors need to be considered. Other ideas that will help: Juice Therapy: The following juice combinations can help speed healing: black currant and red grapes; carrot, beet, spinach, cucumber, and parsley; and wheat grass juice. Nutritional Supplementation: Vitamin A and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), an omega-6 essential fatty acid found in high quantities in evening primrose oil, have both been shown to improve the symptoms of eczema. Vitamin E. Other useful supplements for preventing and reversing eczema include vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc. Topical Treatment: Apply evening primrose oil directly to cracked and sore areas of the skin. A topical paste made from ginkgo and licorice root extract has also been shown to improve eczema symptoms. Best of health to you Answered by Jesusa Prive 1 year ago.


Can a steroid shot for poison ivy mess up or delay your period? mine was 2 week late and very very light.?
Also, I've taken 6 pregnancy test and all are Neg! Could my cycle just be off, or what are the chance I'm pregnant and the test aren't showing it? Asked by Olin Debruce 1 year ago.

Yes, a one-time corticosteroid injection (such as Aristocort) for poison ivy can delay your period. And infections such as UTIs can also affect your periods. Your entire menstrual cycle depends on certain structures in your brain signaling your ovaries, which signal back to the structures in your brain. Various hormones are released during this procedure. This back-and-forth process can be easily interrupted by medications or illnesses. Of course, if you've had unprotected sex, you may still be pregnant. A very, very light "spotting" period can indicate implantation bleeding, which can occur when a fertilized egg implants in your uterus. Some women also don't excrete enough HCG ("pregnancy hormone") in their urine for it to be detectable; they must have a blood HCG test. As you've taken 6 pregnancy tests, you sound very worried. As you've also had infections and have taken various medications, you may want to see your physician for a blood HCG test. This may mean an extra trip to the doctor and some extra expense, but your peace of mind may be worth it. Answered by Sebrina Pals 1 year ago.

See your pharmacist or Doc. A friend of mine..had the sam periods as you, and was told she had a UTI....but...later found she was actually pregnanat, and had never had a urinary tract infection... I guess her case is kinda rare though...but..just a heads-up :) x Answered by Chelsey Heberle 1 year ago.


How do I get rid of poison ivy?
help..I have tried everything..and its still spreading.. even steroids arent working..bleach, calmine, nothing. :( Asked by Kerrie Petkoff 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor for Aristocort cream. Also known genericly as triamcinolone acetonide cream, 0.5% strength. This stuff works on every skin condition I've ever had, and I have had a lot of skin issues. Answered by Nicolette Barresi 1 year ago.

How long have you had the rash? If it is more than 3 weeks and you just got a new line of bubbles, you might think about the clothes you were wearing. Did you wash them all, even shoes? Did you put them down anywhere? Did you touch the inside of your car? The oil could be somewhere you keep coming in contact with. You can't see it, so take precautions and clean everywhere you could have touched. It could be on the inside of the car door, on the shovel handle or that sweatshirt you were wearing. It could be on the brim of your hat. I got it from my cat one time. Thankfully, she cleans herself and it was gone and I didn't get re-infected. Answered by Edwin Macnair 1 year ago.

): i was going to say calamine! stop itching it though Answered by Denese Connally 1 year ago.


Remedies for skin care?
Asked by Mayme Vannorman 1 year ago.

Many pills: Accutane Acticin Aldara Aristocort Azelex Benzac Diprolene Elocon Furacin Grifulvin Ilosone Mentax Oxsoralen Renova Rheumatrex Temovate Valtrex but talk to your doctor... Answered by Tanya Straseskie 1 year ago.

We need more info - what kind of skin? Natural or shop-bought remedies? What do you need to treat? Then maybe we can help you more. Answered by Jammie Gaetani 1 year ago.


Heated back/belly itching?
Can anybody tell me what it is? Asked by Karlene Obeirne 1 year ago.

Well, throughout my life I've been getting these. It's an itch on my belly and on my back. It comes with Immense itching then once I itch it, it occurs everywhere. This normally happens when my back or belly is sweaty and my body heats up, but I do not feel it. My question, what is this? Many people I know have this unknown thing and I'm getting sick of getting it. =/ Answered by Lovella Rouff 1 year ago.

A prescription gel called "Aristocort" worked for me. In the meantime just rub aloe-vera on to the affected areas...works wonders Answered by Laine Typhair 1 year ago.


Is there a cure for Dermatitis?
I don't have severe, just a few rashes on my legs but it's kinda annoying me. I went to the Dermatalogist but I would like to hear people's experiences on this and how they cured it.... Asked by Samira Weck 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor about TRIAMCINOLONE. Triamcinolone (Aristocort®, Triderm®, Kenalog®, Flutex®, Kenonel®) is a corticosteroid. It helps to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions on the skin. Generic triamcinolone skin cream, ointment and lotion are available, but not skin aerosol. Answered by Domingo Happer 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there a cure for Dermatitis? Is there a cure for Dermatitis? How long does it usually take to clear up completely? What are some great products for Dermatitis? Answered by Floyd Neuhoff 1 year ago.

You state that you have “Dermatitis - Excema. Treatment of dermatitis varies, depending on the cause. These are the basic forms of dermatitis, and each have a specific treatment. Contact dermatitis - It can take as long as two to four weeks for this type of dermatitis to clear up. Neurodermatitis - Getting you to stop scratching and to avoid further aggravating your skin are the treatment objectives. Seborrheic dermatitis - You'll need to frequently shampoo, then carefully rinse your scalp. Your doctor may recommend a specific shampoo. Stasis dermatitis - Treatment consists of correcting the condition that causes fluid to accumulate in your legs or ankles for extended periods. Atopic dermatitis - Treatment typically consists of applying hydrocortisone-containing lotions to ease signs and symptoms. Perioral dermatitis - Treatment for this condition is usually with the oral antibiotic tetracycline. For all types of dermatitis, occasional use of over-the-counter antihistamines can reduce itching. As this subject is extensive, you would be advised to consult your doctor or dermatologist. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Jame Suddath 1 year ago.

Depends on what type of "dermatitis" you have. Sometimes this used as a generic term. You may have come into contact with something that caused the irritation (contact dermatitis) such as new soap, lotion or laundry detergent. Obviously you should stop usuing that product. You can use hydrocortizone to help with the rash as well taking Benedryl to help stop the itching (it will make you sleepy). My doctor had to prescribe a course of steroids (prednisone) for mine to finally go away. Answered by Madalene Havenhill 1 year ago.

Always keep your skin moisturized. Reduce itching and scratching with topical medications or antihistamines. Avoid irritating and drying substances such as perfumes or harsh detergents. Topical steroids are often used to treat dermatitis. There is a new cream called pimecrolimus cream which has less side effects than the topical steroids. Also you could try cortisone-type creams. Flucloxacillin and erythromycin are antibiotics to help dermatitis. Answered by Davida Feddersen 1 year ago.

yes there is stop eating meat start taking super omega which comtains omega 3 omega 6 fish oil flax oil and you will see an immediate improvement although u will still have relapses if you continue to take this product and abstain from all meats it will eventually disappear i know because thats the way i cured mine. You can get the Super Omega at the Dollar General for 2 bucks so its not an expensive process and as far as not eating meat you will also see other health benefits. Answered by Rosie Pillo 1 year ago.

Dove soap and Hydrocortisone 1% cream from your doctor. Always works for me! Answered by Buddy Gurtner 1 year ago.


What's the best treatment for a vicious case of Poison Ivy?
My skin itches so bad I feel like tearing myself apart but I know if I scratch it it gets worse so what is the best way to get some relief? Is there a shot you can get from the doctor? Asked by Tomika Dematteis 1 year ago.

Your doctor can give you a shot such as Aristocort (a corticosteroid) and/or oral corticosteroids, to decrease the contact dermatitis that exposure to the poison ivy has caused. He/she may also recommend a topical hydrocortisone cream, or a diphenhydramine ("Benadryl") to help with the itching. While scratching doesn't generally cause poison ivy to spread (by the time the blisters form, the urushiol (poison ivy oil) is usually no longer on your skin), it can end up causing an infection. See your doctor. Answered by Dalene Kryder 1 year ago.

Yes there is a shot that you can get from the doctor. I am not sure what the name of it is but I have had it before. So I would recommend going to the doctor. Hope this helps. Answered by Vickey Willaims 1 year ago.


How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away Asked by Lucrecia Berkoff 1 year ago.

You might have Keratosis Pilaris. There are several different types of keratosis pilaris: 1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps 2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin 3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request. Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day. Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed. An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication. As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment. Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition. exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps. Answered by Ivonne Ramlall 1 year ago.

Go to a dermatologist to get the best results! trust me save your money! Answered by Malia Perruzzi 1 year ago.

shave it with a really sharp razor ;) Answered by Karmen Monsky 1 year ago.

try some vaseline or even proactive :) Answered by Noe Mapalo 1 year ago.


Need your help figuring out what is wrong with me...?
I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started... Asked by Justin Zapatero 1 year ago.

I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started getting what I thought was the flu. I got a mild fever (99.0), headaches, nausea, stuffy nose, post-nasal drip, sneezing, sore throat, mild dry cough, fatigue and body aches. Those symptoms lasted about 1 1/2 weeks without improvement. At the 2nd week mark, the symptoms lessened. Something new appeared: a patch of dry skin on the left side on my jaw. It wasn't itchy, just dry. 4 days after it appeared, it became red and started to itch mildly. 2 days later, I developed a non itchy rash on my upper chest and neck. It was red and in streaky patches. Keep in mind that I still have the other symptoms. On Dec 13th, I started getting what I think is a UTI. I go to urgent care for burning and urge to urinate sensation along with a pain in my back, on the right side just under my ribs. I am told that I have a bad infection and am put on Keflex. By Mon the burning and urge to urinate goes away, but the pain in my back gets worse and I go back to urgent care. My UTI is gone, I am told to stop the Keflex and told that I just have a sore muscle. On Wed, Dec 21 I feel better overall. My symptoms have lessened a lot but are still there. I start feeling better and then for about 1-2 hours I start to feel horribly sick. As soon as it started, I feel better again. By the 26th, the symptoms that I still have left are the stuffy, runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, headaches, mild fever, body aches and the rash. A doctor I saw for the rash said it was just an airborne allergy (contact dermatitis) and said it should clear up in a week with use of a cream called triamcinolone acetonide (kenalog/aristocort), sparingly of course. I started using a small dab once every other day on the 24th. As of today, it still hasn't cleared up. So all of these doctors have said that I just have a cold that I am still fighting off. The rash is an allergy. I do not have the allergy anywhere else on my body except on my jaw and neck. It is now very itchy and red and welts have developed. I still feel like I have the flu at times. My fever never goes over 99.0, I am nauseous several times throughout the day, though have never vomited. I just have a feeling overall run down. I just feel like crap. I have good days where all I have is a sore throat, runny nose, cough and the rash. Other days, all the symptoms come back. I have tried taking Benedryl- does nothing, it feels like my nose symptoms get worse. Cold-mist humidifier - nothing. Neti-pot- makes the nose symptoms, sore throat worse. Ibeuprofin eases the body aches. Lotion does nothing for the dry skin/rash. 3 pregnancy tests have come back negative. No history of diabetes in my family, all my tests have so far come back normal. The meds that I am on are: Yasmin birth control (on it for 3 months), over the counter women's one a day vitamin, OTC vitamin D, OTC Lysine. If anyone could help with ideas, I would really appreciate it. Answered by Gerri Garafola 1 year ago.


How long does it take eczema to go away after using aristocort cream or generic triamcinolone acetonide cream?
Asked by Yasmin Loucks 1 year ago.

Hi Neighbor Not sure about creams you're reffering to but here are some other ideas to help the healing process. Here is a herb remedy that will work. 1. Take 1-3 droppersful of Echinacea Plus Tincture (at herbdoc.com or another qualified site) to strengthen the immune system. 2. Rub Garlic oil ALL over the affected area (Garlic will kill anything if you use enough of it) 3. Give 1-3 glasses of Activated Charcoal Slurry per day (to absorb the toxins out of the blood) 4. Mix equal parts of Aloe Vera Gel, Slippery Elm Powder and Activated Charcoal Powder together (absorbs the toxins externally) 5. Apply a thin layer of this mixture over the AFFECTED area(s). 6. Continue this treatment, until the desired Results are achieved. This is healing at it's highest point. Cause Eczema is often called Dermatitis, and may be a symptom of an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. Eczema can be due to allergies, allergies secondary to digestive disorders such as hydrochloric acid deficiency, rashes secondary to immune diseases, genetic metabolic disorders, and/or nutritional deficiencies, especially of niacin (vitamin B3) and B6, as well as other B vitamins. To minimize your risk of developing eczema, avoid irritating substances, wear natural nonirritating materials, use soothing ointments, and check to see if dietary, nutritional, and/or and allergy-causing factors need to be considered. Other ideas that will help: Juice Therapy: The following juice combinations can help speed healing: black currant and red grapes; carrot, beet, spinach, cucumber, and parsley; and wheat grass juice. Nutritional Supplementation: Vitamin A and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), an omega-6 essential fatty acid found in high quantities in evening primrose oil, have both been shown to improve the symptoms of eczema. Vitamin E. Other useful supplements for preventing and reversing eczema include vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc. Topical Treatment: Apply evening primrose oil directly to cracked and sore areas of the skin. A topical paste made from ginkgo and licorice root extract has also been shown to improve eczema symptoms. Best of health to you Answered by Steve Westaway 1 year ago.


Can a steroid shot for poison ivy mess up or delay your period? mine was 2 week late and very very light.?
Also, I've taken 6 pregnancy test and all are Neg! Could my cycle just be off, or what are the chance I'm pregnant and the test aren't showing it? Asked by Regenia Pafundi 1 year ago.

Yes, a one-time corticosteroid injection (such as Aristocort) for poison ivy can delay your period. And infections such as UTIs can also affect your periods. Your entire menstrual cycle depends on certain structures in your brain signaling your ovaries, which signal back to the structures in your brain. Various hormones are released during this procedure. This back-and-forth process can be easily interrupted by medications or illnesses. Of course, if you've had unprotected sex, you may still be pregnant. A very, very light "spotting" period can indicate implantation bleeding, which can occur when a fertilized egg implants in your uterus. Some women also don't excrete enough HCG ("pregnancy hormone") in their urine for it to be detectable; they must have a blood HCG test. As you've taken 6 pregnancy tests, you sound very worried. As you've also had infections and have taken various medications, you may want to see your physician for a blood HCG test. This may mean an extra trip to the doctor and some extra expense, but your peace of mind may be worth it. Answered by Jodee Niu 1 year ago.

See your pharmacist or Doc. A friend of mine..had the sam periods as you, and was told she had a UTI....but...later found she was actually pregnanat, and had never had a urinary tract infection... I guess her case is kinda rare though...but..just a heads-up :) x Answered by Sol Barro 1 year ago.


How do I get rid of poison ivy?
help..I have tried everything..and its still spreading.. even steroids arent working..bleach, calmine, nothing. :( Asked by Victor Siruta 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor for Aristocort cream. Also known genericly as triamcinolone acetonide cream, 0.5% strength. This stuff works on every skin condition I've ever had, and I have had a lot of skin issues. Answered by Maryalice Chaulklin 1 year ago.

How long have you had the rash? If it is more than 3 weeks and you just got a new line of bubbles, you might think about the clothes you were wearing. Did you wash them all, even shoes? Did you put them down anywhere? Did you touch the inside of your car? The oil could be somewhere you keep coming in contact with. You can't see it, so take precautions and clean everywhere you could have touched. It could be on the inside of the car door, on the shovel handle or that sweatshirt you were wearing. It could be on the brim of your hat. I got it from my cat one time. Thankfully, she cleans herself and it was gone and I didn't get re-infected. Answered by Pamelia Synakowski 1 year ago.

): i was going to say calamine! stop itching it though Answered by Heidy Koy 1 year ago.


Remedies for skin care?
Asked by Linda Commer 1 year ago.

Many pills: Accutane Acticin Aldara Aristocort Azelex Benzac Diprolene Elocon Furacin Grifulvin Ilosone Mentax Oxsoralen Renova Rheumatrex Temovate Valtrex but talk to your doctor... Answered by Buena Fries 1 year ago.

We need more info - what kind of skin? Natural or shop-bought remedies? What do you need to treat? Then maybe we can help you more. Answered by Annmarie Credit 1 year ago.


Heated back/belly itching?
Can anybody tell me what it is? Asked by Annice Fabula 1 year ago.

Well, throughout my life I've been getting these. It's an itch on my belly and on my back. It comes with Immense itching then once I itch it, it occurs everywhere. This normally happens when my back or belly is sweaty and my body heats up, but I do not feel it. My question, what is this? Many people I know have this unknown thing and I'm getting sick of getting it. =/ Answered by Rosenda Muenchow 1 year ago.

A prescription gel called "Aristocort" worked for me. In the meantime just rub aloe-vera on to the affected areas...works wonders Answered by Leonora Lalley 1 year ago.


Is there a cure for Dermatitis?
I don't have severe, just a few rashes on my legs but it's kinda annoying me. I went to the Dermatalogist but I would like to hear people's experiences on this and how they cured it.... Asked by Chanelle Malena 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor about TRIAMCINOLONE. Triamcinolone (Aristocort®, Triderm®, Kenalog®, Flutex®, Kenonel®) is a corticosteroid. It helps to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions on the skin. Generic triamcinolone skin cream, ointment and lotion are available, but not skin aerosol. Answered by Deidra Valotta 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there a cure for Dermatitis? Is there a cure for Dermatitis? How long does it usually take to clear up completely? What are some great products for Dermatitis? Answered by Alanna Padillia 1 year ago.

You state that you have “Dermatitis - Excema. Treatment of dermatitis varies, depending on the cause. These are the basic forms of dermatitis, and each have a specific treatment. Contact dermatitis - It can take as long as two to four weeks for this type of dermatitis to clear up. Neurodermatitis - Getting you to stop scratching and to avoid further aggravating your skin are the treatment objectives. Seborrheic dermatitis - You'll need to frequently shampoo, then carefully rinse your scalp. Your doctor may recommend a specific shampoo. Stasis dermatitis - Treatment consists of correcting the condition that causes fluid to accumulate in your legs or ankles for extended periods. Atopic dermatitis - Treatment typically consists of applying hydrocortisone-containing lotions to ease signs and symptoms. Perioral dermatitis - Treatment for this condition is usually with the oral antibiotic tetracycline. For all types of dermatitis, occasional use of over-the-counter antihistamines can reduce itching. As this subject is extensive, you would be advised to consult your doctor or dermatologist. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Gretchen Balog 1 year ago.

Depends on what type of "dermatitis" you have. Sometimes this used as a generic term. You may have come into contact with something that caused the irritation (contact dermatitis) such as new soap, lotion or laundry detergent. Obviously you should stop usuing that product. You can use hydrocortizone to help with the rash as well taking Benedryl to help stop the itching (it will make you sleepy). My doctor had to prescribe a course of steroids (prednisone) for mine to finally go away. Answered by Renato Afan 1 year ago.

Always keep your skin moisturized. Reduce itching and scratching with topical medications or antihistamines. Avoid irritating and drying substances such as perfumes or harsh detergents. Topical steroids are often used to treat dermatitis. There is a new cream called pimecrolimus cream which has less side effects than the topical steroids. Also you could try cortisone-type creams. Flucloxacillin and erythromycin are antibiotics to help dermatitis. Answered by Kimberly Bularz 1 year ago.

yes there is stop eating meat start taking super omega which comtains omega 3 omega 6 fish oil flax oil and you will see an immediate improvement although u will still have relapses if you continue to take this product and abstain from all meats it will eventually disappear i know because thats the way i cured mine. You can get the Super Omega at the Dollar General for 2 bucks so its not an expensive process and as far as not eating meat you will also see other health benefits. Answered by Dewitt Colbath 1 year ago.

Dove soap and Hydrocortisone 1% cream from your doctor. Always works for me! Answered by Tobi Right 1 year ago.


What's the best treatment for a vicious case of Poison Ivy?
My skin itches so bad I feel like tearing myself apart but I know if I scratch it it gets worse so what is the best way to get some relief? Is there a shot you can get from the doctor? Asked by Kristofer Herrnandez 1 year ago.

Your doctor can give you a shot such as Aristocort (a corticosteroid) and/or oral corticosteroids, to decrease the contact dermatitis that exposure to the poison ivy has caused. He/she may also recommend a topical hydrocortisone cream, or a diphenhydramine ("Benadryl") to help with the itching. While scratching doesn't generally cause poison ivy to spread (by the time the blisters form, the urushiol (poison ivy oil) is usually no longer on your skin), it can end up causing an infection. See your doctor. Answered by Alejandrina Budreau 1 year ago.

Yes there is a shot that you can get from the doctor. I am not sure what the name of it is but I have had it before. So I would recommend going to the doctor. Hope this helps. Answered by Tracy Cobane 1 year ago.


How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away Asked by Liberty Zesati 1 year ago.

You might have Keratosis Pilaris. There are several different types of keratosis pilaris: 1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps 2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin 3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request. Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day. Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed. An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication. As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment. Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition. exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps. Answered by Herb Hennigan 1 year ago.

Go to a dermatologist to get the best results! trust me save your money! Answered by Bethany Gentilcore 1 year ago.

shave it with a really sharp razor ;) Answered by Barbera Spielmaker 1 year ago.

try some vaseline or even proactive :) Answered by Yong Brinkley 1 year ago.


Need your help figuring out what is wrong with me...?
I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started... Asked by Sara Thoennes 1 year ago.

I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started getting what I thought was the flu. I got a mild fever (99.0), headaches, nausea, stuffy nose, post-nasal drip, sneezing, sore throat, mild dry cough, fatigue and body aches. Those symptoms lasted about 1 1/2 weeks without improvement. At the 2nd week mark, the symptoms lessened. Something new appeared: a patch of dry skin on the left side on my jaw. It wasn't itchy, just dry. 4 days after it appeared, it became red and started to itch mildly. 2 days later, I developed a non itchy rash on my upper chest and neck. It was red and in streaky patches. Keep in mind that I still have the other symptoms. On Dec 13th, I started getting what I think is a UTI. I go to urgent care for burning and urge to urinate sensation along with a pain in my back, on the right side just under my ribs. I am told that I have a bad infection and am put on Keflex. By Mon the burning and urge to urinate goes away, but the pain in my back gets worse and I go back to urgent care. My UTI is gone, I am told to stop the Keflex and told that I just have a sore muscle. On Wed, Dec 21 I feel better overall. My symptoms have lessened a lot but are still there. I start feeling better and then for about 1-2 hours I start to feel horribly sick. As soon as it started, I feel better again. By the 26th, the symptoms that I still have left are the stuffy, runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, headaches, mild fever, body aches and the rash. A doctor I saw for the rash said it was just an airborne allergy (contact dermatitis) and said it should clear up in a week with use of a cream called triamcinolone acetonide (kenalog/aristocort), sparingly of course. I started using a small dab once every other day on the 24th. As of today, it still hasn't cleared up. So all of these doctors have said that I just have a cold that I am still fighting off. The rash is an allergy. I do not have the allergy anywhere else on my body except on my jaw and neck. It is now very itchy and red and welts have developed. I still feel like I have the flu at times. My fever never goes over 99.0, I am nauseous several times throughout the day, though have never vomited. I just have a feeling overall run down. I just feel like crap. I have good days where all I have is a sore throat, runny nose, cough and the rash. Other days, all the symptoms come back. I have tried taking Benedryl- does nothing, it feels like my nose symptoms get worse. Cold-mist humidifier - nothing. Neti-pot- makes the nose symptoms, sore throat worse. Ibeuprofin eases the body aches. Lotion does nothing for the dry skin/rash. 3 pregnancy tests have come back negative. No history of diabetes in my family, all my tests have so far come back normal. The meds that I am on are: Yasmin birth control (on it for 3 months), over the counter women's one a day vitamin, OTC vitamin D, OTC Lysine. If anyone could help with ideas, I would really appreciate it. Answered by Curtis Worford 1 year ago.


How long does it take eczema to go away after using aristocort cream or generic triamcinolone acetonide cream?
Asked by Keila Milovich 1 year ago.

Hi Neighbor Not sure about creams you're reffering to but here are some other ideas to help the healing process. Here is a herb remedy that will work. 1. Take 1-3 droppersful of Echinacea Plus Tincture (at herbdoc.com or another qualified site) to strengthen the immune system. 2. Rub Garlic oil ALL over the affected area (Garlic will kill anything if you use enough of it) 3. Give 1-3 glasses of Activated Charcoal Slurry per day (to absorb the toxins out of the blood) 4. Mix equal parts of Aloe Vera Gel, Slippery Elm Powder and Activated Charcoal Powder together (absorbs the toxins externally) 5. Apply a thin layer of this mixture over the AFFECTED area(s). 6. Continue this treatment, until the desired Results are achieved. This is healing at it's highest point. Cause Eczema is often called Dermatitis, and may be a symptom of an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. Eczema can be due to allergies, allergies secondary to digestive disorders such as hydrochloric acid deficiency, rashes secondary to immune diseases, genetic metabolic disorders, and/or nutritional deficiencies, especially of niacin (vitamin B3) and B6, as well as other B vitamins. To minimize your risk of developing eczema, avoid irritating substances, wear natural nonirritating materials, use soothing ointments, and check to see if dietary, nutritional, and/or and allergy-causing factors need to be considered. Other ideas that will help: Juice Therapy: The following juice combinations can help speed healing: black currant and red grapes; carrot, beet, spinach, cucumber, and parsley; and wheat grass juice. Nutritional Supplementation: Vitamin A and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), an omega-6 essential fatty acid found in high quantities in evening primrose oil, have both been shown to improve the symptoms of eczema. Vitamin E. Other useful supplements for preventing and reversing eczema include vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc. Topical Treatment: Apply evening primrose oil directly to cracked and sore areas of the skin. A topical paste made from ginkgo and licorice root extract has also been shown to improve eczema symptoms. Best of health to you Answered by Linh Bail 1 year ago.


Can a steroid shot for poison ivy mess up or delay your period? mine was 2 week late and very very light.?
Also, I've taken 6 pregnancy test and all are Neg! Could my cycle just be off, or what are the chance I'm pregnant and the test aren't showing it? Asked by Oliva Dobrinin 1 year ago.

Yes, a one-time corticosteroid injection (such as Aristocort) for poison ivy can delay your period. And infections such as UTIs can also affect your periods. Your entire menstrual cycle depends on certain structures in your brain signaling your ovaries, which signal back to the structures in your brain. Various hormones are released during this procedure. This back-and-forth process can be easily interrupted by medications or illnesses. Of course, if you've had unprotected sex, you may still be pregnant. A very, very light "spotting" period can indicate implantation bleeding, which can occur when a fertilized egg implants in your uterus. Some women also don't excrete enough HCG ("pregnancy hormone") in their urine for it to be detectable; they must have a blood HCG test. As you've taken 6 pregnancy tests, you sound very worried. As you've also had infections and have taken various medications, you may want to see your physician for a blood HCG test. This may mean an extra trip to the doctor and some extra expense, but your peace of mind may be worth it. Answered by Ciara Ruegsegger 1 year ago.

See your pharmacist or Doc. A friend of mine..had the sam periods as you, and was told she had a UTI....but...later found she was actually pregnanat, and had never had a urinary tract infection... I guess her case is kinda rare though...but..just a heads-up :) x Answered by Ignacia Carriedo 1 year ago.


How do I get rid of poison ivy?
help..I have tried everything..and its still spreading.. even steroids arent working..bleach, calmine, nothing. :( Asked by Lacie Bertog 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor for Aristocort cream. Also known genericly as triamcinolone acetonide cream, 0.5% strength. This stuff works on every skin condition I've ever had, and I have had a lot of skin issues. Answered by Dolores Gajewski 1 year ago.

How long have you had the rash? If it is more than 3 weeks and you just got a new line of bubbles, you might think about the clothes you were wearing. Did you wash them all, even shoes? Did you put them down anywhere? Did you touch the inside of your car? The oil could be somewhere you keep coming in contact with. You can't see it, so take precautions and clean everywhere you could have touched. It could be on the inside of the car door, on the shovel handle or that sweatshirt you were wearing. It could be on the brim of your hat. I got it from my cat one time. Thankfully, she cleans herself and it was gone and I didn't get re-infected. Answered by Chad Frederique 1 year ago.

): i was going to say calamine! stop itching it though Answered by Joellen Suren 1 year ago.


Remedies for skin care?
Asked by Roxane Wisser 1 year ago.

Many pills: Accutane Acticin Aldara Aristocort Azelex Benzac Diprolene Elocon Furacin Grifulvin Ilosone Mentax Oxsoralen Renova Rheumatrex Temovate Valtrex but talk to your doctor... Answered by Chandra Timbers 1 year ago.

We need more info - what kind of skin? Natural or shop-bought remedies? What do you need to treat? Then maybe we can help you more. Answered by Savanna Kopchick 1 year ago.


Heated back/belly itching?
Can anybody tell me what it is? Asked by Leigh Esquer 1 year ago.

Well, throughout my life I've been getting these. It's an itch on my belly and on my back. It comes with Immense itching then once I itch it, it occurs everywhere. This normally happens when my back or belly is sweaty and my body heats up, but I do not feel it. My question, what is this? Many people I know have this unknown thing and I'm getting sick of getting it. =/ Answered by Albertine Casal 1 year ago.

A prescription gel called "Aristocort" worked for me. In the meantime just rub aloe-vera on to the affected areas...works wonders Answered by Lorraine Lorusso 1 year ago.


Is there a cure for Dermatitis?
I don't have severe, just a few rashes on my legs but it's kinda annoying me. I went to the Dermatalogist but I would like to hear people's experiences on this and how they cured it.... Asked by Nicolas Kalauli 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor about TRIAMCINOLONE. Triamcinolone (Aristocort®, Triderm®, Kenalog®, Flutex®, Kenonel®) is a corticosteroid. It helps to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions on the skin. Generic triamcinolone skin cream, ointment and lotion are available, but not skin aerosol. Answered by Sharron Lehrfeld 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there a cure for Dermatitis? Is there a cure for Dermatitis? How long does it usually take to clear up completely? What are some great products for Dermatitis? Answered by Winnifred Opeka 1 year ago.

You state that you have “Dermatitis - Excema. Treatment of dermatitis varies, depending on the cause. These are the basic forms of dermatitis, and each have a specific treatment. Contact dermatitis - It can take as long as two to four weeks for this type of dermatitis to clear up. Neurodermatitis - Getting you to stop scratching and to avoid further aggravating your skin are the treatment objectives. Seborrheic dermatitis - You'll need to frequently shampoo, then carefully rinse your scalp. Your doctor may recommend a specific shampoo. Stasis dermatitis - Treatment consists of correcting the condition that causes fluid to accumulate in your legs or ankles for extended periods. Atopic dermatitis - Treatment typically consists of applying hydrocortisone-containing lotions to ease signs and symptoms. Perioral dermatitis - Treatment for this condition is usually with the oral antibiotic tetracycline. For all types of dermatitis, occasional use of over-the-counter antihistamines can reduce itching. As this subject is extensive, you would be advised to consult your doctor or dermatologist. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Deloras Brothern 1 year ago.

Depends on what type of "dermatitis" you have. Sometimes this used as a generic term. You may have come into contact with something that caused the irritation (contact dermatitis) such as new soap, lotion or laundry detergent. Obviously you should stop usuing that product. You can use hydrocortizone to help with the rash as well taking Benedryl to help stop the itching (it will make you sleepy). My doctor had to prescribe a course of steroids (prednisone) for mine to finally go away. Answered by Juan Newlin 1 year ago.

Always keep your skin moisturized. Reduce itching and scratching with topical medications or antihistamines. Avoid irritating and drying substances such as perfumes or harsh detergents. Topical steroids are often used to treat dermatitis. There is a new cream called pimecrolimus cream which has less side effects than the topical steroids. Also you could try cortisone-type creams. Flucloxacillin and erythromycin are antibiotics to help dermatitis. Answered by Miranda Schedler 1 year ago.

yes there is stop eating meat start taking super omega which comtains omega 3 omega 6 fish oil flax oil and you will see an immediate improvement although u will still have relapses if you continue to take this product and abstain from all meats it will eventually disappear i know because thats the way i cured mine. You can get the Super Omega at the Dollar General for 2 bucks so its not an expensive process and as far as not eating meat you will also see other health benefits. Answered by Rosanna Moorehouse 1 year ago.

Dove soap and Hydrocortisone 1% cream from your doctor. Always works for me! Answered by Vernie Jacobus 1 year ago.


What's the best treatment for a vicious case of Poison Ivy?
My skin itches so bad I feel like tearing myself apart but I know if I scratch it it gets worse so what is the best way to get some relief? Is there a shot you can get from the doctor? Asked by Ruth Joulwan 1 year ago.

Your doctor can give you a shot such as Aristocort (a corticosteroid) and/or oral corticosteroids, to decrease the contact dermatitis that exposure to the poison ivy has caused. He/she may also recommend a topical hydrocortisone cream, or a diphenhydramine ("Benadryl") to help with the itching. While scratching doesn't generally cause poison ivy to spread (by the time the blisters form, the urushiol (poison ivy oil) is usually no longer on your skin), it can end up causing an infection. See your doctor. Answered by Dominic Aubut 1 year ago.

Yes there is a shot that you can get from the doctor. I am not sure what the name of it is but I have had it before. So I would recommend going to the doctor. Hope this helps. Answered by Tessie Mead 1 year ago.


How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away Asked by Ranae Sletten 1 year ago.

You might have Keratosis Pilaris. There are several different types of keratosis pilaris: 1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps 2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin 3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request. Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day. Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed. An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication. As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment. Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition. exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps. Answered by Fredericka Loehrer 1 year ago.

Go to a dermatologist to get the best results! trust me save your money! Answered by Sabina Kap 1 year ago.

shave it with a really sharp razor ;) Answered by Liberty Ellestad 1 year ago.

try some vaseline or even proactive :) Answered by Shani Firlik 1 year ago.


Need your help figuring out what is wrong with me...?
I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started... Asked by Katherine Chapman 1 year ago.

I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started getting what I thought was the flu. I got a mild fever (99.0), headaches, nausea, stuffy nose, post-nasal drip, sneezing, sore throat, mild dry cough, fatigue and body aches. Those symptoms lasted about 1 1/2 weeks without improvement. At the 2nd week mark, the symptoms lessened. Something new appeared: a patch of dry skin on the left side on my jaw. It wasn't itchy, just dry. 4 days after it appeared, it became red and started to itch mildly. 2 days later, I developed a non itchy rash on my upper chest and neck. It was red and in streaky patches. Keep in mind that I still have the other symptoms. On Dec 13th, I started getting what I think is a UTI. I go to urgent care for burning and urge to urinate sensation along with a pain in my back, on the right side just under my ribs. I am told that I have a bad infection and am put on Keflex. By Mon the burning and urge to urinate goes away, but the pain in my back gets worse and I go back to urgent care. My UTI is gone, I am told to stop the Keflex and told that I just have a sore muscle. On Wed, Dec 21 I feel better overall. My symptoms have lessened a lot but are still there. I start feeling better and then for about 1-2 hours I start to feel horribly sick. As soon as it started, I feel better again. By the 26th, the symptoms that I still have left are the stuffy, runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, headaches, mild fever, body aches and the rash. A doctor I saw for the rash said it was just an airborne allergy (contact dermatitis) and said it should clear up in a week with use of a cream called triamcinolone acetonide (kenalog/aristocort), sparingly of course. I started using a small dab once every other day on the 24th. As of today, it still hasn't cleared up. So all of these doctors have said that I just have a cold that I am still fighting off. The rash is an allergy. I do not have the allergy anywhere else on my body except on my jaw and neck. It is now very itchy and red and welts have developed. I still feel like I have the flu at times. My fever never goes over 99.0, I am nauseous several times throughout the day, though have never vomited. I just have a feeling overall run down. I just feel like crap. I have good days where all I have is a sore throat, runny nose, cough and the rash. Other days, all the symptoms come back. I have tried taking Benedryl- does nothing, it feels like my nose symptoms get worse. Cold-mist humidifier - nothing. Neti-pot- makes the nose symptoms, sore throat worse. Ibeuprofin eases the body aches. Lotion does nothing for the dry skin/rash. 3 pregnancy tests have come back negative. No history of diabetes in my family, all my tests have so far come back normal. The meds that I am on are: Yasmin birth control (on it for 3 months), over the counter women's one a day vitamin, OTC vitamin D, OTC Lysine. If anyone could help with ideas, I would really appreciate it. Answered by Roxana Rubert 1 year ago.


How long does it take eczema to go away after using aristocort cream or generic triamcinolone acetonide cream?
Asked by Antoine Konow 1 year ago.

Hi Neighbor Not sure about creams you're reffering to but here are some other ideas to help the healing process. Here is a herb remedy that will work. 1. Take 1-3 droppersful of Echinacea Plus Tincture (at herbdoc.com or another qualified site) to strengthen the immune system. 2. Rub Garlic oil ALL over the affected area (Garlic will kill anything if you use enough of it) 3. Give 1-3 glasses of Activated Charcoal Slurry per day (to absorb the toxins out of the blood) 4. Mix equal parts of Aloe Vera Gel, Slippery Elm Powder and Activated Charcoal Powder together (absorbs the toxins externally) 5. Apply a thin layer of this mixture over the AFFECTED area(s). 6. Continue this treatment, until the desired Results are achieved. This is healing at it's highest point. Cause Eczema is often called Dermatitis, and may be a symptom of an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. Eczema can be due to allergies, allergies secondary to digestive disorders such as hydrochloric acid deficiency, rashes secondary to immune diseases, genetic metabolic disorders, and/or nutritional deficiencies, especially of niacin (vitamin B3) and B6, as well as other B vitamins. To minimize your risk of developing eczema, avoid irritating substances, wear natural nonirritating materials, use soothing ointments, and check to see if dietary, nutritional, and/or and allergy-causing factors need to be considered. Other ideas that will help: Juice Therapy: The following juice combinations can help speed healing: black currant and red grapes; carrot, beet, spinach, cucumber, and parsley; and wheat grass juice. Nutritional Supplementation: Vitamin A and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), an omega-6 essential fatty acid found in high quantities in evening primrose oil, have both been shown to improve the symptoms of eczema. Vitamin E. Other useful supplements for preventing and reversing eczema include vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc. Topical Treatment: Apply evening primrose oil directly to cracked and sore areas of the skin. A topical paste made from ginkgo and licorice root extract has also been shown to improve eczema symptoms. Best of health to you Answered by Vilma Tiogangco 1 year ago.


Can a steroid shot for poison ivy mess up or delay your period? mine was 2 week late and very very light.?
Also, I've taken 6 pregnancy test and all are Neg! Could my cycle just be off, or what are the chance I'm pregnant and the test aren't showing it? Asked by Kory Ahart 1 year ago.

Yes, a one-time corticosteroid injection (such as Aristocort) for poison ivy can delay your period. And infections such as UTIs can also affect your periods. Your entire menstrual cycle depends on certain structures in your brain signaling your ovaries, which signal back to the structures in your brain. Various hormones are released during this procedure. This back-and-forth process can be easily interrupted by medications or illnesses. Of course, if you've had unprotected sex, you may still be pregnant. A very, very light "spotting" period can indicate implantation bleeding, which can occur when a fertilized egg implants in your uterus. Some women also don't excrete enough HCG ("pregnancy hormone") in their urine for it to be detectable; they must have a blood HCG test. As you've taken 6 pregnancy tests, you sound very worried. As you've also had infections and have taken various medications, you may want to see your physician for a blood HCG test. This may mean an extra trip to the doctor and some extra expense, but your peace of mind may be worth it. Answered by Lester Stemmler 1 year ago.

See your pharmacist or Doc. A friend of mine..had the sam periods as you, and was told she had a UTI....but...later found she was actually pregnanat, and had never had a urinary tract infection... I guess her case is kinda rare though...but..just a heads-up :) x Answered by Lacey Cromuel 1 year ago.


How do I get rid of poison ivy?
help..I have tried everything..and its still spreading.. even steroids arent working..bleach, calmine, nothing. :( Asked by Marta Zierke 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor for Aristocort cream. Also known genericly as triamcinolone acetonide cream, 0.5% strength. This stuff works on every skin condition I've ever had, and I have had a lot of skin issues. Answered by Boyd Mccolloch 1 year ago.

How long have you had the rash? If it is more than 3 weeks and you just got a new line of bubbles, you might think about the clothes you were wearing. Did you wash them all, even shoes? Did you put them down anywhere? Did you touch the inside of your car? The oil could be somewhere you keep coming in contact with. You can't see it, so take precautions and clean everywhere you could have touched. It could be on the inside of the car door, on the shovel handle or that sweatshirt you were wearing. It could be on the brim of your hat. I got it from my cat one time. Thankfully, she cleans herself and it was gone and I didn't get re-infected. Answered by Candelaria Huschle 1 year ago.

): i was going to say calamine! stop itching it though Answered by Lenny Cravy 1 year ago.


Remedies for skin care?
Asked by Karan Larance 1 year ago.

Many pills: Accutane Acticin Aldara Aristocort Azelex Benzac Diprolene Elocon Furacin Grifulvin Ilosone Mentax Oxsoralen Renova Rheumatrex Temovate Valtrex but talk to your doctor... Answered by Shelby Kullas 1 year ago.

We need more info - what kind of skin? Natural or shop-bought remedies? What do you need to treat? Then maybe we can help you more. Answered by Shirleen Keegan 1 year ago.


Heated back/belly itching?
Can anybody tell me what it is? Asked by Catarina Brumback 1 year ago.

Well, throughout my life I've been getting these. It's an itch on my belly and on my back. It comes with Immense itching then once I itch it, it occurs everywhere. This normally happens when my back or belly is sweaty and my body heats up, but I do not feel it. My question, what is this? Many people I know have this unknown thing and I'm getting sick of getting it. =/ Answered by Melanie Bertoli 1 year ago.

A prescription gel called "Aristocort" worked for me. In the meantime just rub aloe-vera on to the affected areas...works wonders Answered by Cassandra Mennecke 1 year ago.


Is there a cure for Dermatitis?
I don't have severe, just a few rashes on my legs but it's kinda annoying me. I went to the Dermatalogist but I would like to hear people's experiences on this and how they cured it.... Asked by Demetra Howett 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor about TRIAMCINOLONE. Triamcinolone (Aristocort®, Triderm®, Kenalog®, Flutex®, Kenonel®) is a corticosteroid. It helps to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions on the skin. Generic triamcinolone skin cream, ointment and lotion are available, but not skin aerosol. Answered by Lonnie Demilt 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there a cure for Dermatitis? Is there a cure for Dermatitis? How long does it usually take to clear up completely? What are some great products for Dermatitis? Answered by Ena Goeing 1 year ago.

You state that you have “Dermatitis - Excema. Treatment of dermatitis varies, depending on the cause. These are the basic forms of dermatitis, and each have a specific treatment. Contact dermatitis - It can take as long as two to four weeks for this type of dermatitis to clear up. Neurodermatitis - Getting you to stop scratching and to avoid further aggravating your skin are the treatment objectives. Seborrheic dermatitis - You'll need to frequently shampoo, then carefully rinse your scalp. Your doctor may recommend a specific shampoo. Stasis dermatitis - Treatment consists of correcting the condition that causes fluid to accumulate in your legs or ankles for extended periods. Atopic dermatitis - Treatment typically consists of applying hydrocortisone-containing lotions to ease signs and symptoms. Perioral dermatitis - Treatment for this condition is usually with the oral antibiotic tetracycline. For all types of dermatitis, occasional use of over-the-counter antihistamines can reduce itching. As this subject is extensive, you would be advised to consult your doctor or dermatologist. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Emil Timus 1 year ago.

Depends on what type of "dermatitis" you have. Sometimes this used as a generic term. You may have come into contact with something that caused the irritation (contact dermatitis) such as new soap, lotion or laundry detergent. Obviously you should stop usuing that product. You can use hydrocortizone to help with the rash as well taking Benedryl to help stop the itching (it will make you sleepy). My doctor had to prescribe a course of steroids (prednisone) for mine to finally go away. Answered by Candance Mackerl 1 year ago.

Always keep your skin moisturized. Reduce itching and scratching with topical medications or antihistamines. Avoid irritating and drying substances such as perfumes or harsh detergents. Topical steroids are often used to treat dermatitis. There is a new cream called pimecrolimus cream which has less side effects than the topical steroids. Also you could try cortisone-type creams. Flucloxacillin and erythromycin are antibiotics to help dermatitis. Answered by Neva Hoch 1 year ago.

yes there is stop eating meat start taking super omega which comtains omega 3 omega 6 fish oil flax oil and you will see an immediate improvement although u will still have relapses if you continue to take this product and abstain from all meats it will eventually disappear i know because thats the way i cured mine. You can get the Super Omega at the Dollar General for 2 bucks so its not an expensive process and as far as not eating meat you will also see other health benefits. Answered by Jordan Enfort 1 year ago.

Dove soap and Hydrocortisone 1% cream from your doctor. Always works for me! Answered by Brigitte Riding 1 year ago.


What's the best treatment for a vicious case of Poison Ivy?
My skin itches so bad I feel like tearing myself apart but I know if I scratch it it gets worse so what is the best way to get some relief? Is there a shot you can get from the doctor? Asked by Lavonda Falcon 1 year ago.

Your doctor can give you a shot such as Aristocort (a corticosteroid) and/or oral corticosteroids, to decrease the contact dermatitis that exposure to the poison ivy has caused. He/she may also recommend a topical hydrocortisone cream, or a diphenhydramine ("Benadryl") to help with the itching. While scratching doesn't generally cause poison ivy to spread (by the time the blisters form, the urushiol (poison ivy oil) is usually no longer on your skin), it can end up causing an infection. See your doctor. Answered by Danuta Magda 1 year ago.

Yes there is a shot that you can get from the doctor. I am not sure what the name of it is but I have had it before. So I would recommend going to the doctor. Hope this helps. Answered by Helene Pescador 1 year ago.


How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away Asked by Tuan Homsher 1 year ago.

You might have Keratosis Pilaris. There are several different types of keratosis pilaris: 1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps 2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin 3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request. Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day. Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed. An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication. As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment. Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition. exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps. Answered by Williams Pochiba 1 year ago.

Go to a dermatologist to get the best results! trust me save your money! Answered by Jeromy Bisset 1 year ago.

shave it with a really sharp razor ;) Answered by Aleta Musolino 1 year ago.

try some vaseline or even proactive :) Answered by Roy Vasek 1 year ago.


Need your help figuring out what is wrong with me...?
I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started... Asked by Laure Intrieri 1 year ago.

I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started getting what I thought was the flu. I got a mild fever (99.0), headaches, nausea, stuffy nose, post-nasal drip, sneezing, sore throat, mild dry cough, fatigue and body aches. Those symptoms lasted about 1 1/2 weeks without improvement. At the 2nd week mark, the symptoms lessened. Something new appeared: a patch of dry skin on the left side on my jaw. It wasn't itchy, just dry. 4 days after it appeared, it became red and started to itch mildly. 2 days later, I developed a non itchy rash on my upper chest and neck. It was red and in streaky patches. Keep in mind that I still have the other symptoms. On Dec 13th, I started getting what I think is a UTI. I go to urgent care for burning and urge to urinate sensation along with a pain in my back, on the right side just under my ribs. I am told that I have a bad infection and am put on Keflex. By Mon the burning and urge to urinate goes away, but the pain in my back gets worse and I go back to urgent care. My UTI is gone, I am told to stop the Keflex and told that I just have a sore muscle. On Wed, Dec 21 I feel better overall. My symptoms have lessened a lot but are still there. I start feeling better and then for about 1-2 hours I start to feel horribly sick. As soon as it started, I feel better again. By the 26th, the symptoms that I still have left are the stuffy, runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, headaches, mild fever, body aches and the rash. A doctor I saw for the rash said it was just an airborne allergy (contact dermatitis) and said it should clear up in a week with use of a cream called triamcinolone acetonide (kenalog/aristocort), sparingly of course. I started using a small dab once every other day on the 24th. As of today, it still hasn't cleared up. So all of these doctors have said that I just have a cold that I am still fighting off. The rash is an allergy. I do not have the allergy anywhere else on my body except on my jaw and neck. It is now very itchy and red and welts have developed. I still feel like I have the flu at times. My fever never goes over 99.0, I am nauseous several times throughout the day, though have never vomited. I just have a feeling overall run down. I just feel like crap. I have good days where all I have is a sore throat, runny nose, cough and the rash. Other days, all the symptoms come back. I have tried taking Benedryl- does nothing, it feels like my nose symptoms get worse. Cold-mist humidifier - nothing. Neti-pot- makes the nose symptoms, sore throat worse. Ibeuprofin eases the body aches. Lotion does nothing for the dry skin/rash. 3 pregnancy tests have come back negative. No history of diabetes in my family, all my tests have so far come back normal. The meds that I am on are: Yasmin birth control (on it for 3 months), over the counter women's one a day vitamin, OTC vitamin D, OTC Lysine. If anyone could help with ideas, I would really appreciate it. Answered by Wally Dorvillier 1 year ago.


How long does it take eczema to go away after using aristocort cream or generic triamcinolone acetonide cream?
Asked by Stephane Tracey 1 year ago.

Hi Neighbor Not sure about creams you're reffering to but here are some other ideas to help the healing process. Here is a herb remedy that will work. 1. Take 1-3 droppersful of Echinacea Plus Tincture (at herbdoc.com or another qualified site) to strengthen the immune system. 2. Rub Garlic oil ALL over the affected area (Garlic will kill anything if you use enough of it) 3. Give 1-3 glasses of Activated Charcoal Slurry per day (to absorb the toxins out of the blood) 4. Mix equal parts of Aloe Vera Gel, Slippery Elm Powder and Activated Charcoal Powder together (absorbs the toxins externally) 5. Apply a thin layer of this mixture over the AFFECTED area(s). 6. Continue this treatment, until the desired Results are achieved. This is healing at it's highest point. Cause Eczema is often called Dermatitis, and may be a symptom of an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. Eczema can be due to allergies, allergies secondary to digestive disorders such as hydrochloric acid deficiency, rashes secondary to immune diseases, genetic metabolic disorders, and/or nutritional deficiencies, especially of niacin (vitamin B3) and B6, as well as other B vitamins. To minimize your risk of developing eczema, avoid irritating substances, wear natural nonirritating materials, use soothing ointments, and check to see if dietary, nutritional, and/or and allergy-causing factors need to be considered. Other ideas that will help: Juice Therapy: The following juice combinations can help speed healing: black currant and red grapes; carrot, beet, spinach, cucumber, and parsley; and wheat grass juice. Nutritional Supplementation: Vitamin A and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), an omega-6 essential fatty acid found in high quantities in evening primrose oil, have both been shown to improve the symptoms of eczema. Vitamin E. Other useful supplements for preventing and reversing eczema include vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc. Topical Treatment: Apply evening primrose oil directly to cracked and sore areas of the skin. A topical paste made from ginkgo and licorice root extract has also been shown to improve eczema symptoms. Best of health to you Answered by Marianna Ortz 1 year ago.


Can a steroid shot for poison ivy mess up or delay your period? mine was 2 week late and very very light.?
Also, I've taken 6 pregnancy test and all are Neg! Could my cycle just be off, or what are the chance I'm pregnant and the test aren't showing it? Asked by Sharen Frerichs 1 year ago.

Yes, a one-time corticosteroid injection (such as Aristocort) for poison ivy can delay your period. And infections such as UTIs can also affect your periods. Your entire menstrual cycle depends on certain structures in your brain signaling your ovaries, which signal back to the structures in your brain. Various hormones are released during this procedure. This back-and-forth process can be easily interrupted by medications or illnesses. Of course, if you've had unprotected sex, you may still be pregnant. A very, very light "spotting" period can indicate implantation bleeding, which can occur when a fertilized egg implants in your uterus. Some women also don't excrete enough HCG ("pregnancy hormone") in their urine for it to be detectable; they must have a blood HCG test. As you've taken 6 pregnancy tests, you sound very worried. As you've also had infections and have taken various medications, you may want to see your physician for a blood HCG test. This may mean an extra trip to the doctor and some extra expense, but your peace of mind may be worth it. Answered by Johnnie Brescia 1 year ago.

See your pharmacist or Doc. A friend of mine..had the sam periods as you, and was told she had a UTI....but...later found she was actually pregnanat, and had never had a urinary tract infection... I guess her case is kinda rare though...but..just a heads-up :) x Answered by Jamie Corrao 1 year ago.


How do I get rid of poison ivy?
help..I have tried everything..and its still spreading.. even steroids arent working..bleach, calmine, nothing. :( Asked by Elmer Coulson 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor for Aristocort cream. Also known genericly as triamcinolone acetonide cream, 0.5% strength. This stuff works on every skin condition I've ever had, and I have had a lot of skin issues. Answered by Ellis Mccanna 1 year ago.

How long have you had the rash? If it is more than 3 weeks and you just got a new line of bubbles, you might think about the clothes you were wearing. Did you wash them all, even shoes? Did you put them down anywhere? Did you touch the inside of your car? The oil could be somewhere you keep coming in contact with. You can't see it, so take precautions and clean everywhere you could have touched. It could be on the inside of the car door, on the shovel handle or that sweatshirt you were wearing. It could be on the brim of your hat. I got it from my cat one time. Thankfully, she cleans herself and it was gone and I didn't get re-infected. Answered by Myrtle Norvell 1 year ago.

): i was going to say calamine! stop itching it though Answered by Caroyln Grodi 1 year ago.


Remedies for skin care?
Asked by Otha Bentley 1 year ago.

Many pills: Accutane Acticin Aldara Aristocort Azelex Benzac Diprolene Elocon Furacin Grifulvin Ilosone Mentax Oxsoralen Renova Rheumatrex Temovate Valtrex but talk to your doctor... Answered by Marian Maduena 1 year ago.

We need more info - what kind of skin? Natural or shop-bought remedies? What do you need to treat? Then maybe we can help you more. Answered by Mabel Crago 1 year ago.


Heated back/belly itching?
Can anybody tell me what it is? Asked by Ashley Sava 1 year ago.

Well, throughout my life I've been getting these. It's an itch on my belly and on my back. It comes with Immense itching then once I itch it, it occurs everywhere. This normally happens when my back or belly is sweaty and my body heats up, but I do not feel it. My question, what is this? Many people I know have this unknown thing and I'm getting sick of getting it. =/ Answered by Sherri Lieuallen 1 year ago.

A prescription gel called "Aristocort" worked for me. In the meantime just rub aloe-vera on to the affected areas...works wonders Answered by Michell Viger 1 year ago.


Is there a cure for Dermatitis?
I don't have severe, just a few rashes on my legs but it's kinda annoying me. I went to the Dermatalogist but I would like to hear people's experiences on this and how they cured it.... Asked by Taina Asato 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor about TRIAMCINOLONE. Triamcinolone (Aristocort®, Triderm®, Kenalog®, Flutex®, Kenonel®) is a corticosteroid. It helps to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions on the skin. Generic triamcinolone skin cream, ointment and lotion are available, but not skin aerosol. Answered by Perry Benoy 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there a cure for Dermatitis? Is there a cure for Dermatitis? How long does it usually take to clear up completely? What are some great products for Dermatitis? Answered by Skye Russo 1 year ago.

You state that you have “Dermatitis - Excema. Treatment of dermatitis varies, depending on the cause. These are the basic forms of dermatitis, and each have a specific treatment. Contact dermatitis - It can take as long as two to four weeks for this type of dermatitis to clear up. Neurodermatitis - Getting you to stop scratching and to avoid further aggravating your skin are the treatment objectives. Seborrheic dermatitis - You'll need to frequently shampoo, then carefully rinse your scalp. Your doctor may recommend a specific shampoo. Stasis dermatitis - Treatment consists of correcting the condition that causes fluid to accumulate in your legs or ankles for extended periods. Atopic dermatitis - Treatment typically consists of applying hydrocortisone-containing lotions to ease signs and symptoms. Perioral dermatitis - Treatment for this condition is usually with the oral antibiotic tetracycline. For all types of dermatitis, occasional use of over-the-counter antihistamines can reduce itching. As this subject is extensive, you would be advised to consult your doctor or dermatologist. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Bart Tompkin 1 year ago.

Depends on what type of "dermatitis" you have. Sometimes this used as a generic term. You may have come into contact with something that caused the irritation (contact dermatitis) such as new soap, lotion or laundry detergent. Obviously you should stop usuing that product. You can use hydrocortizone to help with the rash as well taking Benedryl to help stop the itching (it will make you sleepy). My doctor had to prescribe a course of steroids (prednisone) for mine to finally go away. Answered by Asa Cradic 1 year ago.

Always keep your skin moisturized. Reduce itching and scratching with topical medications or antihistamines. Avoid irritating and drying substances such as perfumes or harsh detergents. Topical steroids are often used to treat dermatitis. There is a new cream called pimecrolimus cream which has less side effects than the topical steroids. Also you could try cortisone-type creams. Flucloxacillin and erythromycin are antibiotics to help dermatitis. Answered by Roslyn Shuey 1 year ago.

yes there is stop eating meat start taking super omega which comtains omega 3 omega 6 fish oil flax oil and you will see an immediate improvement although u will still have relapses if you continue to take this product and abstain from all meats it will eventually disappear i know because thats the way i cured mine. You can get the Super Omega at the Dollar General for 2 bucks so its not an expensive process and as far as not eating meat you will also see other health benefits. Answered by Porfirio Jarema 1 year ago.

Dove soap and Hydrocortisone 1% cream from your doctor. Always works for me! Answered by Haywood Coile 1 year ago.


What's the best treatment for a vicious case of Poison Ivy?
My skin itches so bad I feel like tearing myself apart but I know if I scratch it it gets worse so what is the best way to get some relief? Is there a shot you can get from the doctor? Asked by Jeramy Loeurm 1 year ago.

Your doctor can give you a shot such as Aristocort (a corticosteroid) and/or oral corticosteroids, to decrease the contact dermatitis that exposure to the poison ivy has caused. He/she may also recommend a topical hydrocortisone cream, or a diphenhydramine ("Benadryl") to help with the itching. While scratching doesn't generally cause poison ivy to spread (by the time the blisters form, the urushiol (poison ivy oil) is usually no longer on your skin), it can end up causing an infection. See your doctor. Answered by Kristen Powlen 1 year ago.

Yes there is a shot that you can get from the doctor. I am not sure what the name of it is but I have had it before. So I would recommend going to the doctor. Hope this helps. Answered by Francis Sances 1 year ago.


How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away Asked by Mui Edith 1 year ago.

You might have Keratosis Pilaris. There are several different types of keratosis pilaris: 1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps 2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin 3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request. Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day. Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed. An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication. As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment. Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition. exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps. Answered by Terrell Tolin 1 year ago.

Go to a dermatologist to get the best results! trust me save your money! Answered by Anitra Dimling 1 year ago.

shave it with a really sharp razor ;) Answered by Vinita Paci 1 year ago.

try some vaseline or even proactive :) Answered by Valencia Schoeder 1 year ago.


Need your help figuring out what is wrong with me...?
I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started... Asked by Cris Isagba 1 year ago.

I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started getting what I thought was the flu. I got a mild fever (99.0), headaches, nausea, stuffy nose, post-nasal drip, sneezing, sore throat, mild dry cough, fatigue and body aches. Those symptoms lasted about 1 1/2 weeks without improvement. At the 2nd week mark, the symptoms lessened. Something new appeared: a patch of dry skin on the left side on my jaw. It wasn't itchy, just dry. 4 days after it appeared, it became red and started to itch mildly. 2 days later, I developed a non itchy rash on my upper chest and neck. It was red and in streaky patches. Keep in mind that I still have the other symptoms. On Dec 13th, I started getting what I think is a UTI. I go to urgent care for burning and urge to urinate sensation along with a pain in my back, on the right side just under my ribs. I am told that I have a bad infection and am put on Keflex. By Mon the burning and urge to urinate goes away, but the pain in my back gets worse and I go back to urgent care. My UTI is gone, I am told to stop the Keflex and told that I just have a sore muscle. On Wed, Dec 21 I feel better overall. My symptoms have lessened a lot but are still there. I start feeling better and then for about 1-2 hours I start to feel horribly sick. As soon as it started, I feel better again. By the 26th, the symptoms that I still have left are the stuffy, runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, headaches, mild fever, body aches and the rash. A doctor I saw for the rash said it was just an airborne allergy (contact dermatitis) and said it should clear up in a week with use of a cream called triamcinolone acetonide (kenalog/aristocort), sparingly of course. I started using a small dab once every other day on the 24th. As of today, it still hasn't cleared up. So all of these doctors have said that I just have a cold that I am still fighting off. The rash is an allergy. I do not have the allergy anywhere else on my body except on my jaw and neck. It is now very itchy and red and welts have developed. I still feel like I have the flu at times. My fever never goes over 99.0, I am nauseous several times throughout the day, though have never vomited. I just have a feeling overall run down. I just feel like crap. I have good days where all I have is a sore throat, runny nose, cough and the rash. Other days, all the symptoms come back. I have tried taking Benedryl- does nothing, it feels like my nose symptoms get worse. Cold-mist humidifier - nothing. Neti-pot- makes the nose symptoms, sore throat worse. Ibeuprofin eases the body aches. Lotion does nothing for the dry skin/rash. 3 pregnancy tests have come back negative. No history of diabetes in my family, all my tests have so far come back normal. The meds that I am on are: Yasmin birth control (on it for 3 months), over the counter women's one a day vitamin, OTC vitamin D, OTC Lysine. If anyone could help with ideas, I would really appreciate it. Answered by Gino Hollinghead 1 year ago.


How long does it take eczema to go away after using aristocort cream or generic triamcinolone acetonide cream?
Asked by Adele Picken 1 year ago.

Hi Neighbor Not sure about creams you're reffering to but here are some other ideas to help the healing process. Here is a herb remedy that will work. 1. Take 1-3 droppersful of Echinacea Plus Tincture (at herbdoc.com or another qualified site) to strengthen the immune system. 2. Rub Garlic oil ALL over the affected area (Garlic will kill anything if you use enough of it) 3. Give 1-3 glasses of Activated Charcoal Slurry per day (to absorb the toxins out of the blood) 4. Mix equal parts of Aloe Vera Gel, Slippery Elm Powder and Activated Charcoal Powder together (absorbs the toxins externally) 5. Apply a thin layer of this mixture over the AFFECTED area(s). 6. Continue this treatment, until the desired Results are achieved. This is healing at it's highest point. Cause Eczema is often called Dermatitis, and may be a symptom of an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. Eczema can be due to allergies, allergies secondary to digestive disorders such as hydrochloric acid deficiency, rashes secondary to immune diseases, genetic metabolic disorders, and/or nutritional deficiencies, especially of niacin (vitamin B3) and B6, as well as other B vitamins. To minimize your risk of developing eczema, avoid irritating substances, wear natural nonirritating materials, use soothing ointments, and check to see if dietary, nutritional, and/or and allergy-causing factors need to be considered. Other ideas that will help: Juice Therapy: The following juice combinations can help speed healing: black currant and red grapes; carrot, beet, spinach, cucumber, and parsley; and wheat grass juice. Nutritional Supplementation: Vitamin A and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), an omega-6 essential fatty acid found in high quantities in evening primrose oil, have both been shown to improve the symptoms of eczema. Vitamin E. Other useful supplements for preventing and reversing eczema include vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc. Topical Treatment: Apply evening primrose oil directly to cracked and sore areas of the skin. A topical paste made from ginkgo and licorice root extract has also been shown to improve eczema symptoms. Best of health to you Answered by Melissa Spinney 1 year ago.


Can a steroid shot for poison ivy mess up or delay your period? mine was 2 week late and very very light.?
Also, I've taken 6 pregnancy test and all are Neg! Could my cycle just be off, or what are the chance I'm pregnant and the test aren't showing it? Asked by Azzie Magette 1 year ago.

Yes, a one-time corticosteroid injection (such as Aristocort) for poison ivy can delay your period. And infections such as UTIs can also affect your periods. Your entire menstrual cycle depends on certain structures in your brain signaling your ovaries, which signal back to the structures in your brain. Various hormones are released during this procedure. This back-and-forth process can be easily interrupted by medications or illnesses. Of course, if you've had unprotected sex, you may still be pregnant. A very, very light "spotting" period can indicate implantation bleeding, which can occur when a fertilized egg implants in your uterus. Some women also don't excrete enough HCG ("pregnancy hormone") in their urine for it to be detectable; they must have a blood HCG test. As you've taken 6 pregnancy tests, you sound very worried. As you've also had infections and have taken various medications, you may want to see your physician for a blood HCG test. This may mean an extra trip to the doctor and some extra expense, but your peace of mind may be worth it. Answered by Alena Naftel 1 year ago.

See your pharmacist or Doc. A friend of mine..had the sam periods as you, and was told she had a UTI....but...later found she was actually pregnanat, and had never had a urinary tract infection... I guess her case is kinda rare though...but..just a heads-up :) x Answered by Bettyann Raupp 1 year ago.


How do I get rid of poison ivy?
help..I have tried everything..and its still spreading.. even steroids arent working..bleach, calmine, nothing. :( Asked by Dominga Pooler 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor for Aristocort cream. Also known genericly as triamcinolone acetonide cream, 0.5% strength. This stuff works on every skin condition I've ever had, and I have had a lot of skin issues. Answered by Lourdes Bowdre 1 year ago.

How long have you had the rash? If it is more than 3 weeks and you just got a new line of bubbles, you might think about the clothes you were wearing. Did you wash them all, even shoes? Did you put them down anywhere? Did you touch the inside of your car? The oil could be somewhere you keep coming in contact with. You can't see it, so take precautions and clean everywhere you could have touched. It could be on the inside of the car door, on the shovel handle or that sweatshirt you were wearing. It could be on the brim of your hat. I got it from my cat one time. Thankfully, she cleans herself and it was gone and I didn't get re-infected. Answered by Robbie Graubard 1 year ago.

): i was going to say calamine! stop itching it though Answered by Rosalba Bassano 1 year ago.


Remedies for skin care?
Asked by Lindsay Soros 1 year ago.

Many pills: Accutane Acticin Aldara Aristocort Azelex Benzac Diprolene Elocon Furacin Grifulvin Ilosone Mentax Oxsoralen Renova Rheumatrex Temovate Valtrex but talk to your doctor... Answered by Cristine Cobey 1 year ago.

We need more info - what kind of skin? Natural or shop-bought remedies? What do you need to treat? Then maybe we can help you more. Answered by Homer Sobol 1 year ago.


Heated back/belly itching?
Can anybody tell me what it is? Asked by Gene Arimas 1 year ago.

Well, throughout my life I've been getting these. It's an itch on my belly and on my back. It comes with Immense itching then once I itch it, it occurs everywhere. This normally happens when my back or belly is sweaty and my body heats up, but I do not feel it. My question, what is this? Many people I know have this unknown thing and I'm getting sick of getting it. =/ Answered by Jordon Stern 1 year ago.

A prescription gel called "Aristocort" worked for me. In the meantime just rub aloe-vera on to the affected areas...works wonders Answered by Jarrod Walsh 1 year ago.


Is there a cure for Dermatitis?
I don't have severe, just a few rashes on my legs but it's kinda annoying me. I went to the Dermatalogist but I would like to hear people's experiences on this and how they cured it.... Asked by Rhona Bilous 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor about TRIAMCINOLONE. Triamcinolone (Aristocort®, Triderm®, Kenalog®, Flutex®, Kenonel®) is a corticosteroid. It helps to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions on the skin. Generic triamcinolone skin cream, ointment and lotion are available, but not skin aerosol. Answered by Yong Mosser 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there a cure for Dermatitis? Is there a cure for Dermatitis? How long does it usually take to clear up completely? What are some great products for Dermatitis? Answered by Fumiko Howick 1 year ago.

You state that you have “Dermatitis - Excema. Treatment of dermatitis varies, depending on the cause. These are the basic forms of dermatitis, and each have a specific treatment. Contact dermatitis - It can take as long as two to four weeks for this type of dermatitis to clear up. Neurodermatitis - Getting you to stop scratching and to avoid further aggravating your skin are the treatment objectives. Seborrheic dermatitis - You'll need to frequently shampoo, then carefully rinse your scalp. Your doctor may recommend a specific shampoo. Stasis dermatitis - Treatment consists of correcting the condition that causes fluid to accumulate in your legs or ankles for extended periods. Atopic dermatitis - Treatment typically consists of applying hydrocortisone-containing lotions to ease signs and symptoms. Perioral dermatitis - Treatment for this condition is usually with the oral antibiotic tetracycline. For all types of dermatitis, occasional use of over-the-counter antihistamines can reduce itching. As this subject is extensive, you would be advised to consult your doctor or dermatologist. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Modesta Dellamora 1 year ago.

Depends on what type of "dermatitis" you have. Sometimes this used as a generic term. You may have come into contact with something that caused the irritation (contact dermatitis) such as new soap, lotion or laundry detergent. Obviously you should stop usuing that product. You can use hydrocortizone to help with the rash as well taking Benedryl to help stop the itching (it will make you sleepy). My doctor had to prescribe a course of steroids (prednisone) for mine to finally go away. Answered by Marta Kiehne 1 year ago.

Always keep your skin moisturized. Reduce itching and scratching with topical medications or antihistamines. Avoid irritating and drying substances such as perfumes or harsh detergents. Topical steroids are often used to treat dermatitis. There is a new cream called pimecrolimus cream which has less side effects than the topical steroids. Also you could try cortisone-type creams. Flucloxacillin and erythromycin are antibiotics to help dermatitis. Answered by George Ochsner 1 year ago.

yes there is stop eating meat start taking super omega which comtains omega 3 omega 6 fish oil flax oil and you will see an immediate improvement although u will still have relapses if you continue to take this product and abstain from all meats it will eventually disappear i know because thats the way i cured mine. You can get the Super Omega at the Dollar General for 2 bucks so its not an expensive process and as far as not eating meat you will also see other health benefits. Answered by Greta Baca 1 year ago.

Dove soap and Hydrocortisone 1% cream from your doctor. Always works for me! Answered by Dell Momplaisir 1 year ago.


What's the best treatment for a vicious case of Poison Ivy?
My skin itches so bad I feel like tearing myself apart but I know if I scratch it it gets worse so what is the best way to get some relief? Is there a shot you can get from the doctor? Asked by Harley Smaldone 1 year ago.

Your doctor can give you a shot such as Aristocort (a corticosteroid) and/or oral corticosteroids, to decrease the contact dermatitis that exposure to the poison ivy has caused. He/she may also recommend a topical hydrocortisone cream, or a diphenhydramine ("Benadryl") to help with the itching. While scratching doesn't generally cause poison ivy to spread (by the time the blisters form, the urushiol (poison ivy oil) is usually no longer on your skin), it can end up causing an infection. See your doctor. Answered by Wilbur Laquay 1 year ago.

Yes there is a shot that you can get from the doctor. I am not sure what the name of it is but I have had it before. So I would recommend going to the doctor. Hope this helps. Answered by Tamisha Spannbauer 1 year ago.


How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away Asked by Alleen Failey 1 year ago.

You might have Keratosis Pilaris. There are several different types of keratosis pilaris: 1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps 2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin 3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request. Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day. Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed. An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication. As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment. Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition. exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps. Answered by Vanetta Dayton 1 year ago.

Go to a dermatologist to get the best results! trust me save your money! Answered by Elsa Branchaud 1 year ago.

shave it with a really sharp razor ;) Answered by Marlyn Kohatsu 1 year ago.

try some vaseline or even proactive :) Answered by Margarete Huckaby 1 year ago.


Need your help figuring out what is wrong with me...?
I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started... Asked by Myron Mongiovi 1 year ago.

I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started getting what I thought was the flu. I got a mild fever (99.0), headaches, nausea, stuffy nose, post-nasal drip, sneezing, sore throat, mild dry cough, fatigue and body aches. Those symptoms lasted about 1 1/2 weeks without improvement. At the 2nd week mark, the symptoms lessened. Something new appeared: a patch of dry skin on the left side on my jaw. It wasn't itchy, just dry. 4 days after it appeared, it became red and started to itch mildly. 2 days later, I developed a non itchy rash on my upper chest and neck. It was red and in streaky patches. Keep in mind that I still have the other symptoms. On Dec 13th, I started getting what I think is a UTI. I go to urgent care for burning and urge to urinate sensation along with a pain in my back, on the right side just under my ribs. I am told that I have a bad infection and am put on Keflex. By Mon the burning and urge to urinate goes away, but the pain in my back gets worse and I go back to urgent care. My UTI is gone, I am told to stop the Keflex and told that I just have a sore muscle. On Wed, Dec 21 I feel better overall. My symptoms have lessened a lot but are still there. I start feeling better and then for about 1-2 hours I start to feel horribly sick. As soon as it started, I feel better again. By the 26th, the symptoms that I still have left are the stuffy, runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, headaches, mild fever, body aches and the rash. A doctor I saw for the rash said it was just an airborne allergy (contact dermatitis) and said it should clear up in a week with use of a cream called triamcinolone acetonide (kenalog/aristocort), sparingly of course. I started using a small dab once every other day on the 24th. As of today, it still hasn't cleared up. So all of these doctors have said that I just have a cold that I am still fighting off. The rash is an allergy. I do not have the allergy anywhere else on my body except on my jaw and neck. It is now very itchy and red and welts have developed. I still feel like I have the flu at times. My fever never goes over 99.0, I am nauseous several times throughout the day, though have never vomited. I just have a feeling overall run down. I just feel like crap. I have good days where all I have is a sore throat, runny nose, cough and the rash. Other days, all the symptoms come back. I have tried taking Benedryl- does nothing, it feels like my nose symptoms get worse. Cold-mist humidifier - nothing. Neti-pot- makes the nose symptoms, sore throat worse. Ibeuprofin eases the body aches. Lotion does nothing for the dry skin/rash. 3 pregnancy tests have come back negative. No history of diabetes in my family, all my tests have so far come back normal. The meds that I am on are: Yasmin birth control (on it for 3 months), over the counter women's one a day vitamin, OTC vitamin D, OTC Lysine. If anyone could help with ideas, I would really appreciate it. Answered by Marhta Breazeal 1 year ago.


How long does it take eczema to go away after using aristocort cream or generic triamcinolone acetonide cream?
Asked by Donny Dolin 1 year ago.

Hi Neighbor Not sure about creams you're reffering to but here are some other ideas to help the healing process. Here is a herb remedy that will work. 1. Take 1-3 droppersful of Echinacea Plus Tincture (at herbdoc.com or another qualified site) to strengthen the immune system. 2. Rub Garlic oil ALL over the affected area (Garlic will kill anything if you use enough of it) 3. Give 1-3 glasses of Activated Charcoal Slurry per day (to absorb the toxins out of the blood) 4. Mix equal parts of Aloe Vera Gel, Slippery Elm Powder and Activated Charcoal Powder together (absorbs the toxins externally) 5. Apply a thin layer of this mixture over the AFFECTED area(s). 6. Continue this treatment, until the desired Results are achieved. This is healing at it's highest point. Cause Eczema is often called Dermatitis, and may be a symptom of an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. Eczema can be due to allergies, allergies secondary to digestive disorders such as hydrochloric acid deficiency, rashes secondary to immune diseases, genetic metabolic disorders, and/or nutritional deficiencies, especially of niacin (vitamin B3) and B6, as well as other B vitamins. To minimize your risk of developing eczema, avoid irritating substances, wear natural nonirritating materials, use soothing ointments, and check to see if dietary, nutritional, and/or and allergy-causing factors need to be considered. Other ideas that will help: Juice Therapy: The following juice combinations can help speed healing: black currant and red grapes; carrot, beet, spinach, cucumber, and parsley; and wheat grass juice. Nutritional Supplementation: Vitamin A and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), an omega-6 essential fatty acid found in high quantities in evening primrose oil, have both been shown to improve the symptoms of eczema. Vitamin E. Other useful supplements for preventing and reversing eczema include vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc. Topical Treatment: Apply evening primrose oil directly to cracked and sore areas of the skin. A topical paste made from ginkgo and licorice root extract has also been shown to improve eczema symptoms. Best of health to you Answered by Rana Rogacion 1 year ago.


Can a steroid shot for poison ivy mess up or delay your period? mine was 2 week late and very very light.?
Also, I've taken 6 pregnancy test and all are Neg! Could my cycle just be off, or what are the chance I'm pregnant and the test aren't showing it? Asked by Mia Bettner 1 year ago.

Yes, a one-time corticosteroid injection (such as Aristocort) for poison ivy can delay your period. And infections such as UTIs can also affect your periods. Your entire menstrual cycle depends on certain structures in your brain signaling your ovaries, which signal back to the structures in your brain. Various hormones are released during this procedure. This back-and-forth process can be easily interrupted by medications or illnesses. Of course, if you've had unprotected sex, you may still be pregnant. A very, very light "spotting" period can indicate implantation bleeding, which can occur when a fertilized egg implants in your uterus. Some women also don't excrete enough HCG ("pregnancy hormone") in their urine for it to be detectable; they must have a blood HCG test. As you've taken 6 pregnancy tests, you sound very worried. As you've also had infections and have taken various medications, you may want to see your physician for a blood HCG test. This may mean an extra trip to the doctor and some extra expense, but your peace of mind may be worth it. Answered by Jonathon Albarazi 1 year ago.

See your pharmacist or Doc. A friend of mine..had the sam periods as you, and was told she had a UTI....but...later found she was actually pregnanat, and had never had a urinary tract infection... I guess her case is kinda rare though...but..just a heads-up :) x Answered by Dorinda Laycock 1 year ago.


How do I get rid of poison ivy?
help..I have tried everything..and its still spreading.. even steroids arent working..bleach, calmine, nothing. :( Asked by Cami Dehmer 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor for Aristocort cream. Also known genericly as triamcinolone acetonide cream, 0.5% strength. This stuff works on every skin condition I've ever had, and I have had a lot of skin issues. Answered by Ima Brevik 1 year ago.

How long have you had the rash? If it is more than 3 weeks and you just got a new line of bubbles, you might think about the clothes you were wearing. Did you wash them all, even shoes? Did you put them down anywhere? Did you touch the inside of your car? The oil could be somewhere you keep coming in contact with. You can't see it, so take precautions and clean everywhere you could have touched. It could be on the inside of the car door, on the shovel handle or that sweatshirt you were wearing. It could be on the brim of your hat. I got it from my cat one time. Thankfully, she cleans herself and it was gone and I didn't get re-infected. Answered by Ora Morenco 1 year ago.

): i was going to say calamine! stop itching it though Answered by Chara Demont 1 year ago.


Remedies for skin care?
Asked by Alina Englerth 1 year ago.

Many pills: Accutane Acticin Aldara Aristocort Azelex Benzac Diprolene Elocon Furacin Grifulvin Ilosone Mentax Oxsoralen Renova Rheumatrex Temovate Valtrex but talk to your doctor... Answered by Galen Dula 1 year ago.

We need more info - what kind of skin? Natural or shop-bought remedies? What do you need to treat? Then maybe we can help you more. Answered by Berniece Alstott 1 year ago.


Heated back/belly itching?
Can anybody tell me what it is? Asked by Renna Offner 1 year ago.

Well, throughout my life I've been getting these. It's an itch on my belly and on my back. It comes with Immense itching then once I itch it, it occurs everywhere. This normally happens when my back or belly is sweaty and my body heats up, but I do not feel it. My question, what is this? Many people I know have this unknown thing and I'm getting sick of getting it. =/ Answered by Kayleen Raglow 1 year ago.

A prescription gel called "Aristocort" worked for me. In the meantime just rub aloe-vera on to the affected areas...works wonders Answered by Marline Wommack 1 year ago.


Is there a cure for Dermatitis?
I don't have severe, just a few rashes on my legs but it's kinda annoying me. I went to the Dermatalogist but I would like to hear people's experiences on this and how they cured it.... Asked by Clarinda Abate 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor about TRIAMCINOLONE. Triamcinolone (Aristocort®, Triderm®, Kenalog®, Flutex®, Kenonel®) is a corticosteroid. It helps to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions on the skin. Generic triamcinolone skin cream, ointment and lotion are available, but not skin aerosol. Answered by Lawanda Baros 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there a cure for Dermatitis? Is there a cure for Dermatitis? How long does it usually take to clear up completely? What are some great products for Dermatitis? Answered by Cassaundra Scarber 1 year ago.

You state that you have “Dermatitis - Excema. Treatment of dermatitis varies, depending on the cause. These are the basic forms of dermatitis, and each have a specific treatment. Contact dermatitis - It can take as long as two to four weeks for this type of dermatitis to clear up. Neurodermatitis - Getting you to stop scratching and to avoid further aggravating your skin are the treatment objectives. Seborrheic dermatitis - You'll need to frequently shampoo, then carefully rinse your scalp. Your doctor may recommend a specific shampoo. Stasis dermatitis - Treatment consists of correcting the condition that causes fluid to accumulate in your legs or ankles for extended periods. Atopic dermatitis - Treatment typically consists of applying hydrocortisone-containing lotions to ease signs and symptoms. Perioral dermatitis - Treatment for this condition is usually with the oral antibiotic tetracycline. For all types of dermatitis, occasional use of over-the-counter antihistamines can reduce itching. As this subject is extensive, you would be advised to consult your doctor or dermatologist. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Jerrell Verble 1 year ago.

Depends on what type of "dermatitis" you have. Sometimes this used as a generic term. You may have come into contact with something that caused the irritation (contact dermatitis) such as new soap, lotion or laundry detergent. Obviously you should stop usuing that product. You can use hydrocortizone to help with the rash as well taking Benedryl to help stop the itching (it will make you sleepy). My doctor had to prescribe a course of steroids (prednisone) for mine to finally go away. Answered by Stacy Baxa 1 year ago.

Always keep your skin moisturized. Reduce itching and scratching with topical medications or antihistamines. Avoid irritating and drying substances such as perfumes or harsh detergents. Topical steroids are often used to treat dermatitis. There is a new cream called pimecrolimus cream which has less side effects than the topical steroids. Also you could try cortisone-type creams. Flucloxacillin and erythromycin are antibiotics to help dermatitis. Answered by Shelby Herriott 1 year ago.

yes there is stop eating meat start taking super omega which comtains omega 3 omega 6 fish oil flax oil and you will see an immediate improvement although u will still have relapses if you continue to take this product and abstain from all meats it will eventually disappear i know because thats the way i cured mine. You can get the Super Omega at the Dollar General for 2 bucks so its not an expensive process and as far as not eating meat you will also see other health benefits. Answered by Nelia Kozusko 1 year ago.

Dove soap and Hydrocortisone 1% cream from your doctor. Always works for me! Answered by Flossie Laris 1 year ago.


What's the best treatment for a vicious case of Poison Ivy?
My skin itches so bad I feel like tearing myself apart but I know if I scratch it it gets worse so what is the best way to get some relief? Is there a shot you can get from the doctor? Asked by September Wooleyhan 1 year ago.

Your doctor can give you a shot such as Aristocort (a corticosteroid) and/or oral corticosteroids, to decrease the contact dermatitis that exposure to the poison ivy has caused. He/she may also recommend a topical hydrocortisone cream, or a diphenhydramine ("Benadryl") to help with the itching. While scratching doesn't generally cause poison ivy to spread (by the time the blisters form, the urushiol (poison ivy oil) is usually no longer on your skin), it can end up causing an infection. See your doctor. Answered by Althea Nolden 1 year ago.

Yes there is a shot that you can get from the doctor. I am not sure what the name of it is but I have had it before. So I would recommend going to the doctor. Hope this helps. Answered by Ines Jahaly 1 year ago.


How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away Asked by Erwin Peaden 1 year ago.

You might have Keratosis Pilaris. There are several different types of keratosis pilaris: 1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps 2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin 3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request. Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day. Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed. An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication. As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment. Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition. exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps. Answered by Chu Lisman 1 year ago.

Go to a dermatologist to get the best results! trust me save your money! Answered by Yi Vafiadis 1 year ago.

shave it with a really sharp razor ;) Answered by Josephina Romar 1 year ago.

try some vaseline or even proactive :) Answered by Yolande Cantwell 1 year ago.


Need your help figuring out what is wrong with me...?
I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started... Asked by Shaunte Burland 1 year ago.

I have been having a lot of different symptoms and have been to several different doctors and no one knows what is wrong. Hopefully someone can help me figure something out. I first had what I think was a head cold for about 1 week back in October. I felt better for about 1 month. Around Thanksgiving, I started getting what I thought was the flu. I got a mild fever (99.0), headaches, nausea, stuffy nose, post-nasal drip, sneezing, sore throat, mild dry cough, fatigue and body aches. Those symptoms lasted about 1 1/2 weeks without improvement. At the 2nd week mark, the symptoms lessened. Something new appeared: a patch of dry skin on the left side on my jaw. It wasn't itchy, just dry. 4 days after it appeared, it became red and started to itch mildly. 2 days later, I developed a non itchy rash on my upper chest and neck. It was red and in streaky patches. Keep in mind that I still have the other symptoms. On Dec 13th, I started getting what I think is a UTI. I go to urgent care for burning and urge to urinate sensation along with a pain in my back, on the right side just under my ribs. I am told that I have a bad infection and am put on Keflex. By Mon the burning and urge to urinate goes away, but the pain in my back gets worse and I go back to urgent care. My UTI is gone, I am told to stop the Keflex and told that I just have a sore muscle. On Wed, Dec 21 I feel better overall. My symptoms have lessened a lot but are still there. I start feeling better and then for about 1-2 hours I start to feel horribly sick. As soon as it started, I feel better again. By the 26th, the symptoms that I still have left are the stuffy, runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, headaches, mild fever, body aches and the rash. A doctor I saw for the rash said it was just an airborne allergy (contact dermatitis) and said it should clear up in a week with use of a cream called triamcinolone acetonide (kenalog/aristocort), sparingly of course. I started using a small dab once every other day on the 24th. As of today, it still hasn't cleared up. So all of these doctors have said that I just have a cold that I am still fighting off. The rash is an allergy. I do not have the allergy anywhere else on my body except on my jaw and neck. It is now very itchy and red and welts have developed. I still feel like I have the flu at times. My fever never goes over 99.0, I am nauseous several times throughout the day, though have never vomited. I just have a feeling overall run down. I just feel like crap. I have good days where all I have is a sore throat, runny nose, cough and the rash. Other days, all the symptoms come back. I have tried taking Benedryl- does nothing, it feels like my nose symptoms get worse. Cold-mist humidifier - nothing. Neti-pot- makes the nose symptoms, sore throat worse. Ibeuprofin eases the body aches. Lotion does nothing for the dry skin/rash. 3 pregnancy tests have come back negative. No history of diabetes in my family, all my tests have so far come back normal. The meds that I am on are: Yasmin birth control (on it for 3 months), over the counter women's one a day vitamin, OTC vitamin D, OTC Lysine. If anyone could help with ideas, I would really appreciate it. Answered by Laurinda Minassian 1 year ago.


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