Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 015874/001.

Names and composition

"ALUPENT" is the commercial name of a drug composed of METAPROTERENOL SULFATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
015874/001 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
015874/002 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
016402/001 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.65MG per INH
017571/001 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
017659/001 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 5%
018761/001 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.6%
018761/002 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.4%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
015874/001 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
015874/002 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
016402/001 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.65MG per INH
017571/001 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
017659/001 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 5%
018761/001 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.6%
018761/002 ALUPENT METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.4%
070804/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.6%
070805/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 5%
071013/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
071014/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
071018/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.6%
071275/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.4%
071656/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
071726/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.6%
071786/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.4%
071805/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.5%
071806/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.33%
071855/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.4%
072023/001 PROMETA METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
072024/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072025/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
072054/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072055/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
072190/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 5%
072519/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072520/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
072761/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
072795/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
073013/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
073034/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
073340/001 PROMETA METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 5%
073632/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
074702/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
075235/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
075402/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.4%
075403/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.6%
075586/001 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.4%
075586/002 METAPROTERENOL SULFATE METAPROTERENOL SULFATE SOLUTION/INHALATION 0.6%

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Why caution administering alupent to diabetes patient?
Thank you for getting back to me, is it that it in some way inhibits the insulin either in production or release, or is it that it effects the cell membrane from allowing sugar to pass, or some other reason? I only ask because I spent time researching and can't find any specific information. Thanks Asked by Cliff Pfahler 2 years ago.

One of the cautions in using alupent is for diabetic patients. I understand the cautions with cardiac patients, because of the sympathomimetic influence, but don't grasp the effects with a diabetic patients. Will the sympathetic response boost metabolism burning more sugar? Any information would be appreciated. Thanks Answered by Thelma Horkley 2 years ago.

There is a very small possibility that metoproteronol (Alupent) may increase blood sugar levels after use. There have been a few case reports with IV albuterol (not available in US) or terbutaline causing this problem. The chances of this happening with Alupent, if properly taken, is unlikely. Regardless, if you have diabetes, it wouldn't hurt to monitor your blood sugar after taking this drug. Answered by Yolanda Bigsby 2 years ago.


I'm taking Alupent inhaler is there another inhalent that is equivalent to it ? If so were can I find it?
SoMeOnE pLeAsE hElP!! Asked by Marylee Whitesides 2 years ago.

The generic name of the brand name Alupent is metaproterenol sulfate. You need to ask your physician or pharmacist to see if there are other brand names of metaproterenol sulfate available, or if the generic version is available for purchase - resulting in a lower cost to the patient. Answered by Judith Unrau 2 years ago.


What is the difference between Albuterol and Alupent for quick acting asthma relief?
I hove both Albuterol and Alupent in my medicine cabinet. My doctor didn't give me clear directions about which to take. The pharmacist said that both are interchangeable. Is this true? What is the difference? Asked by Miss Kakar 2 years ago.

Matt's right. Albuterol has less cardiac side effects. Answered by Marquitta Shellhamer 2 years ago.

To make it simple, They both do the same thing. The way I understand it is, Alupent was first on the market for asthma relief and had many side effects like racing heart and overall jittery feeling. Then came along albuterol. Albuterol did the same as Alupent on opening the airways and had less side effects. To add to this, now there is Levalbuterol (Xopenex) that has less side effect then albuterol. If I were you, I would use the one that did the best for asthma relief and had the least side effects. Good luck Answered by Ellis Aikey 2 years ago.

Both are considered quick-acting beta agonists. Which one works better for you when you need it? That's the question that will answer which one you should take. And the answer to that question is different for everyone. For example, albuterol works best for me when I need something, but some kinds of albuterol (Proventil HFA, for instance) don't work as well as others do (ProAir HFA, for example). So then, something else to think about is whether it's just the medication or the brand of it. In theory, it doesn't matter what you use, but in practice, it can make all the difference in the world when you're having an exacerbation. Answered by Salvador Torgersen 2 years ago.


Whats up with my asthma?
It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for... Asked by Cristobal Likos 2 years ago.

It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for about a month then I needed a fast acting one alupent. Now I have crushing pressure on the bottom part of my chest when I get up in the morning and in the last few days it has also been right before I get to bed in the evening, alupnet makes it go away. Now I am having trouble holding my breath for my flovent daily, I am worried that I am not getting enough meds and thats my chest pain issue. How can I tell? I don't have a peak flow meter, I am not in a position to run to the doc if it is not absolutely urgent. thanks for any insight. am also taking isoniazid and pyridoxine. I abegining my fourth month of treatment. the doc said it is "latent" Answered by Fidelia Nodd 2 years ago.

Hot humid weather is very bad for asthmatics. If you are having chest pain, then you are not getting enough oxygen to your heart.The meds alupent must work for you if it is relieving the symptoms, you need to go the doctor and get your meds straightened out. You obviously have a change in the needs of the meds that you are taking. It could be related to the environment, or a change in your asthma/ condition, and a doctor needs to re-evaulate that. Answered by Daphne Kleinpeter 2 years ago.

Not to scare you or anything, but asthma can kill you. I also have asthma that I don't always treat as seriously as I should, and my doctor gave me a big lecture when she last saw me for asthma symptoms. Like you, I don't like to run to the doctor for every little thing, but breathing is a big thing. Take care of yourself. Answered by Nubia Chetram 2 years ago.


Please help me with this question........?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are ... Asked by Quinton Mehr 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Janae Mccrady 2 years ago.

I'm not sure if I fully understand what you are asking, but I will try to answer. "Lopresor" is a drug that contains metoprolol and is used to lower the patient's heart rate or blood pressure. A common side effect of metoprolol is a problem with breathing, when the airways are smaller than normal. "Alupent" is a drug used to help the patient breathe more easily. This drug is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol. I hope he gets better soon. Answered by Annice Righetti 2 years ago.

Please talk carefully to your doctor about this. Lopressor contains metoprolol - they are different names for the same drug. This is used to control blood pressure or some other heart problems (angina, or after a heart attack). It should not be used if there is a slow heart beat. This drug may not be a good choice for someone with asthma or other breathing problems. Alupent is a bronchodilator, which means that it opens up the airways to make breathing easier. This is normally used in people with asthma or other breathing problems. The answer by Belle that Alupent "is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol" is not correct in my opinion. These drugs both work on the "beta receptors" in the body. But Lopressor reduces the activity of these beta receptors, while Alupent increases the activity of these beta receptors. It is not normal to use them together because they have some opposite actions. There may be a reason the doctor is using these medications together. If both do need to be used, then it is possible but a lot of care is needed. DO NOT CHANGE THE MEDICATIONS OR STOP TAKING THEM WITHOUT TALKING TO THE DOCTOR. IT COULD BE DANGEROUS. PLEASE TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT YOUR CONCERNS AND ASK IF THESE ARE THE BEST MEDICATIONS TO USE. If your uncle is feeling unwell, or dizzy, or feels that his heartbeat or breathing is unusual - please see someone as soon as possible. Answered by Pia Croshaw 2 years ago.

great site www.rxlist.com I use it all the time to compare drugs since doctors just seem to prescribe whats new and not really care whats best for the patient (my opinion). Answered by Chere Crudup 2 years ago.

please rephrase question better.... But basically ask the doctor the side affecgts of each medication, and ask him which one he would recommend and why Answered by Kaila Fingerson 2 years ago.


Please help me...I'm confused...?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are... Asked by Jeramy Barbaglia 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Shizue Trygg 2 years ago.

Wait a sec... 1st of all, Lopressor LOWERS the heart rate and blood pressure. 2nd, Metoprolol is the generic name for Lopressor. So there has to be more going on than you are aware of. Otherwise, he would not be on this! Answered by Wen Burdette 2 years ago.

You can look these drugs up on pharmacy websites. Just type in their names in a search engine like 'google' or similar. Your uncle should ask his prescribing doctor these questions. He should go back to see the doctor and ask what the tablets are for, which one does what and ask questions until he is satisfied that he understands EXACTLY what he puts in his mouth. His doctor is OBLIGED (means he HAS to) explain until he is blue in the face until the patient understands. If this doctor does NOT do this, he is not a good doctor and your uncle should get another doctor straight away. Answered by Xiomara Stancato 2 years ago.


Will sympathomimetic drug help a person with asthma?
Asked by Loida Evelo 2 years ago.

A sympathomimetic drug is the bronchodilators doctors prescribe for people with asthma or conditions with asthmatic components to it. These include, Isuprel, Bronkosol, Alupent, Albuterol etc. The body has two systems of autonomic nerves. Sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Where one does one thing the other does the opposite. The term sympathomimetic means something that will "mimic" the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics dilate or relax the bronchial muscles so you can see it would be very useful in asthmatic patients. As I said there are two systems so another approach some doctors use is to give the patient a parasympatholytic medicine (Atrovent) to reduce the influence of the parasympathetic system.They will give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time. God bless. Answered by Isabell Kitch 2 years ago.

idk, do BITCHES EAT 'SCREAM? (ice cream) listen, dont ask on yahoo answers. no one here has a medical degree, save 1 or 2 Answered by Ricarda Leiby 2 years ago.


Has anyone with severe asthma contracted Swine Flu?
Or do you know anyone else with severe asthma who has had it? How ill were you. I have severe asthma and I am 'mildly' worried about the implications of this virus with regards to asthma. Asked by Janita Toya 2 years ago.

I've had asthma all of my life, and just got over what may have been the Swine Flu. It actually could have been a very bad cold, but it really affected me for weeks. The asthma attacks were really bad, but kept under control by Alupent. They've taken Alupent off the market, along with most of the effective asthma medications, including the over-the-counter ones. It doesn't make sense, but with the rising number of individuals with asthma, they take the most effective medications off of the market, and try to steer people to the steroid ones, which don't work, at least for me. Since the strain of Swine Flue isn't as dangerous as previously thought, it's not as dangerous for most people, but is serious for those of us who have chronic diseases. I came close to going into the hospital, but managed to take care of it myself. I used to take Isuprel for asthma, which instantly would eliminate a serious asthma attack, but they also took that off the market. I have little faith in doctors or the pharmaceutical companies. Answered by Wen Jaimes 2 years ago.


Why caution administering alupent to diabetes patient?
Thank you for getting back to me, is it that it in some way inhibits the insulin either in production or release, or is it that it effects the cell membrane from allowing sugar to pass, or some other reason? I only ask because I spent time researching and can't find any specific information. Thanks Asked by Roger Swantner 2 years ago.

One of the cautions in using alupent is for diabetic patients. I understand the cautions with cardiac patients, because of the sympathomimetic influence, but don't grasp the effects with a diabetic patients. Will the sympathetic response boost metabolism burning more sugar? Any information would be appreciated. Thanks Answered by Reta Mellady 2 years ago.

There is a very small possibility that metoproteronol (Alupent) may increase blood sugar levels after use. There have been a few case reports with IV albuterol (not available in US) or terbutaline causing this problem. The chances of this happening with Alupent, if properly taken, is unlikely. Regardless, if you have diabetes, it wouldn't hurt to monitor your blood sugar after taking this drug. Answered by Jennette Schwenk 2 years ago.


I'm taking Alupent inhaler is there another inhalent that is equivalent to it ? If so were can I find it?
SoMeOnE pLeAsE hElP!! Asked by Gwyn Longacre 2 years ago.

The generic name of the brand name Alupent is metaproterenol sulfate. You need to ask your physician or pharmacist to see if there are other brand names of metaproterenol sulfate available, or if the generic version is available for purchase - resulting in a lower cost to the patient. Answered by Nikia Bieniek 2 years ago.


What is the difference between Albuterol and Alupent for quick acting asthma relief?
I hove both Albuterol and Alupent in my medicine cabinet. My doctor didn't give me clear directions about which to take. The pharmacist said that both are interchangeable. Is this true? What is the difference? Asked by Santana Jonte 2 years ago.

Matt's right. Albuterol has less cardiac side effects. Answered by Shanice Coykendall 2 years ago.

To make it simple, They both do the same thing. The way I understand it is, Alupent was first on the market for asthma relief and had many side effects like racing heart and overall jittery feeling. Then came along albuterol. Albuterol did the same as Alupent on opening the airways and had less side effects. To add to this, now there is Levalbuterol (Xopenex) that has less side effect then albuterol. If I were you, I would use the one that did the best for asthma relief and had the least side effects. Good luck Answered by Kendall Torrell 2 years ago.

Both are considered quick-acting beta agonists. Which one works better for you when you need it? That's the question that will answer which one you should take. And the answer to that question is different for everyone. For example, albuterol works best for me when I need something, but some kinds of albuterol (Proventil HFA, for instance) don't work as well as others do (ProAir HFA, for example). So then, something else to think about is whether it's just the medication or the brand of it. In theory, it doesn't matter what you use, but in practice, it can make all the difference in the world when you're having an exacerbation. Answered by Latrina Hilfiker 2 years ago.


Whats up with my asthma?
It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for... Asked by Harlan Schachsieck 2 years ago.

It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for about a month then I needed a fast acting one alupent. Now I have crushing pressure on the bottom part of my chest when I get up in the morning and in the last few days it has also been right before I get to bed in the evening, alupnet makes it go away. Now I am having trouble holding my breath for my flovent daily, I am worried that I am not getting enough meds and thats my chest pain issue. How can I tell? I don't have a peak flow meter, I am not in a position to run to the doc if it is not absolutely urgent. thanks for any insight. am also taking isoniazid and pyridoxine. I abegining my fourth month of treatment. the doc said it is "latent" Answered by Angelyn Angst 2 years ago.

Hot humid weather is very bad for asthmatics. If you are having chest pain, then you are not getting enough oxygen to your heart.The meds alupent must work for you if it is relieving the symptoms, you need to go the doctor and get your meds straightened out. You obviously have a change in the needs of the meds that you are taking. It could be related to the environment, or a change in your asthma/ condition, and a doctor needs to re-evaulate that. Answered by Josue Maronge 2 years ago.

Not to scare you or anything, but asthma can kill you. I also have asthma that I don't always treat as seriously as I should, and my doctor gave me a big lecture when she last saw me for asthma symptoms. Like you, I don't like to run to the doctor for every little thing, but breathing is a big thing. Take care of yourself. Answered by Charlotte Hering 2 years ago.


Please help me with this question........?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are ... Asked by Juanita Alto 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Rosella Firpi 2 years ago.

I'm not sure if I fully understand what you are asking, but I will try to answer. "Lopresor" is a drug that contains metoprolol and is used to lower the patient's heart rate or blood pressure. A common side effect of metoprolol is a problem with breathing, when the airways are smaller than normal. "Alupent" is a drug used to help the patient breathe more easily. This drug is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol. I hope he gets better soon. Answered by Shameka Hochstetter 2 years ago.

Please talk carefully to your doctor about this. Lopressor contains metoprolol - they are different names for the same drug. This is used to control blood pressure or some other heart problems (angina, or after a heart attack). It should not be used if there is a slow heart beat. This drug may not be a good choice for someone with asthma or other breathing problems. Alupent is a bronchodilator, which means that it opens up the airways to make breathing easier. This is normally used in people with asthma or other breathing problems. The answer by Belle that Alupent "is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol" is not correct in my opinion. These drugs both work on the "beta receptors" in the body. But Lopressor reduces the activity of these beta receptors, while Alupent increases the activity of these beta receptors. It is not normal to use them together because they have some opposite actions. There may be a reason the doctor is using these medications together. If both do need to be used, then it is possible but a lot of care is needed. DO NOT CHANGE THE MEDICATIONS OR STOP TAKING THEM WITHOUT TALKING TO THE DOCTOR. IT COULD BE DANGEROUS. PLEASE TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT YOUR CONCERNS AND ASK IF THESE ARE THE BEST MEDICATIONS TO USE. If your uncle is feeling unwell, or dizzy, or feels that his heartbeat or breathing is unusual - please see someone as soon as possible. Answered by Melida Bogucki 2 years ago.

great site www.rxlist.com I use it all the time to compare drugs since doctors just seem to prescribe whats new and not really care whats best for the patient (my opinion). Answered by Heather Lamphear 2 years ago.

please rephrase question better.... But basically ask the doctor the side affecgts of each medication, and ask him which one he would recommend and why Answered by Charolette Abrial 2 years ago.


Please help me...I'm confused...?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are... Asked by Jackelyn Barlett 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Voncile Bedeau 2 years ago.

Wait a sec... 1st of all, Lopressor LOWERS the heart rate and blood pressure. 2nd, Metoprolol is the generic name for Lopressor. So there has to be more going on than you are aware of. Otherwise, he would not be on this! Answered by Harrison Lindhorst 2 years ago.

You can look these drugs up on pharmacy websites. Just type in their names in a search engine like 'google' or similar. Your uncle should ask his prescribing doctor these questions. He should go back to see the doctor and ask what the tablets are for, which one does what and ask questions until he is satisfied that he understands EXACTLY what he puts in his mouth. His doctor is OBLIGED (means he HAS to) explain until he is blue in the face until the patient understands. If this doctor does NOT do this, he is not a good doctor and your uncle should get another doctor straight away. Answered by Claire Patsy 2 years ago.


Will sympathomimetic drug help a person with asthma?
Asked by Germaine Gunkel 2 years ago.

A sympathomimetic drug is the bronchodilators doctors prescribe for people with asthma or conditions with asthmatic components to it. These include, Isuprel, Bronkosol, Alupent, Albuterol etc. The body has two systems of autonomic nerves. Sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Where one does one thing the other does the opposite. The term sympathomimetic means something that will "mimic" the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics dilate or relax the bronchial muscles so you can see it would be very useful in asthmatic patients. As I said there are two systems so another approach some doctors use is to give the patient a parasympatholytic medicine (Atrovent) to reduce the influence of the parasympathetic system.They will give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time. God bless. Answered by Deann Steadham 2 years ago.

idk, do BITCHES EAT 'SCREAM? (ice cream) listen, dont ask on yahoo answers. no one here has a medical degree, save 1 or 2 Answered by Houston Peyatt 2 years ago.


Has anyone with severe asthma contracted Swine Flu?
Or do you know anyone else with severe asthma who has had it? How ill were you. I have severe asthma and I am 'mildly' worried about the implications of this virus with regards to asthma. Asked by Quentin Teece 2 years ago.

I've had asthma all of my life, and just got over what may have been the Swine Flu. It actually could have been a very bad cold, but it really affected me for weeks. The asthma attacks were really bad, but kept under control by Alupent. They've taken Alupent off the market, along with most of the effective asthma medications, including the over-the-counter ones. It doesn't make sense, but with the rising number of individuals with asthma, they take the most effective medications off of the market, and try to steer people to the steroid ones, which don't work, at least for me. Since the strain of Swine Flue isn't as dangerous as previously thought, it's not as dangerous for most people, but is serious for those of us who have chronic diseases. I came close to going into the hospital, but managed to take care of it myself. I used to take Isuprel for asthma, which instantly would eliminate a serious asthma attack, but they also took that off the market. I have little faith in doctors or the pharmaceutical companies. Answered by Tania Razor 2 years ago.


Why caution administering alupent to diabetes patient?
Thank you for getting back to me, is it that it in some way inhibits the insulin either in production or release, or is it that it effects the cell membrane from allowing sugar to pass, or some other reason? I only ask because I spent time researching and can't find any specific information. Thanks Asked by Tifany Wallaert 2 years ago.

One of the cautions in using alupent is for diabetic patients. I understand the cautions with cardiac patients, because of the sympathomimetic influence, but don't grasp the effects with a diabetic patients. Will the sympathetic response boost metabolism burning more sugar? Any information would be appreciated. Thanks Answered by Audria Merrett 2 years ago.

There is a very small possibility that metoproteronol (Alupent) may increase blood sugar levels after use. There have been a few case reports with IV albuterol (not available in US) or terbutaline causing this problem. The chances of this happening with Alupent, if properly taken, is unlikely. Regardless, if you have diabetes, it wouldn't hurt to monitor your blood sugar after taking this drug. Answered by Matha Donahue 2 years ago.


I'm taking Alupent inhaler is there another inhalent that is equivalent to it ? If so were can I find it?
SoMeOnE pLeAsE hElP!! Asked by Lakiesha Petiet 2 years ago.

The generic name of the brand name Alupent is metaproterenol sulfate. You need to ask your physician or pharmacist to see if there are other brand names of metaproterenol sulfate available, or if the generic version is available for purchase - resulting in a lower cost to the patient. Answered by Vern Ozga 2 years ago.


What is the difference between Albuterol and Alupent for quick acting asthma relief?
I hove both Albuterol and Alupent in my medicine cabinet. My doctor didn't give me clear directions about which to take. The pharmacist said that both are interchangeable. Is this true? What is the difference? Asked by Robby Gladysiewski 2 years ago.

Matt's right. Albuterol has less cardiac side effects. Answered by Shelby Sideris 2 years ago.

To make it simple, They both do the same thing. The way I understand it is, Alupent was first on the market for asthma relief and had many side effects like racing heart and overall jittery feeling. Then came along albuterol. Albuterol did the same as Alupent on opening the airways and had less side effects. To add to this, now there is Levalbuterol (Xopenex) that has less side effect then albuterol. If I were you, I would use the one that did the best for asthma relief and had the least side effects. Good luck Answered by Lulu Donilon 2 years ago.

Both are considered quick-acting beta agonists. Which one works better for you when you need it? That's the question that will answer which one you should take. And the answer to that question is different for everyone. For example, albuterol works best for me when I need something, but some kinds of albuterol (Proventil HFA, for instance) don't work as well as others do (ProAir HFA, for example). So then, something else to think about is whether it's just the medication or the brand of it. In theory, it doesn't matter what you use, but in practice, it can make all the difference in the world when you're having an exacerbation. Answered by Chloe Cole 2 years ago.


Whats up with my asthma?
It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for... Asked by Freeda Malagon 2 years ago.

It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for about a month then I needed a fast acting one alupent. Now I have crushing pressure on the bottom part of my chest when I get up in the morning and in the last few days it has also been right before I get to bed in the evening, alupnet makes it go away. Now I am having trouble holding my breath for my flovent daily, I am worried that I am not getting enough meds and thats my chest pain issue. How can I tell? I don't have a peak flow meter, I am not in a position to run to the doc if it is not absolutely urgent. thanks for any insight. am also taking isoniazid and pyridoxine. I abegining my fourth month of treatment. the doc said it is "latent" Answered by Chery Gullace 2 years ago.

Hot humid weather is very bad for asthmatics. If you are having chest pain, then you are not getting enough oxygen to your heart.The meds alupent must work for you if it is relieving the symptoms, you need to go the doctor and get your meds straightened out. You obviously have a change in the needs of the meds that you are taking. It could be related to the environment, or a change in your asthma/ condition, and a doctor needs to re-evaulate that. Answered by Ariel Leys 2 years ago.

Not to scare you or anything, but asthma can kill you. I also have asthma that I don't always treat as seriously as I should, and my doctor gave me a big lecture when she last saw me for asthma symptoms. Like you, I don't like to run to the doctor for every little thing, but breathing is a big thing. Take care of yourself. Answered by Maggie Galicinao 2 years ago.


Please help me with this question........?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are ... Asked by Federico Riebe 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Sheryl Arnall 2 years ago.

I'm not sure if I fully understand what you are asking, but I will try to answer. "Lopresor" is a drug that contains metoprolol and is used to lower the patient's heart rate or blood pressure. A common side effect of metoprolol is a problem with breathing, when the airways are smaller than normal. "Alupent" is a drug used to help the patient breathe more easily. This drug is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol. I hope he gets better soon. Answered by Yevette Koria 2 years ago.

Please talk carefully to your doctor about this. Lopressor contains metoprolol - they are different names for the same drug. This is used to control blood pressure or some other heart problems (angina, or after a heart attack). It should not be used if there is a slow heart beat. This drug may not be a good choice for someone with asthma or other breathing problems. Alupent is a bronchodilator, which means that it opens up the airways to make breathing easier. This is normally used in people with asthma or other breathing problems. The answer by Belle that Alupent "is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol" is not correct in my opinion. These drugs both work on the "beta receptors" in the body. But Lopressor reduces the activity of these beta receptors, while Alupent increases the activity of these beta receptors. It is not normal to use them together because they have some opposite actions. There may be a reason the doctor is using these medications together. If both do need to be used, then it is possible but a lot of care is needed. DO NOT CHANGE THE MEDICATIONS OR STOP TAKING THEM WITHOUT TALKING TO THE DOCTOR. IT COULD BE DANGEROUS. PLEASE TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT YOUR CONCERNS AND ASK IF THESE ARE THE BEST MEDICATIONS TO USE. If your uncle is feeling unwell, or dizzy, or feels that his heartbeat or breathing is unusual - please see someone as soon as possible. Answered by Gilbert Stoutamire 2 years ago.

great site www.rxlist.com I use it all the time to compare drugs since doctors just seem to prescribe whats new and not really care whats best for the patient (my opinion). Answered by Meg Vattikuti 2 years ago.

please rephrase question better.... But basically ask the doctor the side affecgts of each medication, and ask him which one he would recommend and why Answered by Marlin Rizzardi 2 years ago.


Please help me...I'm confused...?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are... Asked by Merrill Tubergen 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Rosy Tourtellotte 2 years ago.

Wait a sec... 1st of all, Lopressor LOWERS the heart rate and blood pressure. 2nd, Metoprolol is the generic name for Lopressor. So there has to be more going on than you are aware of. Otherwise, he would not be on this! Answered by Lashay Whitehouse 2 years ago.

You can look these drugs up on pharmacy websites. Just type in their names in a search engine like 'google' or similar. Your uncle should ask his prescribing doctor these questions. He should go back to see the doctor and ask what the tablets are for, which one does what and ask questions until he is satisfied that he understands EXACTLY what he puts in his mouth. His doctor is OBLIGED (means he HAS to) explain until he is blue in the face until the patient understands. If this doctor does NOT do this, he is not a good doctor and your uncle should get another doctor straight away. Answered by Jerilyn Mceachran 2 years ago.


Will sympathomimetic drug help a person with asthma?
Asked by Shanda Brunsting 2 years ago.

A sympathomimetic drug is the bronchodilators doctors prescribe for people with asthma or conditions with asthmatic components to it. These include, Isuprel, Bronkosol, Alupent, Albuterol etc. The body has two systems of autonomic nerves. Sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Where one does one thing the other does the opposite. The term sympathomimetic means something that will "mimic" the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics dilate or relax the bronchial muscles so you can see it would be very useful in asthmatic patients. As I said there are two systems so another approach some doctors use is to give the patient a parasympatholytic medicine (Atrovent) to reduce the influence of the parasympathetic system.They will give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time. God bless. Answered by Merrilee Salva 2 years ago.

idk, do BITCHES EAT 'SCREAM? (ice cream) listen, dont ask on yahoo answers. no one here has a medical degree, save 1 or 2 Answered by Khalilah Rubright 2 years ago.


Has anyone with severe asthma contracted Swine Flu?
Or do you know anyone else with severe asthma who has had it? How ill were you. I have severe asthma and I am 'mildly' worried about the implications of this virus with regards to asthma. Asked by Miss Ivens 2 years ago.

I've had asthma all of my life, and just got over what may have been the Swine Flu. It actually could have been a very bad cold, but it really affected me for weeks. The asthma attacks were really bad, but kept under control by Alupent. They've taken Alupent off the market, along with most of the effective asthma medications, including the over-the-counter ones. It doesn't make sense, but with the rising number of individuals with asthma, they take the most effective medications off of the market, and try to steer people to the steroid ones, which don't work, at least for me. Since the strain of Swine Flue isn't as dangerous as previously thought, it's not as dangerous for most people, but is serious for those of us who have chronic diseases. I came close to going into the hospital, but managed to take care of it myself. I used to take Isuprel for asthma, which instantly would eliminate a serious asthma attack, but they also took that off the market. I have little faith in doctors or the pharmaceutical companies. Answered by Lionel Sarabia 2 years ago.


Why caution administering alupent to diabetes patient?
Thank you for getting back to me, is it that it in some way inhibits the insulin either in production or release, or is it that it effects the cell membrane from allowing sugar to pass, or some other reason? I only ask because I spent time researching and can't find any specific information. Thanks Asked by Chauncey Mcgurk 2 years ago.

One of the cautions in using alupent is for diabetic patients. I understand the cautions with cardiac patients, because of the sympathomimetic influence, but don't grasp the effects with a diabetic patients. Will the sympathetic response boost metabolism burning more sugar? Any information would be appreciated. Thanks Answered by Tenesha Volckmann 2 years ago.

There is a very small possibility that metoproteronol (Alupent) may increase blood sugar levels after use. There have been a few case reports with IV albuterol (not available in US) or terbutaline causing this problem. The chances of this happening with Alupent, if properly taken, is unlikely. Regardless, if you have diabetes, it wouldn't hurt to monitor your blood sugar after taking this drug. Answered by Elias Trulson 2 years ago.


I'm taking Alupent inhaler is there another inhalent that is equivalent to it ? If so were can I find it?
SoMeOnE pLeAsE hElP!! Asked by Mana Reinsfelder 2 years ago.

The generic name of the brand name Alupent is metaproterenol sulfate. You need to ask your physician or pharmacist to see if there are other brand names of metaproterenol sulfate available, or if the generic version is available for purchase - resulting in a lower cost to the patient. Answered by Denise Tsuruda 2 years ago.


What is the difference between Albuterol and Alupent for quick acting asthma relief?
I hove both Albuterol and Alupent in my medicine cabinet. My doctor didn't give me clear directions about which to take. The pharmacist said that both are interchangeable. Is this true? What is the difference? Asked by Morton Peroutka 2 years ago.

Matt's right. Albuterol has less cardiac side effects. Answered by Laquita Palmieri 2 years ago.

To make it simple, They both do the same thing. The way I understand it is, Alupent was first on the market for asthma relief and had many side effects like racing heart and overall jittery feeling. Then came along albuterol. Albuterol did the same as Alupent on opening the airways and had less side effects. To add to this, now there is Levalbuterol (Xopenex) that has less side effect then albuterol. If I were you, I would use the one that did the best for asthma relief and had the least side effects. Good luck Answered by Brunilda Faus 2 years ago.

Both are considered quick-acting beta agonists. Which one works better for you when you need it? That's the question that will answer which one you should take. And the answer to that question is different for everyone. For example, albuterol works best for me when I need something, but some kinds of albuterol (Proventil HFA, for instance) don't work as well as others do (ProAir HFA, for example). So then, something else to think about is whether it's just the medication or the brand of it. In theory, it doesn't matter what you use, but in practice, it can make all the difference in the world when you're having an exacerbation. Answered by Laila Jochim 2 years ago.


Whats up with my asthma?
It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for... Asked by Kary Bodwin 2 years ago.

It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for about a month then I needed a fast acting one alupent. Now I have crushing pressure on the bottom part of my chest when I get up in the morning and in the last few days it has also been right before I get to bed in the evening, alupnet makes it go away. Now I am having trouble holding my breath for my flovent daily, I am worried that I am not getting enough meds and thats my chest pain issue. How can I tell? I don't have a peak flow meter, I am not in a position to run to the doc if it is not absolutely urgent. thanks for any insight. am also taking isoniazid and pyridoxine. I abegining my fourth month of treatment. the doc said it is "latent" Answered by Celia Bresler 2 years ago.

Hot humid weather is very bad for asthmatics. If you are having chest pain, then you are not getting enough oxygen to your heart.The meds alupent must work for you if it is relieving the symptoms, you need to go the doctor and get your meds straightened out. You obviously have a change in the needs of the meds that you are taking. It could be related to the environment, or a change in your asthma/ condition, and a doctor needs to re-evaulate that. Answered by Felecia Needles 2 years ago.

Not to scare you or anything, but asthma can kill you. I also have asthma that I don't always treat as seriously as I should, and my doctor gave me a big lecture when she last saw me for asthma symptoms. Like you, I don't like to run to the doctor for every little thing, but breathing is a big thing. Take care of yourself. Answered by Rosalina Gleckler 2 years ago.


Please help me with this question........?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are ... Asked by Chery Gaudier 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Sabine Ginzel 2 years ago.

I'm not sure if I fully understand what you are asking, but I will try to answer. "Lopresor" is a drug that contains metoprolol and is used to lower the patient's heart rate or blood pressure. A common side effect of metoprolol is a problem with breathing, when the airways are smaller than normal. "Alupent" is a drug used to help the patient breathe more easily. This drug is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol. I hope he gets better soon. Answered by Bette Spellane 2 years ago.

Please talk carefully to your doctor about this. Lopressor contains metoprolol - they are different names for the same drug. This is used to control blood pressure or some other heart problems (angina, or after a heart attack). It should not be used if there is a slow heart beat. This drug may not be a good choice for someone with asthma or other breathing problems. Alupent is a bronchodilator, which means that it opens up the airways to make breathing easier. This is normally used in people with asthma or other breathing problems. The answer by Belle that Alupent "is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol" is not correct in my opinion. These drugs both work on the "beta receptors" in the body. But Lopressor reduces the activity of these beta receptors, while Alupent increases the activity of these beta receptors. It is not normal to use them together because they have some opposite actions. There may be a reason the doctor is using these medications together. If both do need to be used, then it is possible but a lot of care is needed. DO NOT CHANGE THE MEDICATIONS OR STOP TAKING THEM WITHOUT TALKING TO THE DOCTOR. IT COULD BE DANGEROUS. PLEASE TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT YOUR CONCERNS AND ASK IF THESE ARE THE BEST MEDICATIONS TO USE. If your uncle is feeling unwell, or dizzy, or feels that his heartbeat or breathing is unusual - please see someone as soon as possible. Answered by Eliz Yablonski 2 years ago.

great site www.rxlist.com I use it all the time to compare drugs since doctors just seem to prescribe whats new and not really care whats best for the patient (my opinion). Answered by Annis Ferringer 2 years ago.

please rephrase question better.... But basically ask the doctor the side affecgts of each medication, and ask him which one he would recommend and why Answered by Ona Placha 2 years ago.


Please help me...I'm confused...?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are... Asked by Tracey Bertozzi 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Dorris Kjolseth 2 years ago.

Wait a sec... 1st of all, Lopressor LOWERS the heart rate and blood pressure. 2nd, Metoprolol is the generic name for Lopressor. So there has to be more going on than you are aware of. Otherwise, he would not be on this! Answered by Marco Sarcone 2 years ago.

You can look these drugs up on pharmacy websites. Just type in their names in a search engine like 'google' or similar. Your uncle should ask his prescribing doctor these questions. He should go back to see the doctor and ask what the tablets are for, which one does what and ask questions until he is satisfied that he understands EXACTLY what he puts in his mouth. His doctor is OBLIGED (means he HAS to) explain until he is blue in the face until the patient understands. If this doctor does NOT do this, he is not a good doctor and your uncle should get another doctor straight away. Answered by Jennette Mcgibney 2 years ago.


Will sympathomimetic drug help a person with asthma?
Asked by Alena Eisenbarth 2 years ago.

A sympathomimetic drug is the bronchodilators doctors prescribe for people with asthma or conditions with asthmatic components to it. These include, Isuprel, Bronkosol, Alupent, Albuterol etc. The body has two systems of autonomic nerves. Sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Where one does one thing the other does the opposite. The term sympathomimetic means something that will "mimic" the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics dilate or relax the bronchial muscles so you can see it would be very useful in asthmatic patients. As I said there are two systems so another approach some doctors use is to give the patient a parasympatholytic medicine (Atrovent) to reduce the influence of the parasympathetic system.They will give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time. God bless. Answered by Monserrate Teitsworth 2 years ago.

idk, do BITCHES EAT 'SCREAM? (ice cream) listen, dont ask on yahoo answers. no one here has a medical degree, save 1 or 2 Answered by Marget Woolhouse 2 years ago.


Has anyone with severe asthma contracted Swine Flu?
Or do you know anyone else with severe asthma who has had it? How ill were you. I have severe asthma and I am 'mildly' worried about the implications of this virus with regards to asthma. Asked by Seymour Bancourt 2 years ago.

I've had asthma all of my life, and just got over what may have been the Swine Flu. It actually could have been a very bad cold, but it really affected me for weeks. The asthma attacks were really bad, but kept under control by Alupent. They've taken Alupent off the market, along with most of the effective asthma medications, including the over-the-counter ones. It doesn't make sense, but with the rising number of individuals with asthma, they take the most effective medications off of the market, and try to steer people to the steroid ones, which don't work, at least for me. Since the strain of Swine Flue isn't as dangerous as previously thought, it's not as dangerous for most people, but is serious for those of us who have chronic diseases. I came close to going into the hospital, but managed to take care of it myself. I used to take Isuprel for asthma, which instantly would eliminate a serious asthma attack, but they also took that off the market. I have little faith in doctors or the pharmaceutical companies. Answered by Adrien Fusch 2 years ago.


Why caution administering alupent to diabetes patient?
Thank you for getting back to me, is it that it in some way inhibits the insulin either in production or release, or is it that it effects the cell membrane from allowing sugar to pass, or some other reason? I only ask because I spent time researching and can't find any specific information. Thanks Asked by Inez Skomo 2 years ago.

One of the cautions in using alupent is for diabetic patients. I understand the cautions with cardiac patients, because of the sympathomimetic influence, but don't grasp the effects with a diabetic patients. Will the sympathetic response boost metabolism burning more sugar? Any information would be appreciated. Thanks Answered by Tameika Morence 2 years ago.

There is a very small possibility that metoproteronol (Alupent) may increase blood sugar levels after use. There have been a few case reports with IV albuterol (not available in US) or terbutaline causing this problem. The chances of this happening with Alupent, if properly taken, is unlikely. Regardless, if you have diabetes, it wouldn't hurt to monitor your blood sugar after taking this drug. Answered by Dorris Vavricka 2 years ago.


I'm taking Alupent inhaler is there another inhalent that is equivalent to it ? If so were can I find it?
SoMeOnE pLeAsE hElP!! Asked by Kraig Magrath 2 years ago.

The generic name of the brand name Alupent is metaproterenol sulfate. You need to ask your physician or pharmacist to see if there are other brand names of metaproterenol sulfate available, or if the generic version is available for purchase - resulting in a lower cost to the patient. Answered by Kimberely Minock 2 years ago.


What is the difference between Albuterol and Alupent for quick acting asthma relief?
I hove both Albuterol and Alupent in my medicine cabinet. My doctor didn't give me clear directions about which to take. The pharmacist said that both are interchangeable. Is this true? What is the difference? Asked by Kerry Schildt 2 years ago.

Matt's right. Albuterol has less cardiac side effects. Answered by Donita Petti 2 years ago.

To make it simple, They both do the same thing. The way I understand it is, Alupent was first on the market for asthma relief and had many side effects like racing heart and overall jittery feeling. Then came along albuterol. Albuterol did the same as Alupent on opening the airways and had less side effects. To add to this, now there is Levalbuterol (Xopenex) that has less side effect then albuterol. If I were you, I would use the one that did the best for asthma relief and had the least side effects. Good luck Answered by Lee Vardaman 2 years ago.

Both are considered quick-acting beta agonists. Which one works better for you when you need it? That's the question that will answer which one you should take. And the answer to that question is different for everyone. For example, albuterol works best for me when I need something, but some kinds of albuterol (Proventil HFA, for instance) don't work as well as others do (ProAir HFA, for example). So then, something else to think about is whether it's just the medication or the brand of it. In theory, it doesn't matter what you use, but in practice, it can make all the difference in the world when you're having an exacerbation. Answered by Steffanie Curylo 2 years ago.


Whats up with my asthma?
It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for... Asked by Frances Bellamy 2 years ago.

It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for about a month then I needed a fast acting one alupent. Now I have crushing pressure on the bottom part of my chest when I get up in the morning and in the last few days it has also been right before I get to bed in the evening, alupnet makes it go away. Now I am having trouble holding my breath for my flovent daily, I am worried that I am not getting enough meds and thats my chest pain issue. How can I tell? I don't have a peak flow meter, I am not in a position to run to the doc if it is not absolutely urgent. thanks for any insight. am also taking isoniazid and pyridoxine. I abegining my fourth month of treatment. the doc said it is "latent" Answered by Lisabeth Josich 2 years ago.

Hot humid weather is very bad for asthmatics. If you are having chest pain, then you are not getting enough oxygen to your heart.The meds alupent must work for you if it is relieving the symptoms, you need to go the doctor and get your meds straightened out. You obviously have a change in the needs of the meds that you are taking. It could be related to the environment, or a change in your asthma/ condition, and a doctor needs to re-evaulate that. Answered by Kyoko Garoutte 2 years ago.

Not to scare you or anything, but asthma can kill you. I also have asthma that I don't always treat as seriously as I should, and my doctor gave me a big lecture when she last saw me for asthma symptoms. Like you, I don't like to run to the doctor for every little thing, but breathing is a big thing. Take care of yourself. Answered by Rachele Simco 2 years ago.


Please help me with this question........?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are ... Asked by Cassaundra Muldowney 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Renate Lagrave 2 years ago.

I'm not sure if I fully understand what you are asking, but I will try to answer. "Lopresor" is a drug that contains metoprolol and is used to lower the patient's heart rate or blood pressure. A common side effect of metoprolol is a problem with breathing, when the airways are smaller than normal. "Alupent" is a drug used to help the patient breathe more easily. This drug is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol. I hope he gets better soon. Answered by Sheila Veysey 2 years ago.

Please talk carefully to your doctor about this. Lopressor contains metoprolol - they are different names for the same drug. This is used to control blood pressure or some other heart problems (angina, or after a heart attack). It should not be used if there is a slow heart beat. This drug may not be a good choice for someone with asthma or other breathing problems. Alupent is a bronchodilator, which means that it opens up the airways to make breathing easier. This is normally used in people with asthma or other breathing problems. The answer by Belle that Alupent "is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol" is not correct in my opinion. These drugs both work on the "beta receptors" in the body. But Lopressor reduces the activity of these beta receptors, while Alupent increases the activity of these beta receptors. It is not normal to use them together because they have some opposite actions. There may be a reason the doctor is using these medications together. If both do need to be used, then it is possible but a lot of care is needed. DO NOT CHANGE THE MEDICATIONS OR STOP TAKING THEM WITHOUT TALKING TO THE DOCTOR. IT COULD BE DANGEROUS. PLEASE TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT YOUR CONCERNS AND ASK IF THESE ARE THE BEST MEDICATIONS TO USE. If your uncle is feeling unwell, or dizzy, or feels that his heartbeat or breathing is unusual - please see someone as soon as possible. Answered by Sherley Netley 2 years ago.

great site www.rxlist.com I use it all the time to compare drugs since doctors just seem to prescribe whats new and not really care whats best for the patient (my opinion). Answered by Monroe Forlani 2 years ago.

please rephrase question better.... But basically ask the doctor the side affecgts of each medication, and ask him which one he would recommend and why Answered by Cathryn Jarrard 2 years ago.


Please help me...I'm confused...?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are... Asked by Shila Sibilia 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Sang Deadmond 2 years ago.

Wait a sec... 1st of all, Lopressor LOWERS the heart rate and blood pressure. 2nd, Metoprolol is the generic name for Lopressor. So there has to be more going on than you are aware of. Otherwise, he would not be on this! Answered by Jessia Rathman 2 years ago.

You can look these drugs up on pharmacy websites. Just type in their names in a search engine like 'google' or similar. Your uncle should ask his prescribing doctor these questions. He should go back to see the doctor and ask what the tablets are for, which one does what and ask questions until he is satisfied that he understands EXACTLY what he puts in his mouth. His doctor is OBLIGED (means he HAS to) explain until he is blue in the face until the patient understands. If this doctor does NOT do this, he is not a good doctor and your uncle should get another doctor straight away. Answered by Drucilla Lahue 2 years ago.


Will sympathomimetic drug help a person with asthma?
Asked by Vaughn Gamela 2 years ago.

A sympathomimetic drug is the bronchodilators doctors prescribe for people with asthma or conditions with asthmatic components to it. These include, Isuprel, Bronkosol, Alupent, Albuterol etc. The body has two systems of autonomic nerves. Sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Where one does one thing the other does the opposite. The term sympathomimetic means something that will "mimic" the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics dilate or relax the bronchial muscles so you can see it would be very useful in asthmatic patients. As I said there are two systems so another approach some doctors use is to give the patient a parasympatholytic medicine (Atrovent) to reduce the influence of the parasympathetic system.They will give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time. God bless. Answered by Kristopher Michels 2 years ago.

idk, do BITCHES EAT 'SCREAM? (ice cream) listen, dont ask on yahoo answers. no one here has a medical degree, save 1 or 2 Answered by Carrie Kerbow 2 years ago.


Has anyone with severe asthma contracted Swine Flu?
Or do you know anyone else with severe asthma who has had it? How ill were you. I have severe asthma and I am 'mildly' worried about the implications of this virus with regards to asthma. Asked by Tempie Chaffee 2 years ago.

I've had asthma all of my life, and just got over what may have been the Swine Flu. It actually could have been a very bad cold, but it really affected me for weeks. The asthma attacks were really bad, but kept under control by Alupent. They've taken Alupent off the market, along with most of the effective asthma medications, including the over-the-counter ones. It doesn't make sense, but with the rising number of individuals with asthma, they take the most effective medications off of the market, and try to steer people to the steroid ones, which don't work, at least for me. Since the strain of Swine Flue isn't as dangerous as previously thought, it's not as dangerous for most people, but is serious for those of us who have chronic diseases. I came close to going into the hospital, but managed to take care of it myself. I used to take Isuprel for asthma, which instantly would eliminate a serious asthma attack, but they also took that off the market. I have little faith in doctors or the pharmaceutical companies. Answered by Haydee Alcosiba 2 years ago.


Why caution administering alupent to diabetes patient?
Thank you for getting back to me, is it that it in some way inhibits the insulin either in production or release, or is it that it effects the cell membrane from allowing sugar to pass, or some other reason? I only ask because I spent time researching and can't find any specific information. Thanks Asked by Chi Lamison 2 years ago.

One of the cautions in using alupent is for diabetic patients. I understand the cautions with cardiac patients, because of the sympathomimetic influence, but don't grasp the effects with a diabetic patients. Will the sympathetic response boost metabolism burning more sugar? Any information would be appreciated. Thanks Answered by Julian Feiteira 2 years ago.

There is a very small possibility that metoproteronol (Alupent) may increase blood sugar levels after use. There have been a few case reports with IV albuterol (not available in US) or terbutaline causing this problem. The chances of this happening with Alupent, if properly taken, is unlikely. Regardless, if you have diabetes, it wouldn't hurt to monitor your blood sugar after taking this drug. Answered by Yun Seale 2 years ago.


I'm taking Alupent inhaler is there another inhalent that is equivalent to it ? If so were can I find it?
SoMeOnE pLeAsE hElP!! Asked by Jae Fennern 2 years ago.

The generic name of the brand name Alupent is metaproterenol sulfate. You need to ask your physician or pharmacist to see if there are other brand names of metaproterenol sulfate available, or if the generic version is available for purchase - resulting in a lower cost to the patient. Answered by Tommie Douthett 2 years ago.


What is the difference between Albuterol and Alupent for quick acting asthma relief?
I hove both Albuterol and Alupent in my medicine cabinet. My doctor didn't give me clear directions about which to take. The pharmacist said that both are interchangeable. Is this true? What is the difference? Asked by Hayden Heafner 2 years ago.

Matt's right. Albuterol has less cardiac side effects. Answered by Kara Cundick 2 years ago.

To make it simple, They both do the same thing. The way I understand it is, Alupent was first on the market for asthma relief and had many side effects like racing heart and overall jittery feeling. Then came along albuterol. Albuterol did the same as Alupent on opening the airways and had less side effects. To add to this, now there is Levalbuterol (Xopenex) that has less side effect then albuterol. If I were you, I would use the one that did the best for asthma relief and had the least side effects. Good luck Answered by Gia Shouse 2 years ago.

Both are considered quick-acting beta agonists. Which one works better for you when you need it? That's the question that will answer which one you should take. And the answer to that question is different for everyone. For example, albuterol works best for me when I need something, but some kinds of albuterol (Proventil HFA, for instance) don't work as well as others do (ProAir HFA, for example). So then, something else to think about is whether it's just the medication or the brand of it. In theory, it doesn't matter what you use, but in practice, it can make all the difference in the world when you're having an exacerbation. Answered by Vesta Brownd 2 years ago.


Whats up with my asthma?
It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for... Asked by Audra Murdick 2 years ago.

It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for about a month then I needed a fast acting one alupent. Now I have crushing pressure on the bottom part of my chest when I get up in the morning and in the last few days it has also been right before I get to bed in the evening, alupnet makes it go away. Now I am having trouble holding my breath for my flovent daily, I am worried that I am not getting enough meds and thats my chest pain issue. How can I tell? I don't have a peak flow meter, I am not in a position to run to the doc if it is not absolutely urgent. thanks for any insight. am also taking isoniazid and pyridoxine. I abegining my fourth month of treatment. the doc said it is "latent" Answered by Laureen Cechini 2 years ago.

Hot humid weather is very bad for asthmatics. If you are having chest pain, then you are not getting enough oxygen to your heart.The meds alupent must work for you if it is relieving the symptoms, you need to go the doctor and get your meds straightened out. You obviously have a change in the needs of the meds that you are taking. It could be related to the environment, or a change in your asthma/ condition, and a doctor needs to re-evaulate that. Answered by Valerie Briggeman 2 years ago.

Not to scare you or anything, but asthma can kill you. I also have asthma that I don't always treat as seriously as I should, and my doctor gave me a big lecture when she last saw me for asthma symptoms. Like you, I don't like to run to the doctor for every little thing, but breathing is a big thing. Take care of yourself. Answered by Stacy Kreidel 2 years ago.


Please help me with this question........?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are ... Asked by Bertha Fiest 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Louise Ribar 2 years ago.

I'm not sure if I fully understand what you are asking, but I will try to answer. "Lopresor" is a drug that contains metoprolol and is used to lower the patient's heart rate or blood pressure. A common side effect of metoprolol is a problem with breathing, when the airways are smaller than normal. "Alupent" is a drug used to help the patient breathe more easily. This drug is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol. I hope he gets better soon. Answered by Isaiah Bruley 2 years ago.

Please talk carefully to your doctor about this. Lopressor contains metoprolol - they are different names for the same drug. This is used to control blood pressure or some other heart problems (angina, or after a heart attack). It should not be used if there is a slow heart beat. This drug may not be a good choice for someone with asthma or other breathing problems. Alupent is a bronchodilator, which means that it opens up the airways to make breathing easier. This is normally used in people with asthma or other breathing problems. The answer by Belle that Alupent "is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol" is not correct in my opinion. These drugs both work on the "beta receptors" in the body. But Lopressor reduces the activity of these beta receptors, while Alupent increases the activity of these beta receptors. It is not normal to use them together because they have some opposite actions. There may be a reason the doctor is using these medications together. If both do need to be used, then it is possible but a lot of care is needed. DO NOT CHANGE THE MEDICATIONS OR STOP TAKING THEM WITHOUT TALKING TO THE DOCTOR. IT COULD BE DANGEROUS. PLEASE TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT YOUR CONCERNS AND ASK IF THESE ARE THE BEST MEDICATIONS TO USE. If your uncle is feeling unwell, or dizzy, or feels that his heartbeat or breathing is unusual - please see someone as soon as possible. Answered by Ai Joplin 2 years ago.

great site www.rxlist.com I use it all the time to compare drugs since doctors just seem to prescribe whats new and not really care whats best for the patient (my opinion). Answered by Buffy Phanthavongsa 2 years ago.

please rephrase question better.... But basically ask the doctor the side affecgts of each medication, and ask him which one he would recommend and why Answered by Jone Wisler 2 years ago.


Please help me...I'm confused...?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are... Asked by Jetta Rambeau 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Terisa Skorupski 2 years ago.

Wait a sec... 1st of all, Lopressor LOWERS the heart rate and blood pressure. 2nd, Metoprolol is the generic name for Lopressor. So there has to be more going on than you are aware of. Otherwise, he would not be on this! Answered by Leah Santillan 2 years ago.

You can look these drugs up on pharmacy websites. Just type in their names in a search engine like 'google' or similar. Your uncle should ask his prescribing doctor these questions. He should go back to see the doctor and ask what the tablets are for, which one does what and ask questions until he is satisfied that he understands EXACTLY what he puts in his mouth. His doctor is OBLIGED (means he HAS to) explain until he is blue in the face until the patient understands. If this doctor does NOT do this, he is not a good doctor and your uncle should get another doctor straight away. Answered by Evelin Olberding 2 years ago.


Will sympathomimetic drug help a person with asthma?
Asked by Hannah Ready 2 years ago.

A sympathomimetic drug is the bronchodilators doctors prescribe for people with asthma or conditions with asthmatic components to it. These include, Isuprel, Bronkosol, Alupent, Albuterol etc. The body has two systems of autonomic nerves. Sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Where one does one thing the other does the opposite. The term sympathomimetic means something that will "mimic" the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics dilate or relax the bronchial muscles so you can see it would be very useful in asthmatic patients. As I said there are two systems so another approach some doctors use is to give the patient a parasympatholytic medicine (Atrovent) to reduce the influence of the parasympathetic system.They will give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time. God bless. Answered by Towanda Gehret 2 years ago.

idk, do BITCHES EAT 'SCREAM? (ice cream) listen, dont ask on yahoo answers. no one here has a medical degree, save 1 or 2 Answered by Dodie Raborn 2 years ago.


Has anyone with severe asthma contracted Swine Flu?
Or do you know anyone else with severe asthma who has had it? How ill were you. I have severe asthma and I am 'mildly' worried about the implications of this virus with regards to asthma. Asked by Kacey Gaal 2 years ago.

I've had asthma all of my life, and just got over what may have been the Swine Flu. It actually could have been a very bad cold, but it really affected me for weeks. The asthma attacks were really bad, but kept under control by Alupent. They've taken Alupent off the market, along with most of the effective asthma medications, including the over-the-counter ones. It doesn't make sense, but with the rising number of individuals with asthma, they take the most effective medications off of the market, and try to steer people to the steroid ones, which don't work, at least for me. Since the strain of Swine Flue isn't as dangerous as previously thought, it's not as dangerous for most people, but is serious for those of us who have chronic diseases. I came close to going into the hospital, but managed to take care of it myself. I used to take Isuprel for asthma, which instantly would eliminate a serious asthma attack, but they also took that off the market. I have little faith in doctors or the pharmaceutical companies. Answered by Jules Spruiell 2 years ago.


Why caution administering alupent to diabetes patient?
Thank you for getting back to me, is it that it in some way inhibits the insulin either in production or release, or is it that it effects the cell membrane from allowing sugar to pass, or some other reason? I only ask because I spent time researching and can't find any specific information. Thanks Asked by Cortney Stonehouse 2 years ago.

One of the cautions in using alupent is for diabetic patients. I understand the cautions with cardiac patients, because of the sympathomimetic influence, but don't grasp the effects with a diabetic patients. Will the sympathetic response boost metabolism burning more sugar? Any information would be appreciated. Thanks Answered by Ronnie Hintze 2 years ago.

There is a very small possibility that metoproteronol (Alupent) may increase blood sugar levels after use. There have been a few case reports with IV albuterol (not available in US) or terbutaline causing this problem. The chances of this happening with Alupent, if properly taken, is unlikely. Regardless, if you have diabetes, it wouldn't hurt to monitor your blood sugar after taking this drug. Answered by Tiesha Gabrielli 2 years ago.


I'm taking Alupent inhaler is there another inhalent that is equivalent to it ? If so were can I find it?
SoMeOnE pLeAsE hElP!! Asked by Jeannine Mook 2 years ago.

The generic name of the brand name Alupent is metaproterenol sulfate. You need to ask your physician or pharmacist to see if there are other brand names of metaproterenol sulfate available, or if the generic version is available for purchase - resulting in a lower cost to the patient. Answered by Liana Coller 2 years ago.


What is the difference between Albuterol and Alupent for quick acting asthma relief?
I hove both Albuterol and Alupent in my medicine cabinet. My doctor didn't give me clear directions about which to take. The pharmacist said that both are interchangeable. Is this true? What is the difference? Asked by Elyse Natividad 2 years ago.

Matt's right. Albuterol has less cardiac side effects. Answered by Tiffaney Maharg 2 years ago.

To make it simple, They both do the same thing. The way I understand it is, Alupent was first on the market for asthma relief and had many side effects like racing heart and overall jittery feeling. Then came along albuterol. Albuterol did the same as Alupent on opening the airways and had less side effects. To add to this, now there is Levalbuterol (Xopenex) that has less side effect then albuterol. If I were you, I would use the one that did the best for asthma relief and had the least side effects. Good luck Answered by Charolette Scholze 2 years ago.

Both are considered quick-acting beta agonists. Which one works better for you when you need it? That's the question that will answer which one you should take. And the answer to that question is different for everyone. For example, albuterol works best for me when I need something, but some kinds of albuterol (Proventil HFA, for instance) don't work as well as others do (ProAir HFA, for example). So then, something else to think about is whether it's just the medication or the brand of it. In theory, it doesn't matter what you use, but in practice, it can make all the difference in the world when you're having an exacerbation. Answered by Kelsi Citrin 2 years ago.


Whats up with my asthma?
It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for... Asked by Frieda Onsgard 2 years ago.

It has been about 8 years since my asthma has bothered me, meaning I have not had to use any form of inhaler, no attacks, nothing totally fine. I have moved a lot since then. I moved to hot humid s Korea and at first thought it was just me unfit went to doc got flovent 110mcg morning and night. that was great for about a month then I needed a fast acting one alupent. Now I have crushing pressure on the bottom part of my chest when I get up in the morning and in the last few days it has also been right before I get to bed in the evening, alupnet makes it go away. Now I am having trouble holding my breath for my flovent daily, I am worried that I am not getting enough meds and thats my chest pain issue. How can I tell? I don't have a peak flow meter, I am not in a position to run to the doc if it is not absolutely urgent. thanks for any insight. am also taking isoniazid and pyridoxine. I abegining my fourth month of treatment. the doc said it is "latent" Answered by Michel Brandstrom 2 years ago.

Hot humid weather is very bad for asthmatics. If you are having chest pain, then you are not getting enough oxygen to your heart.The meds alupent must work for you if it is relieving the symptoms, you need to go the doctor and get your meds straightened out. You obviously have a change in the needs of the meds that you are taking. It could be related to the environment, or a change in your asthma/ condition, and a doctor needs to re-evaulate that. Answered by Jolyn Millott 2 years ago.

Not to scare you or anything, but asthma can kill you. I also have asthma that I don't always treat as seriously as I should, and my doctor gave me a big lecture when she last saw me for asthma symptoms. Like you, I don't like to run to the doctor for every little thing, but breathing is a big thing. Take care of yourself. Answered by Wei Thomason 2 years ago.


Please help me with this question........?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are ... Asked by Catarina Rodriguez 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Adelina Sylvian 2 years ago.

I'm not sure if I fully understand what you are asking, but I will try to answer. "Lopresor" is a drug that contains metoprolol and is used to lower the patient's heart rate or blood pressure. A common side effect of metoprolol is a problem with breathing, when the airways are smaller than normal. "Alupent" is a drug used to help the patient breathe more easily. This drug is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol. I hope he gets better soon. Answered by Autumn Sniezek 2 years ago.

Please talk carefully to your doctor about this. Lopressor contains metoprolol - they are different names for the same drug. This is used to control blood pressure or some other heart problems (angina, or after a heart attack). It should not be used if there is a slow heart beat. This drug may not be a good choice for someone with asthma or other breathing problems. Alupent is a bronchodilator, which means that it opens up the airways to make breathing easier. This is normally used in people with asthma or other breathing problems. The answer by Belle that Alupent "is only being used because your uncle is taking metoprolol" is not correct in my opinion. These drugs both work on the "beta receptors" in the body. But Lopressor reduces the activity of these beta receptors, while Alupent increases the activity of these beta receptors. It is not normal to use them together because they have some opposite actions. There may be a reason the doctor is using these medications together. If both do need to be used, then it is possible but a lot of care is needed. DO NOT CHANGE THE MEDICATIONS OR STOP TAKING THEM WITHOUT TALKING TO THE DOCTOR. IT COULD BE DANGEROUS. PLEASE TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT YOUR CONCERNS AND ASK IF THESE ARE THE BEST MEDICATIONS TO USE. If your uncle is feeling unwell, or dizzy, or feels that his heartbeat or breathing is unusual - please see someone as soon as possible. Answered by Joeann Haigler 2 years ago.

great site www.rxlist.com I use it all the time to compare drugs since doctors just seem to prescribe whats new and not really care whats best for the patient (my opinion). Answered by Mohammed Duboise 2 years ago.

please rephrase question better.... But basically ask the doctor the side affecgts of each medication, and ask him which one he would recommend and why Answered by Bridgett Calicutt 2 years ago.


Please help me...I'm confused...?
My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are... Asked by Ryan Daleo 2 years ago.

My uncle fell down from a ladder few days ego and his head brokes....so now he is okey but he has a low heartbeats.so his doctor gave him a drug with three name....so we confused..please help me with this dugs.wich one is better.((less side efect))and good for low heart beats....the names of the drugs are METOPROLOL & LOPRESOR & ALUPENT............thanks Answered by Nikole Jenness 2 years ago.

Wait a sec... 1st of all, Lopressor LOWERS the heart rate and blood pressure. 2nd, Metoprolol is the generic name for Lopressor. So there has to be more going on than you are aware of. Otherwise, he would not be on this! Answered by Bobbye Theimer 2 years ago.

You can look these drugs up on pharmacy websites. Just type in their names in a search engine like 'google' or similar. Your uncle should ask his prescribing doctor these questions. He should go back to see the doctor and ask what the tablets are for, which one does what and ask questions until he is satisfied that he understands EXACTLY what he puts in his mouth. His doctor is OBLIGED (means he HAS to) explain until he is blue in the face until the patient understands. If this doctor does NOT do this, he is not a good doctor and your uncle should get another doctor straight away. Answered by Marinda Straney 2 years ago.


Will sympathomimetic drug help a person with asthma?
Asked by Gabrielle Rapelyea 2 years ago.

A sympathomimetic drug is the bronchodilators doctors prescribe for people with asthma or conditions with asthmatic components to it. These include, Isuprel, Bronkosol, Alupent, Albuterol etc. The body has two systems of autonomic nerves. Sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Where one does one thing the other does the opposite. The term sympathomimetic means something that will "mimic" the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics dilate or relax the bronchial muscles so you can see it would be very useful in asthmatic patients. As I said there are two systems so another approach some doctors use is to give the patient a parasympatholytic medicine (Atrovent) to reduce the influence of the parasympathetic system.They will give a sympathomimetic and a parasympatholytic at the same time. God bless. Answered by Breanne Datri 2 years ago.

idk, do BITCHES EAT 'SCREAM? (ice cream) listen, dont ask on yahoo answers. no one here has a medical degree, save 1 or 2 Answered by Ethelyn Farish 2 years ago.


Has anyone with severe asthma contracted Swine Flu?
Or do you know anyone else with severe asthma who has had it? How ill were you. I have severe asthma and I am 'mildly' worried about the implications of this virus with regards to asthma. Asked by Angelia Loeven 2 years ago.

I've had asthma all of my life, and just got over what may have been the Swine Flu. It actually could have been a very bad cold, but it really affected me for weeks. The asthma attacks were really bad, but kept under control by Alupent. They've taken Alupent off the market, along with most of the effective asthma medications, including the over-the-counter ones. It doesn't make sense, but with the rising number of individuals with asthma, they take the most effective medications off of the market, and try to steer people to the steroid ones, which don't work, at least for me. Since the strain of Swine Flue isn't as dangerous as previously thought, it's not as dangerous for most people, but is serious for those of us who have chronic diseases. I came close to going into the hospital, but managed to take care of it myself. I used to take Isuprel for asthma, which instantly would eliminate a serious asthma attack, but they also took that off the market. I have little faith in doctors or the pharmaceutical companies. Answered by Idalia Ingersoll 2 years ago.


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