Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 008453/001.

Names and composition

"ANECTINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008453/001 ANECTINE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
008453/002 ANECTINE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
008453/003 ANECTINE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
008453/004 ANECTINE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008453/001 ANECTINE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
008453/002 ANECTINE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
008453/003 ANECTINE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
008453/004 ANECTINE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per VIAL
008845/001 QUELICIN PRESERVATIVE FREE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
008845/002 QUELICIN PRESERVATIVE FREE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
008845/004 QUELICIN PRESERVATIVE FREE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
008845/006 QUELICIN SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
008847/001 SUCOSTRIN SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
008847/003 SUCOSTRIN SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
080997/001 SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per ML
085400/001 SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL

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Answered questions

Which two classifications of drugs are given during rapid sequence intubation?
Which two classifications of drugs are given during rapid sequence intubation? A) Steroids and sedatives B) Sedation and narcotics C) Sedation and neuromuscular blockers D) Analgesics and hypnotics Asked by Gilberto Bonebrake 1 year ago.

C. Valium then Anectine Answered by Shante Macoreno 1 year ago.

tellmedoc82, The answer is (C) Sedation and neuromuscular blockers. I shall briefly explain. The choice of hypnotics and opioids for rapid-sequence induction, and the use of premedication, is influenced by the choice of the muscle relaxant. Anaesthetic agents have a major influence on the quality of intubation when rapid-sequence induction is achieved without a muscle relaxant. Premedication is important, along with a high dose of propofol (2.5 mg kg−1 or more) and a short-acting opioid such as alfentanil (30–40 μg kg−1) or remifentanil (up to 4 μg kg−1). ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Conchita Fray 1 year ago.


Do you think rapid intubation meds caused more heart attacks other than in the o.r.?
CUARE Asked by Martin Tvedt 1 year ago.

The drugs are not banned by the FDA. The drugs and the procedure are very useful for many situations to intubate a patient with a difficult airway if used correctly by those who know what they are doing and for the right reasons. RSI has caused deaths in the field when used by poorly trained Paramedics. Many states do not allow Paramedics to do RSI due to the lack of appropriate education, training and equipment to monitor the patients. Yes there is a potential for it to be misused such as paralyzing a patient without sedation to teach them a lesson which is sometimes discussed on the Paramedic forums as a cool thing to control an annoying patient or teach a frequent flyer a lesson. I can't say how often that is done with that intent. Answered by Lecia Byrnside 1 year ago.

Sorry, but that's a load of crap. Paralytics are NOT used to control behavior. NONE of the have been banned by the FDA. If you have a list, let's see it. Your question still doesn't make a lot of sense. The drugs don't cause heart attacks. Still waiting on the list of "banned" drugs. Why would they be abused? Answered by Alexia Bierstedt 1 year ago.


Accident cost two fingers leads to drug testing more than 2 hours latter?
fingers caught in router, homemade guard not ajustable, held fingers in . taken to hospital given hydromorphone 2mg, ibuprofen800 mg, 2 oxycodone ,lidocaine, diprivan10mg and 6 hydrocodone plus promeethazine25 mg, anectine 20mg, fentanyl .05mg 3, metoclopramide 5 mg, midazolam hcl 5mg , ondansetron 4mg x4 ,... Asked by Eden Sickles 1 year ago.

fingers caught in router, homemade guard not ajustable, held fingers in . taken to hospital given hydromorphone 2mg, ibuprofen800 mg, 2 oxycodone ,lidocaine, diprivan10mg and 6 hydrocodone plus promeethazine25 mg, anectine 20mg, fentanyl .05mg 3, metoclopramide 5 mg, midazolam hcl 5mg , ondansetron 4mg x4 , cefazolin 1 gm x2 . so how would all of the medicines plus anesthesia effect a drug test , that was given 2 hours latter and sent from indiana to ks. my drug test came back positive for thc at a reading of over 130% . can any one explain the way this works Answered by Tamiko Brakke 1 year ago.

THC can be detected for up to a month after smoking weed. None of the compounds that you mention will affect a drug test specifically looking for THC. IF you don't do cannabis - ever - you should get an independant drug test straight away bad luck, but it looks like you were caught and it is going to severly affect your claim for compensation. Answered by Betty Kennemore 1 year ago.

that hospital totally overmedicated you!! nothing you took however should indicate as thc. you must have smoked at least some weed, and the loss of blood, and other drugs could then heighten the levels. but you needed more than just some second hand smoke for that to happen. i have 5 broken vertabrae, and a crushed skull. been on damn near every pain killer out there and all i use now is booze and a little crazy hay when i feel i need it and for seizures, i think i know a little about how it shows in drug tests. you can always appeal the results, if it affects your compo or something and request copies of "initial assesment forms" which basically are the opinions of the emts that first saw you. it is not always accurate but it would say if they felt you were stoned or not. obviously not or they wouldn't have drugged you up so much. Answered by Diana Muckey 1 year ago.

BLAZE IT AGAIN then you will see how it happened you are about to go thru either termination pending your suspension for coming up dirty, there is a pill that cost 45 dollars called Body Flush, this takes effect in one hour buy some and carry them with you for next text, good luck ,it sucks that any accident means the person was high, that is bullsh*t MARYJANE ROCKS Answered by Antonia Griffieth 1 year ago.

Nope, none of those drugs contain THC. Answered by Ja Rezentes 1 year ago.

did you smoke beforehand? because none of those meds affects (or has) THC levels in your blood. Answered by Maxima Hellard 1 year ago.

lost two fingers recently? you type pretty good. Answered by Hermina Dumay 1 year ago.

ummm...re-read the question you just asked and get back to me Answered by Maricruz Searl 1 year ago.


How do medical professionals administer psych meds that can only be given IV to a combative patient?
I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation... Asked by Rozella Vonderkell 1 year ago.

I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation of the needed drug does not exist or would work too slowly or far too erraticly (diazepam) if given IM, do you establish patent IV access to administer the drug? Even those who are being held with every orderly and nurse in the ward can make miniscule movements that would seem to render a proper IV line placement difficult. Taking this further, how do you do this over and over, to a patient who is refusing something like valproate (the therapeutic portion being the valproate anion of compounds containing it valproic acid, sodium valproate, etc.) or another agent that can only be given PO or IV, due to tissue damage for instance? This would seem to be a very tedious task that would take up an enormous amount of staff resources if a medication had to be administered even just daily, but if this was a B.I.D. or T.I.D. dosing, and you had a refractory patient (refusing more out of spite than out of illness), this could go on ad infinitum. I'm adding the caveat that the medication does work when administered, which is a mitigating factor in ECT use. However, there again, even with ECT, most physicians would make an allowance for a short acting anesthetic (Brevital®, Diprivan®, etc.) and a paralytic (Anectine®, Pavulon®, Norcuron®, etc.) which are optimally given through an IV line (propofol can only be given that way). So with consistently refractory and recalcitrant patients, is a dose of remifentanil given IM and the anesthetic effect awaited? With ECT, can it just be administered unmodified? It can't be that painful, it will induce immediate unconsciousness anyway and it is the patient's fault, perhaps unmodified ECT can induce a change. I'm just curious to know from those who work in ER's, psych. wards/hospitals, etc. Answered by Catheryn Bragado 1 year ago.

IV Medications used to treat combative patients is only administered if the patient cannot be reasoned with. At that point, the medications are simply used to sedate the patient so that they can be observed. Usually, that IV medication is something more similar to Xanax or Ativan used for short term relief of symptoms. Once a patient is sedated in the ER they would be involuntarily admitted to the psychology ward of the hospital. At that point, medication would be controlled by the doctor on staff and would not be administered through IV unless the patient refused medication in which case medication may be given involuntarily. However, the medication given in the ward would usually be meant to ease the symptoms of mental illness not sedate the patient. So, generally the patient will begin feeling better after taking the medications indicated for his/her condition and in turn become more compliant and there will no longer be a need to administer anything via IV. ECT is a last resort in many cases and is really only therapeutic for treating various forms of depression (though this point can be argued). Further, ECT is not meant to work as a sedating agent as you suggest with the above drugs. ECT is inherently sedating but the real reason for doing ECT is to change the patients brain chemistry so that their symptoms subside. Generally when a patient is undergoing ECT they are not combative. Answered by Anton Denkins 1 year ago.

It relies upon on the meds. I by surprise met a difficulty the place the nurse refused to replenish my Effexor and that i went via withdrawal for 2 days (it grew to become into torture). from time to time the drugstore supply you a pair of days properly worth of meds in the event that they know you're seeing a physician quickly. If that's no longer an selection authentic now, I say bypass to the ER and get your meds. Then attempt to discover someplace the place you may get seen by utilising a psychiatrist often. in case you're on incapacity or Medicare, numerous places will see you (even extreme-scale places). you do no longer could desire to bypass to the interior sight well-being sanatorium. stable success! :) draw close in there!!! :) Answered by Stephani Rauhuff 1 year ago.


Is there a drug or poison that mimics death but allows the victim to survive?
You see it in like movie and books. I think it was in the recent x-men movie too with wolverine... Just wondering if this is something real or entirely science fiction. Asked by Dannie Gembarowski 1 year ago.

Well, there's this muscle relaxant / respiratory sys depressant called succinylcholine (Anectine) used to paralyze muscle groups without really doing serious harm. Answered by Cynthia Walizer 1 year ago.


Succinylcholine family allergy?
Looking moreso for an answer from an allergist or anesthesiologist. Not that long ago, my mother went to the ED, and I went with her. When they came to asking if she had any allergies, I know she had an allergy to PCN, but then she said she was allergic to something called "Anectine". I had never heard... Asked by Margorie Buckman 1 year ago.

Looking moreso for an answer from an allergist or anesthesiologist. Not that long ago, my mother went to the ED, and I went with her. When they came to asking if she had any allergies, I know she had an allergy to PCN, but then she said she was allergic to something called "Anectine". I had never heard the Trade name before, so I had no idea what it was, but the triage nurse said "oh, that's ok. They haven't used the med in YEARS". So when I got home, I googled it and saw it was succ. I'm familiar with the med because I'm a paramedic, and although my med control doesn't allow RSI, other places do, so I at least had to study it. I also learned from my mother, that her aunt had actually died from it, which I'm assuming was due to MH. Then, when I was in the OR doing intubations for my paramedic, one of the anesthesiologists called it Anectine, and I mentioned something about what the triage nurse had said and that my mother was allergic to it. Then they gave me like a crazy look and said that was quite a big deal. I know that if I had to have surgery, I'd mention it to the anesthesiologist, and I could imagine they'd avoid it just because of family history, but knowing that there are paramedic services around here the do RSI, that makes me kind of nervous. From the sources I've looked at, it looks that it should be avoided for anyone who has a family history of MH. My question is, should I even bother to be tested for the allergy? I don't think it's neccessary that if I do discover I am allergic, that I actually get the muscle biopsy for MH because I would intend to avoid it regardless. Also, because my mothers aunt and my mother are allergic, is there a high chance I am allergic to? Or is it still rare? Also, anything else you think would be of any help to me. Answered by Lester Walbert 1 year ago.

Not a true allergy, but it could be one of 2 things. 1. MH. VERY big deal, and it involves volatile anesthetics as well as sux. Find out if it's in your family, and if so, get tested. 2. More common, is atypical pseudocholinesterase, the enzyme that breaks down sux. That's genetic, so you might have it. Usually, the enzyme is present but works at very low capacity, so a dose of sux that should last 5 minutes might last 2-3 hours. And sux gets used a lot in the ED and the OR. Maybe the ED nurse was confused. It's a lifesaver with a questionable airway, but wouldn't be so if you have either of the above problems. You and your mom should research what happened to her and get medical records relating to the event. It's important to know which of the above it is. There is another thing that might have happened, which is a Phase 2 block from sux. If you get too much, it acts more like a non-depolarizing NMBA, and lasts a long time. That can easily be confused with atypical PCE, and is NOT an allergy or problem inherent in your mom. It was just too much sux. Hope that helps. Answered by Mercy Casey 1 year ago.

Succinylcholine Allergy Answered by China Reopell 1 year ago.

Well the best way for me to answer this for you is to tell you I have had air born (inhaled) allergies most of my life. I have become allergic to all the weeds, all the trees, all the grasses, cockroaches, cats and dogs. From there I started becoming allergic to foods. First wheat, which is obviously a grass.Then walnuts and I'm becoming sensitive to peanuts, and melons. I found out the hard way I'm allergic to shellfish. I was on a trip and consumed one shrimp and my throat began to close off. I took several benadryls and felt like death warmed over for several days after. Since then my children and my husband have become allergic to shellfish also. Strange that my husband and I both would have the same allergy to shellfish since he has never had any allergy problems at all. I believe that all of my inhalant allergies have pushed me to the point that I am now reacting to foods. I think I am a good example of why people with inhalant allergies need treatment to keep them from becoming allergic to foods. Answered by Tammy Banfield 1 year ago.

What is MH. Not familiar with that abbreviation. However, succinylcholine is used often, more so in ICU/critical care, trauma. However it is not worth it for the allergy test, since they can only test you for certain genes/alleles that have been studied to be associated with MH (whatever it is). I would not worry about for you, despite the relatives allergy. And also succinylcholine is a inpatient med so will not be given at home anyway. Answered by Jenniffer Cragan 1 year ago.

It is a big deal and you should be tested and children you have should be tested. I have this and my youngest son also has this, Thank goodness he was tested before his surgery so he didn't have to go though what I did. I still thank the doctors that safed me that day. Answered by Ronnie Donton 1 year ago.


Is there another easy, non-painful way to end my own life besides using carbon monoxide from car exhaust?
Can someone help me please. Asked by Angel Surgeon 1 year ago.

No, that's about it. Unless you were to take >30 mg of valium and then give yourself a shot of anectine. Please let us know how it works out. GET COUNSELING!!! CALL THE SUICIDE HOT LINE!!! Nothing is THAT bad. Remember, you'll be sorry if you commit suicide. Answered by Shakira Vanriper 1 year ago.

Don't kill yourself. It is NOT the answer. you may feel horrible now, but your life WILL turn around. You will be very happy you stuck around. There is someone who loves you... no matter what. Suicide is a very selfish thing to do. It puts your family and friends in more pain than you are in right now. Don't do it. Answered by Kelley Byal 1 year ago.

besides the actuality that the biggest section, by ability of a processes, of maximum combustion gases is incredibly threat unfastened nitrogen (N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2), a incredibly very small portion of it quite is undesirable noxious or poisonous components, alongside with carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particulate be counted. while a hydrocarbon combusts, it additionally produces water, or H2O Answered by Signe Glorioso 1 year ago.

Doc, Please get help. Life is so hard sometimes, but you are here for a reason. Maybe you will move on from this and be a counselor for suicidal teenagers? Who knows? There are still good things waiting for you. Your life is valuable and its yours. Don't steal it from yourself. Answered by Yasuko Topia 1 year ago.

Don't give up now. All it takes is for one great event to happen, and you won't regret another single day. A new love, holding your child, the difference you made in someone's life.... whatever it is. Hold out, because when it happens, you'll be glad you stuck around. Peace! Answered by Edris Mcaskill 1 year ago.

Don't kill yourself. You may be feeling really bad right now but the idea behind suicide is to feel relief. Relief and a loss of pain is an emotion and you can't feel an emotion if your dead. It won't make it better, I promise. Please get help. www.nwrain.com/~skydiver/suicide.htm Answered by Halina Reifsnider 1 year ago.

There's no way that won't be painful to the people who care about you, even if you think no one does. Answered by Melanie Neave 1 year ago.

no don't do it at all call 1-800-273 TALK , and don't wait Answered by Rosamaria Biccum 1 year ago.


What substance is an efficient paralyzing agent?
This is simple curiosity Asked by Rudy Sparaco 1 year ago.

Suxamethonium chloride (INN), also known as suxamethonium or succinylcholine, is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, used to induce muscle relaxation and short-term paralysis, usually to facilitate tracheal intubation. Suxamethonium is sold under the trade names Anectine, Quelicin, and Scoline. It is used as a paralytic agent for euthanasia/immobilization of horses. It is colloquially referred to as "sux" in hospital settings. Answered by Katlyn Laureles 1 year ago.

Midazolam or sevoflurane. These two are very powerful anesthetics. Answered by Mikaela Gorzynski 1 year ago.


Which two classifications of drugs are given during rapid sequence intubation?
Which two classifications of drugs are given during rapid sequence intubation? A) Steroids and sedatives B) Sedation and narcotics C) Sedation and neuromuscular blockers D) Analgesics and hypnotics Asked by Pansy Verderosa 1 year ago.

C. Valium then Anectine Answered by Lucio Nitti 1 year ago.

tellmedoc82, The answer is (C) Sedation and neuromuscular blockers. I shall briefly explain. The choice of hypnotics and opioids for rapid-sequence induction, and the use of premedication, is influenced by the choice of the muscle relaxant. Anaesthetic agents have a major influence on the quality of intubation when rapid-sequence induction is achieved without a muscle relaxant. Premedication is important, along with a high dose of propofol (2.5 mg kg−1 or more) and a short-acting opioid such as alfentanil (30–40 μg kg−1) or remifentanil (up to 4 μg kg−1). ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Tonie Nazelrod 1 year ago.


Do you think rapid intubation meds caused more heart attacks other than in the o.r.?
CUARE Asked by Carlton Auvil 1 year ago.

The drugs are not banned by the FDA. The drugs and the procedure are very useful for many situations to intubate a patient with a difficult airway if used correctly by those who know what they are doing and for the right reasons. RSI has caused deaths in the field when used by poorly trained Paramedics. Many states do not allow Paramedics to do RSI due to the lack of appropriate education, training and equipment to monitor the patients. Yes there is a potential for it to be misused such as paralyzing a patient without sedation to teach them a lesson which is sometimes discussed on the Paramedic forums as a cool thing to control an annoying patient or teach a frequent flyer a lesson. I can't say how often that is done with that intent. Answered by Kelvin Monat 1 year ago.

Sorry, but that's a load of crap. Paralytics are NOT used to control behavior. NONE of the have been banned by the FDA. If you have a list, let's see it. Your question still doesn't make a lot of sense. The drugs don't cause heart attacks. Still waiting on the list of "banned" drugs. Why would they be abused? Answered by Joan Jestes 1 year ago.


Accident cost two fingers leads to drug testing more than 2 hours latter?
fingers caught in router, homemade guard not ajustable, held fingers in . taken to hospital given hydromorphone 2mg, ibuprofen800 mg, 2 oxycodone ,lidocaine, diprivan10mg and 6 hydrocodone plus promeethazine25 mg, anectine 20mg, fentanyl .05mg 3, metoclopramide 5 mg, midazolam hcl 5mg , ondansetron 4mg x4 ,... Asked by Shannon Yamagata 1 year ago.

fingers caught in router, homemade guard not ajustable, held fingers in . taken to hospital given hydromorphone 2mg, ibuprofen800 mg, 2 oxycodone ,lidocaine, diprivan10mg and 6 hydrocodone plus promeethazine25 mg, anectine 20mg, fentanyl .05mg 3, metoclopramide 5 mg, midazolam hcl 5mg , ondansetron 4mg x4 , cefazolin 1 gm x2 . so how would all of the medicines plus anesthesia effect a drug test , that was given 2 hours latter and sent from indiana to ks. my drug test came back positive for thc at a reading of over 130% . can any one explain the way this works Answered by Jeffery Whiting 1 year ago.

THC can be detected for up to a month after smoking weed. None of the compounds that you mention will affect a drug test specifically looking for THC. IF you don't do cannabis - ever - you should get an independant drug test straight away bad luck, but it looks like you were caught and it is going to severly affect your claim for compensation. Answered by Lyman Poteet 1 year ago.

that hospital totally overmedicated you!! nothing you took however should indicate as thc. you must have smoked at least some weed, and the loss of blood, and other drugs could then heighten the levels. but you needed more than just some second hand smoke for that to happen. i have 5 broken vertabrae, and a crushed skull. been on damn near every pain killer out there and all i use now is booze and a little crazy hay when i feel i need it and for seizures, i think i know a little about how it shows in drug tests. you can always appeal the results, if it affects your compo or something and request copies of "initial assesment forms" which basically are the opinions of the emts that first saw you. it is not always accurate but it would say if they felt you were stoned or not. obviously not or they wouldn't have drugged you up so much. Answered by Sylvester Gholson 1 year ago.

BLAZE IT AGAIN then you will see how it happened you are about to go thru either termination pending your suspension for coming up dirty, there is a pill that cost 45 dollars called Body Flush, this takes effect in one hour buy some and carry them with you for next text, good luck ,it sucks that any accident means the person was high, that is bullsh*t MARYJANE ROCKS Answered by Adela Doke 1 year ago.

Nope, none of those drugs contain THC. Answered by Heide Palmertree 1 year ago.

did you smoke beforehand? because none of those meds affects (or has) THC levels in your blood. Answered by Ngan Cherry 1 year ago.

lost two fingers recently? you type pretty good. Answered by Jama Askey 1 year ago.

ummm...re-read the question you just asked and get back to me Answered by Phil Lor 1 year ago.


How do medical professionals administer psych meds that can only be given IV to a combative patient?
I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation... Asked by Gia Barnes 1 year ago.

I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation of the needed drug does not exist or would work too slowly or far too erraticly (diazepam) if given IM, do you establish patent IV access to administer the drug? Even those who are being held with every orderly and nurse in the ward can make miniscule movements that would seem to render a proper IV line placement difficult. Taking this further, how do you do this over and over, to a patient who is refusing something like valproate (the therapeutic portion being the valproate anion of compounds containing it valproic acid, sodium valproate, etc.) or another agent that can only be given PO or IV, due to tissue damage for instance? This would seem to be a very tedious task that would take up an enormous amount of staff resources if a medication had to be administered even just daily, but if this was a B.I.D. or T.I.D. dosing, and you had a refractory patient (refusing more out of spite than out of illness), this could go on ad infinitum. I'm adding the caveat that the medication does work when administered, which is a mitigating factor in ECT use. However, there again, even with ECT, most physicians would make an allowance for a short acting anesthetic (Brevital®, Diprivan®, etc.) and a paralytic (Anectine®, Pavulon®, Norcuron®, etc.) which are optimally given through an IV line (propofol can only be given that way). So with consistently refractory and recalcitrant patients, is a dose of remifentanil given IM and the anesthetic effect awaited? With ECT, can it just be administered unmodified? It can't be that painful, it will induce immediate unconsciousness anyway and it is the patient's fault, perhaps unmodified ECT can induce a change. I'm just curious to know from those who work in ER's, psych. wards/hospitals, etc. Answered by Hyman Catalina 1 year ago.

IV Medications used to treat combative patients is only administered if the patient cannot be reasoned with. At that point, the medications are simply used to sedate the patient so that they can be observed. Usually, that IV medication is something more similar to Xanax or Ativan used for short term relief of symptoms. Once a patient is sedated in the ER they would be involuntarily admitted to the psychology ward of the hospital. At that point, medication would be controlled by the doctor on staff and would not be administered through IV unless the patient refused medication in which case medication may be given involuntarily. However, the medication given in the ward would usually be meant to ease the symptoms of mental illness not sedate the patient. So, generally the patient will begin feeling better after taking the medications indicated for his/her condition and in turn become more compliant and there will no longer be a need to administer anything via IV. ECT is a last resort in many cases and is really only therapeutic for treating various forms of depression (though this point can be argued). Further, ECT is not meant to work as a sedating agent as you suggest with the above drugs. ECT is inherently sedating but the real reason for doing ECT is to change the patients brain chemistry so that their symptoms subside. Generally when a patient is undergoing ECT they are not combative. Answered by Moshe Schenfeld 1 year ago.

It relies upon on the meds. I by surprise met a difficulty the place the nurse refused to replenish my Effexor and that i went via withdrawal for 2 days (it grew to become into torture). from time to time the drugstore supply you a pair of days properly worth of meds in the event that they know you're seeing a physician quickly. If that's no longer an selection authentic now, I say bypass to the ER and get your meds. Then attempt to discover someplace the place you may get seen by utilising a psychiatrist often. in case you're on incapacity or Medicare, numerous places will see you (even extreme-scale places). you do no longer could desire to bypass to the interior sight well-being sanatorium. stable success! :) draw close in there!!! :) Answered by Angelica Sy 1 year ago.


Is there a drug or poison that mimics death but allows the victim to survive?
You see it in like movie and books. I think it was in the recent x-men movie too with wolverine... Just wondering if this is something real or entirely science fiction. Asked by Neta Novitski 1 year ago.

Well, there's this muscle relaxant / respiratory sys depressant called succinylcholine (Anectine) used to paralyze muscle groups without really doing serious harm. Answered by Hannah Dool 1 year ago.


Succinylcholine family allergy?
Looking moreso for an answer from an allergist or anesthesiologist. Not that long ago, my mother went to the ED, and I went with her. When they came to asking if she had any allergies, I know she had an allergy to PCN, but then she said she was allergic to something called "Anectine". I had never heard... Asked by Ida Hint 1 year ago.

Looking moreso for an answer from an allergist or anesthesiologist. Not that long ago, my mother went to the ED, and I went with her. When they came to asking if she had any allergies, I know she had an allergy to PCN, but then she said she was allergic to something called "Anectine". I had never heard the Trade name before, so I had no idea what it was, but the triage nurse said "oh, that's ok. They haven't used the med in YEARS". So when I got home, I googled it and saw it was succ. I'm familiar with the med because I'm a paramedic, and although my med control doesn't allow RSI, other places do, so I at least had to study it. I also learned from my mother, that her aunt had actually died from it, which I'm assuming was due to MH. Then, when I was in the OR doing intubations for my paramedic, one of the anesthesiologists called it Anectine, and I mentioned something about what the triage nurse had said and that my mother was allergic to it. Then they gave me like a crazy look and said that was quite a big deal. I know that if I had to have surgery, I'd mention it to the anesthesiologist, and I could imagine they'd avoid it just because of family history, but knowing that there are paramedic services around here the do RSI, that makes me kind of nervous. From the sources I've looked at, it looks that it should be avoided for anyone who has a family history of MH. My question is, should I even bother to be tested for the allergy? I don't think it's neccessary that if I do discover I am allergic, that I actually get the muscle biopsy for MH because I would intend to avoid it regardless. Also, because my mothers aunt and my mother are allergic, is there a high chance I am allergic to? Or is it still rare? Also, anything else you think would be of any help to me. Answered by Enoch Cedeno 1 year ago.

Not a true allergy, but it could be one of 2 things. 1. MH. VERY big deal, and it involves volatile anesthetics as well as sux. Find out if it's in your family, and if so, get tested. 2. More common, is atypical pseudocholinesterase, the enzyme that breaks down sux. That's genetic, so you might have it. Usually, the enzyme is present but works at very low capacity, so a dose of sux that should last 5 minutes might last 2-3 hours. And sux gets used a lot in the ED and the OR. Maybe the ED nurse was confused. It's a lifesaver with a questionable airway, but wouldn't be so if you have either of the above problems. You and your mom should research what happened to her and get medical records relating to the event. It's important to know which of the above it is. There is another thing that might have happened, which is a Phase 2 block from sux. If you get too much, it acts more like a non-depolarizing NMBA, and lasts a long time. That can easily be confused with atypical PCE, and is NOT an allergy or problem inherent in your mom. It was just too much sux. Hope that helps. Answered by Laurena Laker 1 year ago.

Succinylcholine Allergy Answered by Velia Robison 1 year ago.

Well the best way for me to answer this for you is to tell you I have had air born (inhaled) allergies most of my life. I have become allergic to all the weeds, all the trees, all the grasses, cockroaches, cats and dogs. From there I started becoming allergic to foods. First wheat, which is obviously a grass.Then walnuts and I'm becoming sensitive to peanuts, and melons. I found out the hard way I'm allergic to shellfish. I was on a trip and consumed one shrimp and my throat began to close off. I took several benadryls and felt like death warmed over for several days after. Since then my children and my husband have become allergic to shellfish also. Strange that my husband and I both would have the same allergy to shellfish since he has never had any allergy problems at all. I believe that all of my inhalant allergies have pushed me to the point that I am now reacting to foods. I think I am a good example of why people with inhalant allergies need treatment to keep them from becoming allergic to foods. Answered by Iesha Escobar 1 year ago.

What is MH. Not familiar with that abbreviation. However, succinylcholine is used often, more so in ICU/critical care, trauma. However it is not worth it for the allergy test, since they can only test you for certain genes/alleles that have been studied to be associated with MH (whatever it is). I would not worry about for you, despite the relatives allergy. And also succinylcholine is a inpatient med so will not be given at home anyway. Answered by Guy Olivarra 1 year ago.

It is a big deal and you should be tested and children you have should be tested. I have this and my youngest son also has this, Thank goodness he was tested before his surgery so he didn't have to go though what I did. I still thank the doctors that safed me that day. Answered by Flo Guerard 1 year ago.


Is there another easy, non-painful way to end my own life besides using carbon monoxide from car exhaust?
Can someone help me please. Asked by Patrica Pochintesta 1 year ago.

No, that's about it. Unless you were to take >30 mg of valium and then give yourself a shot of anectine. Please let us know how it works out. GET COUNSELING!!! CALL THE SUICIDE HOT LINE!!! Nothing is THAT bad. Remember, you'll be sorry if you commit suicide. Answered by Adelina Rippey 1 year ago.

Don't kill yourself. It is NOT the answer. you may feel horrible now, but your life WILL turn around. You will be very happy you stuck around. There is someone who loves you... no matter what. Suicide is a very selfish thing to do. It puts your family and friends in more pain than you are in right now. Don't do it. Answered by Randolph Bucklin 1 year ago.

besides the actuality that the biggest section, by ability of a processes, of maximum combustion gases is incredibly threat unfastened nitrogen (N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2), a incredibly very small portion of it quite is undesirable noxious or poisonous components, alongside with carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particulate be counted. while a hydrocarbon combusts, it additionally produces water, or H2O Answered by Linda Sleeter 1 year ago.

Doc, Please get help. Life is so hard sometimes, but you are here for a reason. Maybe you will move on from this and be a counselor for suicidal teenagers? Who knows? There are still good things waiting for you. Your life is valuable and its yours. Don't steal it from yourself. Answered by Jeana Butorac 1 year ago.

Don't give up now. All it takes is for one great event to happen, and you won't regret another single day. A new love, holding your child, the difference you made in someone's life.... whatever it is. Hold out, because when it happens, you'll be glad you stuck around. Peace! Answered by Myrtie Pangallo 1 year ago.

Don't kill yourself. You may be feeling really bad right now but the idea behind suicide is to feel relief. Relief and a loss of pain is an emotion and you can't feel an emotion if your dead. It won't make it better, I promise. Please get help. www.nwrain.com/~skydiver/suicide.htm Answered by Brittni Muhs 1 year ago.

There's no way that won't be painful to the people who care about you, even if you think no one does. Answered by Audrie Ambrosino 1 year ago.

no don't do it at all call 1-800-273 TALK , and don't wait Answered by Gabriella Heavin 1 year ago.


What substance is an efficient paralyzing agent?
This is simple curiosity Asked by Charlott Strudwick 1 year ago.

Suxamethonium chloride (INN), also known as suxamethonium or succinylcholine, is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, used to induce muscle relaxation and short-term paralysis, usually to facilitate tracheal intubation. Suxamethonium is sold under the trade names Anectine, Quelicin, and Scoline. It is used as a paralytic agent for euthanasia/immobilization of horses. It is colloquially referred to as "sux" in hospital settings. Answered by Valencia Borger 1 year ago.

Midazolam or sevoflurane. These two are very powerful anesthetics. Answered by Allen Boustead 1 year ago.


Which two classifications of drugs are given during rapid sequence intubation?
Which two classifications of drugs are given during rapid sequence intubation? A) Steroids and sedatives B) Sedation and narcotics C) Sedation and neuromuscular blockers D) Analgesics and hypnotics Asked by Monnie Mcbratney 1 year ago.

C. Valium then Anectine Answered by Kory Kandra 1 year ago.

tellmedoc82, The answer is (C) Sedation and neuromuscular blockers. I shall briefly explain. The choice of hypnotics and opioids for rapid-sequence induction, and the use of premedication, is influenced by the choice of the muscle relaxant. Anaesthetic agents have a major influence on the quality of intubation when rapid-sequence induction is achieved without a muscle relaxant. Premedication is important, along with a high dose of propofol (2.5 mg kg−1 or more) and a short-acting opioid such as alfentanil (30–40 μg kg−1) or remifentanil (up to 4 μg kg−1). ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Landon Sures 1 year ago.


Do you think rapid intubation meds caused more heart attacks other than in the o.r.?
CUARE Asked by Hassan Krough 1 year ago.

The drugs are not banned by the FDA. The drugs and the procedure are very useful for many situations to intubate a patient with a difficult airway if used correctly by those who know what they are doing and for the right reasons. RSI has caused deaths in the field when used by poorly trained Paramedics. Many states do not allow Paramedics to do RSI due to the lack of appropriate education, training and equipment to monitor the patients. Yes there is a potential for it to be misused such as paralyzing a patient without sedation to teach them a lesson which is sometimes discussed on the Paramedic forums as a cool thing to control an annoying patient or teach a frequent flyer a lesson. I can't say how often that is done with that intent. Answered by Li Shandley 1 year ago.

Sorry, but that's a load of crap. Paralytics are NOT used to control behavior. NONE of the have been banned by the FDA. If you have a list, let's see it. Your question still doesn't make a lot of sense. The drugs don't cause heart attacks. Still waiting on the list of "banned" drugs. Why would they be abused? Answered by Jadwiga Whittley 1 year ago.


Accident cost two fingers leads to drug testing more than 2 hours latter?
fingers caught in router, homemade guard not ajustable, held fingers in . taken to hospital given hydromorphone 2mg, ibuprofen800 mg, 2 oxycodone ,lidocaine, diprivan10mg and 6 hydrocodone plus promeethazine25 mg, anectine 20mg, fentanyl .05mg 3, metoclopramide 5 mg, midazolam hcl 5mg , ondansetron 4mg x4 ,... Asked by Xochitl Lipan 1 year ago.

fingers caught in router, homemade guard not ajustable, held fingers in . taken to hospital given hydromorphone 2mg, ibuprofen800 mg, 2 oxycodone ,lidocaine, diprivan10mg and 6 hydrocodone plus promeethazine25 mg, anectine 20mg, fentanyl .05mg 3, metoclopramide 5 mg, midazolam hcl 5mg , ondansetron 4mg x4 , cefazolin 1 gm x2 . so how would all of the medicines plus anesthesia effect a drug test , that was given 2 hours latter and sent from indiana to ks. my drug test came back positive for thc at a reading of over 130% . can any one explain the way this works Answered by Christena Amdahl 1 year ago.

THC can be detected for up to a month after smoking weed. None of the compounds that you mention will affect a drug test specifically looking for THC. IF you don't do cannabis - ever - you should get an independant drug test straight away bad luck, but it looks like you were caught and it is going to severly affect your claim for compensation. Answered by Ben Prestwood 1 year ago.

that hospital totally overmedicated you!! nothing you took however should indicate as thc. you must have smoked at least some weed, and the loss of blood, and other drugs could then heighten the levels. but you needed more than just some second hand smoke for that to happen. i have 5 broken vertabrae, and a crushed skull. been on damn near every pain killer out there and all i use now is booze and a little crazy hay when i feel i need it and for seizures, i think i know a little about how it shows in drug tests. you can always appeal the results, if it affects your compo or something and request copies of "initial assesment forms" which basically are the opinions of the emts that first saw you. it is not always accurate but it would say if they felt you were stoned or not. obviously not or they wouldn't have drugged you up so much. Answered by Meryl Berky 1 year ago.

BLAZE IT AGAIN then you will see how it happened you are about to go thru either termination pending your suspension for coming up dirty, there is a pill that cost 45 dollars called Body Flush, this takes effect in one hour buy some and carry them with you for next text, good luck ,it sucks that any accident means the person was high, that is bullsh*t MARYJANE ROCKS Answered by Tad Smoke 1 year ago.

Nope, none of those drugs contain THC. Answered by Carley Felicia 1 year ago.

did you smoke beforehand? because none of those meds affects (or has) THC levels in your blood. Answered by Pablo Bentham 1 year ago.

lost two fingers recently? you type pretty good. Answered by Arlena Lyew 1 year ago.

ummm...re-read the question you just asked and get back to me Answered by Julieta Bruechert 1 year ago.


How do medical professionals administer psych meds that can only be given IV to a combative patient?
I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation... Asked by Luciano Lukman 1 year ago.

I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation of the needed drug does not exist or would work too slowly or far too erraticly (diazepam) if given IM, do you establish patent IV access to administer the drug? Even those who are being held with every orderly and nurse in the ward can make miniscule movements that would seem to render a proper IV line placement difficult. Taking this further, how do you do this over and over, to a patient who is refusing something like valproate (the therapeutic portion being the valproate anion of compounds containing it valproic acid, sodium valproate, etc.) or another agent that can only be given PO or IV, due to tissue damage for instance? This would seem to be a very tedious task that would take up an enormous amount of staff resources if a medication had to be administered even just daily, but if this was a B.I.D. or T.I.D. dosing, and you had a refractory patient (refusing more out of spite than out of illness), this could go on ad infinitum. I'm adding the caveat that the medication does work when administered, which is a mitigating factor in ECT use. However, there again, even with ECT, most physicians would make an allowance for a short acting anesthetic (Brevital®, Diprivan®, etc.) and a paralytic (Anectine®, Pavulon®, Norcuron®, etc.) which are optimally given through an IV line (propofol can only be given that way). So with consistently refractory and recalcitrant patients, is a dose of remifentanil given IM and the anesthetic effect awaited? With ECT, can it just be administered unmodified? It can't be that painful, it will induce immediate unconsciousness anyway and it is the patient's fault, perhaps unmodified ECT can induce a change. I'm just curious to know from those who work in ER's, psych. wards/hospitals, etc. Answered by Whitney Braly 1 year ago.

IV Medications used to treat combative patients is only administered if the patient cannot be reasoned with. At that point, the medications are simply used to sedate the patient so that they can be observed. Usually, that IV medication is something more similar to Xanax or Ativan used for short term relief of symptoms. Once a patient is sedated in the ER they would be involuntarily admitted to the psychology ward of the hospital. At that point, medication would be controlled by the doctor on staff and would not be administered through IV unless the patient refused medication in which case medication may be given involuntarily. However, the medication given in the ward would usually be meant to ease the symptoms of mental illness not sedate the patient. So, generally the patient will begin feeling better after taking the medications indicated for his/her condition and in turn become more compliant and there will no longer be a need to administer anything via IV. ECT is a last resort in many cases and is really only therapeutic for treating various forms of depression (though this point can be argued). Further, ECT is not meant to work as a sedating agent as you suggest with the above drugs. ECT is inherently sedating but the real reason for doing ECT is to change the patients brain chemistry so that their symptoms subside. Generally when a patient is undergoing ECT they are not combative. Answered by Coretta Klier 1 year ago.

It relies upon on the meds. I by surprise met a difficulty the place the nurse refused to replenish my Effexor and that i went via withdrawal for 2 days (it grew to become into torture). from time to time the drugstore supply you a pair of days properly worth of meds in the event that they know you're seeing a physician quickly. If that's no longer an selection authentic now, I say bypass to the ER and get your meds. Then attempt to discover someplace the place you may get seen by utilising a psychiatrist often. in case you're on incapacity or Medicare, numerous places will see you (even extreme-scale places). you do no longer could desire to bypass to the interior sight well-being sanatorium. stable success! :) draw close in there!!! :) Answered by Suellen Ohanley 1 year ago.


Is there a drug or poison that mimics death but allows the victim to survive?
You see it in like movie and books. I think it was in the recent x-men movie too with wolverine... Just wondering if this is something real or entirely science fiction. Asked by Kristeen Shonka 1 year ago.

Well, there's this muscle relaxant / respiratory sys depressant called succinylcholine (Anectine) used to paralyze muscle groups without really doing serious harm. Answered by Allan Pizzaro 1 year ago.


Succinylcholine family allergy?
Looking moreso for an answer from an allergist or anesthesiologist. Not that long ago, my mother went to the ED, and I went with her. When they came to asking if she had any allergies, I know she had an allergy to PCN, but then she said she was allergic to something called "Anectine". I had never heard... Asked by Forest Hannula 1 year ago.

Looking moreso for an answer from an allergist or anesthesiologist. Not that long ago, my mother went to the ED, and I went with her. When they came to asking if she had any allergies, I know she had an allergy to PCN, but then she said she was allergic to something called "Anectine". I had never heard the Trade name before, so I had no idea what it was, but the triage nurse said "oh, that's ok. They haven't used the med in YEARS". So when I got home, I googled it and saw it was succ. I'm familiar with the med because I'm a paramedic, and although my med control doesn't allow RSI, other places do, so I at least had to study it. I also learned from my mother, that her aunt had actually died from it, which I'm assuming was due to MH. Then, when I was in the OR doing intubations for my paramedic, one of the anesthesiologists called it Anectine, and I mentioned something about what the triage nurse had said and that my mother was allergic to it. Then they gave me like a crazy look and said that was quite a big deal. I know that if I had to have surgery, I'd mention it to the anesthesiologist, and I could imagine they'd avoid it just because of family history, but knowing that there are paramedic services around here the do RSI, that makes me kind of nervous. From the sources I've looked at, it looks that it should be avoided for anyone who has a family history of MH. My question is, should I even bother to be tested for the allergy? I don't think it's neccessary that if I do discover I am allergic, that I actually get the muscle biopsy for MH because I would intend to avoid it regardless. Also, because my mothers aunt and my mother are allergic, is there a high chance I am allergic to? Or is it still rare? Also, anything else you think would be of any help to me. Answered by Shawn Ogle 1 year ago.

Not a true allergy, but it could be one of 2 things. 1. MH. VERY big deal, and it involves volatile anesthetics as well as sux. Find out if it's in your family, and if so, get tested. 2. More common, is atypical pseudocholinesterase, the enzyme that breaks down sux. That's genetic, so you might have it. Usually, the enzyme is present but works at very low capacity, so a dose of sux that should last 5 minutes might last 2-3 hours. And sux gets used a lot in the ED and the OR. Maybe the ED nurse was confused. It's a lifesaver with a questionable airway, but wouldn't be so if you have either of the above problems. You and your mom should research what happened to her and get medical records relating to the event. It's important to know which of the above it is. There is another thing that might have happened, which is a Phase 2 block from sux. If you get too much, it acts more like a non-depolarizing NMBA, and lasts a long time. That can easily be confused with atypical PCE, and is NOT an allergy or problem inherent in your mom. It was just too much sux. Hope that helps. Answered by Jordan Franks 1 year ago.

Succinylcholine Allergy Answered by Catheryn Melchior 1 year ago.

Well the best way for me to answer this for you is to tell you I have had air born (inhaled) allergies most of my life. I have become allergic to all the weeds, all the trees, all the grasses, cockroaches, cats and dogs. From there I started becoming allergic to foods. First wheat, which is obviously a grass.Then walnuts and I'm becoming sensitive to peanuts, and melons. I found out the hard way I'm allergic to shellfish. I was on a trip and consumed one shrimp and my throat began to close off. I took several benadryls and felt like death warmed over for several days after. Since then my children and my husband have become allergic to shellfish also. Strange that my husband and I both would have the same allergy to shellfish since he has never had any allergy problems at all. I believe that all of my inhalant allergies have pushed me to the point that I am now reacting to foods. I think I am a good example of why people with inhalant allergies need treatment to keep them from becoming allergic to foods. Answered by Gretchen Gelder 1 year ago.

What is MH. Not familiar with that abbreviation. However, succinylcholine is used often, more so in ICU/critical care, trauma. However it is not worth it for the allergy test, since they can only test you for certain genes/alleles that have been studied to be associated with MH (whatever it is). I would not worry about for you, despite the relatives allergy. And also succinylcholine is a inpatient med so will not be given at home anyway. Answered by Mui Fortes 1 year ago.

It is a big deal and you should be tested and children you have should be tested. I have this and my youngest son also has this, Thank goodness he was tested before his surgery so he didn't have to go though what I did. I still thank the doctors that safed me that day. Answered by Leonarda Kuban 1 year ago.


Is there another easy, non-painful way to end my own life besides using carbon monoxide from car exhaust?
Can someone help me please. Asked by Roland Megna 1 year ago.

No, that's about it. Unless you were to take >30 mg of valium and then give yourself a shot of anectine. Please let us know how it works out. GET COUNSELING!!! CALL THE SUICIDE HOT LINE!!! Nothing is THAT bad. Remember, you'll be sorry if you commit suicide. Answered by Charity Wilding 1 year ago.

Don't kill yourself. It is NOT the answer. you may feel horrible now, but your life WILL turn around. You will be very happy you stuck around. There is someone who loves you... no matter what. Suicide is a very selfish thing to do. It puts your family and friends in more pain than you are in right now. Don't do it. Answered by Caridad Zerck 1 year ago.

besides the actuality that the biggest section, by ability of a processes, of maximum combustion gases is incredibly threat unfastened nitrogen (N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2), a incredibly very small portion of it quite is undesirable noxious or poisonous components, alongside with carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particulate be counted. while a hydrocarbon combusts, it additionally produces water, or H2O Answered by Thora Lekey 1 year ago.

Doc, Please get help. Life is so hard sometimes, but you are here for a reason. Maybe you will move on from this and be a counselor for suicidal teenagers? Who knows? There are still good things waiting for you. Your life is valuable and its yours. Don't steal it from yourself. Answered by Jeanene Haith 1 year ago.

Don't give up now. All it takes is for one great event to happen, and you won't regret another single day. A new love, holding your child, the difference you made in someone's life.... whatever it is. Hold out, because when it happens, you'll be glad you stuck around. Peace! Answered by Retha Siona 1 year ago.

Don't kill yourself. You may be feeling really bad right now but the idea behind suicide is to feel relief. Relief and a loss of pain is an emotion and you can't feel an emotion if your dead. It won't make it better, I promise. Please get help. www.nwrain.com/~skydiver/suicide.htm Answered by Nicky Wiersteiner 1 year ago.

There's no way that won't be painful to the people who care about you, even if you think no one does. Answered by Erna Gillikin 1 year ago.

no don't do it at all call 1-800-273 TALK , and don't wait Answered by Zelda Artice 1 year ago.


What substance is an efficient paralyzing agent?
This is simple curiosity Asked by Jimmie Cullinan 1 year ago.

Suxamethonium chloride (INN), also known as suxamethonium or succinylcholine, is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, used to induce muscle relaxation and short-term paralysis, usually to facilitate tracheal intubation. Suxamethonium is sold under the trade names Anectine, Quelicin, and Scoline. It is used as a paralytic agent for euthanasia/immobilization of horses. It is colloquially referred to as "sux" in hospital settings. Answered by Armanda Tydeman 1 year ago.

Midazolam or sevoflurane. These two are very powerful anesthetics. Answered by Wynona Berno 1 year ago.


Which two classifications of drugs are given during rapid sequence intubation?
Which two classifications of drugs are given during rapid sequence intubation? A) Steroids and sedatives B) Sedation and narcotics C) Sedation and neuromuscular blockers D) Analgesics and hypnotics Asked by Denny Gentner 1 year ago.

C. Valium then Anectine Answered by Madalene Brodey 1 year ago.

tellmedoc82, The answer is (C) Sedation and neuromuscular blockers. I shall briefly explain. The choice of hypnotics and opioids for rapid-sequence induction, and the use of premedication, is influenced by the choice of the muscle relaxant. Anaesthetic agents have a major influence on the quality of intubation when rapid-sequence induction is achieved without a muscle relaxant. Premedication is important, along with a high dose of propofol (2.5 mg kg−1 or more) and a short-acting opioid such as alfentanil (30–40 μg kg−1) or remifentanil (up to 4 μg kg−1). ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Louise Lukin 1 year ago.


Do you think rapid intubation meds caused more heart attacks other than in the o.r.?
CUARE Asked by Faustina Dorsaint 1 year ago.

The drugs are not banned by the FDA. The drugs and the procedure are very useful for many situations to intubate a patient with a difficult airway if used correctly by those who know what they are doing and for the right reasons. RSI has caused deaths in the field when used by poorly trained Paramedics. Many states do not allow Paramedics to do RSI due to the lack of appropriate education, training and equipment to monitor the patients. Yes there is a potential for it to be misused such as paralyzing a patient without sedation to teach them a lesson which is sometimes discussed on the Paramedic forums as a cool thing to control an annoying patient or teach a frequent flyer a lesson. I can't say how often that is done with that intent. Answered by Greta Corneil 1 year ago.

Sorry, but that's a load of crap. Paralytics are NOT used to control behavior. NONE of the have been banned by the FDA. If you have a list, let's see it. Your question still doesn't make a lot of sense. The drugs don't cause heart attacks. Still waiting on the list of "banned" drugs. Why would they be abused? Answered by Gena Mungin 1 year ago.


Accident cost two fingers leads to drug testing more than 2 hours latter?
fingers caught in router, homemade guard not ajustable, held fingers in . taken to hospital given hydromorphone 2mg, ibuprofen800 mg, 2 oxycodone ,lidocaine, diprivan10mg and 6 hydrocodone plus promeethazine25 mg, anectine 20mg, fentanyl .05mg 3, metoclopramide 5 mg, midazolam hcl 5mg , ondansetron 4mg x4 ,... Asked by Mitsuko Falconio 1 year ago.

fingers caught in router, homemade guard not ajustable, held fingers in . taken to hospital given hydromorphone 2mg, ibuprofen800 mg, 2 oxycodone ,lidocaine, diprivan10mg and 6 hydrocodone plus promeethazine25 mg, anectine 20mg, fentanyl .05mg 3, metoclopramide 5 mg, midazolam hcl 5mg , ondansetron 4mg x4 , cefazolin 1 gm x2 . so how would all of the medicines plus anesthesia effect a drug test , that was given 2 hours latter and sent from indiana to ks. my drug test came back positive for thc at a reading of over 130% . can any one explain the way this works Answered by Rosanna Slocomb 1 year ago.

THC can be detected for up to a month after smoking weed. None of the compounds that you mention will affect a drug test specifically looking for THC. IF you don't do cannabis - ever - you should get an independant drug test straight away bad luck, but it looks like you were caught and it is going to severly affect your claim for compensation. Answered by Matilde Berberian 1 year ago.

that hospital totally overmedicated you!! nothing you took however should indicate as thc. you must have smoked at least some weed, and the loss of blood, and other drugs could then heighten the levels. but you needed more than just some second hand smoke for that to happen. i have 5 broken vertabrae, and a crushed skull. been on damn near every pain killer out there and all i use now is booze and a little crazy hay when i feel i need it and for seizures, i think i know a little about how it shows in drug tests. you can always appeal the results, if it affects your compo or something and request copies of "initial assesment forms" which basically are the opinions of the emts that first saw you. it is not always accurate but it would say if they felt you were stoned or not. obviously not or they wouldn't have drugged you up so much. Answered by Gaye Dortilla 1 year ago.

BLAZE IT AGAIN then you will see how it happened you are about to go thru either termination pending your suspension for coming up dirty, there is a pill that cost 45 dollars called Body Flush, this takes effect in one hour buy some and carry them with you for next text, good luck ,it sucks that any accident means the person was high, that is bullsh*t MARYJANE ROCKS Answered by Yi Voights 1 year ago.

Nope, none of those drugs contain THC. Answered by Walker Lasyone 1 year ago.

did you smoke beforehand? because none of those meds affects (or has) THC levels in your blood. Answered by William Deponte 1 year ago.

lost two fingers recently? you type pretty good. Answered by Lizabeth Mattingley 1 year ago.

ummm...re-read the question you just asked and get back to me Answered by Brande Veazie 1 year ago.


How do medical professionals administer psych meds that can only be given IV to a combative patient?
I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation... Asked by Leonardo Groys 1 year ago.

I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation of the needed drug does not exist or would work too slowly or far too erraticly (diazepam) if given IM, do you establish patent IV access to administer the drug? Even those who are being held with every orderly and nurse in the ward can make miniscule movements that would seem to render a proper IV line placement difficult. Taking this further, how do you do this over and over, to a patient who is refusing something like valproate (the therapeutic portion being the valproate anion of compounds containing it valproic acid, sodium valproate, etc.) or another agent that can only be given PO or IV, due to tissue damage for instance? This would seem to be a very tedious task that would take up an enormous amount of staff resources if a medication had to be administered even just daily, but if this was a B.I.D. or T.I.D. dosing, and you had a refractory patient (refusing more out of spite than out of illness), this could go on ad infinitum. I'm adding the caveat that the medication does work when administered, which is a mitigating factor in ECT use. However, there again, even with ECT, most physicians would make an allowance for a short acting anesthetic (Brevital®, Diprivan®, etc.) and a paralytic (Anectine®, Pavulon®, Norcuron®, etc.) which are optimally given through an IV line (propofol can only be given that way). So with consistently refractory and recalcitrant patients, is a dose of remifentanil given IM and the anesthetic effect awaited? With ECT, can it just be administered unmodified? It can't be that painful, it will induce immediate unconsciousness anyway and it is the patient's fault, perhaps unmodified ECT can induce a change. I'm just curious to know from those who work in ER's, psych. wards/hospitals, etc. Answered by Ivory Plowe 1 year ago.

IV Medications used to treat combative patients is only administered if the patient cannot be reasoned with. At that point, the medications are simply used to sedate the patient so that they can be observed. Usually, that IV medication is something more similar to Xanax or Ativan used for short term relief of symptoms. Once a patient is sedated in the ER they would be involuntarily admitted to the psychology ward of the hospital. At that point, medication would be controlled by the doctor on staff and would not be administered through IV unless the patient refused medication in which case medication may be given involuntarily. However, the medication given in the ward would usually be meant to ease the symptoms of mental illness not sedate the patient. So, generally the patient will begin feeling better after taking the medications indicated for his/her condition and in turn become more compliant and there will no longer be a need to administer anything via IV. ECT is a last resort in many cases and is really only therapeutic for treating various forms of depression (though this point can be argued). Further, ECT is not meant to work as a sedating agent as you suggest with the above drugs. ECT is inherently sedating but the real reason for doing ECT is to change the patients brain chemistry so that their symptoms subside. Generally when a patient is undergoing ECT they are not combative. Answered by Alfred Corban 1 year ago.

It relies upon on the meds. I by surprise met a difficulty the place the nurse refused to replenish my Effexor and that i went via withdrawal for 2 days (it grew to become into torture). from time to time the drugstore supply you a pair of days properly worth of meds in the event that they know you're seeing a physician quickly. If that's no longer an selection authentic now, I say bypass to the ER and get your meds. Then attempt to discover someplace the place you may get seen by utilising a psychiatrist often. in case you're on incapacity or Medicare, numerous places will see you (even extreme-scale places). you do no longer could desire to bypass to the interior sight well-being sanatorium. stable success! :) draw close in there!!! :) Answered by Sparkle Macvane 1 year ago.


Is there a drug or poison that mimics death but allows the victim to survive?
You see it in like movie and books. I think it was in the recent x-men movie too with wolverine... Just wondering if this is something real or entirely science fiction. Asked by Evia Finigan 1 year ago.

Well, there's this muscle relaxant / respiratory sys depressant called succinylcholine (Anectine) used to paralyze muscle groups without really doing serious harm. Answered by Felicitas Ultsch 1 year ago.


Succinylcholine family allergy?
Looking moreso for an answer from an allergist or anesthesiologist. Not that long ago, my mother went to the ED, and I went with her. When they came to asking if she had any allergies, I know she had an allergy to PCN, but then she said she was allergic to something called "Anectine". I had never heard... Asked by Debbi Buel 1 year ago.

Looking moreso for an answer from an allergist or anesthesiologist. Not that long ago, my mother went to the ED, and I went with her. When they came to asking if she had any allergies, I know she had an allergy to PCN, but then she said she was allergic to something called "Anectine". I had never heard the Trade name before, so I had no idea what it was, but the triage nurse said "oh, that's ok. They haven't used the med in YEARS". So when I got home, I googled it and saw it was succ. I'm familiar with the med because I'm a paramedic, and although my med control doesn't allow RSI, other places do, so I at least had to study it. I also learned from my mother, that her aunt had actually died from it, which I'm assuming was due to MH. Then, when I was in the OR doing intubations for my paramedic, one of the anesthesiologists called it Anectine, and I mentioned something about what the triage nurse had said and that my mother was allergic to it. Then they gave me like a crazy look and said that was quite a big deal. I know that if I had to have surgery, I'd mention it to the anesthesiologist, and I could imagine they'd avoid it just because of family history, but knowing that there are paramedic services around here the do RSI, that makes me kind of nervous. From the sources I've looked at, it looks that it should be avoided for anyone who has a family history of MH. My question is, should I even bother to be tested for the allergy? I don't think it's neccessary that if I do discover I am allergic, that I actually get the muscle biopsy for MH because I would intend to avoid it regardless. Also, because my mothers aunt and my mother are allergic, is there a high chance I am allergic to? Or is it still rare? Also, anything else you think would be of any help to me. Answered by Donette Screen 1 year ago.

Not a true allergy, but it could be one of 2 things. 1. MH. VERY big deal, and it involves volatile anesthetics as well as sux. Find out if it's in your family, and if so, get tested. 2. More common, is atypical pseudocholinesterase, the enzyme that breaks down sux. That's genetic, so you might have it. Usually, the enzyme is present but works at very low capacity, so a dose of sux that should last 5 minutes might last 2-3 hours. And sux gets used a lot in the ED and the OR. Maybe the ED nurse was confused. It's a lifesaver with a questionable airway, but wouldn't be so if you have either of the above problems. You and your mom should research what happened to her and get medical records relating to the event. It's important to know which of the above it is. There is another thing that might have happened, which is a Phase 2 block from sux. If you get too much, it acts more like a non-depolarizing NMBA, and lasts a long time. That can easily be confused with atypical PCE, and is NOT an allergy or problem inherent in your mom. It was just too much sux. Hope that helps. Answered by Mirna Schnitzler 1 year ago.

Succinylcholine Allergy Answered by Ghislaine Hodell 1 year ago.

Well the best way for me to answer this for you is to tell you I have had air born (inhaled) allergies most of my life. I have become allergic to all the weeds, all the trees, all the grasses, cockroaches, cats and dogs. From there I started becoming allergic to foods. First wheat, which is obviously a grass.Then walnuts and I'm becoming sensitive to peanuts, and melons. I found out the hard way I'm allergic to shellfish. I was on a trip and consumed one shrimp and my throat began to close off. I took several benadryls and felt like death warmed over for several days after. Since then my children and my husband have become allergic to shellfish also. Strange that my husband and I both would have the same allergy to shellfish since he has never had any allergy problems at all. I believe that all of my inhalant allergies have pushed me to the point that I am now reacting to foods. I think I am a good example of why people with inhalant allergies need treatment to keep them from becoming allergic to foods. Answered by Lloyd Shimer 1 year ago.

What is MH. Not familiar with that abbreviation. However, succinylcholine is used often, more so in ICU/critical care, trauma. However it is not worth it for the allergy test, since they can only test you for certain genes/alleles that have been studied to be associated with MH (whatever it is). I would not worry about for you, despite the relatives allergy. And also succinylcholine is a inpatient med so will not be given at home anyway. Answered by Paul Dettmann 1 year ago.

It is a big deal and you should be tested and children you have should be tested. I have this and my youngest son also has this, Thank goodness he was tested before his surgery so he didn't have to go though what I did. I still thank the doctors that safed me that day. Answered by Corine Drutman 1 year ago.


Is there another easy, non-painful way to end my own life besides using carbon monoxide from car exhaust?
Can someone help me please. Asked by Terresa Bueschel 1 year ago.

No, that's about it. Unless you were to take >30 mg of valium and then give yourself a shot of anectine. Please let us know how it works out. GET COUNSELING!!! CALL THE SUICIDE HOT LINE!!! Nothing is THAT bad. Remember, you'll be sorry if you commit suicide. Answered by Marissa Pedez 1 year ago.

Don't kill yourself. It is NOT the answer. you may feel horrible now, but your life WILL turn around. You will be very happy you stuck around. There is someone who loves you... no matter what. Suicide is a very selfish thing to do. It puts your family and friends in more pain than you are in right now. Don't do it. Answered by Bulah Zwiefelhofer 1 year ago.

besides the actuality that the biggest section, by ability of a processes, of maximum combustion gases is incredibly threat unfastened nitrogen (N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2), a incredibly very small portion of it quite is undesirable noxious or poisonous components, alongside with carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particulate be counted. while a hydrocarbon combusts, it additionally produces water, or H2O Answered by Willette Gagen 1 year ago.

Doc, Please get help. Life is so hard sometimes, but you are here for a reason. Maybe you will move on from this and be a counselor for suicidal teenagers? Who knows? There are still good things waiting for you. Your life is valuable and its yours. Don't steal it from yourself. Answered by Debbi Manna 1 year ago.

Don't give up now. All it takes is for one great event to happen, and you won't regret another single day. A new love, holding your child, the difference you made in someone's life.... whatever it is. Hold out, because when it happens, you'll be glad you stuck around. Peace! Answered by Rosette Dunscomb 1 year ago.

Don't kill yourself. You may be feeling really bad right now but the idea behind suicide is to feel relief. Relief and a loss of pain is an emotion and you can't feel an emotion if your dead. It won't make it better, I promise. Please get help. www.nwrain.com/~skydiver/suicide.htm Answered by Nilda Mersereau 1 year ago.

There's no way that won't be painful to the people who care about you, even if you think no one does. Answered by Lauran Cossio 1 year ago.

no don't do it at all call 1-800-273 TALK , and don't wait Answered by Herb Vanostberg 1 year ago.


What substance is an efficient paralyzing agent?
This is simple curiosity Asked by Kelsie Bottalico 1 year ago.

Suxamethonium chloride (INN), also known as suxamethonium or succinylcholine, is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, used to induce muscle relaxation and short-term paralysis, usually to facilitate tracheal intubation. Suxamethonium is sold under the trade names Anectine, Quelicin, and Scoline. It is used as a paralytic agent for euthanasia/immobilization of horses. It is colloquially referred to as "sux" in hospital settings. Answered by Marceline Goldsmith 1 year ago.

Midazolam or sevoflurane. These two are very powerful anesthetics. Answered by Susana Wrighton 1 year ago.


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