Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 006002/001.

Names and composition

"ARALEN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
006002/001 ARALEN CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
006002/001 ARALEN CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
040516/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
080880/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
080886/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
083082/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
083082/002 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
087228/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
087504/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
087979/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
088030/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
090249/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
090610/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
090612/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
091621/001 CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE

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Answered questions

Are anti malarial drugs antibiotics?
helpppp Asked by Alica Kunka 1 year ago.

Malarone, Aralen, Lariam are antimalarial drugs belong to the pharmacological class of antimalarial agents. Prymaccone is also an antimalarial agent used to prevent relapse of malaria. This drug also belongs to the pharmacological class of antimalarial agents. Doxycycline belongs to the pharmacological class of antibiotics. This drug is used if there is resistance to aralen and lariam. Answered by Herminia Rakowski 1 year ago.


What is the best Malaria prevention drug?
I'm moving to Mozambique Africa for a year and malaria is really high high in that region. I know that Malarone and Lariam (Mefloquine) are the best two Malaria preventive drugs... Malarone is SO expensive but Lariam has so many side effects.. Which one do you think works better or which do you recommend? Also,... Asked by Moises Thelemaque 1 year ago.

I'm moving to Mozambique Africa for a year and malaria is really high high in that region. I know that Malarone and Lariam (Mefloquine) are the best two Malaria preventive drugs... Malarone is SO expensive but Lariam has so many side effects.. Which one do you think works better or which do you recommend? Also, I know a lot of people who take doxycycline alone as a preventive. Do you think doxycycline would work just as well as the two main drugs? I know you sun burn easily with doxycycline, but is it as good as preventing Malaria as Malarone or Lariam? I'm thinking about buying both Lariam and doxycycline (they are both cheap) for a year and taking Lariam. If I have weird side effects on Lariam switching to doxycycline. Would you advise from this? Answered by Billye Magnano 1 year ago.

atovaquone-proguanil-oral, Malarone chloroquine-oral, Aralen halofantrine-oral, Halfan hydroxychloroquine, Plaquenil mefloquine-oral, Lariam primaquine phosphate-oral, Primaquine proguanil-oral pyrimethamine-oral, Daraprim quinine (antimalarial)-oral, Quinerva, Quinite, QM-260 sulfadoxine with pyrimethamine-oral, Fansidar Answered by Ilda Korth 1 year ago.

WARNING - One drug does not fit all! Just as there are several variants of malaria - so you need to know what the best drug is for the area you are going to. Local knowledge is prime when it comes to making that choice! Answered by Alec Hoogland 1 year ago.

All alcohol and medicines (apart from people who advance of course and are not converted into yet another sort) are undesirable for you, faith and society as an entire. Alcohol is the real gateway drug and could be banned on the same time as marijuana would desire to be legalized. Doing so could decrease inebriated driving statistics, kinfolk abuse, stupidly, gang problems/wars/shootings. human beings on weed communicate faith and politics. human beings on alcohol and different drugs talk incoherent jibberish. Answered by Arlette Soibelman 1 year ago.

LAPIAM Doxcycline Quinine Answered by Kylee Loughmiller 1 year ago.

lariam is once a week. It can make you crazy especailly if youre already neurotic. doxycycline is daily; you cant drink much alcohol or go in the sun. bad rash from sun. I'd rather take Lariam. dont drink on the day you take it. Better to avoid mozzies. OK to switch between the two every now and then. Answered by Thanh Yokley 1 year ago.

we used to prescribe Doxy and Mefloquine to the troops in Haiti, but Cipro works just as well, take a 500mg dose of Cipro. get it from your doctor. its a one time dose. it should do the trick but it will only last for about 28 days in your system. Answered by Adelia Halcomb 1 year ago.

Quinine water still helps too, plus it mixes well with gin! Answered by Irving Hendon 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Bruna Tiro 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Royce Seelig 1 year ago.


What is treatment of malaria ?
Asked by Lawana Sequeira 1 year ago.

The most common antimalarial drugs include: Chloroquine (Aralen) Quinine sulfate (Qualaquin) Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) Mefloquine Combination of atovaquone and proguanil (Malarone) Answered by Derrick Hamlette 1 year ago.

Methods used to prevent malaria include medications, mosquito elimination and the prevention of bites. The presence of malaria in an area requires a combination of high human population density, high mosquito population density and high rates of transmission from humans to mosquitoes and from mosquitoes to humans. If any of these is lowered sufficiently, the parasite will eventually disappear from that area, as happened in North America, Europe and much of the Middle East. However, unless the parasite is eliminated from the whole world, it could become re- established if conditions revert to a combination that favours the parasite's reproduction Answered by Kathrine Thiboutot 1 year ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Keren Kimbril 1 year ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Sherise Delbridge 1 year ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Shirley Traff 1 year ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Shelby Pullin 1 year ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Darline Skokan 1 year ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Candida Frary 1 year ago.


How to protect yourself from malaria?
I will already use sun protection cause of the strong sun, so is there a sun protection that can also prevent mosquitos from bitting? Asked by Minna Seegobin 1 year ago.

If you plan to travel to a country where malaria is common, you'll probably take a medicine that may keep you from getting malaria. This is called "prophylactic" malaria medicine. Remember, however, no medicine can protect you 100% and you should still take other precautions to prevent malaria. Prophylactic malaria medicines require you to start taking the medicine a few days or a week before you leave on your trip. You keep taking the medicine during your trip and after your trip for about 1 to 4 weeks, depending on which medicine you are taking. It's important to keep taking the medicine after your trip because the malaria parasites could still be in your blood. If you stop taking the medicine too soon, it could give the parasites an opportunity to grow and make you sick. Malaria medicines have some side effects, and not everyone can take them. Your doctor can tell you which medicine is right for you. What type of medicine you take also depends on where you will be traveling. Mefloquine (brand name: Lariam) and atovaquone/proguanil (brand name: Malarone) are two medicines you can take. If you can't take one of these, your doctor might recommend you take doxycycline (brand name: Vibramycin). Doxycycline makes you sunburn easily, so you must wear a hat, long sleeves and sunscreen whenever you're outside during the day. If you're traveling to parts of Central America, the Dominican Republic, Haiti or some areas of the Middle East, your doctor may prescribe chloroquine (brand name: Aralen). __________________________ In addition, you should do whatever you can to keep from getting mosquito bites. If you can, sleep in a room with screens on the windows and doors. Use a mosquito net over your bed. If possible, spray the net with permethrin (one brand name: Elimite). (Permethrin is a spray that repels mosquitoes.) During the evening, wear light-colored pants and shirts with long sleeves. It's important to protect yourself with a bug repellent spray that contains no more than 35% of a chemical called DEET. Avoid going outdoors without protection in the evening, when mosquitoes are typically more active. For the prevention of malaria, CDC recommends an insect repellent with DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) as the repellent of choice. Many DEET products give long-lasting protection against the mosquitoes that transmit malaria (the anopheline mosquitoes). A new repellent is now available in the United States that contains 7% picaridin (KBR 3023). Picaridin may be used if a DEET-containing repellent is not acceptable to the user. However, there is much less information available on how effective picaridin is at protecting against all of the types of mosquitoes that transmit malaria. Also, since the percent of picaridin is low, this repellent may only protect against bites for 1-4 hours. At this time, use of other repellents is not recommended for the prevention of malaria because there is insufficient data on how well they protect against the mosquitoes that transmit malaria. _______________________ Precautions When Using Any Repellent:. 1.Use only when outdoors and thoroughly wash off the repellent from the skin with soap and water after coming indoors. 2.Do not breathe in, swallow, or get repellent into the eyes or mouth. 3.If using a spray product, apply to your face by spraying your hands and rubbing the product carefully over the face, avoiding eyes and mouth. 4.Never use repellents on wounds or broken skin 5.Pregnant women should use insect repellent as recommended for other adults. Wash off with soap and water after coming indoors. 6.Do not get repellent containing DEET into the mouth. DEET is toxic if swallowed. 7.Higher concentrations of DEET may have a longer repellent effect; however, concentrations over 50% provide no added protection. 8.Timed-release DEET products, which are micro-encapsulated, may have a longer repellent effect than liquid DEET products. Lastly, take a flying insect spray on their trip to help clear rooms of mosquitoes. The product should contain a pyrethroid insecticide. Answered by Estefana Pickler 1 year ago.

Malaria is spread by mosquitos. Use mosquito repellant, mosquito nets, and stay away from jungles. There are drugs you can take to reduce the chances of getting malaria - ask your doctor and make sure to follow the dose and schedule. Answered by Toshiko Croff 1 year ago.

Great information on prevention in the article I've cited. I don't know whether there is a sun screen with mosquito repellent, but wouldn't that be a great idea? I'd buy loads of it. Answered by Bradly Renker 1 year ago.

I am going to asia aswell! Talk to your doctor. I have to get that too. I believe you're doctor can give you a pill that you take just before you go and every week that you are in asia. Just talk to you're doctor about ordering it in. Answered by Dreama Blanford 1 year ago.

Maybe talk to your doctor if an antimalarial, such as hydroxychloroquine(Plaquenil), is what you would need. Answered by Reinaldo Vilca 1 year ago.


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