Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 008303/001.

Names and composition

"APRESOLINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008303/001 APRESOLINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008303/002 APRESOLINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008303/003 APRESOLINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008303/004 APRESOLINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008303/005 APRESOLINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008303/001 APRESOLINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008303/002 APRESOLINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008303/003 APRESOLINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008303/004 APRESOLINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008303/005 APRESOLINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
040136/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
040373/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
040388/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
040730/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
040858/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040858/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
040858/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
040858/004 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
040901/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040901/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
040901/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
040901/004 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
083241/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
083560/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
083561/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084106/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084107/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084301/001 DRALZINE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084437/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084443/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084469/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084503/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084504/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084581/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
084922/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084923/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
085088/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
085532/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
085533/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086088/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
086242/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086242/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086242/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
086242/004 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
086243/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ ORAL 25MG
086961/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
086962/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087712/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087751/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087780/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087836/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
087908/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088177/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088178/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088240/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088241/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088310/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088311/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088391/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088467/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088468/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088517/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
088518/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
088560/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088649/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088652/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088657/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088671/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088686/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088728/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088729/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088787/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088788/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088789/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088846/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088847/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088848/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088849/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
089097/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089098/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
089130/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
089178/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
089218/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089222/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
089258/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
089259/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
089359/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089532/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
090255/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
090255/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
090255/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
090255/004 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
090413/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
090413/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
090413/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
090413/004 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
090527/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
090527/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
090527/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
090527/004 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
091679/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
091679/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
091679/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
091679/004 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
200737/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
200737/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
200737/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
200737/004 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
200770/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
200770/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
200770/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
202938/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
203110/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
203845/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
203845/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
203845/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
204680/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
205236/001 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
205236/002 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
205236/003 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
205236/004 HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDRALAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG

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Answered questions

For the following medication orders, identify the essential component that is missing.?
(Note: All have been correctly signed by the prescriber) Write the correct order a. Apresoline IM stat b. Morphine sulfate 10mg q3-4h c. Vancomycin 1 g IV d. Lasix 40 mg bid Asked by Brian Bianchini 1 year ago.

a) dose: Apresoline 10mg IM stat b) route: Morphine sulfate 10mg IV q 3-4h c) frequency: Vancomycin 1g IV bid d) route: Lasix 40mg PO bid Answered by Eliza Thornquist 1 year ago.

a. concentration b. range orders are not permitted so either Q4 or Q3 and watch out for the maximum daily dose c. time period of IV, how many times a day, volume of IV d. how the lasix is adminstered PO, etc. really guessing here Answered by Hoyt Carlen 1 year ago.


Can you give an example of a vasodilator that is used to treat hypertension?
Asked by Tamesha Weinger 1 year ago.

amyl nitrate Hyperstat hydralazine Apresoline minoxidil just to name a few Answered by Eufemia Rippey 1 year ago.

Vasodilation refers to the widening of blood vessels resulting from relaxation of smooth muscle cells within the vessel walls, particularly in the large arteries, smaller arterioles and large veins. The process is essentially the opposite of vasoconstriction, or the narrowing of blood vessels. When vessels dilate, the flow of blood is increased due to a decrease in vascular resistance. Therefore, dilation of arterial blood vessels (mainly arterioles) leads to a decrease in blood pressure. Answered by Norris Sykes 1 year ago.


Hydralazine... please help?
Couldnt find the information i needed. sorry :/ Asked by Kimbery Hoxie 1 year ago.

Look up the patent information for Apresoline, the brand name for hydralazine. It wasn't discovered, it was developed in the labs of Ciba-Geigy Corp. EDIT: If you really need this information for your paper, I would suggest contacting Novartis Corporation at 1 South Ringdale Ave, East Hanover, NJ, 07936. Phone: 888-644-8585. Novartis was formed in 1996 by the merger of Ciba-Geigy and Sandoz Answered by Luana Herra 1 year ago.


What are the 38 drugs that can cause drug-induced lupus?
I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest.From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could... Asked by Joline Arigo 1 year ago.

I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest. From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could tell me the 38 drugs that can cause lupus. Thank you! Answered by Alia Dibbern 1 year ago.

can it be cause by Keppra or Lamictal . I used to take Dilantin and tegretol as well as mysoline. But haven't taken them for years. I have been on Lamictal since it came out on the market with tegretol for most of it till 2005 Then in 2007 I began the keppra. I was diagnosed with Lupus back in 2013, after they found I had hyper thyroidism/ Graves Disease, RA and a few other problems. They told me they're all connected and can stem from the anti seizure drugs. i don't see them on any lists but do see anti seizure drugs. I'm concerned. As the combination or the 2 drugs have given me control of my seizures. BUt At what price must i live with if I want to keep control. As stopping them to stop the lupus could cause me to spiral back into the dark pit pof no control and leave me homebound again. Answered by Iliana Waldorf 1 year ago.

Drug Induced Lupus Answered by Elias Diliberti 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Rickie Mongolo 1 year ago.

Her rheumatologist will certainly look over her list of medications. S/he will spot any that can cause drug induced lupus. If the lupus is drug induced, it will go away when the medication is withdrawn. Some of the medications listed by femmina matt are high blood pressure meds and anti TB meds. Answered by Santos Quintano 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Mathew Savory 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Cecil Roeser 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Adalberto Oakley 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Farah Duperre 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Kerstin Roura 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Dion Drahota 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Linh Coppedge 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Vilma Kenealy 1 year ago.


Need some help with my dosage calc test.?
I would study out of my book if I had one, but this test only comes with a practice test. Anyone who can walk me through these or just show your work so that I can learn how to do them it would really help. Or if you cant answer all of them, even just whatever you can answer I really appreciate... Asked by Vanetta Chai 1 year ago.

I would study out of my book if I had one, but this test only comes with a practice test. Anyone who can walk me through these or just show your work so that I can learn how to do them it would really help. Or if you cant answer all of them, even just whatever you can answer I really appreciate it. INSTRUCTIONS: All answers must be labled correctly in order to recieve credit. Carry the division at least two decimal places and round to the nearest tenth. Assume that all tablets are scored. (And some I know how to do just off of the top of my head like 6 and 7 cause its easy to see that the answer to number 6 is 0.5 and the answer to 7 is 1.5.... But I just wanted to know what the equation that I should follow is and not based on looking at the easy one and just knowing.) 6) Order: Lanoxin 0.125 mg Available: Lanoxin 0.25 mg tables Give __________? 7) Order: Apresoline 30 mg Available: Apresoline 20 mg tablets Give___________? 8) Order: Calan 10 mg Available: Calan 2.5 mg tablets Give__________? 9) Order: Cleocin 10 mg Available: Cleocin 0.6 g/4 mL Give__________? 10) Order: heparin 6,000 units subcutaneous Available: heparin 10,000 units/mL Give_________? Answered by Kraig Panias 1 year ago.

The one formula that will work in 99% of cases is: What you have = What you want #8 What you have: 2.5mg/1tab; What you want: 10mg 2.5mg/1tab = 10mg/Xtab Xtab * 2.5mg = 1tab * 10mg Xtab = (1tab * 10mg) / 2.5mg Xtab = 4tab #9 What you have: 0.6gm/4ml; What you want: 10mg 1gm = 1000mg so 0.6gm = 600mg 600mg/4ml = 10mg/Xml Xml * 600mg = 4ml * 10mg Xml = (4ml * 10mg) / 600mg Xml = 0.1ml (based on the instructions of rounding to the nearest tenth) Answered by Luanna Yewell 1 year ago.

Your equation is Order/Available. Answered by Ashlyn Lahmers 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Wm Padua 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Linn Ceravolo 1 year ago.


For the following medication orders, identify the essential component that is missing.?
(Note: All have been correctly signed by the prescriber) Write the correct order a. Apresoline IM stat b. Morphine sulfate 10mg q3-4h c. Vancomycin 1 g IV d. Lasix 40 mg bid Asked by Towanda Perilli 1 year ago.

a) dose: Apresoline 10mg IM stat b) route: Morphine sulfate 10mg IV q 3-4h c) frequency: Vancomycin 1g IV bid d) route: Lasix 40mg PO bid Answered by Marcelino Goetz 1 year ago.

a. concentration b. range orders are not permitted so either Q4 or Q3 and watch out for the maximum daily dose c. time period of IV, how many times a day, volume of IV d. how the lasix is adminstered PO, etc. really guessing here Answered by Arlinda Fergusson 1 year ago.


Can you give an example of a vasodilator that is used to treat hypertension?
Asked by Latrina Lindwall 1 year ago.

amyl nitrate Hyperstat hydralazine Apresoline minoxidil just to name a few Answered by Von Ridgel 1 year ago.

Vasodilation refers to the widening of blood vessels resulting from relaxation of smooth muscle cells within the vessel walls, particularly in the large arteries, smaller arterioles and large veins. The process is essentially the opposite of vasoconstriction, or the narrowing of blood vessels. When vessels dilate, the flow of blood is increased due to a decrease in vascular resistance. Therefore, dilation of arterial blood vessels (mainly arterioles) leads to a decrease in blood pressure. Answered by Kamala Koscielak 1 year ago.


Hydralazine... please help?
Couldnt find the information i needed. sorry :/ Asked by Mary Raines 1 year ago.

Look up the patent information for Apresoline, the brand name for hydralazine. It wasn't discovered, it was developed in the labs of Ciba-Geigy Corp. EDIT: If you really need this information for your paper, I would suggest contacting Novartis Corporation at 1 South Ringdale Ave, East Hanover, NJ, 07936. Phone: 888-644-8585. Novartis was formed in 1996 by the merger of Ciba-Geigy and Sandoz Answered by Meri Skok 1 year ago.


What are the 38 drugs that can cause drug-induced lupus?
I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest.From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could... Asked by Rhett Cerrillo 1 year ago.

I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest. From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could tell me the 38 drugs that can cause lupus. Thank you! Answered by Bethanie Despres 1 year ago.

can it be cause by Keppra or Lamictal . I used to take Dilantin and tegretol as well as mysoline. But haven't taken them for years. I have been on Lamictal since it came out on the market with tegretol for most of it till 2005 Then in 2007 I began the keppra. I was diagnosed with Lupus back in 2013, after they found I had hyper thyroidism/ Graves Disease, RA and a few other problems. They told me they're all connected and can stem from the anti seizure drugs. i don't see them on any lists but do see anti seizure drugs. I'm concerned. As the combination or the 2 drugs have given me control of my seizures. BUt At what price must i live with if I want to keep control. As stopping them to stop the lupus could cause me to spiral back into the dark pit pof no control and leave me homebound again. Answered by Brook Mareno 1 year ago.

Drug Induced Lupus Answered by Josefine Criscillis 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Keven Durio 1 year ago.

Her rheumatologist will certainly look over her list of medications. S/he will spot any that can cause drug induced lupus. If the lupus is drug induced, it will go away when the medication is withdrawn. Some of the medications listed by femmina matt are high blood pressure meds and anti TB meds. Answered by Colin Countee 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Yoko Mcnight 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Natisha Myking 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Magdalene Comparoni 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Treva Spilman 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Savanna Lancia 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Yung Pardew 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Kyra Plakke 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Bethany Clarida 1 year ago.


Need some help with my dosage calc test.?
I would study out of my book if I had one, but this test only comes with a practice test. Anyone who can walk me through these or just show your work so that I can learn how to do them it would really help. Or if you cant answer all of them, even just whatever you can answer I really appreciate... Asked by Alejandro Rabasca 1 year ago.

I would study out of my book if I had one, but this test only comes with a practice test. Anyone who can walk me through these or just show your work so that I can learn how to do them it would really help. Or if you cant answer all of them, even just whatever you can answer I really appreciate it. INSTRUCTIONS: All answers must be labled correctly in order to recieve credit. Carry the division at least two decimal places and round to the nearest tenth. Assume that all tablets are scored. (And some I know how to do just off of the top of my head like 6 and 7 cause its easy to see that the answer to number 6 is 0.5 and the answer to 7 is 1.5.... But I just wanted to know what the equation that I should follow is and not based on looking at the easy one and just knowing.) 6) Order: Lanoxin 0.125 mg Available: Lanoxin 0.25 mg tables Give __________? 7) Order: Apresoline 30 mg Available: Apresoline 20 mg tablets Give___________? 8) Order: Calan 10 mg Available: Calan 2.5 mg tablets Give__________? 9) Order: Cleocin 10 mg Available: Cleocin 0.6 g/4 mL Give__________? 10) Order: heparin 6,000 units subcutaneous Available: heparin 10,000 units/mL Give_________? Answered by Raeann Widener 1 year ago.

The one formula that will work in 99% of cases is: What you have = What you want #8 What you have: 2.5mg/1tab; What you want: 10mg 2.5mg/1tab = 10mg/Xtab Xtab * 2.5mg = 1tab * 10mg Xtab = (1tab * 10mg) / 2.5mg Xtab = 4tab #9 What you have: 0.6gm/4ml; What you want: 10mg 1gm = 1000mg so 0.6gm = 600mg 600mg/4ml = 10mg/Xml Xml * 600mg = 4ml * 10mg Xml = (4ml * 10mg) / 600mg Xml = 0.1ml (based on the instructions of rounding to the nearest tenth) Answered by Houston Torrain 1 year ago.

Your equation is Order/Available. Answered by Shane Rebera 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Mabelle Zumpano 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Dominique Doderer 1 year ago.


For the following medication orders, identify the essential component that is missing.?
(Note: All have been correctly signed by the prescriber) Write the correct order a. Apresoline IM stat b. Morphine sulfate 10mg q3-4h c. Vancomycin 1 g IV d. Lasix 40 mg bid Asked by Jamal Drainer 1 year ago.

a) dose: Apresoline 10mg IM stat b) route: Morphine sulfate 10mg IV q 3-4h c) frequency: Vancomycin 1g IV bid d) route: Lasix 40mg PO bid Answered by Chandra Helfenstein 1 year ago.

a. concentration b. range orders are not permitted so either Q4 or Q3 and watch out for the maximum daily dose c. time period of IV, how many times a day, volume of IV d. how the lasix is adminstered PO, etc. really guessing here Answered by Lan Dewey 1 year ago.


Can you give an example of a vasodilator that is used to treat hypertension?
Asked by Ima Marus 1 year ago.

amyl nitrate Hyperstat hydralazine Apresoline minoxidil just to name a few Answered by Suk Olivia 1 year ago.

Vasodilation refers to the widening of blood vessels resulting from relaxation of smooth muscle cells within the vessel walls, particularly in the large arteries, smaller arterioles and large veins. The process is essentially the opposite of vasoconstriction, or the narrowing of blood vessels. When vessels dilate, the flow of blood is increased due to a decrease in vascular resistance. Therefore, dilation of arterial blood vessels (mainly arterioles) leads to a decrease in blood pressure. Answered by Aretha Babbitt 1 year ago.


Hydralazine... please help?
Couldnt find the information i needed. sorry :/ Asked by Eleonor Akimseu 1 year ago.

Look up the patent information for Apresoline, the brand name for hydralazine. It wasn't discovered, it was developed in the labs of Ciba-Geigy Corp. EDIT: If you really need this information for your paper, I would suggest contacting Novartis Corporation at 1 South Ringdale Ave, East Hanover, NJ, 07936. Phone: 888-644-8585. Novartis was formed in 1996 by the merger of Ciba-Geigy and Sandoz Answered by Ja Lallo 1 year ago.


What are the 38 drugs that can cause drug-induced lupus?
I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest.From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could... Asked by Sherwood Spark 1 year ago.

I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest. From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could tell me the 38 drugs that can cause lupus. Thank you! Answered by Rheba Eckerson 1 year ago.

can it be cause by Keppra or Lamictal . I used to take Dilantin and tegretol as well as mysoline. But haven't taken them for years. I have been on Lamictal since it came out on the market with tegretol for most of it till 2005 Then in 2007 I began the keppra. I was diagnosed with Lupus back in 2013, after they found I had hyper thyroidism/ Graves Disease, RA and a few other problems. They told me they're all connected and can stem from the anti seizure drugs. i don't see them on any lists but do see anti seizure drugs. I'm concerned. As the combination or the 2 drugs have given me control of my seizures. BUt At what price must i live with if I want to keep control. As stopping them to stop the lupus could cause me to spiral back into the dark pit pof no control and leave me homebound again. Answered by Marlin Strachn 1 year ago.

Drug Induced Lupus Answered by Juliette Allcock 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Danika Lymon 1 year ago.

Her rheumatologist will certainly look over her list of medications. S/he will spot any that can cause drug induced lupus. If the lupus is drug induced, it will go away when the medication is withdrawn. Some of the medications listed by femmina matt are high blood pressure meds and anti TB meds. Answered by Meredith Weisfeld 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Zulema Roskelley 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Ernesto Tolley 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Barbera Fontanilla 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Corinna Platko 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Rubie Wittler 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Marlana Boas 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Janessa Holstein 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Shanell Szklarski 1 year ago.


Need some help with my dosage calc test.?
I would study out of my book if I had one, but this test only comes with a practice test. Anyone who can walk me through these or just show your work so that I can learn how to do them it would really help. Or if you cant answer all of them, even just whatever you can answer I really appreciate... Asked by Jerrod Zolty 1 year ago.

I would study out of my book if I had one, but this test only comes with a practice test. Anyone who can walk me through these or just show your work so that I can learn how to do them it would really help. Or if you cant answer all of them, even just whatever you can answer I really appreciate it. INSTRUCTIONS: All answers must be labled correctly in order to recieve credit. Carry the division at least two decimal places and round to the nearest tenth. Assume that all tablets are scored. (And some I know how to do just off of the top of my head like 6 and 7 cause its easy to see that the answer to number 6 is 0.5 and the answer to 7 is 1.5.... But I just wanted to know what the equation that I should follow is and not based on looking at the easy one and just knowing.) 6) Order: Lanoxin 0.125 mg Available: Lanoxin 0.25 mg tables Give __________? 7) Order: Apresoline 30 mg Available: Apresoline 20 mg tablets Give___________? 8) Order: Calan 10 mg Available: Calan 2.5 mg tablets Give__________? 9) Order: Cleocin 10 mg Available: Cleocin 0.6 g/4 mL Give__________? 10) Order: heparin 6,000 units subcutaneous Available: heparin 10,000 units/mL Give_________? Answered by Shannon Zill 1 year ago.

The one formula that will work in 99% of cases is: What you have = What you want #8 What you have: 2.5mg/1tab; What you want: 10mg 2.5mg/1tab = 10mg/Xtab Xtab * 2.5mg = 1tab * 10mg Xtab = (1tab * 10mg) / 2.5mg Xtab = 4tab #9 What you have: 0.6gm/4ml; What you want: 10mg 1gm = 1000mg so 0.6gm = 600mg 600mg/4ml = 10mg/Xml Xml * 600mg = 4ml * 10mg Xml = (4ml * 10mg) / 600mg Xml = 0.1ml (based on the instructions of rounding to the nearest tenth) Answered by Hee Cramer 1 year ago.

Your equation is Order/Available. Answered by Ivan Zrake 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Hester Donovan 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Viki Hilgeman 1 year ago.


For the following medication orders, identify the essential component that is missing.?
(Note: All have been correctly signed by the prescriber) Write the correct order a. Apresoline IM stat b. Morphine sulfate 10mg q3-4h c. Vancomycin 1 g IV d. Lasix 40 mg bid Asked by Tammera Khat 1 year ago.

a) dose: Apresoline 10mg IM stat b) route: Morphine sulfate 10mg IV q 3-4h c) frequency: Vancomycin 1g IV bid d) route: Lasix 40mg PO bid Answered by Beulah Modafferi 1 year ago.

a. concentration b. range orders are not permitted so either Q4 or Q3 and watch out for the maximum daily dose c. time period of IV, how many times a day, volume of IV d. how the lasix is adminstered PO, etc. really guessing here Answered by Keri Alvanez 1 year ago.


Can you give an example of a vasodilator that is used to treat hypertension?
Asked by Angelic Casad 1 year ago.

amyl nitrate Hyperstat hydralazine Apresoline minoxidil just to name a few Answered by Annemarie Cuartas 1 year ago.

Vasodilation refers to the widening of blood vessels resulting from relaxation of smooth muscle cells within the vessel walls, particularly in the large arteries, smaller arterioles and large veins. The process is essentially the opposite of vasoconstriction, or the narrowing of blood vessels. When vessels dilate, the flow of blood is increased due to a decrease in vascular resistance. Therefore, dilation of arterial blood vessels (mainly arterioles) leads to a decrease in blood pressure. Answered by Lyda Blessett 1 year ago.


Hydralazine... please help?
Couldnt find the information i needed. sorry :/ Asked by Shantel Haffner 1 year ago.

Look up the patent information for Apresoline, the brand name for hydralazine. It wasn't discovered, it was developed in the labs of Ciba-Geigy Corp. EDIT: If you really need this information for your paper, I would suggest contacting Novartis Corporation at 1 South Ringdale Ave, East Hanover, NJ, 07936. Phone: 888-644-8585. Novartis was formed in 1996 by the merger of Ciba-Geigy and Sandoz Answered by Leone Tweedie 1 year ago.


What are the 38 drugs that can cause drug-induced lupus?
I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest.From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could... Asked by Glinda Eberly 1 year ago.

I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest. From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could tell me the 38 drugs that can cause lupus. Thank you! Answered by Otis Gesmondi 1 year ago.

can it be cause by Keppra or Lamictal . I used to take Dilantin and tegretol as well as mysoline. But haven't taken them for years. I have been on Lamictal since it came out on the market with tegretol for most of it till 2005 Then in 2007 I began the keppra. I was diagnosed with Lupus back in 2013, after they found I had hyper thyroidism/ Graves Disease, RA and a few other problems. They told me they're all connected and can stem from the anti seizure drugs. i don't see them on any lists but do see anti seizure drugs. I'm concerned. As the combination or the 2 drugs have given me control of my seizures. BUt At what price must i live with if I want to keep control. As stopping them to stop the lupus could cause me to spiral back into the dark pit pof no control and leave me homebound again. Answered by Leeanne Pollock 1 year ago.

Drug Induced Lupus Answered by Hanna Schweiner 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Hailey Fuertes 1 year ago.

Her rheumatologist will certainly look over her list of medications. S/he will spot any that can cause drug induced lupus. If the lupus is drug induced, it will go away when the medication is withdrawn. Some of the medications listed by femmina matt are high blood pressure meds and anti TB meds. Answered by Griselda Dawson 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Santos Barda 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Randolph Stieglitz 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Jeraldine Tollefsrud 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Aida Kivel 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Cheri Fukuda 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Britni Golec 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Tabitha Migliori 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Cristy Winckler 1 year ago.


Need some help with my dosage calc test.?
I would study out of my book if I had one, but this test only comes with a practice test. Anyone who can walk me through these or just show your work so that I can learn how to do them it would really help. Or if you cant answer all of them, even just whatever you can answer I really appreciate... Asked by Ellsworth Elzy 1 year ago.

I would study out of my book if I had one, but this test only comes with a practice test. Anyone who can walk me through these or just show your work so that I can learn how to do them it would really help. Or if you cant answer all of them, even just whatever you can answer I really appreciate it. INSTRUCTIONS: All answers must be labled correctly in order to recieve credit. Carry the division at least two decimal places and round to the nearest tenth. Assume that all tablets are scored. (And some I know how to do just off of the top of my head like 6 and 7 cause its easy to see that the answer to number 6 is 0.5 and the answer to 7 is 1.5.... But I just wanted to know what the equation that I should follow is and not based on looking at the easy one and just knowing.) 6) Order: Lanoxin 0.125 mg Available: Lanoxin 0.25 mg tables Give __________? 7) Order: Apresoline 30 mg Available: Apresoline 20 mg tablets Give___________? 8) Order: Calan 10 mg Available: Calan 2.5 mg tablets Give__________? 9) Order: Cleocin 10 mg Available: Cleocin 0.6 g/4 mL Give__________? 10) Order: heparin 6,000 units subcutaneous Available: heparin 10,000 units/mL Give_________? Answered by Melany Esaw 1 year ago.

The one formula that will work in 99% of cases is: What you have = What you want #8 What you have: 2.5mg/1tab; What you want: 10mg 2.5mg/1tab = 10mg/Xtab Xtab * 2.5mg = 1tab * 10mg Xtab = (1tab * 10mg) / 2.5mg Xtab = 4tab #9 What you have: 0.6gm/4ml; What you want: 10mg 1gm = 1000mg so 0.6gm = 600mg 600mg/4ml = 10mg/Xml Xml * 600mg = 4ml * 10mg Xml = (4ml * 10mg) / 600mg Xml = 0.1ml (based on the instructions of rounding to the nearest tenth) Answered by Julianne Farwell 1 year ago.

Your equation is Order/Available. Answered by Cristy Jirjis 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Mabel Mensick 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Ashton Vanos 1 year ago.


For the following medication orders, identify the essential component that is missing.?
(Note: All have been correctly signed by the prescriber) Write the correct order a. Apresoline IM stat b. Morphine sulfate 10mg q3-4h c. Vancomycin 1 g IV d. Lasix 40 mg bid Asked by Clelia Mackall 1 year ago.

a) dose: Apresoline 10mg IM stat b) route: Morphine sulfate 10mg IV q 3-4h c) frequency: Vancomycin 1g IV bid d) route: Lasix 40mg PO bid Answered by Antonina Bernt 1 year ago.

a. concentration b. range orders are not permitted so either Q4 or Q3 and watch out for the maximum daily dose c. time period of IV, how many times a day, volume of IV d. how the lasix is adminstered PO, etc. really guessing here Answered by Vicki Engnath 1 year ago.


Can you give an example of a vasodilator that is used to treat hypertension?
Asked by Catheryn Schauer 1 year ago.

amyl nitrate Hyperstat hydralazine Apresoline minoxidil just to name a few Answered by Jennie Drenon 1 year ago.

Vasodilation refers to the widening of blood vessels resulting from relaxation of smooth muscle cells within the vessel walls, particularly in the large arteries, smaller arterioles and large veins. The process is essentially the opposite of vasoconstriction, or the narrowing of blood vessels. When vessels dilate, the flow of blood is increased due to a decrease in vascular resistance. Therefore, dilation of arterial blood vessels (mainly arterioles) leads to a decrease in blood pressure. Answered by Etha Beachem 1 year ago.


Hydralazine... please help?
Couldnt find the information i needed. sorry :/ Asked by Cristopher Cader 1 year ago.

Look up the patent information for Apresoline, the brand name for hydralazine. It wasn't discovered, it was developed in the labs of Ciba-Geigy Corp. EDIT: If you really need this information for your paper, I would suggest contacting Novartis Corporation at 1 South Ringdale Ave, East Hanover, NJ, 07936. Phone: 888-644-8585. Novartis was formed in 1996 by the merger of Ciba-Geigy and Sandoz Answered by Felice Richerds 1 year ago.


What are the 38 drugs that can cause drug-induced lupus?
I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest.From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could... Asked by Adelaide Jiron 1 year ago.

I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest. From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could tell me the 38 drugs that can cause lupus. Thank you! Answered by Carolyne Dahle 1 year ago.

can it be cause by Keppra or Lamictal . I used to take Dilantin and tegretol as well as mysoline. But haven't taken them for years. I have been on Lamictal since it came out on the market with tegretol for most of it till 2005 Then in 2007 I began the keppra. I was diagnosed with Lupus back in 2013, after they found I had hyper thyroidism/ Graves Disease, RA and a few other problems. They told me they're all connected and can stem from the anti seizure drugs. i don't see them on any lists but do see anti seizure drugs. I'm concerned. As the combination or the 2 drugs have given me control of my seizures. BUt At what price must i live with if I want to keep control. As stopping them to stop the lupus could cause me to spiral back into the dark pit pof no control and leave me homebound again. Answered by Tania Senske 1 year ago.

Drug Induced Lupus Answered by Tracie Stivason 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Don Siano 1 year ago.

Her rheumatologist will certainly look over her list of medications. S/he will spot any that can cause drug induced lupus. If the lupus is drug induced, it will go away when the medication is withdrawn. Some of the medications listed by femmina matt are high blood pressure meds and anti TB meds. Answered by Zachariah Zola 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Laila Lile 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Chung Reints 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Miki Synovic 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Matilde Cuthill 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Carmina Herkel 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Reiko Millen 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Sherie Innerst 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Rex Gulke 1 year ago.


Need some help with my dosage calc test.?
I would study out of my book if I had one, but this test only comes with a practice test. Anyone who can walk me through these or just show your work so that I can learn how to do them it would really help. Or if you cant answer all of them, even just whatever you can answer I really appreciate... Asked by Enriqueta Saez 1 year ago.

I would study out of my book if I had one, but this test only comes with a practice test. Anyone who can walk me through these or just show your work so that I can learn how to do them it would really help. Or if you cant answer all of them, even just whatever you can answer I really appreciate it. INSTRUCTIONS: All answers must be labled correctly in order to recieve credit. Carry the division at least two decimal places and round to the nearest tenth. Assume that all tablets are scored. (And some I know how to do just off of the top of my head like 6 and 7 cause its easy to see that the answer to number 6 is 0.5 and the answer to 7 is 1.5.... But I just wanted to know what the equation that I should follow is and not based on looking at the easy one and just knowing.) 6) Order: Lanoxin 0.125 mg Available: Lanoxin 0.25 mg tables Give __________? 7) Order: Apresoline 30 mg Available: Apresoline 20 mg tablets Give___________? 8) Order: Calan 10 mg Available: Calan 2.5 mg tablets Give__________? 9) Order: Cleocin 10 mg Available: Cleocin 0.6 g/4 mL Give__________? 10) Order: heparin 6,000 units subcutaneous Available: heparin 10,000 units/mL Give_________? Answered by Zetta Kerens 1 year ago.

The one formula that will work in 99% of cases is: What you have = What you want #8 What you have: 2.5mg/1tab; What you want: 10mg 2.5mg/1tab = 10mg/Xtab Xtab * 2.5mg = 1tab * 10mg Xtab = (1tab * 10mg) / 2.5mg Xtab = 4tab #9 What you have: 0.6gm/4ml; What you want: 10mg 1gm = 1000mg so 0.6gm = 600mg 600mg/4ml = 10mg/Xml Xml * 600mg = 4ml * 10mg Xml = (4ml * 10mg) / 600mg Xml = 0.1ml (based on the instructions of rounding to the nearest tenth) Answered by Svetlana Bromley 1 year ago.

Your equation is Order/Available. Answered by Lacy Drought 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Berry Westrick 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Jonnie Whitledge 1 year ago.


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