ALLOPURINOL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 071449/001.

Names and composition

"ALLOPURINOL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ALLOPURINOL.
It belongs to the class Gout treatments and is used in Gout (Musculoskeletal Disorders)

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
071449/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071450/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
075798/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075798/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
077353/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
077353/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078253/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078253/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078390/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078390/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
090637/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
090637/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
203154/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
203154/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
204467/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
204467/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018241/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018241/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018659/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018659/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018785/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018785/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018832/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018877/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070147/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070150/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070268/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070269/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070466/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070467/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070579/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070580/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070950/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070951/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016084/001 ZYLOPRIM ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
016084/002 ZYLOPRIM ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018297/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018297/002 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071449/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071450/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
075798/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075798/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
077353/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
077353/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071586/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078253/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071587/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078253/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078390/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078390/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
090637/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
090637/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
203154/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
203154/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
204467/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
204467/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018241/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018241/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018659/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018659/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018785/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018785/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018832/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018877/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070147/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070150/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070268/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070269/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070466/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070467/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070579/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070580/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070950/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070951/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Aspen Pharma Trading Ltd

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Answered questions

What is allopurinol medication?
medication Asked by Felecia Hillbrant 1 month ago.

GENERIC NAME: allopurinol BRAND NAME: Zyloprim, Aloprim DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Allopurinol is used for treating gout caused by excessive levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia). Uric acid is a by product from the breakdown of certain proteins (purines) in the body. Hyperuricemia occurs when the body produces more uric acid than it can eliminate. The uric acid forms crystals in joints (gouty arthritis) and tissues, causing inflammation and pain. Elevated blood uric acid levels also can cause kidney disease and stones. Allopurinol prevents the production of uric acid by blocking the activity of the enzyme that converts purines to uric acid. Uric acid levels usually begin to fall within 2-3 days of starting treatment and return to their original levels within 7-10 days after allopurinol is stopped. It may take several months of therapy before attacks of gout are controlled. The FDA approved allopurinol prior to 1982. PRESCRIPTION: Yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 100, 300 mg; Powder for injection: 500 mg STORAGE: Tablets should be stored at room temperature between 15 to 25 C (59-77 F) and in a moisture proof, light- resistant container. Powder should be stored between 20 and 25 C (68-77 F) and not refrigerated. PRESCRIBED FOR: Allopurinol is used for treating acute attacks of gout, erosive destructive gouty joint disease, uric acid deposits in tissues (tophi), gouty kidney disease, and uric acid stones. Allopurinol also is used to prevent elevation of blood uric acid in patients undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of certain cancers and in patients with recurrent calcium kidney stones and elevated uric acid levels. DOSING: The dose range of allopurinol is 100-800 mg day. It should be taken with food to avoid irritation of the stomach. In order to avoid formation of kidney stones, patients should drink plenty of fluids while taking allopurinol. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Allopurinol increases blood levels of oral mercaptopurine (Purinethol) and azathioprine (Imuran) by reducing their breakdown in the body. Therefore, the dose of mercaptopurine and azathioprine should be reduced in order to avoid toxicity. There is an increased risk of skin rash in patients taking allopurinol in combination with penicillins. PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies of allopurinol in pregnant women. NURSING MOTHERS: Allopurinol is excreted in breast milk. To avoid adverse effects in the infant, nursing mothers taking allopurinol should consider not breastfeeding. SIDE EFFECTS: Common reactions include diarrhea, nausea, rash and itching, and drowsiness. The most frequent side effect to allopurinol is skin rash. Allopurinol should be discontinued immediately at the first appearance of rash, painful urination, blood in the urine, eye irritation, or swelling of the mouth or lips, because these can be a signs of an impending severe allergic reaction that can be fatal. Allopurinol should be avoided by patients with a prior severe reaction to the drug. Allopurinol can cause a flare-up of gouty arthritis during initial therapy. Therefore, colchicine often is used simultaneously to prevent these flares. Rarely, allopurinol can cause nerve, kidney, and bone marrow damage. Allopurinol can cause a serious allergic liver toxicity that can be fatal. Appetite loss and itching can be signs of liver toxicity. The risk of this reaction increases in patients with kidney impairment. Patients with kidney impairment should receive lower doses of allopurinol. Answered by Will Jagodzinski 1 month ago.

The problem with allopurinol medication is that their designed on the basis of “interruption” mechanism. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors disrupt the purine – uric acid cycle by suppressing the enzyme that helps to break down purine to uric acid. Look, God created xanthine oxidase to help us dispose the excess purine in the body. The degradation of purine happens in the liver, and the end product which is uric acid is released back into the bloodstream to be sent to the kidneys for disposal. Blocking this cycle with allopurinol causes the built up of purine in the liver which leads to all sorts of side effects. Answered by Russ Snoddy 1 month ago.

It reduces uric acid production and is used to Prevent (not treat) gout. In fact it will make acutr gout worse. It needs to be started when the patient is free from acute gout, started at a low dose (50mg) and increased slowly. Answered by Tiara Coachman 1 month ago.

it blocks the production of uric acid which precipitates in the joints as crystals, which are needle like and cause a lot of pain and swelling. This is known as gout. Answered by Taylor Lehmkuhl 1 month ago.

neutralizes uric acid in the system....treats gout. Answered by Roxanne Cherny 1 month ago.

No it doesnt to my knowledge. I am on allopurinol, coreg, spironolactone, diovan, and several others with no side effects! Answered by Guadalupe Fengler 1 month ago.

ITS FOR SOMEONE WITH A BIG UGLY TOE THAT IS FULL OF URIC ACID. IT INHIBITS THIS ENZYME CALLED *XANTHINE OXIDASE*....ITS FOR GOUT :) Answered by Adrianna Latina 1 month ago.


For gout .. how much allopurinol should i take?
what are the doses for allopurinol? Asked by Kia Govero 1 month ago.

Allopurinol is prescribed to prevent gout attacks. It is taken in low dosages at first. The dosage is gradually increased to control uric acid levels.Since allopurinol must be taken daily, it is used only if the criteria for treatment of chronic gout are fulfilled. initial dose - 100 to 300 mg od orally maintenance dose - 100 to 600 mg/day orally but don't start it or change the dose without your doctor advice. if you need technical information i should tell you that: "The dosage of allopurinol to accomplish full control of gout and to lower serum uric acid to normal or near-normal levels varies with the severity of the disease. The average is 200 to 300 mg per day for patients with mild gout and 400 to 600 mg per day for those with moderately severe tophaceous gout. The appropriate dosage may be administered in divided doses or as a single equivalent dose with the 300 mg tablet. Dosage requirements in excess of 300 mg should be administered in divided doses. The minimal effective dosage is 100 to 200 mg daily and the maximal recommended dosage is 800 mg daily. To reduce the possibility of flare-up of acute gouty attacks, it is recommended that the patient start with a low dose of allopurinol (100 mg daily) and increase at weekly intervals by 100 mg until a serum uric acid level of 6 mg/dl or less is attained but without exceeding the maximal recommended dosage. Normal serum urate levels are usually achieved in one to three weeks. The upper limit of normal is about 7 mg/dl for men and postmenopausal women and 6 mg/dl for premenopausal women. Too much reliance should not be placed on a single serum uric acid determination since, for technical reasons, estimation of uric acid may be difficult. By selecting the appropriate dosage and, in certain patients, using uricosuric agents concurrently, it is possible to reduce serum uric acid to normal or, if desired, to as low as 2 to 3 mg/dl and keep it there indefinitely. While adjusting the dosage of allopurinol in patients who are being treated with colchicine and/or anti-inflammatory agents, it is wise to continue the latter therapy until serum uric acid has been normalized and there has been freedom from acute gouty attacks for several months. In transferring a patient from a uricosuric agent to allopurinol, the dose of the uricosuric agent should be gradually reduced over a period of several weeks and the dose of allopurinol gradually increased to the required dose needed to maintain a normal serum uric acid level. It should also be noted that allopurinol is generally better tolerated if taken following meals. A fluid intake sufficient to yield a daily urinary output of at least two liters and the maintenance of a neutral or, preferably, slightly alkaline urine are desirable. Since allopurinol and its metabolites are primarily eliminated only by the kidney, accumulation of the drug can occur in renal failure, and the dose of allopurinol should consequently be reduced. With a creatinine clearance of 10 to 20 ml/min, a daily dosage of 200 mg of allopurinol is suitable. When the creatinine clearance is less than 10 ml/min the daily dosage should not exceed 100 mg. With extreme renal impairment (creatinine clearance less than 3 ml/min) the interval between doses may also need to be lengthened. The correct size and frequency of dosage for maintaining the serum uric acid just within the normal range is best determined by using the serum uric acid level as an index. For the prevention of uric acid nephropathy during the vigorous therapy of neoplastic disease, treatment with 600 to 800 mg daily for two or three days is advisable together with a high fluid intake. Otherwise similar considerations to the above recommendations for treating patients with gout govern the regulation of dosage for maintenance purposes in secondary hyperuricemia. The dose of allopurinol recommended for management of recurrent calcium oxalate stones in hyperuricosuric patients is 200 to 300 mg/day in divided doses or as the single equivalent. This dose may be adjusted up or down depending upon the resultant control of the hyperuricosuria based upon subsequent 24 hour urinary urate determinations. Clinical experience suggests that patients with recurrent calcium oxalate stones may also benefit from dietary changes such as the reduction of animal protein, sodium, refined sugars, oxalate-rich foods, and excessive calcium intake as well as an increase in oral fluids and dietary fiber. Children, 6 to 10 years of age, with secondary hyperuricemia associated with malignancies may be given 300 mg allopurinol daily while those under 6 years are generally given 150 mg daily. The response is evaluated after approximately 48 hours of therapy and a dosage adjustment is made if necessary." Answered by Dortha Andreasen 1 month ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Juliana Turber 1 month ago.

My husband had "galloping" gout. Started in the foot, cleared up and jumped to an elbow, then the hand. Pain was excruciating. He has been on allopurinol for years. We watch his diet. "All things in moderation." Just take it easy on red meats, gravies, soups, pies, alcohol. My husband is a big guy and lives to eat, but with care, he has been gout-free for some time. About the colchicine - he took this also but only for 3 days at the onset when the gout was at its worst. Should you be taking this ongoing? Answered by Nestor Thielman 1 month ago.

What Is Allopurinol Taken For Answered by Flo Porro 1 month ago.

I am taking 1 100mg daily. I still get occasional flare ups. You answered my question as the best time to take the allopurinol. Thank you. Kathryn Answered by Kristen Murrock 1 month ago.

The dosage would be on the prescription bottle. Answered by Annalee Lonn 1 month ago.


Does the body become resistant to the benefits of Allopurinol over time?
I have been on it for about 10 months. I've been chronic for about 5 years, but had a near death (from the pain) gout attack a year ago that lasted a month, and thus I got on da pill. It seems like it may be losing its effectiveness, though. But to be sure, I have been testing the limits a little lately yet... Asked by Clarinda Habina 1 month ago.

I have been on it for about 10 months. I've been chronic for about 5 years, but had a near death (from the pain) gout attack a year ago that lasted a month, and thus I got on da pill. It seems like it may be losing its effectiveness, though. But to be sure, I have been testing the limits a little lately yet still drinking tons of water. No alcohol either. 300mg every morning. Answered by Mertie Ronin 1 month ago.

Allopurinol is an inhibitor that suppresses the degradation of purine to uric acid. Everyday, there are millions of body cell die off and the breaking down of the DNA structure produces huge amount purine. Part of these purines will be used by the body for the formation of new body cells while the rest of it will be sent to the liver to be further broken down to uric acid for disposal through urine. When just started to take Allopurinol, the drug works fine in delivering the promised result, lower down your blood serum uric acid level. But the doctors forgot to tell you that this effect is only temporary. Here is the flow of the purine disposal cycle, excess purines enter the liver to be degraded to uric acid, and the the uric acid is carried by the blood to the kidneys for disposal. There are 2 possible causes of hyperuricemia, the increased purine input or decreased uric acid output. If you have cut down or abstain from the high purine diet but your blood uric acid level still remains high, then the major cause of your gout is because of the weakened kidney function which results in the decrease of uric acid disposal capability. Taking Allopurinol can only hold the un-degraded purine in the liver for certain period of time, eventually your body still have to get rid of the purine. If it cannot get rid of it through conversion to uric acid, it will force it to find some alternative channels such as through the skin to get rid of the unwanted purine, and that is why some gout patients experience skin rashes after they start taking Allopurinol. And since the liver is holding up huge amount of purine, you CANNOT stop the consumption of Allopurinol, at least not suddenly stop it. This is because once the suppressing factor is removed, hell break loose! The liver is start churning out huge amount of uric acid and cause a serious spike of uric acid level that result in series of serious gout attack. Sad but true, none of those gout drugs can remove the urate crystals that have already formed inside the gouty joints. As long as those tiny nasty crystals are still there, you will alway have chronic gout attack. You cannot depend on those chemical drugs for the rest of your life for those chemical residues will only further destroy your kidneys and send you to dialysis unit. If conventional medicine works, you won't be suffering from the awful gout pain for years. It is time to give yourself a chance to try some alternative solution which makes more sense than the crazy pills. Answered by Randa Koff 1 month ago.

It is not so much that you become resistant, but the bacteria that you are trying to kill with the antibiotic become resistant, so it becomes ineffective. If you develop an allergy to the antibiotic, that usually is somewhat permanent - it is possible to be allergic to a carrier rather than the antibiotic, so you might be able to tolerate the drug in a different carrier... We tend to rotate antibiotics to avoid creating a bacteria that is immune but there are many antibiotics that were very effective in the 40's and 50's that are almost worthless today because of that effect. People that take prophylactic doses can cause this - there are several STDs that became very drug resistant in the far East because prostitutes took low dosages of antibotics... It is important to take an entire series of an antibiotic unless you have adverse reactions to it for that reason. Answered by Emeline Schoemer 1 month ago.

What makes you think allopurinol is losing its effectiveness? What is your serum uric acid (SUA) level? Are you checking it regularly? I have been on 300 mg. allopurinol for 7 months, and if anything, it is more effective than ever. I test my SUA at least weekly, and it is now extremely low (<2.5 mg/dL), even when I drink beer. Get a uric acid test kit and track your SUA. If it's consistently below 6 mg/dL you're OK, though <5 is better for recovering gouties. Some people have been on allopurinol for decades, and I haven't seen any reports of it losing effectiveness over time. Bodies change, though, and sometimes the dosage must be adjusted. 300 mg. per day is the standard dose, but up to 800 mg. is permitted. Keep track of your SUA and consult your doctor. Answered by Marna Ganino 1 month ago.


Is allopurinol classified as an antacid?
My blood pressure medication indicates that it should not be taken with an antacid. Would allupurinol be included? Asked by Marquis Batcher 1 month ago.

Allopurinol is not an antacid in the same way as Mylanta or Tums. It targets a specific type of acid (uric acid) which is not in the GI tract (which is where the Tums, etc are intended to work). Antacids such as Tums, Rolaids, etc are known to "bind up" other meds taken at the same time as these antacids therefore they would inhibit the intended action (i.e. BP meds would not be able to lower BP b/c they are bound up & not available to do their "job"). Allopurinol is different in this aspect and is often taken along with various BP meds. Check with your pharmacist as he/she is aware of the specific BP med you are taking & can advise you further. Hope this helps. Answered by Darleen Sung 1 month ago.

It is classified as a Hyperuricemia & Gout Preparation. Allopurinol is a drug used primarily to treat conditions arising from excess uric acid, most notably chronic gout. Allopurinol does not alleviate acute attacks of gout, but is useful in preventing recurrence. Allopurinol has been used in the United States since 1964. Uses (other than in treatment of gout) In addition to its use in gout, allopurinol is also commonly used as prophylaxis with chemotherapeutic treatments, which can rapidly result in very high uric acid concentrations due to widespread cell death (tumour lysis syndrome). Other established indications for allopurinol therapy include ischaemic reperfusion injury, kidney stones (urolithiasis) and protozoal infections (Leishmaniasis). Answered by Jack Vibbard 1 month ago.

Allopurinol is primarily a gout medicine. It helps decrease uric acid levels. Uric acid is a byproduct of protein metabolism. When you uric acid levels get to high it can deposit in tissues and cause inflammation. This condition is known as gout and can be very painful and uncomfortable. You would use Colchicine for acute attacks of gout and allopurinol to keep from getting gout attacks. It also helps to decrease protein in you diet if you are having gout problems. Allopurinol is also use in cancer therapy to decrease uric acid levels that rise due to certain treatments. Answered by Sulema Kassman 1 month ago.

Allopurinol Wikipedia Answered by Simone Nordling 1 month ago.

ph =14- poh and if ph less than 7 acidic if ph=7 neutral if ph greater than 7 basic Answered by Donn Hatten 1 month ago.


Allopurinol medicine?
Asked by Casandra Madnick 1 month ago.

Allopurinol (Zyloprim) is used to treat gout (joint inflammation in gout) and kidney stones (calcium stones, mainly). And it prevents high levels of uric acid in patients receiving chemo treatments. It si NOT a pain reliever, though. Most people find it easiest to take after meals to decrease upset stomach, and with a full glass of water. If taken for stones, it is also best to drink at least 3-4 more glasses of water throughout the day to prevent more stone build-up. Hope this info helps. Of course, always consult your Dr. for best medical advice. Not these yahoos!!! Answered by Vina Shupp 1 month ago.

It would help if you put more in your question explaining what you want to know. I take allopurinol every day. My body produces too much uric acid, and the allopurinol helps the body eliminate the uric acid so it doesn't build up. When uric acid builds up, it can form crystals in the joints. The bodies immune system reacts to those crystals as if they were outside organisms, and the immune response causes swelling and tenderness and lots of pain. The name for this mishap is gout. Allopurinol helps prevent gout attacks in people who have too much uric acid. Follow the link in the source section for lots of info. Answered by Clarence Brits 1 month ago.

Allopurinol is used to treat patients with multiple recurrent gout attacks, erosive destructive gouty joint disease, hard lumps of uric acid deposits in tissues (called tophi), gouty kidney disease, or uric acid stones. Allopurinol is also used to prevent elevation of blood uric acid in patients undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of certain cancers. NREMT-P, CPC Answered by Berniece Romer 1 month ago.

Commonly prescribed for gout!!! Answered by Margrett Vannoy 1 month ago.

I'm not sure what your question is? Can you be more specific? Answered by Nelson Carra 1 month ago.


Skin rash from allopurinol ,how is it dangerous?
After applying skin cream the rash was less.What happens if allopurinol is not stopped.There are no other side effects.Without allo he is getting frequent gout attacks Asked by Cheri Dambrosio 1 month ago.

FIRST READ THE WARNING FOR ALLOPURINOL BELOW! Where is the rash? Benadryl is great for problems with medicine related rashes, but it makes most people too sleepy to work or drive. If the rash is in the mouth or throat you can use benadryl syrup and rinse, or gargle, then spit it out. That way it works locally. Benadryl comes in an over the counter cream too, and in an "insect sting stick". Ask the Dr. too, there may be a substitute that causes fewer side effects. Monograph title ALLOPURINOL - ORAL Phonetic pronunciation (al-oh-PURE-in-ohl) Common brand name(s) Zyloprim Uses Allopurinol is an enzyme blocker that lowers high levels of uric acid in your body by decreasing the amount produced. It is used to treat gout and certain types of kidney stones. This drug is also used to prevent high uric acid levels in patients who receive cancer chemotherapy. Cancer cells that are destroyed with therapy release large amounts of uric acid into the bloodstream. How to use Take this medication by mouth usually once daily after a meal to reduce stomach upset, or as directed by your doctor. It is best to drink a full glass of water with each dose and at least another 8 glasses (8 oz. each) a day while taking this drug in order to prevent kidney stones from forming. This drug may rarely cause very serious (possibly fatal) allergic reactions. Stop taking allopurinol and SEEK IMMEDIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION IF ANY OF THESE ALLERGIC REACTION SYMPTOMS OCCUR: SKIN RASH, HIVES, ITCHING, SWELLING, (especially of the lips or mouth), dizziness, pain when urinating, blood in the urine, unusual eye redness/pain, fever and chills, muscle/joint pain, trouble breathing.If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. Answered by Edwina Jess 1 month ago.

Allopurinol Rash Answered by Buddy Fretwell 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: skin rash from allopurinol ,how is it dangerous? After applying skin cream the rash was less.What happens if allopurinol is not stopped.There are no other side effects.Without allo he is getting frequent gout attacks Answered by Yuonne Mahrer 1 month ago.


Allopurinol - if you take it regualarly for gout (say years) , then you have a flare up - do you cease it unti?
the flare up subsides? Asked by Mee Illian 1 month ago.

No, never stop taking allopurinol, even if you have a gout flare. You should take an anti-inflammatory if you cannot stand the pain. Ibuprofen works for me, but some people cannot stomach it. If you have adverse reactions to all anti-inflammatory drugs, a corticosteroid injection often helps, but they can only be taken short term as they reduce the body's natural corticosteroid production. If you have had a gout flare now after years of allopurinol, it is an indication that your dosage is not right. You should be having uric acid tests at least every 3 months. First year or so of allopurinol, your uric acid level should aim to be around 5mg/dL, definitely under 6. This ensures any existing uric acid crystals in your body tissue dissolve. After that, it must be maintained below 7. If doctor has monitored a few years of low uric acid, it can sometimes be stopped for a few months, subject to monthly uric acid tests. At first sign of it rising above 7, you must get straight back on the allopurinol. The only other time to stop taking allopurinol is if you show any serious side effects. These side effects should be listed on your allopurinol packaging. If not, you can read them on the reference site below. Answered by Beata Ciejka 1 month ago.

When you feel pain start in your hand, which I'm going to guess is the hand you use to write with, can you stop using that hand and rest and elevate? Also, try applying a warm compress. Some people find relief with NSAIDS (Ibuprofen) - just don't take Aspirin (which could aggravate the condition. Also, consider risk factors associated with gout such as being overweight, eating red meat or large quantities of alcohol. Answered by Junko Glassel 1 month ago.


How does lisinopril affect allopurinol?
20mg lisinopril 100 mg allopurinol Asked by Joeann Comeau 1 month ago.

There is a major drug-drug interaction between allopurinol and lisinopril. MONITOR CLOSELY: Allopurinol and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) e.g. lisinopril, given concomitantly may increase the risk of hypersensitivity reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, skin eruptions, anaphylaxis, fever and arthralgias. The mechanism is not known, but impaired renal function may be a predisposing factor. Case reports exist for captopril and enalapril (also ACE inhibitors). MANAGEMENT: Allopurinol should only be used with ACE inhibitors if benefit outweighs risk. If these agents must be administered together, monitor for hypersensitivity reactions and discontinue therapy if needed. Patients should be advised to seek medical help if they develop dyspnea, throat constriction, swelling or hives of the face, lips, or tongue, urticaria, rash, fever, arthralgia, or myalgia. Answered by Cicely Baytos 1 month ago.

I was diagnosed with BPH 3 yrs ago and prescribed Dioxasosin. Had a heart attack shortly thereafter and was prescribed lisinopril. haven't had a hard on since starting these two drugs and was able to have sex tgree times a day every day of the year prior to that. I miss my puss.. Sad thing about it is I also have a prescription for nitroglycerin and can't get a Viagra prescription because I may take nitrates when i want to screw. Answered by Amina Rutenberg 1 month ago.

Monitor for hypersensitivity reactions and discontinue therapy if needed. Patients should be advised to seek medical help if they develop dyspnea, throat constriction, swelling or hives of the face, lips, or tongue, urticaria, rash, fever, arthralgia, or myalgia. Answered by Rebecca Toting 1 month ago.


Hi Triglycerides dr. put me on Allopurinol is this going to help.I thought this was for Gout.?
Triglycerides count was 268.I,m also takeing Atenol for high blood presure and was told this causes high triglcerides,Please Help Asked by Ghislaine Feist 1 month ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Linh Finck 1 month ago.


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