Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012616/004.

Names and composition

"ALDACTAZIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE and SPIRONOLACTONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012616/004 ALDACTAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
012616/005 ALDACTAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 50MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012616/004 ALDACTAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
012616/005 ALDACTAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 50MG
085974/001 SPIRONOLACTONE W/ HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
086026/001 SPIRONOLACTONE W/ HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
086513/001 SPIRONOLACTONE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
086881/001 SPIRONOLACTONE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
087004/002 SPIRONOLACTONE W/ HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
087267/001 SPIRONOLACTONE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
087398/001 SPIRONOLACTONE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
087511/001 SPIRONOLACTONE W/ HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
087553/001 SPIRONOLACTONE W/ HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
087651/001 SPIRONOLACTONE W/ HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
087655/001 SPIRONOLACTONE W/ HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
087948/001 SPIRONOLACTONE W/ HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
087999/001 SPIRONOLACTONE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
088025/001 SPIRONOLACTONE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
088054/001 SPIRONOLACTONE W/ HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
089137/001 SPIRONOLACTONE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
089534/001 SPIRONOLACTONE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE; SPIRONOLACTONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Which spyronolactone brand from these 5 is the safest and best/strongest androgen-blocker?
Aldactone, Novo-Spiroton, Aldactazide, Spiractin, Spirotone, Verospiron or Berlactone?? Asked by Bernarda Moret 1 year ago.

The brand itself has no effect upon the effect of the spironalactone in the tablets. As I am sure your pharmacist will tell you when they give you the medication, they all have the same concentration (strength) in them, so they will have identical effects. Each brand of tablet has to pass a rigorous series of tests before they can be sold in pharmacies, so you really don't need to worry about the brand given to you. Answered by Odis Skibo 1 year ago.

All of them contains Spironolactone. Answered by Karie Mittman 1 year ago.


Anyone taking spirinolactone?
If you are taking it for a puspore OTHER than as a water pill... can you tell me how it's working for you?? any side effects? Do you like it?? Asked by Hye Botto 1 year ago.

Good article here: Aldactazide (Spirinolactone/Hydrochlorothiazide): Aldactazide contains an Aldosterone-receptor antagonist (Spirinolactone) and a thiazide diuretic (Hydrochlorothiazide). It is an acceptable form of therapy for edema associated with congestive heart failure or cirrhosis of the liver, the nephrotic syndrome when the use of other diuretics does not prove adequate, and for the management of hypertension when other measures are not adequate. Both components of Aldactazide are diuretics, but work together to counteract potassium loss that is usually observed with the use of diuretics. However, a fixed dose combinational drug like Aldactazide is not recommended as an initial therapy for edema or hypertension since edema and hypertension require that therapy be specific to the patient and open to adjustment Answered by Denyse Twymon 1 year ago.


What is ALDAZIDE and what does it do?
Asked by Tobias Creviston 1 year ago.

If you mean aldactazide, It's a combination of two diruretics used to lower blood pressure. Answered by Carlita Hofstad 1 year ago.


Pill identification please! Small, light yellow, round pill with a D marked on one side?
The pill is small, round, and only is marked on one side. It just has a D on one side. I can't find identification for it anywhere! I'd really appreciate some help! Thanks! Asked by Lyndia Matsunaga 1 year ago.

Aldactazide. That is all I could find. If you go to the link you can see if it is the same pill. Answered by Avery Cristal 1 year ago.

Yellow Pill Identification Answered by Mallie Odums 1 year ago.

Is there a reason this is important? I may be able to do the research, but as it will take some time, I need to know whether this is important or not. Thanks. Answered by Numbers Soloway 1 year ago.


I have PCOS are there Natural remedies or cures 10 points!!..?
I have bad acne due to PCOS what can i do to make it better??? what can i do about the abdominal pains??? also how do you reduce androgen levels??? Asked by Marquita Carlos 1 year ago.

Ther is no cure for pcos.or any natural remedies .there ar medicines such as ACNE,PREGNANCY AND MENSTRUATION Medication is generally prescribed to induce regular periods, thereby reducing the risk of uterine cancer. For acne and excess hair growth, the diuretic spironolactone (Aldactazide) can help. (And for women who desire pregnancy, clomiphene (Clomid) can be used to induce ovulation). To make pcos better you can exercise regularly even if your not overweight this helps the circulation and will improve your skin PCOS causes oily skin so you can use cleansers and toners to keep the oiliness under control, Studies have indicated that diabetic medications that are designed to improve the action of the hormone insulin may benefit women with PCOS. Long-term trials of these insulin-sensitizing drugs -- such as Avandia (rosiglitazone), Actos (pioglitazone), and Glucophage (metformin) -- for PCOS are underway. The results appear promising. A type of surgery called a "wedge resection" in which a piece of the ovary is removed also helps some women with PCOS. LOWER ANDROGEN LEVELS There are many treatment options available to provide a hair-growing environment of low androgens and female hair follicle stimulation. Many of these options rely on prescription medications; only one of these medications (Minoxidil) is approved for the treatment of hair loss - the others are all prescribed "off label." Success is often limited by the occurrence of drawbacks, which we have listed below. Minoxidil (Rogaine) may bring about only fuzzy growth that does not match existing hair. It is only effective for about 33% of users, and has potential side effects. Tagamet (Cimetidine) requires high doses. Cyproterone Acetate, usually used to reduce men's sex drive, may be toxic and has long-term side effects. Oral Contraceptives must be low androgen index, or will exacerbate the imbalance of low androgens and hair loss will worsen. Since there are risks and side effects associated with low androgen and hair loss medications, many patients are turning to all-natural treatments as a hair loss solution Answered by Kristopher Battistini 1 year ago.


What medication can cause gout?
I am trying to locate what types of prescription drugs can cause gout. Asked by Thu Shers 1 year ago.

The list of possible medications or substances mentioned in sources as possibe causes of Gout includes: * Accure * Aldactazide * Amlodipine and Benazepril * Aspirin * Coversyl Plus * Cyclosporine - an immunosuppressant. * Dapa-Tabs * Diuretics * Dyazide * Edecril * Ethacrynic Acid * Indahexal * Indapamide * Insig * Isohexal * Isotretinoin * Isotrex * IsotrexGel * Levodopa - used for Parkinson's disease. * Lotrel * Maxzide * Maxzide-25 * Moduretic * Nadide * Napamide * Natrilix * Niacin (vitamin B3) - excessive niacin can cause gout and high blood sugars. * Nicotinic acid * Oratane * Pyrazinamide * Pyrazynamide * Roaccutane * Salicylates * Salicylic acid * Spironazide * Spirozide * Zinamide Answered by Lenard Harpin 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Steve Ruacho 1 year ago.

>> Hmm, I don't think you really have a problem at all. Looks like you are just over-analyzing I think - BOB SAGGET Answered by Daina Teteak 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Rosaline Mccleaf 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Melida Terwey 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Geoffrey Lecy 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Coletta Dowgiallo 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Dorothea Sporer 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Chelsie Handkins 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Melodie Amidi 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Elwood Dukelow 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Sheena Kimel 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Aaron Oneill 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Lavonda Mcconnico 1 year ago.


Which spyronolactone brand from these 5 is the safest and best/strongest androgen-blocker?
Aldactone, Novo-Spiroton, Aldactazide, Spiractin, Spirotone, Verospiron or Berlactone?? Asked by Felicita Lavis 1 year ago.

The brand itself has no effect upon the effect of the spironalactone in the tablets. As I am sure your pharmacist will tell you when they give you the medication, they all have the same concentration (strength) in them, so they will have identical effects. Each brand of tablet has to pass a rigorous series of tests before they can be sold in pharmacies, so you really don't need to worry about the brand given to you. Answered by Summer Masson 1 year ago.

All of them contains Spironolactone. Answered by Jesus Wintersteen 1 year ago.


Anyone taking spirinolactone?
If you are taking it for a puspore OTHER than as a water pill... can you tell me how it's working for you?? any side effects? Do you like it?? Asked by Wanda Koegel 1 year ago.

Good article here: Aldactazide (Spirinolactone/Hydrochlorothiazide): Aldactazide contains an Aldosterone-receptor antagonist (Spirinolactone) and a thiazide diuretic (Hydrochlorothiazide). It is an acceptable form of therapy for edema associated with congestive heart failure or cirrhosis of the liver, the nephrotic syndrome when the use of other diuretics does not prove adequate, and for the management of hypertension when other measures are not adequate. Both components of Aldactazide are diuretics, but work together to counteract potassium loss that is usually observed with the use of diuretics. However, a fixed dose combinational drug like Aldactazide is not recommended as an initial therapy for edema or hypertension since edema and hypertension require that therapy be specific to the patient and open to adjustment Answered by Fanny Mcguff 1 year ago.


What is ALDAZIDE and what does it do?
Asked by Toshia Sciacca 1 year ago.

If you mean aldactazide, It's a combination of two diruretics used to lower blood pressure. Answered by Tova Poirot 1 year ago.


Pill identification please! Small, light yellow, round pill with a D marked on one side?
The pill is small, round, and only is marked on one side. It just has a D on one side. I can't find identification for it anywhere! I'd really appreciate some help! Thanks! Asked by Tosha Luckhardt 1 year ago.

Aldactazide. That is all I could find. If you go to the link you can see if it is the same pill. Answered by Amee Aldredge 1 year ago.

Yellow Pill Identification Answered by Wei Powelson 1 year ago.

Is there a reason this is important? I may be able to do the research, but as it will take some time, I need to know whether this is important or not. Thanks. Answered by Booker Odon 1 year ago.


I have PCOS are there Natural remedies or cures 10 points!!..?
I have bad acne due to PCOS what can i do to make it better??? what can i do about the abdominal pains??? also how do you reduce androgen levels??? Asked by Chan Freemon 1 year ago.

Ther is no cure for pcos.or any natural remedies .there ar medicines such as ACNE,PREGNANCY AND MENSTRUATION Medication is generally prescribed to induce regular periods, thereby reducing the risk of uterine cancer. For acne and excess hair growth, the diuretic spironolactone (Aldactazide) can help. (And for women who desire pregnancy, clomiphene (Clomid) can be used to induce ovulation). To make pcos better you can exercise regularly even if your not overweight this helps the circulation and will improve your skin PCOS causes oily skin so you can use cleansers and toners to keep the oiliness under control, Studies have indicated that diabetic medications that are designed to improve the action of the hormone insulin may benefit women with PCOS. Long-term trials of these insulin-sensitizing drugs -- such as Avandia (rosiglitazone), Actos (pioglitazone), and Glucophage (metformin) -- for PCOS are underway. The results appear promising. A type of surgery called a "wedge resection" in which a piece of the ovary is removed also helps some women with PCOS. LOWER ANDROGEN LEVELS There are many treatment options available to provide a hair-growing environment of low androgens and female hair follicle stimulation. Many of these options rely on prescription medications; only one of these medications (Minoxidil) is approved for the treatment of hair loss - the others are all prescribed "off label." Success is often limited by the occurrence of drawbacks, which we have listed below. Minoxidil (Rogaine) may bring about only fuzzy growth that does not match existing hair. It is only effective for about 33% of users, and has potential side effects. Tagamet (Cimetidine) requires high doses. Cyproterone Acetate, usually used to reduce men's sex drive, may be toxic and has long-term side effects. Oral Contraceptives must be low androgen index, or will exacerbate the imbalance of low androgens and hair loss will worsen. Since there are risks and side effects associated with low androgen and hair loss medications, many patients are turning to all-natural treatments as a hair loss solution Answered by Prudence Yarzabal 1 year ago.


What medication can cause gout?
I am trying to locate what types of prescription drugs can cause gout. Asked by Cuc Kellom 1 year ago.

The list of possible medications or substances mentioned in sources as possibe causes of Gout includes: * Accure * Aldactazide * Amlodipine and Benazepril * Aspirin * Coversyl Plus * Cyclosporine - an immunosuppressant. * Dapa-Tabs * Diuretics * Dyazide * Edecril * Ethacrynic Acid * Indahexal * Indapamide * Insig * Isohexal * Isotretinoin * Isotrex * IsotrexGel * Levodopa - used for Parkinson's disease. * Lotrel * Maxzide * Maxzide-25 * Moduretic * Nadide * Napamide * Natrilix * Niacin (vitamin B3) - excessive niacin can cause gout and high blood sugars. * Nicotinic acid * Oratane * Pyrazinamide * Pyrazynamide * Roaccutane * Salicylates * Salicylic acid * Spironazide * Spirozide * Zinamide Answered by Edwin Monroy 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Clementina Mckissick 1 year ago.

>> Hmm, I don't think you really have a problem at all. Looks like you are just over-analyzing I think - BOB SAGGET Answered by Jacquelynn Levatino 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Krystal Padovani 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Wonda Kuffel 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Garfield Kilcoyne 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Yer Manton 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Beaulah Lacerda 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Pamela Ebling 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Hershel Hodel 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Ariane Jodoin 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Dorathy Spickerman 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Joannie Edris 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Gita Kelk 1 year ago.


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