AMBIEN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019908/002.

Names and composition

"AMBIEN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019908/002 AMBIEN ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
019908/001 AMBIEN ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021412/001 TOVALT ODT ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 5MG
021412/002 TOVALT ODT ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG
019908/002 AMBIEN ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
019908/001 AMBIEN ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
021774/001 AMBIEN CR ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12.5MG
021774/002 AMBIEN CR ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 6.25MG
021997/001 EDLUAR ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 5MG
021997/002 EDLUAR ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 10MG
022328/001 INTERMEZZO ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 1.75MG
022328/002 INTERMEZZO ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 3.5MG
076062/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
022196/001 ZOLPIMIST ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE SPRAY, METERED/ORAL 5MG per SPRAY
076062/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076410/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076410/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076578/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076578/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077214/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077214/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077288/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077288/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077322/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077322/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077359/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077359/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077388/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077388/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077540/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077540/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077773/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077773/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077884/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077884/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077903/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077903/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077985/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077985/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077990/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077990/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078016/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
078016/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078055/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
078055/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078129/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
078129/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078184/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
078184/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078413/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
078413/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078426/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
078426/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078616/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
078616/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
201509/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 5MG
201509/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 10MG
202657/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 5MG
202657/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 10MG
204299/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 1.75MG
204299/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 3.5MG
204503/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 1.75MG
204503/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 3.5MG
078148/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12.5MG
078148/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 6.25MG
078179/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12.5MG
078179/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 6.25MG
078483/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 6.25MG
078483/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12.5MG
078970/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 6.25MG
078970/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12.5MG
090107/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 6.25MG
090107/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12.5MG
090153/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 6.25MG
090153/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12.5MG
200266/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 6.25MG
200266/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12.5MG
204170/001 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 6.25MG
204170/002 ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE ZOLPIDEM TARTRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12.5MG

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Answered questions

Information on ambien?
My doctor says I should start taking it.I have pretty bad insomnia, and he said that taking it and getting more sleep could help with my behavior(my dad told him that I tend to rebel, which I won't completely deny). But anyway, I was wondering what it will do.Like if there's any side effects, or if I'll have... Asked by Sydney Pulfrey 1 month ago.

My doctor says I should start taking it. I have pretty bad insomnia, and he said that taking it and getting more sleep could help with my behavior(my dad told him that I tend to rebel, which I won't completely deny). But anyway, I was wondering what it will do. Like if there's any side effects, or if I'll have a lot of trouble waking up in the morning. I also want to know if it can become addicting easily or anything like that. Also, I have a history of depression(I've tried to kill myself before). Right now I'm fine, but I'm worried if taking sleeping pills will effect me in a way that will make it come back. Just so you know, I'm 14 and I've had insomnia since the fifth grade. Answered by Frederica Weathers 1 month ago.

Ambien is used for short-term treatment of insomnia (difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, or early awakening). A relatively new drug, it is chemically different from other common sleep medications such as Halcion and Dalmane. Most important fact about Ambien Sleep problems are usually temporary and require medication for a week or two at most. Insomnia that lasts longer could be a sign of another medical problem. If you find that you need this medicine for more than 7 to 10 days, be sure to check with your doctor. Ambien works very quickly. Take it just before going to bed. Take only the prescribed dose, exactly as instructed by your doctor. --If you miss a dose... Take Ambien only as needed. Never double the dose. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, tell your doctor immediately. Only your doctor can determine whether it is safe to continue taking Ambien. More common side effects may include: Allergy, daytime drowsiness, dizziness, drugged feeling, headache, indigestion, nausea Special warnings about Ambien When sleep medications are used every night for more than a few weeks, some may lose their effectiveness. Remember, too, that you can become dependent on some sleep medications if you use them for a long time or at high doses. Some people using Ambien--especially those taking serotonin-boosting antidepressants--have experienced unusual changes in their thinking and/or behavior. Alert your doctor if you notice a change. Ambien and other sleep medicines can cause a special type of memory loss. It should not be taken on an overnight airplane flight of less than 7 to 8 hours, since "traveler's amnesia" may occur. Answered by Jeremy Maier 1 month ago.

Ambien is one of the most prescribed sleep medication in the United States for people suffering from insomnia. It is highly effective for the treatment of insomnia on a short-term basis. In case you are having sleepless night Ambien helps in getting a good night's sleep. Ambien works in combination with the natural brain chemical Gaba. Gaba is a neurotransmitter and is one of the 18 major brain chemicals that control communication among neighboring brain cells. Once this chemical is discharged from a brain cell, it is hypothesized that GABA dampens the electrical activity of neighboring brain cells. Laboratory studies have shown that Ambien works with Gaba to further reduce the possibility of certain brain cells becoming electrically active. Unlike older sleep drugs, Ambien targets a specific area of the brain cell. Answered by Deetta Gambles 1 month ago.


About ambien?
ive been taking ambien for eight months and i think i maybe addicted , cant go one night without it. should i kick the habit? how? Asked by Ernesto Dietsch 1 month ago.

Ambien is a very dangerous drug that is completely misrepresented as safe. It's definitely not something you can take every day or even every once in awhile for the long term. The very least of the problems it causes is it destroys your normal sleep cycle. It took me the better part of a year to recover from that and I still use a prescription sleep aid many nights. What you should do is talk to your doctor about this and consider getting a script for a new sleep drug called Rozerem. Rozerem is non narcotic and has none of the problems that Ambien has. Stop using Ambien cold turkey and switch to Rozerem. Then taper off on the drug. This will take awhile I bet since you've been using Ambien for 8 months. Answered by Rickie Remfert 1 month ago.

I have been taking Ambien for probably 15 years now (whenever it came on the market) to counteract another med I take that causes insomnia (catch 22 there, unfortunately). I have not found it to be addictive other than when I have run out or stop it, I have a few nights of poor sleep until the natural mechanisms of the body for sleep kick back in. I have never felt any other phsycial or psychological withdrawal. I have switched to Ambien Controlled release recently and find it good. I have found that any sleep med will affect the body's natural ability to sleep without it and will take a few days to return. Answered by Jarod Beshear 1 month ago.

These are highly addictive. At one point I was addicted to them. I was taking 20 or 30 a day (10 mg). (NO.. I am NOT making this up)They say not to take it more than 15 days a month....I now know why. I would talk to my doctor and ask him to change me to something else QUICKLY. I finally kicked the habit but it took taking 1 minute at a time. You may not sleep for a few days but eventually it Will be out of your system Answered by Honey Lebeck 1 month ago.

If you feel like you are addicted this is something that you need to discuss with your doctor. My friend takes Ambien and she does the sleep eating thing. A little worrisome for sure. Good Luck. Answered by Vaughn Rease 1 month ago.

Ambien works in combination with the natural brain chemical Gaba. Gaba is a neurotransmitter and is one of the 18 major brain chemicals that control communication among neighboring brain cells. Once this chemical is discharged from a brain cell, it is hypothesized that GABA dampens the electrical activity of neighboring brain cells. Laboratory studies have shown that Ambien works with Gaba to further reduce the possibility of certain brain cells becoming electrically active. Unlike older sleep drugs, Ambien targets a specific area of the brain cell. The drug is very effective in helping me to fall asleep, and to get a good night's sleep. Answered by Jake Muckel 1 month ago.

Yeah I was addicted to those. Sometimes I would take like 6. They are addictive because they make you feel really good. Like a low dose of x that makes you sleepy. You can quit by gradually lowering your dose and substituting the ambien with benadryl so you can sleep until you are off the ambien and then come off the benadryl in a week or two. Your doctor will confirm what I just said. I know from experiance. Benadryl is diphenhydramine hydrochloride which is an antihistime and also has seratonin reuptake inhibitor qualities and is not addictive. Prozac was actually developed because of diphenhydramine hydrochloride. Answered by Belen Fleischhacker 1 month ago.

Well for the first thing.... if you have children stop taking it now.... they had reports of a women who was taking it and her house caught on fire.... her and her kids died cuz she was unable to get up and wake up..... I have taken it and did not like what is what doing to me... if you think you are addicted then talk to your doc....if you still are not happy with that then go to the er.....Insomnia is a pain in the rump.... I take trazadone..... I would start by not taking it on the nights you can stay awake (like the nights before you don't have to go to work).... Cut your caffeine back a couple of hours before you go to bed..... don't work out before you go to bed.... your doc can help with the rest Answered by Gilma Pothier 1 month ago.

ambien is known to be addictive. Answered by Catrina Graffam 1 month ago.


(zolpidem tartrate)- is the ingredient in Ambien?
I was told there was no genaric for Ambien and my friend in NC showed me she was perscribed Zolpidem as the genaric for $8. Does anyone use this instead of high priced Ambien? Thanks Asked by Kindra Welander 1 month ago.

Yes Ambien (zolpidem tartrate) is a generic drug in the United States, Canada, and many other countries. When a doctor writes a prescription for Ambien a pharmacist will use a generic when it is available. But a doctor can write 'no substitutions,' requiring that brand name Ambien (or any drug) be given. And generally patients can request the brand name product if they are willing to pay the extra money. However, Ambien CR (zolpidem tartrate extended release) is NOT available as a generic. It is also a waste a money for the vast majority of people (ie only a handful benefit from the extended release and other cheaper long lasting drug are available). Most generics are as good as brand name drugs. About 2% of people have increased drug sensitivity and do better on brand name products rather than generics. And some specific generics of drugs are often not as effective. Anticonvulsants are well known for having terrible generics and neurologists often require brand name for patients. But I typically recommend generics. I did have Ambien generic for a couple of weeks. I took Apotex brand. Most Apotex drugs have APO on them. I have also taken brand name Sanofi-Aventis Ambien and Stilnox (the name of Ambien in France) and found Sanofi-Aventis and Apotex to work equally. And if price is a big issue (generic Ambien is typically more than $8) then other drugs like Restoril (Temazepam) are about $8-14 for 30. Good luck Answered by Theodora Haberern 1 month ago.

Zolpidem is a prescription medication used for the short-term treatment of insomnia, as well as some brain disorders. It is a short-acting nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic that potentiates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter, by binding to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors at the same location as benzodiazepines.[1] It works quickly (usually within 15 minutes) and has a short half-life (2–3 hours). Trade names of zolpidem include Adormix, Ambien, Ambien CR, Edluar, Damixan, Hypnogen, Ivedal, Nytamel, Stilnoct, Stilnox, Sucedal, Zoldem, Zolnod and Zolpihexal.[2][3][4][5] Answered by Lakisha Cena 1 month ago.

Zolpidem is a hypnotic, prescribed for the short term treatment of insomnia, or difficulty in getting to sleep or staying asleep. Take one tablet nightly before bed as needed and when you are sure that you will be getting at least 8hrs. sleep. Do not drive or operate machinery while taking this medication. Use care until you are familiar with effects. Answered by Lauren Mazuc 1 month ago.


Snorting ambien sideeffects?
I have a mass in my right temprallobe over my hearing. i get sharp pain from sounds i hear no one else does....i'm waiting on surgery.it is very good god damn hard for mre to sleep. i am on 10mg ambien, 50mg 3xday lamictal. i need sleep i have taken up to 5 at a time nosleep my mind jumps from job to job but... Asked by Celia Norwood 1 month ago.

I have a mass in my right temprallobe over my hearing. i get sharp pain from sounds i hear no one else does....i'm waiting on surgery.it is very good god damn hard for mre to sleep. i am on 10mg ambien, 50mg 3xday lamictal. i need sleep i have taken up to 5 at a time nosleep my mind jumps from job to job but if i laydown i get hot and preassure in my head clims. i want sleep...im on day 3 78hr 13min 58sec i need sleep or im taking half the bottol and work it out later ...............please get back to me quick Answered by Amparo Trojacek 1 month ago.

Ambien is a popular sedative that is used to treat the sleep disorder insomnia. It works with the chemicals in the brain that might be in an unbalanced state and therefore might trigger issues with sleeping and the inability to fall asleep at night. Ambience induces feelings of relaxation to assist insomniacs with falling asleep, and it is believed to be a reliable option for dealing with sleeping issues on a short-term basis. As with any kind of sleep medications, there are various side effects that are commonly associated with using Ambien. Allergic Reactions Some people might experience allergic reactions as side effects to taking Ambien. Some typical signs of allergic reaction to this sleep medication include having a hard time breathing, breaking out into hives and swelling of the tongue, lips, face or throat. If you start to experience any of these allergic reactions, you should immediately cease taking Ambien and seek emergency medical attention. Memory Loss One adverse side effect experienced by individuals who have taken Ambien is loss of memory. Some people who have taken Ambien have engaged in various activities including driving, calling people on the telephone, talking to friends and family, and eating meals, yet later have reported no memory of partaking in those behaviors. Typical Side Effects The manufacturers of Ambien state that typical side effects of this drug are next-day drowsiness, sleepiness and fatigue, dizziness and having headaches. These are common side effects for people who take this sleep medication and usually occur soon after an individual starts using Ambien. Serious Side Effects There are several more serious side effects that are associated with taking Ambien. These include becoming dependent on the drug, going through withdrawal symptoms after the drug use has stopped, exhibiting more outgoing or aggressive behavior than usual, feelings of irritation, confusion, hallucinations, depression, out-of-character behavior and suicidal thoughts. Other Side Effects Other side effects of Ambien that are not usually seen as serious but at the same time are less rare include vomiting, nausea, digestive issues, muscle pains and aches, abnormal or extremely vivid dreams, and even feelings of confusion and being dazed. Answered by Sol Gere 1 month ago.

Snorting Ambien Side Effects Answered by Jarred Honberger 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: snorting ambien sideeffects? I have a mass in my right temprallobe over my hearing. i get sharp pain from sounds i hear no one else does....i'm waiting on surgery.it is very good god damn hard for mre to sleep. i am on 10mg ambien, 50mg 3xday lamictal. i need sleep i have taken up to 5 at a time nosleep my mind jumps from... Answered by Kasandra Rosencranz 1 month ago.

It is a benzodiazepine relative. Which means addictive, and dangerous. It is coated the way it is specifically to allow it to release slowly. Snorting it of course eliminates this and causes it to pass into your bloodstream very quickly. Death has occurred from this almost instantly, as in 2 seconds. Others have gotten away with snorting it for quite awhile before it causes major damage. All in all it is a bad idea to even consider. Answered by Marcelina Tomb 1 month ago.

he best sleeping pills are the ones that work for you. Because every person is different, sometimes you need to experiment to figure out what works best for you. When considering treatment options for insomnia, the relative benefits and drawbacks of sleeping pills should be taken into account. Zolpidem (Ambien), an imidazopyridine, is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for insomnia. It is highly effective for the treatment of insomnia on a short-term basis. Zolpidem is a hypnotic agent with a chemical structure unrelated to benzodiazepines. Answered by Lisabeth Dapoz 1 month ago.

a mild high that feels good. Answered by Ricki Buchholz 1 month ago.


Anyone with amnesia after taking Ambien?
I took Ambien for the first time last night. I remember taking it around 10:15pm and then getting into bed to watch Late Night with Conan that I had taped the night before. When I woke up this morning, my bra was on the floor and my husband said that we had sex last night, yet I don't remember a thing. It... Asked by Taryn Chasen 1 month ago.

I took Ambien for the first time last night. I remember taking it around 10:15pm and then getting into bed to watch Late Night with Conan that I had taped the night before. When I woke up this morning, my bra was on the floor and my husband said that we had sex last night, yet I don't remember a thing. It really scares me that I don't remember anything. Has anyone else out there had a similar experience? And do you ever get that memory back? Answered by Dion Cummiskey 1 month ago.

I took Ambien nearly every night for about a year due to my chronic insomnia, and I had dozens of incidents of amnesia. No, the memories really never came back for most of them. Sometimes, when I think really hard I could remember bits like a from a vague dream, but sometimes I recalled nothing. In addition to amnesia I also did and said things I wouldn't normally. I apparently shopped online for things I didn't even want. I wouldn't know what I had done until packages showed up on the doorstep. I can to return them, of course. Also, I made phone calls and sent text messages. It was scary to wake up in the morning and discover that I had been on the phone between 11 and 11:45 when I thought I fell asleep at 10:30. Hearing about what I said in the conversations was even more painful. I apparently told my boyfriend that I had been unfaithful to him, but the thing is I wasn't ever unfaithful to him. To this day, I think he still has doubts about me which is a bummer. I found that I could avoid all of the bad effects of Ambien such as amnesia, etc., provided that I got into bed with the lights out (and no computer or phone near by) within 15 minutes of taking the pill. It sounds simple enough but for me, it worked every time. No amnesia, because there was nothing to remember. Personally, I think it's a very effective medication that helps me sleep and doesn't make me feel groggy in the morning. If I have insomnia again, I'll take Ambien again. I only ran into trouble when I tried to milk a few extra minutes out of my day by staying awake even after I'd taken the Ambien. Having sex with your husband sounds like a positive outcome --even if you can't remember it, but be careful. Some people actually drive in their Ambien sleep and lots of people end up gaining mystery weight because they eat massive amounts of food when they are Ambien asleep. There are two Ambien formulas: regular and CR. If you have problems with one, consider taking the other. Ask your doctor for more info. Answered by Jacquelynn Porcaro 1 month ago.

Amnesia can occur as a result of taking Ambien.My brother had amnesia after taking Ambien-that memory does not usually come back. Answered by Berry Ricardo 1 month ago.

You are not alone. This is a fairly common side effect of Ambien and the reason I stopped taking the drug myself. It made me feel funny and sort of disconnected. A couple of mornings after I'd get up and find someone had made a real mess in the kitchen (and I live alone!). I think Ambien is just fine if you take it and go RIGHT to sleep. Sometimes, though, I'd take it, intending to go to sleep, then kinda drift around the house in a semi-hyponotic state. I have a fuzzy memory of going outside one night, where I may or may not have had a conversation with a random guy who passed by my house. I still don't know if that event REALLY took place or if I just imagined it. That was the last night I ever took Ambien! Answered by Keith Monkowski 1 month ago.

Ambien does have that side-effect with some people. Only take it when alone, or with someone nearby that you trust implicitely. As with any sleep aid, clear your schedule and plan on going right to bed after taking them. Answered by Larita Bailin 1 month ago.

Ambien CR extended-release tablets comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Ambien CR extended-release tablets refilled. Helps you to stay asleep. It is disturbing to wake up during the night without being able to sleep gain. After taking Ambien insomnia patients report significantly fewer awakenings, compared with placebo. Helps you to avoid waking up early. It provides a full night's sleep, and has been proven to increase total sleep time. Answered by Shon Littrel 1 month ago.


Why do some people like sex on ambien?
It's like impossible to come on it! It's hard to get it up, also. Asked by Yu Tremper 1 month ago.

Ambien is said to offer more than a night of super sleep. For some, the drug can produce a haze of inhibition, making sex crazier, hotter, and more erotic. This is a new incarnation of Ambien sex. It’s already widely known that Ambien can act as a memory eraser. People have sought advice after having affairs in Ambien-induced states, waking up to phone calls from women they have no recollection of meeting, let alone sleeping with. Ambien works in conjunction with a neurotransmitter called Gamma-Aminobuytric acid, a brain chemical that when mixed with the drug reduces the general level of electrical activity in certain areas of the brain associated with sleep. But Ambien, which is classified as a hypnotic drug, works on the same receptors as benzodiazapines. In other words, Ambien shouldn’t be any more sexually exciting than Valium. There are benzodiazapine receptors in the brain, but those are the kinds that are sought out for sedation, not sexual excitement. "The vast majority of people who use Ambien do not find that it promotes sex, and more often they find that it interferes with sexual interest,” says Dr. David Schab, assistant professor of psychiatry at Columbia University. Medical experts, like Schab, say that to the extent Ambien creates a buzz or sense of haziness, someone might be less mindful of his or her usual inhibitions. Answered by Elsie Rebillard 1 month ago.

Ambien is an off-white crystalline powder which is sparingly soluble in water, alcohol and propylene glycol. Inactive ingredients in the tablet include micro-crystalline cellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, polyethylene glycol, lactose, magnesium stearate, titanium dioxide and sodium starch glycolate. Initial dose of Ambien is 6.25 mg for women. For men, the dose would be could range from 6.25 mg to 12.5 mg. The medicine must be taken by insomnia patient immediately before bedtime. Sleeping time after taking the drug must be at least 7-8 hours. For patients suffering from hepatic impairment, the recommended dose is 6.25 mg for men and 2.2mg for women. Answered by Tamekia Lezo 1 month ago.

different strokes for different folks. the variety of human experience is wide. Answered by Simone Ovens 1 month ago.


Is ambien a benzo? And does it actually work?
Crap I took 10mg of ambain and now I am scared I am going to go drive off somewhere, maybe I should hand cuff myself to my bed.I have it but never ever take it because I am afraid of the side effects, I also have seroquel at a low dose, but think I might have taken to much stuff already. Poo another sleepless... Asked by Jesse Figurelli 1 month ago.

In fact not to make myself sound like a junkie for anything or the sort because I absolutely am not. I was in a very bad accident last year and have PTSD, Extreme Anxiety,, Major depressive disorder and insomnia. So there is a ligament reason for me having all this.I took one more 5mg. Hoping it knocks me out I have a very hard time sleeping since the accident. Answered by Minta Gaton 1 month ago.

Crap I took 10mg of ambain and now I am scared I am going to go drive off somewhere, maybe I should hand cuff myself to my bed. I have it but never ever take it because I am afraid of the side effects, I also have seroquel at a low dose, but think I might have taken to much stuff already. Poo another sleepless night and its already midnight. Answered by George Hoock 1 month ago.

Ambien is not a benzo, but it is extremely close. 5 mg is half the normal dose (at least it was, before the FDA recommended cutting that amount in half) and while it should work even at that amount, in your case it probably won't work at all. This is because even though Ambien is not a benzo, it is still affected by cross-tolerance to other benzos like Xanax. If you have a tolerance built up to Xanax and Valium, the Ambien is just not going to be very effective unless you use way more than recommended, but PLEASE don't do that! Ambien can be an incredibly destructive drug, not just for you, but those around you as well. The sleep-driving side effect is not a joke; in fact, while I was on Ambien, I did it several times (of course in my case, I became very addicted to it). Thank God I didn't accidentally kill anyone. Even if you don't actually drive while asleep, it is very common to do other things while asleep like cook food or even have sex! The creepy thing about it is you are semi-conscious and you may appear perfectly fine. Then you wake up the next day with a vague blurry memory of what happened and pray you didn't do something you'll regret. Beyond the above warning, though, as someone who also has dealt with extreme anxiety and depression and still deals with persistent insomnia as the result of all of my misguided attempts at self-medication (and Ambien abuse caused the most damage, by the way), I can tell you that Ambien should NEVER be taken by someone with depression or anxiety. Benzos and z-drugs (Zolpidem, which is Ambien, Zopiclone, Zaleplon) may help you get to sleep, but they disrupt your sleep architecture so much that it can severly compromise your mental health. In my experience, after using Ambien for several months I went from being mildly to depressed to suicidal and paranoid. Keep in mind though, that I was using two and three times the standard dose, but still, when you're desperate for sleep, or in my case, chasing the hallucinatory effects (a whole other story), you often find yourself acting without your best judgement. Finally, instead of Ambien, I suggest using a small amount of melatonin to help you get to sleep. Because I can't use benzos, melatonin is a godsend to me, but if do use it, there are some precautions to consider. First, regardless of what it says on the bottle, you only need 1 mg to safely initiate sleep. I suggest buying the 3 mg version and cutting it into fourths. 0.75 mg works fine for me and has continued to work just as well as the first time I used it over 2 years ago. Second, take it 30 minutes before your normal bedtime. If you need to stay up later, don't use it at all because it can disrupt your circadian rhythm if you use it at the wrong time. I've followed these rules myself and have been able to finally stabilize my sleep enough to function almost as normally as I did before. By the way, if you have really bad nightmares like I have, taking antidepressants or something like L-Tryptophan just before going to sleep will increase your serotonin levels enough to decrease the amount of time of you spend in REM sleep which is when you experience the most vivid dreaming (or nightmares in my case). This is okay to do because depression actually causes you to get too much REM sleep and not enough NREM sleep. I hope this info helps you out. Send me a private message if you have any other questions. Answered by Terrell Tredway 1 month ago.

Is Ambien A Benzo Answered by Rosario Kanode 1 month ago.

cross tolerance is correct Ambien excites the Gabba receptor but doesn't latch on. Ambien is Benzo like tramadol is a opiate. Ambien was created to trigger the sleep mechanism but not give any euphoria. becareful about quitting cold turkey on Ambien panick attacks paranoia can follow . Also benzos and alchole are the only two drugs people can die from withdrawal from, and since Ambien phesdeo Benzo I would be worried. Secound Remeron or mitazpine flexril all mom habit forming and would not have cross tolerance, this could be something to help you replace Ambien I have reacted badly to melatonin so I don't suggest it if you do take the least amount and I think the liquid one is the better from veg. source Answered by Brandon Gabl 1 month ago.

Is Ambien A Benzodiazepine Answered by Ching Delaware 1 month ago.

SWIM need to: 1) detox from sleep meds. They are not intended for ongoing use and can become physically addictive. If that's 20mg of ambien she's taking, this is an even more urgent issue. 2) engage in a sleep/wake study which may help a great deal with many forms of sleep issues. This should very probably be done after the detox process. Answered by Cara Lamott 1 month ago.

The dose of Ambien depends on many things like age, weight, individual variations and medical or psychological conditions. The dose can be 5 mg or 10 mg depends as I mentioned before... I have seen people taking up to 20 mg to sleep however I do not encourage you to do so.... Ambien is not benzo group however it is similar only to it in term of helping people to sleep and all the other benzo group has other uses beside the sleeping part. Finally try 10 mg and if not working, have the doctor to try Ambien 12.5 mg ER or change it completely to something else for example Ativan.. good luck Answered by Elouise Heybrock 1 month ago.

Zolpidem tartrate (Brand name Ambien) is a non-benzodiazepine sedative-hypnotic agent used for insomnia. Although it is chemically unrelated to benzodiazepines, it does interact with the same receptor and can have similar pharmacologic properties. Different available dosage forms include 5mg tabs, 10mg tabs, ER 6.25mg tabs, ER 12.5mg tabs, oral spray, and sublingual tablets. Typical starting doses will include 5mg given 1/2 hour prior to bedtime. It is recommended that 7-8 hours will remain before the planned time of awakening. Maximum dosage limits for immediate release products are typically 10mg at bedtime. This drug is a Pregnancy Category C, therefore its use in pregnancy is not typically recommended unless there is clear benefit over risk. Common side effects you could experience include dizziness, headache, anxiety, and fatigue. Overall, Zolpidem has been found to be an effective agent in helping with short-term insomnia. It is a product better suited for issues of falling asleep rather than staying asleep. Dependence can become an issue with these medications. I hope this helps! Answered by Leonila Emery 1 month ago.

I took 10mg of Ambien around midnight..... By 1:00am, I was waking-up old friends calling them on the phone, eating Ovaltine out of the jar, watering my lawn in my underwear, doing calculus problems I hadn't calculated since college 20 years ago. It is INSANE the effect that sh*t had on me - I remember part of what I did, but cannot figure out what kind of drug that is! I ended up sleeping about 2 hours tops, woke up depressed as hell. Be careful - it's not a benzo, it's a lot closer to bad blotter acid. Answered by Katheryn Eck 1 month ago.

The study found that taking the sleeping pill enhances the brain’s ability to consolidate memories, or move information from short-term to long-term storage. Ambien is known to increase spindle activity, while Xyrem is known to decrease it. Researchers monitored their sleep, measured sleepiness and mood, and gave the subjects several memory tests. But if your learning is followed by a period of amnesia, which decreases your brain activity, you are eliminating those interruptions and it may make it easier to retain what you learned learned before you took the Ambien. Answered by Madlyn Vitera 1 month ago.


Does anyone know if the sleep aid Ambien...?
is addictive or not? If it is do you know of one that has to be prescribed that isn't? I have tried over the counter ones and they just don't work for me.Please don't tell me not to take them.I haven't slept more than 2 hours each night for 2 weeks.I need some help.I am exhausted. Asked by Keeley Gramm 1 month ago.

Ambien is physically addictive (dependance). If you take it as prescribed, you can still develop a terrible physical addiction, and in only a few weeks. Ambien quickly takes away from the brain the abiilty to sleep without it. After a week or so, you quit taking it and you don't sleep at all. Zero. No sleep. For every week you take ambien, it will take one week to recover from it, according to my sleep Doctor, who also told me he seldom prescribes it because it is so harsh on the brain. I took it for four and a half months. I would get about four hours of sleep every night, and when the ambien wore off at 3am or so, I would wake up and be unable to sleep. When I quit taking it, I suffered severe insomnia for four months. Four very long very hellish months. I suffered moderate anxiety and insomnia for over a year. It is not unusual for it to take two years to recover from long term ambien usage. It is a drug from hell. I know you don't want to hear this, but Ambien will not help you. Ambien is not the solution to your sleep problems. Answered by Alejandro Dalluge 1 month ago.

There are two definitions associated with the word "addictive." The first is dependence; Dependence is when the body requires the drug. If the user does not take the drug, they will experience withdrawal symptoms. The second definition is for an addictive behavior; In the case of drugs this is substance abuse, where the user takes the drug inappropriately or in higher-than-intended doses for the purpose of getting high. A large amount of prescribed drugs (and likely all prescribed hypnotic medication) can cause dependence, but this isn't really a problem if a) the drug is taken as directed and b) it is only discontinued under doctor's advise. As for abuse potential, ambien does have a recreational value and can be abused to achieve a high. If you don't have a history of drug abuse in your family and you're emotionally stable, then it's highly likely that you can take the drug as prescribed and never become "addicted" in the second sense of the word. If you're really concerned about it, then you should ask your doctor for advice about alternative medication. Answered by Danilo Ackerman 1 month ago.

I've taken Ambien, and all sleep aids are addictive. Right now I take Clozepam, an anti-anxiety drug that helps me get to sleep. You will get addicted, so the best thing is not to take them for long periods of time. I think also, Tylenol PM really does work, it is over the counter, and I know that is does work. I don't think it's addictive either. Answered by Jenifer Breister 1 month ago.

The normal Ambien (zolpidem ) dose for treatment of insomnia in adults is 10 milligrams immediate release or 12.5 milligrams extended release taken orally immediately before bedtime. Dosing should be individualized to patient response. Therapy should be limited to seven to 10 days. In reality, insomnia patients are often long-term users of zolpidem; few experience adverse effects. While the manufacturer recommends a maximum adult dose of 10 milligrams , studies have found 10 to 20 milligrams effective for insomnia in healthy adults. There are no data on the effectiveness or safety of zolpidem in children under 18 years of age. Answered by Cristie Eskenazi 1 month ago.

Im not sure about addictions but ive tried Ambien a couple times before because I have insomnia but I was like having hillucinations and it even kinda kept me up... Answered by Briana Hernandez 1 month ago.

Yes I have taken it. It made me hallucinate. I was on my computer at the time and all the words I was typing started bouncing around the screen and floating in the air. my cupboards were moving in and out and my bed was moving like a snake. My friend also took it and drove and.crashed her car....she had no recolection of getting in the car and driving. Def not a drug of choice. Answered by Perla Parone 1 month ago.

You might try Trazodone. It's not addictive, and doctors often prescribe it as a sleep aid. Answered by Tifany Douville 1 month ago.

i take ambien cause of two hip surgeries and i havent had a problem with it Answered by Philip Rayas 1 month ago.


What are the effects of prolonged Ambien use?
If you take Ambien for a long time, can it cause depression or other side effects? Asked by Denae Katula 1 month ago.

Ambien is a medication prescribed to individuals with sleeping disorders. It is often used to treat disorders such as insomnia and is intended for short-term consumption. Ambien, also known as zolpidem, works to help individuals fall asleep and maintain restful sleep. Due to its sedative affect on the individual and risk for dependency, the use of Ambien should be closely monitored by a health care professional. Prolonged use of the medication can produce a range of potentially serious side effects. Addiction It is possible to become addicted to Ambien with prolonged use. Due to its sedative nature, individuals may take it upon themselves to treat other conditions or emotional states with Ambien. This is more common in people who have suffered from addiction to other substances than in the general population. In addition, prolonged use of Ambien may lead to higher levels of tolerance, which may leave users feeling a need to increase the dosage of their medication. This is often done without consulting a health care professional, which can be extremely dangerous. Beat Alcohol Addiction Hazelden Treats Addiction and Transforms Lives. 24 Hour Hotline. www.Hazelden.org Sponsored Links Drowsiness Increased drowsiness is both a short-term and long-term effect of the use of Ambien. In people taking the drug over prolonged periods of time, drowsiness may occur throughout the day and make it difficult for users to perform daily activities. Tasks such as driving or working (especially with machinery) may be dangerous. Symptoms of the drug may carry over from the previous evening's administration. This is especially true for people taking high doses of the medication. Memory Loss Prolonged use of Ambien can also cause memory loss. The makers of Ambien recommend that people who are taking this medication not travel, since they could have lapses in memory after taking the drug. This is often referred to as "traveler's amnesia." Any episodes of memory lapses should be monitored by a health care provider. Other Symptoms In rare cases, individuals may experience worsening symptoms of depression, behavior changes or even suicidal thoughts. According to the FDA, the drug is classified as a hypnotic medication. With prolonged use, individuals with depressive disorders or other mental health disorders may experience more severe episodes or worsening symptoms. If this is noticed, a physician should be consulted immediately. Answered by Lenita Scheperle 1 month ago.

I know two people who have died from side effects of taking Ambien. One walked out into the middle of the street not realizing it and got hit by a car. The other took Ambien and then went to bed. They are assuming she got up and took another not realizing that she had already taken one, then for some reason went to the front door and opened the door where she collapsed in the door way in -10 below weather. They found her the next morning her body temperature was 80 degrees the room temperature was below 30 degrees. They tried to save her but they couldnt. Ambien is a very very scary drug and I wouldnt recommend anyone taking it. You however have been taking it a long time and know the side effects and have probably heard other horror stories. No one wants to be addicted to a medication. I would consult your doctor and even consider letting them professionally detox you. It would be worth it! I would hate for something to happen to you with a new baby at home! Good luck!!! Answered by Alva Seltz 1 month ago.

Ambien has the same sedative/hypnotic and memory impairing effects as clonazepam . Ambien is short-acting, the half-life is 2- 3 hours whereas clonaepam is long-acting with a half-life of 18-50 hours. If you can take 4mg of clonazepam and 10mg of ambien and not be sedated into sleep, you have a serious tolerance and addiction problem, my friend. They are both powerful drugs. Long term use of benzodiazepines at high doses causes brain damage and psychosis. Get off while you still have a brain. Seriously, find a detox and rehab and get your life back. Answered by Jackie Allemond 1 month ago.


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