ANZEMET Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020623/001.

Names and composition

"ANZEMET" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DOLASETRON MESYLATE.

Answered questions

Cat overdose from Anzemet?
On Friday my cat Roxy died. She had been vomiting for about 5-6 days (once a day) after she ate. I tried changing her food (dry/wet) but that didn't seem to work. She seemed ok still but lethargic so I took her to the vet. The vet took xray's and blood work and said that it seems that she may have... Asked by Sally Tudman 3 months ago.

On Friday my cat Roxy died. She had been vomiting for about 5-6 days (once a day) after she ate. I tried changing her food (dry/wet) but that didn't seem to work. She seemed ok still but lethargic so I took her to the vet. The vet took xray's and blood work and said that it seems that she may have problems with her gall bladder which could lead to liver disease. They wanted to give her an ultrasound the next day, and in the mean time gave her some pepcid and anzemet (anti nausea) via IV and some fluids via IV as well. They also gave me some prescription a/d wet food that is easier for her to digest. I was given one other drug (name escapes me) in the form of pills - to give Roxy once every 48hrs. When I was going over the treatment for Roxy the vet said give her the liquid medicine and then wait 30 min to give her food. The only liquid drugs I was given were the .15mg/mL of Anzemet. When I got home - 30 min later - I gave Roxy the anzemet orally which she did not like and seemed to spit and salivate a lot. 20 min later gave her some of the wet food. She ate a couple of bites then went under the table. I pick her up and 30sec later her legs got stiff and she arched her back and let out this terrible heartbreaking moan. She floped around and then that was it. She died. Needless to say I was shocked and it has been a terrible weekend as I can't escape this image in my mind. I spoke to the vet today and it seems that the other medication I was given (the pills) can also be administered in liquid form and that was what the vet was referring to that I give roxy - not the anzemet. The anzemet was to be given the next day. The vet said it is highly unlikely the anzemet had anything to do with her death. Overdose is unlikely and since I gave it to her orally - she wouldn't have absorbed it that fast. The vet said more than likely she had a problem that was just not diagnosable - like a blood clot. Can anzemet cause what seems like a heart attack? Answered by Nona Falkenberg 3 months ago.

Anzemet is also given to humans for nausea - including very sick cancer patients. I think your vet is right - it probably wasn't the Anzemet. It has very few side effects and is quite safe. Cats tend to spit and foam when they get liquid medication that tastes bad to them. That's a pretty typical reaction. She also got the Anzemet via IV previously and had no reaction. The reality is your cat was very sick and it could have been the illness itself, one of the other medications or a combination of both. I'm very sorry. Answered by Gidget Burland 3 months ago.


Anzemet and drug tests?
anzemet when used as an anesteic @ 12.5mg in an iv show up in a drug test? Asked by Florance Mcsharry 3 months ago.

Never heard of it. Answered by Cristopher Benzango 3 months ago.

mean half-life for elimination of oral anzemet is 8.1 hours or clearance in 16.2 hours. IV clearance may be up to 38-40% quicker ...but I couldn't find any real concrete data to support that claim, so figure 16 -18 hours. Answered by Lourdes Colantonio 3 months ago.


DOGGIE PROBLEM- PLEASE HELP!!!!!!?
My question was cut off. After we left, we went home and we went to sleep. The next afternoon, same stool but no fever. She was very lethargic. She came to sit with me on the couch, but couldn't even jump up. I attempted to pick her up, from under her front legs, and she yelped hysterically. I could not touch... Asked by Santina Burdis 3 months ago.

Hi, my beagle is 10 months old. 4 days ago, she ate chicken that may have been old and with bones. (My 86 year old aunt was watching her, and she has been specified not to give her human food, but...) That night I awoke to a small puddle of dark soft stool with blood and mucus. The next morning, she continues to excrete in the same form, as well as vomit, that was chicken and rice. By the afternoon, there was no vomiting. But there was still bloody mucousy stool, loss of appetite, lethargy, and a fever of 103.5. We took her to the 24 hour Animal Medical Center. Her fever had rose to 105. They took her and gave her fluids through an IV. They did chest and stomach xrays. They took blood to test. She was found clear of obstructions, no parvo, clean lungs. They injeced her with ANZEMET (20 mg/ml), as well as Metronidazole, and Drontal-Plus. They discharged her with the aforementioned antibiotics and we went home. Answered by Rex Frattali 3 months ago.

My question was cut off. After we left, we went home and we went to sleep. The next afternoon, same stool but no fever. She was very lethargic. She came to sit with me on the couch, but couldn't even jump up. I attempted to pick her up, from under her front legs, and she yelped hysterically. I could not touch her armpit/chest area without her yelping. In a frantic, I took her back to the hospital. They gave her pain meds and more fluids, They suggested admittance to the hospital and sonogram OR to take her home and just monitor her. So, we took her. After we left, we went home, she took a walk, ate all her food, drank lots of water and we went to sleep. This morning when I woke up and called to her to come for her walk, she started yelping continuously. She couldn't lift herself up from a laying position. I helped her, and then she was somewhat ok. Walking very slowly, and sitting uncomfortably. It looks like its the right side moreso than the left. And that is where they ha Answered by Nerissa Wrona 3 months ago.

The emergency vet shotgunned the possibilities she had giardia or hookworms. The anzemet was to settle her stomach. How is she now? Answered by Jennie Mecannic 3 months ago.

What help do you need?? Sounds like you did the right thing and got the dog treated. All she probably needs now is rest and let the medication take affect and to run their course. Keep giving her the medication the vet prescribed until it is all gone then take her back to your vet for a follow up to be sure she has no ill effects. Answered by Arlean Dichiara 3 months ago.

She may still have some bone fragments inside. Does the vet suspect this? Keep him informed. Answered by Betsey Wander 3 months ago.

Sounds like she will be just fine. Answered by Aide Freil 3 months ago.


I start chemo soon. Is there anything I can do before my appointment to relieve nausea or other symptoms?
The chemo follows my lobectomy eight weeks ago for non small celll lung cancer. There was no lymph node involvement. I will receive four cycles in four weeks, assuming I can handle it physically. Asked by Zofia Chiarito 3 months ago.

Dear Worried One, I am an oncology certified registered nurse, and would like to answer your question. There are some very good anti-nausea medications such as Kytril, Anzemet, Zofran, and Aloxi specifically for chemotherapy related nausea. You will most likely not have nausea during the infusion of the chemotherapy, but the nause may happen after the treatment and could continue for a couple of days. Your doctor will most likely order an antinausea medication be given intraveneously just before you are given the chemo. This is to prevent nausea the same day of chemo administration. Then your doctor will give you a prescription for an anti-nausea med to take at home. If one does not work, call your physician and ask for another one. Sometimes high anxiety or dread of the treatment can cause nausea even before the chemo starts. If this happens to you, your doctor can precribe an anti-anxiety medication. As one of the respondants indicated, marijuana is also a good antiemetic. There is a legal pill form that can be prescribed by your physician, but it is very expensive. It you have insurance, maybe it would be covered. The gentlemen who wrote a book about the evils of chemotherapy and the virtues of raw vegetables is misinformed. He is very correct about the importance of a good diet to help your body recover, but he does not understand the priciples of how chemotherapy works. Chemotherapy is not one drug, but many, and each type chemo approaches the cancer from a different angle. If one does not work, your doctor may try another one. Some chemo drugs stop the cancer by interfering with their cell division. Other newer drugs like Avastin specifically target the blood supply to the tumor, shrinking the blood vessels which in turn, causes the turmor to shrink. No treatment promises a cure. A better way to think about cancer is to think of it as a condition that you will fight and attempt to control with medication, diet, exercise, and faith, even if it turns out that your particular cancer is not cureable. (Many other conditions are not cureable, but people live with them....diabetes, epilepsy, hypertension, heart failure). Also, there are many different kinds of treatments available now with more in development. My best advice to you is to: 1. Follow your oncologist's plan of treatment...he has only your best interest in mind and is qualified to decide the best course of treatment for you. 2. Minimize stress in your life (stress suppresses the immune system). 3. Eat small, frequent meals and include a nutritional supplement to give your body plenty of fuel to fight the disease. (Prosure is one nutritional supplement specifically for cancer patients). 4. Don't isolate yourself from family and friends. You need them now more than ever. Spend time with the ones you love, and go places you have always wanted to go. 5. Finally, pray and believe that God is in control of your life and that whatever happens will be His will for you. God bless you. Answered by Tonette Garve 3 months ago.

Hello, I am so sorry to hear about your situation, but you will get through it, take one day at a time. I have had chemo for the past year and my nausea was UNCONTROLLABLE until they gave me IV meds through my port. Here are some to ask your doctor about (everyone is different, this is just so you have the names): 1.) Emend (NEW: a series of 3 pills, taken PRIOR to starting chemo) 2.) Reglan 3.) Zofran (gives me a really bad headache if I take them too close) 4.) Phenegran (Spelling? I was allergic to that one:) 5.) The marijuana pill : Marinol 6.) Ativan, this also helps to calm you down It is important to keep hydrated prior to chemo. These were just some that I've taken over time, yours may not be that bad, but that way you have the names in case some don't work. Good luck...you'll get through this!!! Take care. Answered by Sharyn Trulove 3 months ago.

Do not worry. This side effect varies with different people. About 75% of patient can be relieved of these side effect by using modern anti-emetics (anti vomiting). Common drugs causing N&V are platinum analogues an doxorubicin. The dose of the anti-emetic will be adjusted to match that the dose of chemo (by the physician of course). Just tell him if treatment works or not so he can adjust it accordinly. Alternative medicine also works i.e. acupuncture needle positioned at point P6. If it does not go as mentioned above, you can question again on the net. We'll take it from there Well hear from you soon and all the best. Answered by Delfina Domanski 3 months ago.

I am a chemo RN and give chemotherapy on a regular basis. I think you would benefit from hydrating yourself before you go to the appointment. Start working on drinking extra fluids a couple of days before the appointment and make your calories count, drink milk or juice or something with some calories in it, For example, drink a whole glass of orange juice with your medicine. and drink 2 full glasses of milk or juice with every meal. Keep somthing to drink available all of the time and sip. The nurse giving your chemotherapy will be giving you something for nausea, which should keep you from feeling like your going to vomit your socks off for 24 hrs after the chemo. Also, your physician will be prescribing you nausea medication for home use. Now days, Oncolgist are very aggresive at treating the symptoms associated with chemotherapy. Good luck. Answered by Frank Anable 3 months ago.

I think you should ask your doctors that question and perhaps you have in order to get good advise on what can be prescribed for you. My heart tells me to also express to you my prayers and sincere hope that the chemo doesn't cause you too much distress. Your Yahoo friends are with you so think about the people who care about you and all things good and sweet in life so you will be distracted from the effects of chemo. Be strong and know others are there for you. Here's a big hug for you. Answered by Cristina Raychard 3 months ago.

get plenty of sleep, be well hydrated, chemo is very dehydrating. but know that they have very good medications now to prevent the nausea. although, it's different for each person, and it depends on the chemo agent, many people go through without the horrible nausea typically associated with it. Take care, and I hope it's a swift and effective treatment for you. Answered by Malik Cogar 3 months ago.

Try ginger, also take B12 and B6. But, be careful taking anti oxidents in pill form. Ask some of the nurses who will give you the Chemo what you should take. They are a good source of information. Good luck. Answered by Desmond Dines 3 months ago.

Hate to say it but pot helps......seen least 6 go through chemo of all ages and all ended up using some to get past the nausea. Answered by Lucia Gearing 3 months ago.

Sorry to hear that kathleen, i dont know of anything you can take or do.. My mom went through chemo and got really sick, but we were all there to help her feel better and she is fine now.. Hope you have family close by and i wish you the best of luck... Answered by Destiny Gimar 3 months ago.


What types of side effects have you had from Geodon?
I just started on this medication after trying others but, the side effects I read about really scare me. I would like to hear the pros and cons from others who have taken it. Thanks! Asked by Mariella Pekar 3 months ago.

Most important fact about this drug: In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, indigestion, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, weakness Other side effects may include: Abdominal pain, abnormal body movements, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal secretion of milk, abnormal walk, abnormally low cholesterol, agitation, amnesia, anemia, bleeding gums, bleeding in the eye, blood clots, blood disorders, blood in urine, body spasms, breast development in males, bruising or purple spots, cataracts, chest pain, chills, clogged bowels, confusion, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), coordination problems, decreased blood flow to the heart, delirium, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, difficulty with orgasm, double vision, dry eyes, enlarged heart, eyelid inflammation, female sexual problems, fever, flank pain, flu-like symptoms, fungal infections, gout, hair loss, heavy menstruation, heavy uterine or vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, hives, hostility, impotence, increased reflexes, increased sensitivity to touch or sound, inflammation of the cornea, inflammation of the heart, involuntary or jerky movements, irregular heartbeat, liver problems, lockjaw, loss of appetite, loss of menstruation, low blood sugar, low blood pressure, low body temperature, lymph disorders, male sexual problems, muscle disorders, muscle pain, muscle weakness, nighttime urination, nosebleed, pneumonia, prickling or tingling sensation, rapid heartbeat, rectal bleeding, rigid muscle movement, ringing in ears, rolling of the eyeballs, sensitivity to sunlight, skin problems, slow heartbeat, slowed movement, speech problems, stroke, sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing up, swelling in the arms and legs, swelling in the face, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tongue, tarry stools, tendon inflammation, thirst, throat spasms, thyroid disorders, tremor, twitching, uncontrolled eye movement, urination decrease or increase, vaginal bleeding, vein inflammation, vertigo, vision disorders, vomiting, vomiting or spitting blood, yellowed skin and eyes, weight gain, white spots in the mouth. Special warnings about this medication: Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Particularly during the first few days of therapy, Geodon can cause low blood pressure, with accompanying dizziness, fainting, and rapid heartbeat. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these side effects. To minimize such problems, your doctor will increase your dose gradually. If you are prone to low blood pressure, take blood pressure medicine, become dehydrated, or have heart disease or poor circulation in the brain, use Geodon with caution. Geodon may cause drowsiness and can impair your judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution while driving and don't operate potentially dangerous machinery until you know how this drug affects you. Geodon poses a very slight risk of seizures, especially if you are over age 65, have a history of seizures, or have Alzheimer's disease. Drugs such as Geodon sometimes cause a condition called Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Symptoms include high fever, muscle rigidity, irregular pulse or blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, excessive perspiration, and changes in heart rhythm. If these symptoms appear, tell your doctor immediately. You'll need to stop taking Geodon while the condition is under treatment. There also is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia, a condition marked by slow, rhythmical, involuntary movements. This problem is more likely to occur in mature adults, especially older women. When it does, use of Geodon is usually stopped. Geodon can suppress the cough reflex; you may have trouble clearing your airway. Some people taking Geodon also develop a rash. Tell your doctor when this happens. If the rash doesn't clear up with treatment, you may have to discontinue the drug. Other antipsychotic medications have been known to interfere with the body's temperature-regulating mechanism, causing the body to overheat. Although this problem has not occurred with Geodon, caution is still advisable. Avoid exposure to extreme heat, strenuous exercise, and dehydration. There also is a remote chance that this medication may cause abnormal, prolonged and painful erections. Remember that you must never combine Geodon with any drug that prolongs the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval (see "Most important fact about this drug"). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any doubts about a drug you're taking. If Geodon is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Geodon with the following: Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Certain blood pressure medications Drugs that boost the effects of dopamine such as Mirapex, Parlodel, Permax, and Requip Drugs that affect the brain and nervous system, such as sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet) Answered by Merri Boeckmann 3 months ago.

I have been on geodon for several weeks now. I have experienced paranoia and also headaches about an hour before it is time to take it again. I have also had increased energy and for that it has been a lifesaver for me as all other anti-psychotics have created exhaustion. I love this medication despite the few ill effects. It has truly made me feel more normal again. Answered by Jammie Velazco 3 months ago.

Be careful. I took Geodon last year while in the hospital for med management. I did well on it, so my Psychiatrist increased my dosage to the maximum level. I experienced heart palpitations. I was very scared and the hospital didn't believe me. They performed an emergency EKG the next day, but not until my I called my mother and she threatened to call the police unless the hospital took action and called my doctor. Make sure you and your loved ones monitor this drug VERY CLOSELY. Answered by Fred Chojnowski 3 months ago.

I only took it twice, and it gave me horrible anxiety. I already had some anxiety to begin with, but it was absolutely awful, so awful that I couldn't take it anymore. Answered by Serena Kunshier 3 months ago.


Medical Professionals if possible: Side effects of Geodon, interfering with daily life? Doc on vacation.?
Was just hypoglycemia acting up. Geodon is making me really sensitive to it, have to eat every couple of hours and avoid caffeine and I should be fine... Odd because I havent had any problems with it since I was about 16.. Anyways thanks for your answer Asked by Vernetta Harless 3 months ago.

Hi, My doctor is on vacation so im hoping some medical professionals here may be able to answer my questions. I started the medication at 60mg once a day about a week ago. the first day I couldnt focus on anything and got very tired. At that point I decided to take it at night and it helps me sleep, so I disregard all of those instant side effects. But yesterday about mid-day I started to feel very shaky, my hands got very cold, and my muscles felt really stiff. Later that day It started to get hard to do precise movements with my fingers and my muscles started to burn. This is the point I figured it was just not eating enough that day, or the meds wearing off before my next dose.. So I took my pill early(about 5pm) and went to bed. Well this morning I wake up fine.. about 2 hours up and I feel like I did yesterday with everything and im freezing but im sweating.. Any ideas? I dont want to go to the hospital because it costs $$ that I dont have. Answered by Jaqueline Frerichs 3 months ago.

Hi, I am a doctor.. Most important fact about Geodon In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. How should you take Geodon? Geodon capsules should be taken twice a day with food. --If you miss a dose... Take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once. --Storage instructions... Store at room temperature. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, indigestion, involuntary muscle contractions, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, vomiting, weakness Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Well, your sumptoms can be caused by the drug.. when you get the symptoms next time, try to be calm and try ot concentrate.. do not panic.. If still the symptoms persist, I'm afraid you would have to goto the doctor.. If you want more info, feel free to write to me or visit www.medicguide.org This is a free site done by me and other doctors to answer health querries for free. Answered by Rosalba Loze 3 months ago.

Masturbation is the system of bringing approximately a voluntary pleasure of the sexual facilities following mainly by means of the release of semen.Materbation is natural in younger guys,baby.The facet outcome of masterbation may be very harmful in long run if those turn out to be habbit is also Infertility,Continuous headache and backache. Dizziness and lack of reminiscence.Unable to participate in any heavy bodily or intellectual paintings. Answered by Isreal Capener 3 months ago.


Can anyone tell me of any foundations or charities that help pay for medications even though you have medicaid
The Pact Plus Program helped for two years so I'm still trying to get them to help me more. Nothings changed as far as my being able to qualify for their program so I'm still fighting. I also talked to a person at sanofi-aventis and asked them about and they are trying to help me get to the bottom of why... Asked by Daphne Equia 3 months ago.

I'm trying to find a foundation or a charity that will help pay for a medication called anzemet. The Pact Plus program paid supplied it to me for 2 years but because I have gastroparesis and not cancer they will no longer provide me with assistance. I have medicaid but I only get 6 prescriptions a month and am on about 20 different ones and also medicaid will not cover the cost of this medication and I was told even if they did they would only give me 5 pills a month. I take this medication every 4 hours so I need a total of 90 pills so I can cut them in half so I can take 50 mgs. at a time. If anyone knows where I can receive help please get in touch with me. Thanks Answered by Rudy Haptonstall 3 months ago.

I've talked to my doctor and he didn't have any new answers so now I'm trying to get everyone that has gastroparesis to watch this video from sanofi-aventis.us where it says that they help anyone that needs help and then write a letter to them on my behalf to see if that will help overturn their decision. I've already contacted the Governor's office about this and yes I plan to contact the congressman also. Answered by Rocco Baragan 3 months ago.

The Pact Plus Program helped for two years so I'm still trying to get them to help me more. Nothings changed as far as my being able to qualify for their program so I'm still fighting. I also talked to a person at sanofi-aventis and asked them about and they are trying to help me get to the bottom of why the program now says they can't help me so I'm keeping my fingers crossed and I now have a patient advocate helping me so maybe I'll get somewhere with the help of her. I've already checked with Canada and even there I still can't afford the medication.As far as taking anything else there are no new drugs out that I can find and all of the nausea medications that I've tried either I'm allergic to or they don't work so that's why I fighting so hard to get this one. I think in the end I'll win. We Will Just Have to Wait and See. Answered by Bessie Kirkling 3 months ago.

You need to talk to your dr because he will know the local people that can help you. Our health care system sucks major big time. You really should write your congressman and other state offices and tell them your problem just so you can be heard. Answered by Ervin Schnettler 3 months ago.

That pharmaceutical company will NOT help you if you have medicaid..none of them will. they are for uninsured ONLY. I doubt you will be able to find anyone to help you. If Canada carries them and you can get a Rx, you can get them online and they will be cheaper but I don't know. You can appeal to Medicaid to cover more than 6 drugs but GL with that.. Your MD has to fill out a form listing EVERY drug you take, etc and then medicaid makes a decision...they will NOT cover 20...Can the MD not change the medication? I take a migraine medication and medicaid pays for 6 pills a month for me and I take 2 a day...a FEw pills short but they don't care. If they are really expensive they don't cover most of them. GL Answered by Particia Muoio 3 months ago.


How do I help my mother battle fatigue and nausea after brain surgery radiation when the doctors can't help?
Asked by Jeanelle Madock 3 months ago.

My chemo pt told me pot worked really good. No kidding. One of the Oncologist i work with gives IV Anzemet 150 mg every 24 hrs. We also use Odansetron (zofran) 32 mg in an IV piggyback every 24 hours. These are really huge doses, but they work. Did her physicians tell her they could not help or is she not being assertive enough. I would never give up. Be assertive and if you do not get her nausea under control, seek a second opinion. Also, tell her to take frequent naps. It helps. SLeeping is the side effect of many antiemetics. Anzemet and Zofran will not make her tired. Ask the doctor about it. They come in pill form but are expensive. Answered by Ivory Petrauskas 3 months ago.

Buy her a bottle of Mecclazine. This is an OTC medication that is the main ingredient in motion sickness pills. Make sure it is plain mecclazine and not dramamine (which has other stuff added that will make her TOO sleepy). The mecclazine might make her a little sleepy but it wil help with the nausea and any dizzyness she might be having (when I was sick after my brain tumors were radiated, it helped a lot.) Also, her oncologist/neurologist might want to prescribe a light steroid for her to take to help her get her strength back. Be careful with the steroids though..they can have bad side effects. Another thing I found helpful to me was to do a lot of fresh vegetable or fruit juicing with a juicing machine. (Or visit a juice bar in a health food store). There are many juices that will help revitalize her and detoxify her body of the radiation aftereffects. Any juice recipe that uses ginger will also make nausea subside. So you mom might really enjoy for you to start bringing her glasses of FRESH veggie or fruit juice. Do not be dismayed, nor of good courage... God is with you, wherever you may go. Answered by Raul Kwiecinski 3 months ago.

The doctors should be able to prescribe an anti-nausea medicine like Zofran or Phenergan. I took both to combat side effects of my brain cancer and the treatments. Phenergan can cause drowsiness, but I didn't mind sleeping through the nausea. As for the fatigue, eat a healthy diet, drink plenty of water, and rest. Her body needs some down time. It is working hard to fight this disease. It is perfectly fine to rest! Answered by Hailey Thongdy 3 months ago.

Her body needs good nutrition and her heart needs love. Give her both. Get her on a regiment of fresh, raw, vine-ripe fruits and veggies. Put them in a blender or processor. If he gives them back to you, make her some more. The nutrition will soon take over and start to repair the damage that has been done. If she had been doing a good nutritional diet before the treatments she would not be having as much trouble now. lyn Answered by Elna Stanek 3 months ago.

Just be with her, hold her hand. Be there while she is miserable. You can help in that way, just by being there, getting her a drink of water, a blanket. Help her relax and sing and read to her. Hold her hand and touch her. Answered by Lamar Ottley 3 months ago.

pot works best for nausea Answered by Tressie Kiever 3 months ago.


My Bulldog won't stop panting and shaking, what can I give her?
Just wanted to follow up for everyone that answered. I took her to the emergency animal hospital. The physical didn't show anything. Tried to x-ray but she got too worked up and wasn't able to breathe since the breeds air passages can close up. They call it dyspneic due too increased respiratory stridor.... Asked by Rhett Chui 3 months ago.

Its Sunday night and I therefore won't be able to bring my dog to the vet until tomorrow. She's panting heavily, shaking, has pooped on the floor twice (which she never does) and has thrown up once. Im assuming she is in pain and from the symptoms I'm leaning towards intestinal area. Is there anything I can give her for now that may be able to help temporarily? Pepto? Ect? Thanks Answered by Shera Srinivasan 3 months ago.

Just wanted to follow up for everyone that answered. I took her to the emergency animal hospital. The physical didn't show anything. Tried to x-ray but she got too worked up and wasn't able to breathe since the breeds air passages can close up. They call it dyspneic due too increased respiratory stridor. They treated the symptoms with IV fluids, Anzemet injection, Butorphanol injection, Acepromazine injection and prescribed Metronidazole & Pepcid 10mg. She had to be mildly sedated and placed in a oxygen incubator to get the respitory issues under control as they worssend when they tried to take the x-ray. She's lethargic today but has eaten a little of the soft food they gave me and has also drunk some water. She's not panting nor shaking so hopefully whatever was causing her pain or illness has subsided. Thank you for everyone that has responded! Take care Answered by Jesica Melear 3 months ago.

No human meds! You could try and get her to an emergency vet or an emergency pet hospital. Do not give her medication unless a vet instructs you to give it to her. Lots of fluids, I suppose, and hoping for the best. Answered by Korey Sedlock 3 months ago.

Get her to an emergency vet if you look it up on line or in a phone book you will find a vet open somewhere. If you phone your vet they very well may have an after hours number you could ring also. She may have eaten some poison or have a blockage so time is important & if you leave it till monday or even just till the morning your dog may well die. Answered by Elicia Deering 3 months ago.

You need to take her to the emergency vet. - i'm not someone who says run to the vet, like someone. But it's a bulldog and it's exhibiting serious symptoms which I would associate with breathing/lung or heart problems. Bulldogs are very susceptible to these type of problems and she could die. It does not sound like intestinal issues to me. Answered by Garnett Woodrome 3 months ago.

Call the veterinarian. His answering service should re-direct you to the local emergency services. Given the symptoms you describe, I'm inclined to suggest a heart attack, but I'm not a veterinarian. You need one. Call him NOW. Answered by Tressie Gramling 3 months ago.

Vets have Emergency numbers for this exact reason! Human meds will make her worse and possibly kill her. Answered by Merna Mustain 3 months ago.


The question is that the doctor gave my daughter a shot to stop vomiting cause of a virus. did you hear of it.
Asked by Kittie Morrin 3 months ago.

There are several medications for adults and children to stop vomiting, but just a few are listed below. As you can see, some can be taken orally or by injection. Dolasetron (ANZEMET) oral and injectable Granisetron (KYTRIL) oral and injectable Odansetraon (ZOFRAN) oral and injectable Palonosetron (ALOXI) injectable Answered by Edmundo Bourgault 3 months ago.

The injection was probably because your doc wanted to make sure your daughter didn't throw the meds back up and then the dosage would be all screwed up. There are many injectable versions of drugs that most people are only familiar with taking orally. You may want to search the web for anti-vomitting injections and see what medications pop up. I know there are several. Answered by Roderick Lisko 3 months ago.

I just read a bunch of stuff in a medical book b/c my 10 month old had a cold. Yours needs to go to the doctor/hospital since she's vomiting and has the flu. You don't want to make a fatal mistake by not seeking a doctor's help. I hope she gets better soon...poor thing. Answered by Rhoda Heimsness 3 months ago.

He basically gave her an anti-nausea (phenergan) medication. If she has been loosing a lot of fluids by vomiting. I'm surprised that he didn't put her on an IV or have her drink pedicare to bring her electrolytes up. I've been given the shot when I get migraine headaches. Answered by Letty Singewald 3 months ago.

I actually did hear of it,I also got a shot to stop my vommiting, because I was vomitting 3 days every 20 minutes. I forgot the name of the shot, but it really does work, its amazing! Answered by Winford Graboski 3 months ago.

There's a few different types of injections to stop vomiting. Reglan and Phenergan are the first ones than come to mind. They are fairly common. Answered by Maurita Morten 3 months ago.

I was given a shot of phenergan once because of nausea and vomiting during a severe migraine headache. Answered by Alonso Weirich 3 months ago.

This often leads to a prescription of Phenergan, an antiemetic that can keep your child from vomiting, but often at the price of many other side effects. In addition to making your child very sleepy, Phenergan can cause respiratory depression (which means that your child could stop breathing) and dystonic reactions, with involuntary muscle spasms. Ps i work with a nurse who told me this... Answered by Susan Thuney 3 months ago.

yep if vomitting for any reason is going on too long causing distress or dehydration the doc can give an anti sickness jab nothing to worry about hun Answered by Marine Mater 3 months ago.

They can give you intravenous medications to control nausea. They often give these after surgery when they know the patient is has a history of nausea. I haven't heard of shoots being given in the office for nausea though. Answered by Dominique Grudt 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020623/001 ANZEMET DOLASETRON MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
020623/002 ANZEMET DOLASETRON MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
020624/001 ANZEMET DOLASETRON MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per 5ML (20MG per ML)
020624/002 ANZEMET DOLASETRON MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5MG per 0.625ML (20MG per ML)
020624/003 ANZEMET DOLASETRON MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per 25ML (20MG per ML)

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020623/001 ANZEMET DOLASETRON MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
020623/002 ANZEMET DOLASETRON MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
020624/001 ANZEMET DOLASETRON MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per 5ML (20MG per ML)
020624/002 ANZEMET DOLASETRON MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5MG per 0.625ML (20MG per ML)
020624/003 ANZEMET DOLASETRON MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per 25ML (20MG per ML)

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - Blog - All rights reserved