ALKERAN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 014691/002.

Names and composition

"ALKERAN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MELPHALAN.

Answered questions

Is alkeran used for dogs?
Hello, my dog was just diagnosed with a type of mouth cancer. A veterinarian friend in France told me that they have recently been giving a drug called alkeran to dogs with some types of cancer, including the type my dog has.I have done some research on this drug via some US sources, but only see it being... Asked by Mike Uljevic 3 months ago.

Hello, my dog was just diagnosed with a type of mouth cancer. A veterinarian friend in France told me that they have recently been giving a drug called alkeran to dogs with some types of cancer, including the type my dog has. I have done some research on this drug via some US sources, but only see it being mentioned in connection with humans. Does anyone know if alkeran is available for dogs in the US? Also, has anyone used it on their own dog, and would they like to share their experiences/advice? Please, if you don't have a useful answer, do not write to criticize me in the comments section and tell me to look up more stuff, ask another vet, etc. I have done all that I can and if I could do more on my own, I would. That's what Yahoo Answers is for - for the online community to help each other. Thanks in advance. Answered by Vilma Legan 3 months ago.

Alkeran is used to treat multiple myeloma in dogs. Also known by the name -melphalan (Alkeran) When my sisters dog had an oral tumor he was put on Piroxicam (Feldene), with wonderful results in regards to slowing the growth of the tumor. The dog eventually succumbed to the disease , but the Piroxicam gave him more time with quality of life. Answered by Burl Dawes 3 months ago.

I dont know how long ago this was asked but my dog is presently on melphalan w/Piroxicam. She did well her first treatment but then had a total GI blow-out and needed hospitalized. We suspect it was the piroxicam but unsure. Just yesterday we again started the melphalan but this time with deramaxx. She has anal sac cancer,is a 10 yr old german shepherd. The tumor was surgically removed but not with clean margins.I hope this helps and I wish u the best of luck......Paul Answered by Joycelyn Oberholtzer 3 months ago.


Please help (10 points best answer)?
I was wondering if I could get financial help with the drug alkeran melphalan Thank you. Asked by Cornell Mccarvy 3 months ago.

Contact the manufacturer. There is a government program that requires that pharmaceutical companies to help people who can not afford the medicines they need. Drug companies are nor required to advertise this service, so they don't. Answered by Kaitlin Kipple 3 months ago.

Ask your doctor. The pharmaceutical companies always give doctors plenty of free samples. Most doctors can give you enough meds in free samples that you do not need to buy them. Answered by Alex Carvey 3 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Tonette Papciak 3 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Kristopher Laspina 3 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Elna Ouren 3 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Isobel Prado 3 months ago.


My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG.?
My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG they said its in 99% of her bones. She starts chemo (velcade) monday. what can she expect and what about the other meds. she needs.dexamethasone and Thalidomide and are very expensive she has no insurance any suggestions is greatly appreciated. Asked by Rolf Villalobos 3 months ago.

She should apply for emergency Medicaid to help with the costs. This is from Mayo Clinic literature: Standard treatments for myeloma Though there's no cure for multiple myeloma, with good treatment results you can usually return to near-normal activity. The appropriate multiple myeloma treatment depends on your needs, medical status and general health. You may also wish to consider approved clinical trials as an option. Standard treatment options include: Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine (Oncovin), doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids such as prednisone and dexamethasone (Decadron) have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given as pills. Some research suggests that high doses of steroids may not be needed, and that lower doses may be safer and more effective. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Thalidomide is currently FDA-approved in conjunction with the corticosteroid called dexamethasone for the treatment of newly diagnosed cases of multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Bortezomib (Velcade). Velcade was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It works by blocking the action of proteasomes, which causes cancer cells to die. One study showed that bortezomib had more than twice the response rate of a commonly used drug, dexamethasone. Bortezomib is approved by the FDA for use in a treatment for people with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects. It is given orally. Lenalidomide is FDA-approved for use in combination with dexamethasone as a treatment for people who have received at least one prior therapy for multiple myeloma. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to target myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, to more quickly shrink a tumor that's causing pain or destroying a bone. Initial therapy for myeloma The initial chemotherapy used to treat multiple myeloma depends on whether you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation. Factors such as the risk of your disease progressing, your age and your general health play a part in determining whether stem cell transplantation may be right for you. If you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy will likely exclude melphalan because this drug can have a toxic effect on stem cells, making it impossible to collect enough of them. You may begin treatment with the most common initial myeloma therapy in the United States, thalidomide plus dexamethasone. Or your doctor may instead recommend a newer regimen, lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone. Your stem cells will likely be collected after you've undergone three to four months of treatment with these initial agents. Your doctor may recommend undergoing the stem cell transplant soon after your cells are collected or delaying the transplant until after a relapse, if it occurs. Your age and your personal preference are important factors that will help your doctor make his or her recommendation. If you're not considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy is likely to be a combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide (MPT). If the side effects are intolerable, melphalan plus prednisone is another option (MP). This type of therapy is typically given for about 12 to 18 months. Treatments for relapsed or treatment-resistant multiple myeloma Most people who are treated for multiple myeloma eventually experience a relapse of the disease. And in some cases, none of the currently available, first-line therapies slow the cancer cells from multiplying. If you experience a relapse of multiple myeloma, your doctor may recommend repeating another course of the treatment that initially helped you. Another option is trying one or more of the other treatments typically used as first-line therapy, either alone or in combination. Research on a number of promising new treatment options is ongoing, and these drugs offer important options for those with multiple myeloma. Talk to your doctor about what clinical trials may be available to you. Treating complications Because multiple myeloma can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions. For example: Back pain. Taking pain medication or wearing a back brace can help relieve the back pain you might experience with multiple myeloma. Kidney complications. People with severe kidney damage may need dialysis. Infections. Antibiotics may be necessary to help treat infections or to help reduce your risk of them. Bone loss. You may take medications called bisphosphonates, such as pamidronate (Aredia) or zoledronic acid (Zometa), which bind to the surface of your bones and help prevent bone loss. Treatment with these drugs is associated with the risk of harm to the jawbone. If you're taking these medications, don't have dental procedures done without consulting your doctor first. Anemia. If you have persistent anemia, your doctor may prescribe erythropoietin injections. Erythropoietin is a naturally occurring hormone made in the kidneys that stimulates the production of red blood cells. Research suggests that the use of erythropoietin may increase the risk of blood clots in some people with myeloma. Answered by Conrad Scheulen 3 months ago.

I know Thalidomide has a patient assistance program to help with the cost. Her doctor can give her all the information. But you can check out this website also. Thalomid.com. I don't think dex is that expensive. Answered by Cecila Eichman 3 months ago.


My Grandmother has been diagnosed with Amyloidosis, what does this mean for her and my family?
After going to hospital numerous times due to kidney failure, heart problems and inflamed stomachs. Doctors have said that my Nan has Amyloidosis. I've become a bit upset as from what I have read she may not have long to live.What also worries me from reading on the Internet is that it might be genetic, and... Asked by Margery Munl 3 months ago.

After going to hospital numerous times due to kidney failure, heart problems and inflamed stomachs. Doctors have said that my Nan has Amyloidosis. I've become a bit upset as from what I have read she may not have long to live. What also worries me from reading on the Internet is that it might be genetic, and I fear it may be passed on to me. Answered by Leonard Husanini 3 months ago.

*Some cases of amyloidosis are inherited. Primary amyloidosis. This most common form of amyloidosis can affect many areas, including your heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, nerves, intestines, skin, tongue and blood vessels. Primary amyloidosis isn't associated with other diseases — except for multiple myeloma, a form of bone marrow cancer, in a minority of cases. The exact cause of primary amyloidosis is unknown, but doctors do know that the disease begins in your bone marrow. In addition to producing red and white blood cells and platelets, your bone marrow makes antibodies — proteins that protect you against infection and disease. After antibodies serve their function, your body breaks them down and recycles them. Amyloidosis occurs when cells in the bone marrow produce antibodies that can't be broken down. These antibodies then build up in your bloodstream. Ultimately, they leave your bloodstream and can deposit in your tissues as amyloid, interfering with normal function. * Secondary amyloidosis. This form occurs in association with chronic infectious or inflammatory diseases, such as tuberculosis, rheumatoid arthritis or osteomyelitis, a bone infection. It primarily affects your kidneys, spleen, liver and lymph nodes, though other organs may be involved. Treatment of the underlying disease may help stop progression of this form of amyloidosis. * Hereditary (familial) amyloidosis. As the name implies, this form of amyloidosis is inherited. This type often affects the liver, nerves, heart and kidneys. * Medicines. Therapies include melphalan (Alkeran), a chemotherapy agent also used to treat certain types of cancer, and dexamethasone, a corticosteroid used for its anti-inflammatory effects. Researchers are investigating other types of chemotherapy regimens for amyloidosis. Several medications that are used in the treatment of multiple myeloma are being tested to see if they're effective in treating amyloidosis. These include bortezomib (Velcade), thalidomide (Thalomid), and a thalidomide derivative called lenalidomide (Revlimid). These drugs may be used alone or in combination with dexamethasone. Ask your doctor what clinical trials may be available to you. Anyone undergoing chemotherapy for amyloidosis may experience side effects similar to those of chemotherapy for cancer treatment, such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss and extreme fatigue. * Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation involves using high-dose chemotherapy and transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. These cells may be your own (autologous transplant) or from a donor (allogeneic transplant). Autologous transplant is the preferred approach. Not everyone is a candidate for this aggressive treatment, and it has serious risks, including death. In some research, results from stem cell transplants have been promising, although more recent research suggests that overall survival rates are better for those given chemotherapy compared with stem cell transplantation. Discuss the potential risks and benefits of this treatment with your doctor. Treating secondary amyloidosis If you have secondary amyloidosis, the primary goal of therapy is to treat the underlying condition — for example, taking an anti-inflammatory medication for rheumatoid arthritis. Treating hereditary amyloidosis For hereditary amyloidosis, one possible therapy may be liver transplantation because the protein that causes this form of amyloidosis is made in the liver. Treating complications Because amyloidosis can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions, based on your signs and symptoms and affected organs. For example, if amyloidosis affects your heart or kidneys, you may be asked to follow a low-salt diet to control fluid retention. Or your doctor may prescribe diuretics and other medications. In some cases, your doctor might prescribe medication for pain control. If any of your organs are severely damaged from amyloid deposits, you may need an organ transplant. Although such a transplant won't cure you because amyloid deposits will likely collect in the new organ as well, a transplant could prolong your life. Answered by Wilda Jorden 3 months ago.


Any Multiple Myloma survivors I could link up with?
My husband has received his 15th round of chemo. Dr said his lab #'s have hovered in the same spot for some time now so we may d/c the chemo. I'm scared! what if it's not time to stop? He's been on Alkeran. Any feedback from former survivors would be so apreciated. Asked by Drew Waloven 3 months ago.

HI, I will email you directly also. WE have a large online community of patients and caregivers. Some of us have LIVED ! with Myeloma for over 10 years. A good place to start is the IMF: www.imf.org I am suprised they started with Meph; the "std" for first line treatment is Thal / dex. Sounds like he is in remission - if his numbers are stabile, so stopping for a while is a good thing. Plus gives your body a "break" and lets it get back to normal (or something close to that. Goo luck, Jewells 30 months and still here Answered by Tamica Cefalo 3 months ago.

well think about what chemotherapy is, it's literally injecting a non-specific poison into a person in order to kill the cancer. It devastates the person's own body as well. If lab results are not improving anymore, then you've reached the point where the harm has outweighed the benefit, as continued chemo with no improvement in the disease will only make him sicker. Either he's moving you on to another treatment, or your husband is in enough remission that he can stop chemo for a while. Just remember though, even without treatment, you need to keep him going for regular labwork and check-ups for pretty much the rest of his life. Answered by Ione Jemmett 3 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Multiple myloma and Melphalan(generic name) Alkeran (brand name). You may contact the cancer support group for the survivors of Multiple myloma in the following addresses. American Cancer Society 1599 Clifton Road, NE Atlanta, GA 30329 800-ACS-2345 www.cancer.orgNational Cancer Institute 800-422-6237 www.cancer.govNational Brain Tumor Foundation (NBTF) 22 Battery Street Suite 612 San Francisco, CA 94111-5520 800-934-CURE www.braintumor.orgNational Marrow Donor Program (NMDP Suite 500 3001 Broadway Street, NE Minneapolis, MN 55413-1753 800-627-7692 www.marrow.orgSHARE: Self-Help for Women With Breast or Ovarian Cancer 1501 Broadway, Suite 704A New York, NY 10036 866-891-2392 www.sharecancersupport.orgY-ME National Organization for Breast Cancer Information and Support 212 West Van Buren, Suite 1000 Chicago, IL 60607-3908 800-221-2141 800-986-9505 (Spanish) www.y-me.org Answered by Katelyn Snaza 3 months ago.

Please browse www.nonihealthinfo.com & select testimonials. Then you browse: www.successonlinenow.com/gold/ agoesmuljono/ product/index.html www.tni.com/178system God Bless! Agoes Answered by Maile Ruehlen 3 months ago.


Side efects of cyclosporine?
Asked by Aldo Kelson 3 months ago.

Cyclosporine is a very strong medicine. It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. You and your doctor should talk about the good this medicine will do as well as the risks of using it. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop fever or chills, a sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, mouth sores, abdominal pain, pale stools, or darkened urine. These symptoms could be early signs of dangerous side effects. If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking cyclosporine and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); unusual tiredness or weakness; cough or hoarseness, fever, or chills; painful or difficult urination; severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; unusual bleeding or bruising; seizures; or a sudden unusual feeling of discomfort or illness. Other, less serious side effects may also occur. Continue to take cyclosporine and notify your doctor if you experience tremor (shaking); increased bodily hair growth; gum problems; high blood pressure; numbness or tingling; or decreased appetite. Immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclosporine increase your risk of certain types of cancer, such as lymphomas or skin cancer. Ask you doctor about the risks and benefits of cyclosporine in your treatment. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect cyclosporine? There are many drug/drug interactions with cyclosporine and you should tell your doctor of any drugs you are on and any new drugs, including herbal products, you start. The interactions could alter cyclosporine levels causing a decrease in effectiveness or an increase in side effects. The side effects or effectiveness of the other drugs may also be altered. The following are some examples of medicatoins that may result in a drug/drug interaction when taken with cyclosporine: trimethoprim with sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Sulfatrim, others), gentamicin (Garamycin, others), and vancomycin (Vancocin); ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Naprosyn, Anaprox, Aleve, others), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), fenoprofen (Nalfon), indomethacin (Indocin), ketorolac (Toradol), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis, Oruvail), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), and tolmetin (Tolectin); amphotericin B (Fungizone) and ketoconazole (Nizoral); tacrolimus (Prograf); melphalan (Alkeran); cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB) and ranitidine (Zantac, Zantac 75); diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR, Tiazac), nicardipine (Cardene), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) and verapamil (Calan, Verelan); ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), and fluconazole (Diflucan); danazol (Danocrine) and methylprednisolone (Medrol, others); erythromycin (Ery-Tab, E-Mycin, E.E.S., P.C.E., others), clarithromycin (Biaxin); bromocriptine (Parlodel); colchicine and allopurinol (Aloprim, Lopurin, Zyloprim); indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir), lopinavir-ritonavir(Kaletra) and saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase); metoclopramide (Reglan); prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred, others); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); lovastatin (Mevacor), fluvastatin (Lescol), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), or atorvastatin (Lipitor); PUVA or UVB therapy; and potassium-sparing diuretics (water pills) such as amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone, Spironol), or triamterene (Dyrenium); and any type of vaccination. Answered by Brain Borchardt 3 months ago.

Hi -- "It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. " Answered by Luciana Terrasi 3 months ago.


Can multiple myeloma be treated and cured?
Asked by Malika Guariglia 3 months ago.

Standard treatment options include: Bortezomib (Velcade). Bortezomib was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It causes cancer cells to die by blocking the action of proteasomes. It is approved for people with newly diagnosed and previously treated myeloma. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness during pregnancy in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Today thalidomide is FDA approved for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but because it appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects, it is currently used more often than thalidomide. Lenalidomide is given orally. It is approved for people with previously treated myeloma, but is also often used in people with newly diagnosed disease. Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine, doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids, such as prednisone and dexamethasone, have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given in pill form. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to quickly shrink myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, when a collection of abnormal plasma cells form a tumor (plasmacytoma) that's causing pain or destroying a bone. ***Source Mayo Clinic Answered by Theola Beja 3 months ago.

It can be treated but not cured. Answered by Kirstie Weinfeld 3 months ago.


Has anyone experienced side effects on Imuran?
i also suffer from colitis Asked by Sixta Kirkendoll 3 months ago.

Azathioprine is also used to treat ulcerative colitis (a condition in which sores develop in the intestine causing pain and diarrhea). Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this drug for your condition. Azathioprine can cause a decrease in the number of blood cells in your bone marrow. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: unusual bleeding or bruising; excessive tiredness; pale skin; headache; confusion; dizziness; fast heartbeat; difficulty sleeping; weakness; shortness of breath; and sore throat, fever, chills, and other signs of infection. Your doctor will order tests before, during, and after your treatment to see if your blood cells are affected by this drug. Azathioprine may increase your risk of developing certain types of cancer, especially skin cancer and lymphoma. Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had cancer and if you are taking or have ever taken alkylating agents such as chlorambucil (Leukeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), or melphalan (Alkeran) for cancer. Tell your doctor immediately if you notice any changes in your skin or any lumps or masses anywhere in your body. Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking this medication. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory and ulcerative disease arising in the colonic mucosa, characterized most often by bloody diarrhea. Extraintestinal symptoms, particularly arthritis, may occur. Long-term risk of colon cancer is high. Diagnosis is by colonoscopy. Treatment is with 5-aminosalicylic acid, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, anticytokines, antibiotics, and occasionally surgery. Please see the web pages for more details on Azathioprine (generic name) Imuran (brand name) and Ulcerative colitis. Answered by Hyacinth Sphon 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014691/002 ALKERAN MELPHALAN TABLET/ORAL 2MG
020207/001 ALKERAN MELPHALAN HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014691/002 ALKERAN MELPHALAN TABLET/ORAL 2MG
207809/001 MELPHALAN MELPHALAN TABLET/ORAL 2MG

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