AREDIA Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020036/001.

Names and composition

"AREDIA" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020036/001 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020036/003 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 60MG per VIAL
020036/004 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per VIAL
020927/001 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 30MG per VIAL
020927/002 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 60MG per VIAL
020927/003 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 90MG per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
075841/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per 10ML (3MG per ML)
075841/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 60MG per 10ML (6MG per ML)
075841/003 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per 10ML (9MG per ML)
076153/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per 10ML (3MG per ML)
076153/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per 10ML (9MG per ML)
076207/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per 10ML (3MG per ML)
076207/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per 10ML (9MG per ML)
078156/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per 10ML (3MG per ML)
078156/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 60MG per 10ML (6MG per ML)
078156/003 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per 10ML (9MG per ML)
078373/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per 10ML (3MG per ML)
078373/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per 10ML (9MG per ML)
078520/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per 10ML (3MG per ML)
078520/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per 10ML (9MG per ML)
078942/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per 10ML (3MG per ML)
078942/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per 10ML (9MG per ML)
021113/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per 10ML (9MG per ML)
075290/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per VIAL
075290/003 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per VIAL
075594/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per VIAL
075594/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per VIAL
075773/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per VIAL
075773/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per VIAL
077433/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per VIAL
077433/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 60MG per VIAL
077433/003 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per VIAL
077703/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per VIAL
077703/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per VIAL
078300/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per VIAL
078300/002 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per VIAL
020036/001 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020036/003 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 60MG per VIAL
020036/004 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 90MG per VIAL
020927/001 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 30MG per VIAL
020927/002 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 60MG per VIAL
020927/003 AREDIA PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 90MG per VIAL
021113/001 PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM PAMIDRONATE DISODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per 10ML (3MG per ML)

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Answered questions

Is anyone using Sutent by Pfizer for Lung Cancer (NSCLC)? If so what are your results?
My Dad has Stage IV NSCLC after 3 rounds of Avastin/Carbo/Taxo/Aredia his cancer is "stable" Asked by Lloyd Keefer 1 month ago.

Hi, this is not a right place to ask such question. Go to www.cancergrace,org , www.csncancer.org, www.inspire.com You can find lots of similar cases in this forums. I'll pray for ur father's health --- NKP Answered by Joi Siebeneck 1 month ago.

My Dad had stage 4 lung cancer, had 3 rounds of chemotherapy, they said his cancer was stable, then it went haywire & he passed away a month later. Results with this type of thing are not typical. It depends on how your Dad's body reacts to the treatment. You and your Dad are in my prayers. Answered by Bunny Marrinan 1 month ago.

Mritanjul is wrong. This is a very good place to bring up this subject. Thank you for doing that. Mritanjul's other sources may also be good, but many of us will benefit from you using this site. Answered by Gwyn Strutynski 1 month ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Nickie Forkosh 1 month ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Antonetta Betsinger 1 month ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Twyla Horack 1 month ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Drema Crider 1 month ago.


OSTEOPOROSIS medication question...?
I have spinal cord injury and recently diagnosed with osteoporosis... which of these medication is more effective for my bones • actonel • aredia • boniva • didronel • evista • Forteo • fosamax • miacalcin • zometa • vivelle • reclas ps- im 26 ! Asked by Evita Shoobridge 1 month ago.

My doctor took me off actonel, boniva, evista,fosamax over the years-they never worked. I'm 54 yrs old and the only one that worked for me was miacalcin spray. I went from having swiss cheese bones to strong bones. I had a total hysterectomy at age 35 and finally my bones are stronger. Good Luck. Answered by Harold Roemmich 1 month ago.

speak with an obgyn, maybe even the dr who diagnosed you with osteoporosis........if you get pregnant and drink TONS of milk and other bone building foods....brocoli, buck choy, rhubarb, yogurt, cheese, supplements, bananas.......you can actually build bone. check into food supplements though. I've heard most about boniva and know someone who took evista. she did well with evista.....good luck Answered by Mia Suddarth 1 month ago.

your 26 with osteoporosis !! That is shocking it might be a wrong diagnosis Answered by Talia Donelan 1 month ago.


Questions for patients or caregivers of Multiple Myeloma
My husband is undergoing treatment for Muliple Myeloma. He is on the Thal-Dex treatment, along with Aredia. If anyone has had the experience or caregivers out there, please tell me, how often were blood work up's done, how did the treatments go. What were the side effects. Tell me what you know. Asked by Wei Penez 1 month ago.

Check this out..I think that it will be of some help to you. God Bless! Answered by Ali Deveyra 1 month ago.

The numbers decrease than are from the international Staging gadget tiers. those cases are measured from the factor that scientific care (maximum usually chemotherapy) first began. Median survival refers back to the time it took for 0.5 of the sufferers to die. So 0.5 the sufferers lived longer than the median survival. international Staging gadget degree Median survival degree I - sixty two months degree II - 40 4 months degree III - 29 months those rates are in line with human beings first dealt with 5 to twenty-5 years in the past. recent advancements in scientific care usually advise a extra ideal outlook for human beings at the instant. So there is lots wish on your dad. New drugs are being authorized to boot to characteristic on extra months and years. bear in mind each and every person is unique and info won't be able to are waiting for precisely what is going to ensue on your case. Answered by Karissa Nalepka 1 month ago.


What is the treatment for COXARTRALGIA?
i have a COXARTRALGIA R. GONG TIME RX COXARTROSIS - ASEPTIC NECROSIS Asked by Avery Winick 1 month ago.

What is aseptic necrosis? Aseptic necrosis (also referred to as avascular necrosis or osteonecrosis) is a bone condition that results from poor blood supply to an area of bone causing bone death. This is a serious condition because the dead areas of bone do not function normally, are weakened, and can collapse. What causes aseptic necrosis? Aseptic necrosis can be caused by trauma and damage to the blood vessels that supply bone its oxygen. Other causes of poor blood circulation to the bone include a blockage by air or fat (embolism) that obstructs the blood flow through the blood vessels, abnormally thick blood (hypercoagulable state), and inflammation of the blood vessel walls (vasculitis). What conditions are associated with aseptic necrosis? Conditions that are associated with aseptic necrosis include alcoholism, cortisone medications, Cushing's syndrome, radiation exposure, sickle cell disease, pancreatitis, Gaucher disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Aseptic necrosis of the jaw bone has been rarely reported in association with the use of bisphosphonate medication, particularly zolendronate (Zometa) and pamidronate (Aredia ). What are symptoms of aseptic necrosis? Aseptic necrosis begins as a painless bone abnormality. It can remain painless. The involved bone often later develops pain, especially with use. For example, if a hip joint develops avascular necrosis in the ball of the hip joint, pain can be noted especially with weight-bearing. As the ball of the hip joint collapses from the degeneration of the bone from aseptic necrosis, pain in the groin can be felt with hip rotation and pain can sometimes be noted with rest after weight-bearing. How is aseptic necrosis diagnosed? The diagnosis of aseptic necrosis can often, but not always, be made with x-rays. By the time changes are apparent by plain film x-ray testing there has been substantial damage to the bone affected. Bone changes visible on plain film x-ray are therefore considered a later-stage finding. Earlier signs of avascular necrosis can be detected with an MRI scan or suggested by a nuclear bone scan. What is the treatment for aseptic necrosis? The treatment of aseptic necrosis is critically dependent on the stage of the condition. Early aseptic necrosis (before x-ray changes are evident) can be treated with a surgical operation called a core decompression. This procedure involves removing a core of bone from the involved area and sometimes grafting new bone into the area. This allows new blood supply to form, preserving the bone. Weight bearing or impact of the involved joint is restricted. Later stages of aseptic necrosis (when x-ray changes have occurred) typically lead to seriously damaged bone and joints, requiring joint replacement surgery. For related information, please read the following articles; Total Hip Replacement and Total Knee Replacement. Reference: Clinical Primer of Rheumatology, Lippincott Williams & Wilkens, edited by William Koopman, et. al., 2003. Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology, W B Saunders Co, edited by Shaun Ruddy, et.al., 2000. Answered by Kaycee Middaugh 1 month ago.


Ok health pros, here's one for you. I take medication for HTN, .....?
I AM a nurse, so I know part of the answer already, just thought I'd put it out there to get more info, thanks for the replies so far. Asked by Dorcas Tudela 1 month ago.

HI The Only Solo Rose (very creative) I must commend you first for assisting many people with your time. Athough I have different concepts on how to heal people then modern medicine (mostly drugs) I still see the value and willingness doctors and nurses are trying to help people. We need more healers in the world and we come from all different backgrounds of training and education. Again I applaud you sharing your expertise with so many. Now Ill share my thoughts with you and I have no idea about drugs, but I am very keen on how the body functions. Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke causes high blood pressure because of how smoking damages cells and narrows arteries. In addition, cigarettes contain an abundance of life-threatening chemicals that further increase overall health risks. Even smokeless tobacco products such as chewing tobacco and snuff can raise blood pressure levels because of the nicotine and sodium they contain. Many of the other chemicals contained in cigarettes can create a toxic burden on the liver to further disturb healthy body habits. Pharmaceutical Drugs: According to the Physicians` Desk Reference, the following drugs can all cause high blood pressure as a side effect of their use: Alfenta Injection, Aredia for Injection, Dobutrex Solution Vials, Epogen for Injection, Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System, Lupron Depot, Methergine Injection and Tablets, Orthoclone OKT3 Sterile Solution, Polygam Immune Globulin Intravenous Human, Procrit for Injection, Sandimmune, Sandimmune Soft Gelatin Capsules, Tolectin, Velban Vials, Ventolin Inhalation Aerosol and Refill, and Wellbutrin. ****Here are some ideas to contol your blood pressure: Quick Action Plan for High Blood Pressure 1. Make any necessary lifestyle changes. If you are overweight, commit to a weight loss plan. If you smoke, stop, and avoid all sources of secondhand smoke. Also exercise at least thirty minutes a day at least three to four times a week. Safe and effective exercise choices include brisk walking, bicycling, hiking, rebounding, and swimming. Additionally try a restorative yoga class, tai chi or chi gong; all can provide great stress relief and can be pleasurable ways to add movement to your life. 2. Adopt a healthy diet. In place of red meats, choose fish such as blue fish, cod, Greenland halibut, mackerel, and wild caught salmon, as well as free-range, organic poultry. If you want red meat choose bison, for a low fat option. 3. Emphasize fresh, organic fruits and vegetables that are rich in vital nutrients, such as avocados, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew melons, grapefruit, nectarines, oranges, asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, green peas, kidney and lima beans, leafy green vegetables, nuts such as almonds, cashews, walnuts and pecans, potatoes, squash, and yams, raw dairy, and whole grains like brown rice, buckwheat and quinoa. 4. Use raw virgin coconut butter or organic butter for cooking, and flaxseed and extra virgin olive oil for dressings. 5. Avoid alcohol, coffee, caffeine, and refined salt. 6. Supplement with vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6, vitamin C, bioflavonoids (especially rutin), vitamin E, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), evening primrose oil, fish oil, calcium, magnesium, potassium, selenium, and zinc, as well as the amino acids cysteine, taurine, and tryptophan. 7. Useful herbs for high blood pressure include garlic, hawthorn berry, olive leaf extract, and the medicinal mushrooms maitake and reishi. 8. Drink at least one 8-ounce glass of fresh squeezed, organic vegetable juice each day. Excellent juice combinations include beet, carrot, and celery; and carrot or cucumber, spinach, and parsley. For added benefit, add one clove of juiced garlic. 9. Adopt a stress management program of daily meditation and/or relaxation exercises. 10. Detoxify your body to eliminate toxins and heavy metals that can dramatically increase the risk of high blood pressure. Quick Action Plan for Addictions 1. Determine if the addiction stems from allergies, biochemical imbalances, genetics, and/or malabsorption of nutrients. 2. Repressed core emotions such as denied anger often lead to depression, anxiety, lethargy, mood swings, and disassociation. Embracing your feelings is the most important aspect of beginning to deal with addictive behavior. 3. Regular chiropractic adjustments prove to be supportive, along with release-oriented tissue and bodywork techniques such as Rolfing. 4. Eat three meals and two snacks consistently. Emphasize quality protein foods such as organic poultry, bison, lamb, wild-caught fish, and eggs. Eat plenty of raw nuts and seeds, apples, berries, and other whole fruits; avoid all fruit juices. 5. A critical step in the recovery process is to cleanse, heal and support liver function by using herbs such as Milk Thistle, Dandelion and Bupleurum. 6. Blood-cleansing will support sluggish energy. Herbs in the form of tinctures or teas made from Oat Straw, Burdock Root, Echinacea, and Licorice Root are helpful, and are also vital to healthy kidney function. 7. To calm nerves and anxiety caused by addiction, use the herbs Skullcap, Valerian, and Vervain. 8. After eating a stable whole foods diet for at least 3 months, consider a juice fast of organic vegetable juices. 9. Take nutritional supplements. The B vitamins, particularly thiamin (B1) and B6 are important. Consider amino acid therapy for rebalancing brain chemistry, and to reduce cravings for alcohol, drugs, and/or nicotine. 10. Acupuncture, particularly auriculotherapy (ear acupuncture), is especially useful for drug addictions, and excellent for addressing addictive behaviors such as sex, gambling, and workaholicism. 11. Homeopathy, Hypnotherapy, Naturopathic Medicine and Orthomolecular Medicine are especially helpful for alcoholism, drug addiction, and smoking. Continue your quest to assisting people because the world is in great need. But we do need to have you happy and healthy. Learn about nutrition and drink a gallon of water a day (I do). Keep persuing the answers for all categories you want to know about. There are always higher level of truths to be found. Best of health to you Answered by Julius Novi 1 month ago.

Since you are a nurse, you probably know more about Hypotension than I do, but I'll give it a shot. First, remember that a persons BP can change drastically over a short period of time, often within minutes. No single reading can indicate High or Low BP. Several readings over time must be taken before there is a need for concern. Don't be alarmed by a single reading. Second, there are many factors that can affect your blood pressure. Some of those factors are: - Stress (Emotional, mental and physical) - Some medications (or combinations) can cause a rise or drop in BP - Poor sleep habits and sleep disorders (Sleep Apnea, not enough sleep, sleep disturbances, etc.) - Body position as the reading is taken (lying down. sitting, arm not level with heart, legs crossed, etc.) - Also there is a condition called "White Coat Hypertension". This is when a person visits a doctor and their BP goes up. It's an example of mental stress. - and of course smoking (or not). - How long it's been since your last meal. - Caffeine - Alcohol - Needing to go to the bathroom This comes from the FamilyDoctor.org website: "Hypotension, or low blood pressure, happens when your systolic pressure is consistently (several blood pressure readings over several days) below 90--or 25 points below your normal reading. Hypotension can be a sign of something serious such as shock, a life threatening condition. Contact your doctor immediately if you are dizzy or fainting" If you just started the medication, then it and quitting smoking has probably combined to cause this. It may take a little time for your body to adjust to both improvements and settle out. If you have been on the medication for some time, then I suspect the sudden drop in BP is due to the lack of smoking (nicotine) in your system. I have seen the same result when I don't smoke for several hours, though my BP never drops that low. But my HR varies from around 60 bpm to above 90 bpm (normally 68 to 84 bpm range) and my O2 Sat remains above 90% and is normally above 94%. I wouldn't worry about the HR at all, unless it continues to drop below 50 bpm or stays very near that for some time. As for the BP that is a concern if it remains there, but if it continues to drop I would suggest a visit to the ER is in order. My information comes from my research and experience with 5x Bypasses in Oct. 2006, High BP (Hypertension), High Cholesterol (Hypercholesterolemia), COPD (Emphysema) and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. I suggest the links below for more information. Answered by Jeremy Lutfy 1 month ago.

I'm no pro, but I have an opinion, so I'll share it! First of all, I'm so glad to hear you are quitting smoking. It's a huge step, I'm sure, but a very important one. So kudos to you! Now, as to the hypotension issue, I'm guessing that if you called your doctor and suggested that a) your BP is running low as you withdraw from nicotine so b) you're contemplating scaling back the HTN meds, he would have no problem with it. You already monitor your BP regularly (apparently), so there's no reason that you can't carefully adjust your medications to keep your BP in line. That said, fainting ain't good. If this hasn't happened to you before, you really ought to get a more complete cardio workup. Just my 2 cents worth... Answered by Eleanore Steadham 1 month ago.

I am not a doctor or a nurse, but I feel this is true. As you probably are aware smoking (the nicotine) causes increased heart rate and increased blood pressure. So actually with the nicotine going out of your system now it caused your BP to start dropping and your heart rate. The same thing happened to me when I quit smoking, heart rate decreased and so did my BP. I consulted my cardiologist and physician and they began to decrease my BP meds as they told me you should never just stop taking BP meds cold turkey. I monitored my BP with every decreased dosage they told me to do. My BP remained where it should and then I was off the BP meds. Unfortunately, then I started to smoke again, and my BP increased and so did my heart rate, went back on BP meds again, BUT NOW, I HAVE FINALLY KICKED THE HABIT, have not been smoking for a year now and BP and heart rate is fine. I am just talking from personal experience and I also know that nicotine does increase heart rate and blood pressure. Answered by Leia Swedenburg 1 month ago.

There are many different types of medications that act in different ways to lower BP. The first medication your Dr prescribes may not work well enough or have some adverse side effects. It is important to track BP when you start taking HTN medication and note any side effects you may experience. There are many types of medications available and different combinations of medications that can tried. It is important to treat HTN as it can lead to many serious medical problems. It is important to get your BP checked regularly so that you don’t suffer from the terrible effects of long term untreated HTN, since it is very treatable and the alternatives are costly in many ways, including an untimely death. Answered by Meryl Gustison 1 month ago.

you probably have STDS go get a life! Answered by Jaymie Gitlewski 1 month ago.


What does osteonecrosis mean?
Asked by Alaine Jewell 1 month ago.

Avascular necrosis is a disease resulting from the temporary or permanent loss of the blood supply to the bones. Without blood, the bone tissue dies and causes the bone to collapse. If the process involves the bones near a joint, it often leads to collapse of the joint surface. This disease also is known as osteonecrosis, aseptic (bone) necrosis, and ischemic bone necrosis. While it can, by definition, affect any bone, and half of cases show multiple sites of damage, this disease primarily affects the joints at the shoulder, knee, and hip. There are many causes of avascular necrosis such as alcoholism, excessive steroid use, post trauma, Caisson's disease (decompression sickness), vascular compression, hypertension, vasculitis, thrombosis and damage from radiation. In some cases no cause is found and this is known as idiopathic. Although it can happen in any bone, avascular necrosis most commonly affects the ends (epiphysis) of long bones such as the femur, the bone extending from the knee joint to the hip joint. Other common sites include the upper arm bone, knees, shoulders, and ankles. The disease may affect just one bone, more than one bone at the same time, or more than one bone at different times. Avascular necrosis usually affects people between 30 and 50 years of age; about 10,000 to 20,000 people develop avascular necrosis of the head of the femur in the US each year. Orthopaedic doctors most often diagnose the disease. Avascular necrosis is especially common in the hip joint. A variety of methods are now used to treat avascular necrosis, the most common being the total hip replacement, or THR. However, THRs have a number of downsides including long recovery times and short life spans. THRs are an effective means of treatment in the geriatric population, however doctors shy away from using them in younger patients due to the reasons above. A new, more promising treatment is metal on metal resurfacing. It is a form of a THR, however in this procedure, only the head of the femur is removed as opposed to a THR in which the entire neck is removed. Metal on metal resurfacing is still experimental in America but has been endorsed in Great Britain as an excellent alternative to a THR. Bone is always undergoing change or remodelling. The bone is broken down by osteoclasts and rebuilt by oteoblasts. Some doctors also prescribe medicines such as Fosamax, Actonel, Aredia or Zometa which reduces the rate of bone breakdown by osteoclasts, thus preventing collapse (specifically of the hip) due to AVN. The amount of disability that results from avascular necrosis depends on what part of the bone is affected, how large an area is involved, and how effectively the bone rebuilds itself. The process of bone rebuilding takes place after an injury as well as during normal growth. Normally, bone continuously breaks down and rebuilds--old bone is reabsorbed and replaced with new bone. The process keeps the skeleton strong and helps it to maintain a balance of minerals. In the course of avascular necrosis, however, the healing process is usually ineffective and the bone tissues break down faster than the body can repair them. If left untreated, the disease progresses, the bone collapses, and the joint surface breaks down, leading to pain and arthritis. Avascular necrosis cut short the football and baseball careers of star athlete Bo Jackson [1]. Another sportsperson with this condition is cyclist Floyd Landis, winner of the 2006 Tour de France. Answered by Karima Paschke 1 month ago.

It's a condition where bone tissue dies. Answered by Tasia Commons 1 month ago.

os·te·o·ne·cro·sis (ŏs'tē-ō-nə-krō'sĭs, -nĕ-) n. Necrosis of bone. (that wasn't too hard now - just do a Google in future)........ Answered by Malisa Dunkin 1 month ago.

osteo= bone necrosis= death bone death? Answered by Betsy Quintero 1 month ago.

osteo = bone necrosis = death Answered by Jeffrey Ciampi 1 month ago.


Secondary bone cancer prognosis?
They are NOT giving her chemo- no I don't know why. Asked by Dion Rayl 1 month ago.

My mom is 55 and had breast cancer 17yrs ago. She has just been diagnosed with secondary bone cancer- it is something "positive" (ER or PR??) Her treatment will be a pill everyday a monthly IV and possibly radiation for pain management. It is "extremely widespread"- her skull, all down her spine and tailbone, ribs, arms, legs- basically everywhere but hands and feet. 6 yrs ago my dad died of pancreatic cancer- he was diagnosed in Jan and died May 5th. We knew nothing about pancreatic cancer and were completely taken off guard. I'm afraid the same is going to happen with my mom. Her onc told her only that "50% of people with secondary bone cancer don't live longer than 4 years" I don't know what to make of that- 4 years from when? diagnosis or when the cancer began to spread? Her's is so wide spread what does that mean for her prognosis? She has lost about 40 pounds and looks like a skeleton- she's still working. I want her to quit but is that premature or should I encourage her to stop working and enjoy life while she still can? Anyone have any knowledgeable information to give me? I realize no one knows for sure but certainly there is a basic idea out there about her prognosis. Please- give it to me straight don't try to be a politican about it. I wish someone would have looked me in the eye and told me it was time to say goodbye to my dad I don't want the same thing to happen again but I also don't want to over react. Thanks Answered by Jacquelyn Zanin 1 month ago.

I know this a distressing time for you, but your mother’s doctor is doing exactly what the best treatment is for someone in her situation. The ER/PR thing stands for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor we have found these hormones can stimulate proliferation of cells in the breast and can lead to breast cancer. We now check all breast cancers to see if the tumor reacts to these hormones and apparently your mother’s does. The pill your mother was given is prevent the cancer from getting the hormone(s) they love so much making them less able to thrive and multiply. This treatment is much more targeted to doing this than chemo is and without the nasty side affects. Chemo is reserved for patients with life threatening mets. As painful as bone mets are they are not life threatening. The monthly IV is a drug designed to reduce pain and fractures due to bone mets therefore reducing the need for radiation. Radiation really is not an option for treating bone mets as widespread as your mothers, but may be used in the most painful areas later on if needed. If you would like to look these drugs up they are Aredia and Zometa. Regarding the 4-year thing. This would be from the time the bone mets were discovered and she became a stage 4 breast cancer. At this point her doctor is doing what he can to buy her some more time and is hoping to make that time as pain free as possible. From what I know and he knows far better than I, his estimate is pretty accurate, but may change for the better depending on how well she responds to therapy. My personal opinion about her continuing to work is I think you should take your cues from your mom. Everyone has their own way of dealing with this situation and it would be normal for her to go through several stages. She will likely start feeling much better before she feels bad again so let her live a “normal” life while everything sinks in. Just let her know you love her and you want her to do whatever it is that makes her happy. Best wishes to you both. Answered by Alyce Owolabi 1 month ago.

Bone Cancer Prognosis Answered by Elsie Borne 1 month ago.

Be grateful they're not doing chemo--that's hell on earth and would probably kill her--my sister went through that with breast cancer. Do whatever you can to convince her to quit work--whether she has 1 year, 5 years or 10 years left, she might as well start living each day as her last--I don't say that to be cruel: it's the way we should all live everyday but often don't consider.. It's difficult to estimate how long she might have because it's very much dependent on her state of mind, how far the cancer has progressed, and her health otherwise. My Dad was diagnosed with malignant melanoma 15 years ago and given 6 months to live. Since then he's had 4 melanomas removed, and over the years it's metastasized to his prostate and his bones. He has refused all treatments including radiation, chemo etc. because he believes the cure is worse than the disease. It's hard to argue with someone still alive years after he's supposed to have croaked--he jokes that the only reason people come to visit him is to see if he's still around. He has mostly good days (goes for walks and meeting him you'd never know) and occasional bad days (rests in bed) but overall he's amazing--he's 81. I mention this to let you know your Mom may be in the 50% who beats the odds and is here with us into her 80s. Hope and faith are amazing tonics. I wish you and your Mom hope and faith, and pray for both of you. Good luck! Answered by Delcie Grala 1 month ago.

The problem is that nobody really knows when the cancer started to spread. The "4 years" is likely from the time of diagnosis. Unfortunately, some cancers are more aggressive than others. There's no way to tell which patients have more time and which don't. Having said that, it's probably best to prepare for your mom to not last the 4 years. That way, you'll have the chance to spend time with her. If she does well and lives longer, consider that a "bonus". It sounds like her cancer is "HER2" positive. The treatment is actually more targeted to the cancer than regular chemo. Best of luck. Answered by Robena Sitze 1 month ago.


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