AEROBID Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018340/001.

Names and composition

"AEROBID" is the commercial name of a drug composed of FLUNISOLIDE.

Answered questions

Is Clairtin a steriod? Im looking for a safe allergy drug to help control my asthma. I dont currently have?
insurance so Claritin is the easiest for me to buy. I just dont want to take anything that will hurt my body or cause any other problems. I am trying to use my inhailer less. Also, is Albuterol a steroid which could cause stretchmarks and other stuff? Asked by Nettie Boschert 3 months ago.

Claritin is not steriod based. Albuterol is a short-acting bronchodilator, not a cortisteroidal one like Aerobid, Pulmicort, or Flovent. Inhaled steriods work too slowly for a relief inhaler, they are generally prescribed to be inhaled every morning to help prevent attacks. My Dr told me something interesting about the OTC Claritin. Apparently the company wanted to come out with a non-drowsy form of Claritin since the prescription one will knock you out, so they halved the dose. Still made people tired. They haved it again. Same thing. Dr said that the OTC Claritin is about 1/3d as strong as the prescription, so that if it did not control my allergies, it was safe to take up to 3 times the dose, but you'd experience the drowsy side effect. Don't listen to the health nut dude. More than 5000 people die every year from asthma attacks that were not treated in time. Answered by Candida Reasons 3 months ago.

Claritin is not a steriod. Oral steriods are the bad one. Not the inhaled kind. The bioavailability is low on the kind that you inhale so they do not cause the systemic side effects. The kind you take as a pill are the bad ones. Also albuterol is NOT a steriod. If you have an acute asthma attack, that is when you take your albuterol. Listen to your doctor. Oh yeah, Claritin is a antihystimine. Very safe product. PS. dont listen to that health nut guy. You can die from an asthma attack so please take your meds. Answered by Angelo Gunn 3 months ago.

No Claritin is not a steroid and it is actually a good allergy med for people with allergic asthma. As for the albuterol it is a steroid to control inflamation in the bronchial tubes and lungs not the kind used to bulk up. If you need your inhaler use it. I used it through 2 pregnancys with no problems to me or my children Answered by Marry Offerdahl 3 months ago.

I feel your pain. I've had asthma for 14 years now and have seen several doctors. The truth is, there is no known cure for asthma at the moment. But the symptoms can be prevented. It really depends on what causes your brother's asthma. Mine is usually dust and hot weather. But I think the universal method is using the control inhaler. I cured my Asthma the natural way? Answered by Lynnette Difrancesco 3 months ago.

Claritin is safe, and not a steriod. Singulair is now being used for allergies and asthma. Talk to your doctor. Answered by Rene Mcnurlen 3 months ago.

I take singlair for my asthma. I told my doctor that I didn't have insurance and he gave me samples and also a sample inhaler of advair which has 15 uses. Neither of those are steroids. Answered by Shannan Hockley 3 months ago.

No. It only has the usual unpleasent side effects, like drowsiness, dry mouth, fever etc. Answered by Rory Betts 3 months ago.

Check into essential oils. Answered by Juli Miniard 3 months ago.

Feature articles on asthma: Reducing excessive salt intake can help relieve asthma symptoms, says review (NewsTarget) A review of scientific data by British and American researchers found that reducing salt intake might reduce the severity of asthma and breathing problems. The review -- published in the December issue of the International Journal of Clinical Practice --analyzed both epidemiological... Whole grains, fish lower asthma risk in children (NewsTarget) Children who eat whole grains and fish are far less likely to develop asthma and wheezing than children who do not consume adequate amounts of those foods, according to new Dutch research published in the journal Thorax. A team of researchers from the National Institute of Public Health... Low vitamin E intake during pregnancy can lead to childhood asthma (press release) Children whose mothers had a low intake of vitamin E during pregnancy are more likely to develop wheezing and asthma by age five. This research appears in the first issue for September 2006 of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, published by the American Thoracic Society... Number of Indoor Swimming Pools Per Capita Linked to Rise in Childhood Asthma Across Europe (press release) The prevalence of childhood asthma and wheeze rises around 2 to 3 per cent for every indoor swimming pool per 100,000 of the population across Europe, indicates research published ahead of print in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The researchers analysed the rates of wheezing, asthma,... Vitamin supplement could help treatment-resistant asthma (press release) Asthma patients who don't respond to steroid treatment suffer repeated asthma attacks, and are at greater risk of dying from the condition. Researchers from King's College London have found that vitamin D3 could substantially improve the responsiveness of these patients to steroid treatment, offering... UV irradiation in the home improves kids' asthma (press release) The use of centrally installed ultraviolet (UV) irradiation units in the homes of asthmatic children who are sensitized to mold can improve their symptoms, according to a new report. The idea is that UV light kills off circulating microbial agents that can trigger asthma. The study is one... Asthma is not a disease, but just a name given to various symptoms, says The Lancet (NewsTarget) The medical journal The Lancet is appealing to the medical community to stop using the term "asthma" as it misleads people to believe it is a disease rather than a group of symptoms with various origins and characteristics. Symptoms of asthma include wheezing, coughing and breathing... Fish Oil Reduces Airway Inflammation Caused by Exercise-Induced Asthma (press release) People suffering from exercise-induced asthma were able to reduce their symptoms below the threshold used to diagnose the disease by eating a diet supplemented with fish oil, according to new research findings from Indiana University reported in the January issue of the journal Chest. The special... Common asthma inhaler causing deaths, researchers assert (press release) Three common asthma inhalers containing the drugs salmeterol or formoterol may be causing four out of five U.S. asthma-related deaths per year and should be taken off the market, researchers from Cornell and Stanford universities have concluded after a search of medical literature. They... Concentrated animal feeding operations near schools may pose asthma risk (press release) Children who attend school near large-scale livestock farms known as concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) may be at a higher risk for asthma, according to a new study by University of Iowa researchers. The study, led by Joel Kline, M.D., professor of internal... Obesity May Influence Response to Asthma Medications (press release) As the nation’s collective waistline has swelled in recent decades, rates of asthma diagnoses also have accelerated. Indeed, much research has affirmed a link between the two conditions. But doctors also recognize that asthma may not behave the same way among people who have different body types... Study on Participation of Pharmaceutical-Sponsored Clinical Trials (press release) Physicians who participated in a pharmaceutical-sponsored clinical trial involving asthma medications maintained adherence to treatment guidelines but were more likely to prescribe the sponsor’s drugs, according to a study in the June 21 issue of JAMA. Pharmaceutical companies are frequently involved... Asthma risk increased in women with high levels of fat tissue inflammatory protein (press release) Women with high levels of an inflammatory protein produced by fat tissue are at significantly increased risk of asthma, finds research in published ahead of print in Thorax. The findings are based on almost 6,000 adults taking part in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Study, which... Asthma attacks found to be caused by suppressed immune system (NewsTarget) A study published in the journal Nature Medicine has found that asthma sufferers have low levels of an immune system protein that acts as the lungs' first defense against the cold viruses that can cause severe asthma attacks. Researchers from Imperial College and the Medical Research... Asthma Drugs May Boost Cataract Risk for Elderly (press release) Elderly patients taking anti-asthmatic medications to treat their asthma or lung disease may be more likely to develop cataracts, a new study finds. A Canadian research team studied data compiled over 14 years from more than 100,000 patients with either asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease... Asthma Inhaler Type Could Boost Death Risk (press release) Adding to the ongoing controversy over a popular class of asthma inhaler medications, a new data review suggests the drugs may be dangerous. Compared to placebo, the "long-acting beta-agonist bronchodilator" inhalers (which include Serevent and Advair) more than tripled users' risk of asthma-linked... Swimming pool chemicals promote asthma in children (NewsTarget) Researchers in Europe have found that childhood asthma could be associated with exposure to chemicals in swimming pools. Researchers from the Catholic University of Louvain in Brussels studied nearly 190,000 teenagers from 21 European countries, analyzing rates of asthma, hay fever... Diabetes, asthma, heart disease share biochemical pathway due to rogue aP2 protein (NewsTarget) A study by American and Australian researchers has found that a protein previously linked to type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis -- called aP2 -- may also be key to the development of asthma. According to the study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, the protein has... Combat childhood asthma naturally with the Buteyko breathing method Childhood asthma is fast becoming an epidemic in the United States. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, close to one in 13 schoolchildren have asthma, with the numbers of new diagnoses rising sharply since 1980. Close to 4.2 million children had asthma attacks in the last year. For parents... The common cold is no match for natural healing therapies: minerals, herbs and foods stave off colds and flus It happens to everyone, sometimes multiple times a year. That's why it's called the common cold, right? But while we're all familiar with the common cold, we may only know of one or two ways to fight it, which usually involve some sort of over-the-counter medication, or the folk remedy, a bowl... Asthma explained by common allergy to milk and dairy products The link between asthma and cows' milk is familiar to many young asthma sufferers and their parents. I first became aware of the connection through my cousin's experiences with his four-year-old son. Since infancy, my cousin's son has experienced severe asthma attacks and has been hospitalized twice... Healing with water: the work of "water cure" pioneer Dr. Batmanghelidj Those of you who are familiar with the work of the late Dr B. may own his book called "The Water Cure," or "Water for health, for Healing, for Life: You're Not Sick, You're Thirsty." He's also the author of "Your Body's Many Cries for Water." Essentially, Dr. B is the foremost authority on the relationship... Asthma is a false disease caused by chronic dehydration and body's drought management efforts, says doctor Mike: I'd like you to elaborate a little more on asthma, and the idea that the body is managing its water supply deliberately in a way that produces symptoms that are called asthma. Dr. B: Yes, well you see, drought management means that you have to clog the holes where water is... Asthma inhalers actually worsen asthma; cow's milk and chronic dehyration are the root cause New research shows that ingredients found in asthma inhalers actually worsen the condition in asthmatics, creating a cycle of dependence on the inhaler. Asthma inhalers are largely unnecessary in the first place, since nearly every case of asthma can be reversed through dietary changes alone... Feature articles on asthma: Reducing excessive salt intake can help relieve asthma symptoms, says review (NewsTarget) A review of scientific data by British and American researchers found that reducing salt intake might reduce the severity of asthma and breathing problems. The review -- published in the December issue of the International Journal of Clinical Practice --analyzed both epidemiological... Whole grains, fish lower asthma risk in children (NewsTarget) Children who eat whole grains and fish are far less likely to develop asthma and wheezing than children who do not consume adequate amounts of those foods, according to new Dutch research published in the journal Thorax. A team of researchers from the National Institute of Public Health... Low vitamin E intake during pregnancy can lead to childhood asthma (press release) Children whose mothers had a low intake of vitamin E during pregnancy are more likely to develop wheezing and asthma by age five. This research appears in the first issue for September 2006 of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, published by the American Thoracic Society... Number of Indoor Swimming Pools Per Capita Linked to Rise in Childhood Asthma Across Europe (press release) The prevalence of childhood asthma and wheeze rises around 2 to 3 per cent for every indoor swimming pool per 100,000 of the population across Europe, indicates research published ahead of print in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The researchers analysed the rates of wheezing, asthma,... Vitamin supplement could help treatment-resistant asthma (press release) Asthma patients who don't respond to steroid treatment suffer repeated asthma attacks, and are at greater risk of dying from the condition. Researchers from King's College London have found that vitamin D3 could substantially improve the responsiveness of these patients to steroid treatment, offering... UV irradiation in the home improves kids' asthma (press release) The use of centrally installed ultraviolet (UV) irradiation units in the homes of asthmatic children who are sensitized to mold can improve their symptoms, according to a new report. The idea is that UV light kills off circulating microbial agents that can trigger asthma. The study is one... Asthma is not a disease, but just a name given to various symptoms, says The Lancet (NewsTarget) The medical journal The Lancet is appealing to the medical community to stop using the term "asthma" as it misleads people to believe it is a disease rather than a group of symptoms with various origins and characteristics. Symptoms of asthma include wheezing, coughing and breathing... Fish Oil Reduces Airway Inflammation Caused by Exercise-Induced Asthma (press release) People suffering from exercise-induced asthma were able to reduce their symptoms below the threshold used to diagnose the disease by eating a diet supplemented with fish oil, according to new research findings from Indiana University reported in the January issue of the journal Chest. The special... Common asthma inhaler causing deaths, researchers assert (press release) Three common asthma inhalers containing the drugs salmeterol or formoterol may be causing four out of five U.S. asthma-related deaths per year and should be taken off the market, researchers from Cornell and Stanford universities have concluded after a search of medical literature. They... Concentrated animal feeding operations near schools may pose asthma risk (press release) Children who attend school near large-scale livestock farms known as concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) may be at a higher risk for asthma, according to a new study by University of Iowa researchers. The study, led by Joel Kline, M.D., professor of internal... Obesity May Influence Response to Asthma Medications (press release) As the nation’s collective waistline has swelled in recent decades, rates of asthma diagnoses also have accelerated. Indeed, much research has affirmed a link between the two conditions. But doctors also recognize that asthma may not behave the same way among people who have different body types... Study on Participation of Pharmaceutical-Sponsored Clinical Trials (press release) Physicians who participated in a pharmaceutical-sponsored clinical trial involving asthma medications maintained adherence to treatment guidelines but were more likely to prescribe the sponsor’s drugs, according to a study in the June 21 issue of JAMA. Pharmaceutical companies are frequently involved... Asthma risk increased in women with high levels of fat tissue inflammatory protein (press release) Women with high levels of an inflammatory protein produced by fat tissue are at significantly increased risk of asthma, finds research in published ahead of print in Thorax. The findings are based on almost 6,000 adults taking part in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Study, which... Asthma attacks found to be caused by suppressed immune system (NewsTarget) A study published in the journal Nature Medicine has found that asthma sufferers have low levels of an immune system protein that acts as the lungs' first defense against the cold viruses that can cause severe asthma attacks. Researchers from Imperial College and the Medical Research... Asthma Drugs May Boost Cataract Risk for Elderly (press release) Elderly patients taking anti-asthmatic medications to treat their asthma or lung disease may be more likely to develop cataracts, a new study finds. A Canadian research team studied data compiled over 14 years from more than 100,000 patients with either asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease... Asthma Inhaler Type Could Boost Death Risk (press release) Adding to the ongoing controversy over a popular class of asthma inhaler medications, a new data review suggests the drugs may be dangerous. Compared to placebo, the "long-acting beta-agonist bronchodilator" inhalers (which include Serevent and Advair) more than tripled users' risk of asthma-linked... Swimming pool chemicals promote asthma in children (NewsTarget) Researchers in Europe have found that childhood asthma could be associated with exposure to chemicals in swimming pools. Researchers from the Catholic University of Louvain in Brussels studied nearly 190,000 teenagers from 21 European countries, analyzing rates of asthma, hay fever... Diabetes, asthma, heart disease share biochemical pathway due to rogue aP2 protein (NewsTarget) A study by American and Australian researchers has found that a protein previously linked to type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis -- called aP2 -- may also be key to the development of asthma. According to the study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, the protein has... Combat childhood asthma naturally with the Buteyko breathing method Childhood asthma is fast becoming an epidemic in the United States. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, close to one in 13 schoolchildren have asthma, with the numbers of new diagnoses rising sharply since 1980. Close to 4.2 million children had asthma attacks in the last year. For parents... The common cold is no match for natural healing therapies: minerals, herbs and foods stave off colds and flus It happens to everyone, sometimes multiple times a year. That's why it's called the common cold, right? But while we're all familiar with the common cold, we may only know of one or two ways to fight it, which usually involve some sort of over-the-counter medication, or the folk remedy, a bowl... Asthma explained by common allergy to milk and dairy products The link between asthma and cows' milk is familiar to many young asthma sufferers and their parents. I first became aware of the connection through my cousin's experiences with his four-year-old son. Since infancy, my cousin's son has experienced severe asthma attacks and has been hospitalized twice... Healing with water: the work of "water cure" pioneer Dr. Batmanghelidj Those of you who are familiar with the work of the late Dr B. may own his book called "The Water Cure," or "Water for health, for Healing, for Life: You're Not Sick, You're Thirsty." He's also the author of "Your Body's Many Cries for Water." Essentially, Dr. B is the foremost authority on the relationship... Asthma is a false disease caused by chronic dehydration and body's drought management efforts, says doctor Mike: I'd like you to elaborate a little more on asthma, and the idea that the body is managing its water supply deliberately in a way that produces symptoms that are called asthma. Dr. B: Yes, well you see, drought management means that you have to clog the holes where water is... Asthma inhalers actually worsen asthma; cow's milk and chronic dehyration are the root cause New research shows that ingredients found in asthma inhalers actually worsen the condition in asthmatics, creating a cycle of dependence on the inhaler. Asthma inhalers are largely unnecessary in the first place, since nearly every case of asthma can be reversed through dietary changes alone... Answered by Bobbie Denholm 3 months ago.


Pain at bottom left of rib, heart attack?
The top of my head, forehead, and cheeks have pressure. Seems like it's a sinus infection type cold. Asked by Cristin Frabotta 3 months ago.

I'm having a little pain in my left arm, little pain between shoulder and heart, have a minor mitral valve prolapse, diet controlled diabetis, a bad cold, asthma flair up, and allergies, but no fever. I live way out in the country and don't feel bad enough to call 911 and don't feel good enough to drive into town. Should I worry or not worry? I'm a 51 yr old female. My 13 yr old doesn't drive of course. I'm hoping I'll feel better. I was at the ER twice this past week w/ prednisone in an IV, on antibiotics, taking musinex, been very tired, aerobid steroids, combivent inhaler, fomoteral inhaler, ativan for high blood pressure(Atenolol doesn't work) etc. Answered by Marla Deniston 3 months ago.

I am no Doctor but I don't think you would be able to type your paragraph if you were having a heart attack. Answered by Chasidy Ellerd 3 months ago.

Believe it or now not center assaults may also be felt in a different way through lady and guys. Men believe the conventional strain, left arm tingling and trouble respiring as good as a quick center beat. Woman believe signs in a different way, most of the time they've agony radiating from the neck and jaw and the too can believe nausea. They too may have the sensation of strain, however most of the time it's jaw agony and nausea. A sharp agony isn't related to a center assault. Although it may be related to a pericardial effusion (fluid across the center). This agony is expanded while a man or woman leans ahead. The agony that u believe perhaps only a muscle spasm or probably coming from the lungs. I get the ones "crampy" emotions repeatedly its hurts to inhale the entire means till i therapeutic massage the field. I doubt it's enormous and I doubt you're going to croak every time quickly! :) Answered by Shenita Treptow 3 months ago.

If you have a cold and if you've been coughing you may have strained your muscles, but with the other issues, I wouldn't wait much more than an hour before calling. I'd call 911 if I were you - don't take a chance. Do you have a neighbor that you can call - to take you into town??? If so, that's what I'd do if you really don't feel it warrants a 911 call. Answered by Christina Leski 3 months ago.


My asthma is cold sensitive. I think of relocating from California to Maryland. Can it be controlled there?
I lived for 5 years in Michigan and my astma went out of control in the winter times. Whenever I got a cold, even 2 weeks of medical leave were not enough and I had asthmatic bronchitists all winters despite a very heavy use of steriod inhailer (aerobid). However I had no problems in the summer there. I... Asked by Clare Tift 3 months ago.

I lived for 5 years in Michigan and my astma went out of control in the winter times. Whenever I got a cold, even 2 weeks of medical leave were not enough and I had asthmatic bronchitists all winters despite a very heavy use of steriod inhailer (aerobid). However I had no problems in the summer there. I moved to Californiya 8 years ago and my astma is under full control with a small flovent dose. Now I am offered a very good job in Maryland. Would I have a chance to adjust there? May be someone had this experience? Thank you. Answered by Marlen Studnicki 3 months ago.

READ MY LIPS, DO NOT MOVE WHERE YOUR HEALTH IS GOING TO BE BAD, HOW ARE YOU GONG TO WORK AND HAVE A HEALTHY JOB? THE MONEY IS NOT WORTH IT, IF YOU HAVE TO PAY OUT MONEY ON HEALTH CARE, AND THEN NOT FEEL GOOD. STAY IN CALIFORNIA, IF YOU FEEL BEST HERE, THEN STAY. ONCE YOU LEAVE, IT IS HARD TO GET BACK IN, DUE TO THE COSTS OF GETTING BACK HERE. MARYLAND, THAT DOES NOT SOUND LIKE IT IS EVEN CLOSE TO CALIFORNIA. I HAVE LEFT CALIFORNIA ONCE, AND USED TO LIVE IN TEXAS WHERE I HAD REALLY BAD ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA. WHEN I MOVED TO CALIFORNIA, IT WENT AWAY. I WOULD NOT GO BACK FOR ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD, AND YOU SHOULD DO THE SAME. PLEASE DO NOT MOVE. Answered by Timothy Appleyard 3 months ago.

Assuming you used to live in the Detroit area and have been offered a job in the Baltimore area, you'll find living in Maryland isn't all that much warmer than living in Michigan. Detroit averages (high/low): November: 49/36 December: 38/25 January: 33/20 February: 36/22 March: 46/29 Baltimore averages (high/low): November: 59/42 December: 49/33 January: 44/29 February: 47/31 March: 57/39 Answered by Leo Ta 3 months ago.

Actually, the best weather claimant , for a person with severe asthma is dry claimant,.. I know of a person that has the same symptoms, not sure if you would like the area I'm about to suggest but here goes,.... Las Vegas, Nevada,.. dry claimant you say .. it is because wet claimant only makes asthma worse. I hope this helps. Answered by Shelia Baratta 3 months ago.

Take 25 black peppers crack them ( do no powder) and boil in 50 ml of water (do not add sugar or salt) and filter the contents into a small container and let it cool and drink the same in one gulp. It may burn your throat for a few minutes ( in the beginning) and you do this daily once or twice and you problem of asthma & wheezing will vanish and you will not require any inhalers etc. Answered by Hee Dowsett 3 months ago.

i too have asthma. i have lived in cali, alberta, and nyc. my asthma is *much* better in nyc because of the humidity, even in the winter. i find that the more humid the climate is, the less i have to use a puffer. i also recommend you get the flu shot. i used to get sick *really* bad every time i caught a cold, bronchitis, etc, but i haven't gotten sick in 3 years due to the flu shot, thus i haven't had any of those horrible lung issues associated with sickness. Answered by Karima Schlobohm 3 months ago.

Try Taking this supplement. Asthma testimonials are on this page glycoresource.com Answered by Yuonne Ledbetter 3 months ago.

i think it gets cold in maryland also. i think your health should come first before your job. have you tried applying for jobs in warmer climates like california (just as you said it) and/or florida? Answered by Lilly Hilfiker 3 months ago.

go to hospital and get proffessional help Answered by Rachell Schuemann 3 months ago.


Why do I wheeze when I don't have asthma? Trouble breathing when I exercise or run far, not overweight?
Ok, so Ive had this problem since I was about 11 or 12. Whenever I run a long distance, or even run in like sports or even in gym, I can't breathe AT ALL, and I throw up, and even if I push myself and do it a lot like people say, it doesn't make my lungs any stronger. I was in soccer last year and I could... Asked by Edda Tagala 3 months ago.

Ok, so Ive had this problem since I was about 11 or 12. Whenever I run a long distance, or even run in like sports or even in gym, I can't breathe AT ALL, and I throw up, and even if I push myself and do it a lot like people say, it doesn't make my lungs any stronger. I was in soccer last year and I could never keep up with any one on the team, even a girl (not being mean) that weighed about 200 pounds at 5'2". When we practiced running, I always came in last because I couldn't catch my breath and I would throw up. I'm quite active and I hike and swim and do stuff all the time, but I can't seem to do any fast paced things. :( it also makes me chest hurt. I'm 5'4" or so and weigh 115 and 14 years old. So what could it be?? Doctors said I don't have asthma, but some nurses say I have a slower than normal heart rate (if that has anything to do with it?) ... And I'm a little confused.. Answered by Merlyn Lumley 3 months ago.

How Do I Find Out What's Causing My Wheezing? To determine the cause of wheezing, your doctor will ask questions to determine your symptoms and what leads to them. For example, if you have no history of lung disease and you always wheeze after eating a certain food or at a certain time of year, the doctor may suspect that you have a food or respiratory allergy. The doctor will listen to your lungs with a stethoscope to hear where the wheezing is and how much wheezing you have. If this is the first time you've been evaluated, your doctor will probably ask you to perform a breathing test (spirometry) and may also order a chest X-ray. Other blood tests and procedures may be necessary depending on what the doctor learns from interviewing and examining you. If it seems like allergies may be related to your wheezing, there are a variety of other tests your doctor may use to verify allergies, including skin testing or blood tests. What Are the Treatments for Wheezing? First off, see a doctor to determine the cause of your wheezing and then receive treatment for the specific cause. If wheezing is caused by asthma, your doctor may recommend some or all of the following to reduce inflammation and open the airways: A fast-acting bronchodilator inhaler -- albuterol (Proventil HFA, Ventolin HFA), pirbuterol (Maxair Autoinhaler), levalbuterol (Xopenex ) -- to dilate constricted airways when you have respiratory symptoms An inhaled corticosteroid -- mometasone (Asmanex), ciclesonide (Alvesco), beclomethasone (Qvar), flunisolide (AeroBid), fluticasone (Flovent), budesonide (Pulmicort) A long-acting bronchodilator/corticosteroid combination -- fluticasone/salmeterol (Advair), budesonide/formoterol (Symbicort) An asthma controller pill to reduce airway inflammation -- zafirlukast (Accolate), montelukast (Singulair) A non-sedating antihistamine pill -- loratadine (Claritin, Alavert), fexofenadine (Allegra), cetirizine (Zyrtec) or a prescription nasal spray -- fluticasone propionate (Flonase), triamcinolone acetonide (Nasacort AQ), mometasone furoate (Nasonex) -- if you have nasal allergies If you have acute bronchitis, your doctor may recommend some or all of the following: A bronchodilator -- albuterol (Proventil HFA, Ventolin HFA), pirbuterol, (Maxair Autoinhaler), levalbuterol, (Xopenex) -- to help ease the wheezing as the infection clears. An antibiotic is usually not needed unless you have an underlying chronic lung problem or your doctor suspects a bacterial infection may be present. Generally, any mild wheezing that accompanies acute bronchitis disappears when the infection does. Call 911 if you have any difficulty breathing. In emergencies, a medical team may administer any of the following: A shot of epinephrine to open clogged respiratory passages Oxygen A corticosteroid (such as methylprednisolone or prednisone) Frequent or continuous nebulizer (breathing) treatments A mechanical ventilator to help you breathe Answered by Ilona Klass 3 months ago.

My brother is an asthmatic and after ten years his asthma has shown no sign of improving. He has been to several doctors but they didn't help much. If you want a proven, all-natural way to cure your asthma, without having to pay for useless medications with harmful side-effects, then this is the most important page you'll ever read. Answered by Heide Aristide 3 months ago.


I need medical advice! Please!?
Last night I was making out with my boyfriend & this morning when I woke up I had a sore throat & my voice is deeper. He also has the same symptoms. All week he has had white gums & his voice has been cracking please help me understand what is going on! Asked by Herschel Reitema 3 months ago.

It sounds like it could be Thrush. Although, since neither of you are infants, most likely not geriatric, nor wear dentures, I would say there are other factors you have to consider to figure out if it's Thrush and how you contracted it. 1. Do either of you have a compromised immune system? (There are many things that can compromise an immune system. Without knowing your medical history, medication and supplement lists, and environment/diet, it would be hard for me to explain it thoroughly.) 2. Do either of you take inhaled corticosteroids? These could be like an asthma inhaler. (Pulmicort, Flovent, Aerobid, Qvar, etc) *Note* Asthma isn't the only reason to take an inhaled corticosteroids, however it's a very common one.* 3. Do either of you have exposures or problems with fungal infections? Do either of you have diabetes? In adults, Thrush is generally a result of some other illness. **If the white lesions were limited to your tonsils, I would suggest Strep throat. Considering Thrush doesn't generally cause a lot of pain in the initial stages, it could even be a combination of the two. Quite a few diseases can have 1 or 2 of these symptoms which makes it hard to say one illness with 100% certainty. I won't list all of the illnesses, but here's my advice: Go see a doctor as soon as you can. They can do a culture on the white lesions on your gums as well as blood work and a visual exam to determine if this is a symptom of a bigger problem. And I wouldn't recommend delaying too long since we don't know exactly what it is or if it could progress. Good Luck. Answered by Mercy Edgerly 3 months ago.


Is an inhaler used as a way to provide a steroid? Proof?
Doing a sports medicine project and would like to know if one can take steroids through an inhaler. I figured it opened airways and was used medically in this way but dont use one therefore not 100% sure. Can anyone answers this? Any proof reference as well is much appreciated. Asked by Shawnna Tuschhoff 3 months ago.

Yes, one such product is the Advair Diskus. Inhaled corticosteroids include fluticasone (Flovent), budesonide (Pulmicort), triamcinolone (Azmacort), flunisolide (Aerobid) and beclomethasone (Qvar). Advair Diskus is a combination inhaler containing fluticasone and salmeterol. See the links below for more information. Terry Answered by Delinda Ravenell 3 months ago.

See Beclametasone. This belongs to the group of medicines known as corticosteroids. Beclometasone can be used to treat asthma. Corticosteroids are inhaled to help prevent asthma attacks and to ease breathing problems. They work by reducing swelling and irritation in the small air passages of the lungs. Beclometasone is available in metered dose inhaler and inhalation powder form. Answered by Alba Fulena 3 months ago.

Yes some of the stronger asthma inhalers contain steroids. These are preventative inhalers and are only used in severe asthma or asthma attacks. They act to reduce the inflammatory response of the airway lining but due to the side affects they are used as a last resort. Answered by Darius Betsill 3 months ago.

Yes - there are inhalers that contain steroids (pulmicort, asmanex, flovent, etc). They are used for long term control of asthma (reduce inflammation). They are NOT effective as a rescue inhaler. Answered by Thresa Drossos 3 months ago.


Flovent doesn't help my asthma? Any others?
I am taking flovent 110 2 puffs twice a day. It isn't helping my asthma at all. I do not have an asthma specialist where I am currently at just a "regular" doctor who doesn't know much. Before ever messing with flovent or advair I was on aerobid and I seemingly remember never having a problem like... Asked by Nanette Didriksen 3 months ago.

I am taking flovent 110 2 puffs twice a day. It isn't helping my asthma at all. I do not have an asthma specialist where I am currently at just a "regular" doctor who doesn't know much. Before ever messing with flovent or advair I was on aerobid and I seemingly remember never having a problem like this! Does anyone else notice flovent doesn't help their asthma or they needed another medication instead of flovent? Answered by Marx Gails 3 months ago.

*raises hand* me me me. It does not help me at all. But my doctor is at rained specialist. I would get a second opnion. I just dont use mine anymore, its under my bed somewhere. =] Hope I helped. Answered by Jutta Penner 3 months ago.

You should really see an asthma specialist or pulmonologist. If you can't get to one, there are several options. I see you have already heard of Advair. The other most commonly used controller drug is Symbicort which seems to work very well for people with cough variant asthma (cough a lot). There are several different controller drugs on the market and not all of them will work for everyone. It is really trial and error until you find what works for you. You should also probably use an inhaler such as Combivent as well. Combivent is a mixture of albuterol (which is a bronchodialator to open up the airways) and iptatroprium bromide (which relaxes spasms in the smooth muscle walls that cause coughing). If you don't have a problem with coughing, then just an albuterol inhaler would work well. Answered by Colby Waldridge 3 months ago.

This is the standard: d. Asthma (493), including reactive airway disease, exercise-induced bronchospasm or asthmatic bronchitis, reliably diagnosed and symptomatic after the 13th birthday, is disqualifying. Reliable diagnostic criteria may include any of the following elements: substantiated history of cough, wheeze, chest tightness, and/or dyspnea that persists or recurs over a prolonged period of time, generally more than 12 months. They are going to see a problem when they confiscate the Flovent at Reception. You can lie about. The very first time you go down in a dust storm can you make sure you are the only one that goes down? SSG US Army 73-82 Answered by Tori Moscaritolo 3 months ago.

Im taking Becotide, 2 pufs twice a day. When I'm getting a cough or chest infection though I also take 2 puffs of Ventolin about 15 minutes before I take the Becotide. It seems to be working for me, haven't had an attack in about 5 years. Answered by Tim Abare 3 months ago.


Bouts of Severe Coughing?
A few days ago (almost a week now?) I got sick from the cold, but the sore throat and mild coughing only lasted for about two days. These days, I get these periods of severe and uncontrollable coughing that last about 2-3 min each. I would tear up, maybe go red in the face (especially when I try to hold it in) and... Asked by Leonie Deschepper 3 months ago.

A few days ago (almost a week now?) I got sick from the cold, but the sore throat and mild coughing only lasted for about two days. These days, I get these periods of severe and uncontrollable coughing that last about 2-3 min each. I would tear up, maybe go red in the face (especially when I try to hold it in) and eventually vomit. Between these sessions, I am completely fine, a few dry coughs here and there. I never know when it will hit me. Water seems to help, and I don't usually get it from eating. Talking makes it worse, but it doesn't always come from talking. What do I have? Answered by Abdul Dougal 3 months ago.

Could be walking pneumonia, in which case you will need antibiotics like biaxicin twice a day. And you will also need albuterol inhaler. I also recommend and inhaled steroid like flovent, advair or aerobid. Flovent is cheapest. Coughing like that will cause lung inflammation and makes a vicious circle The albuterol can stop it and the flovent prevent it. Go to a plumanolgist if your regular Dr. won't give you a prescription for at least albuterol. Just ask if you can get an albuterol inhaler. Viral induced asthma is common and goes untreated often to damage peoples lungs so they get lung problems later in life. Answered by Mitchel Keehner 3 months ago.

Following a cold or flu, it's quite common to have a mild chest infection. Are you managing to cough anything up? If you are and your phlegm is coloured green or yellow, then you may have a chest infection and should see your doc asap. If you're not coughing up any phlegm is may be an allergic reaction to something around you. So, has anything different happened at home, school or work? Are you doing anything you didn't do before? If the answer is still no, then I suggest you see your doc and get it sorted before it does blossom into something else. Good luck. Answered by Clora Hanible 3 months ago.


Would acid reflux cause coughing and asthma attacks?
Asked by Chassidy Heino 3 months ago.

ABSOLUTELY. Even though I could go into a lot of medical complex talk I can speak from EXPERIENCE. I have had Chronic Asthma and Bronchitis since I moved to Oklahoma. I thought I had picked up a bug from one person in particular because she coughed all the time time and couldn't get that out of my mind. I never knew I had acid reflux until my family physician said that my Asthma was so out of control that I had to see a Specialist and one of the first things he did was run a bunch of tests and I was IMMEDIATELY diagnosed with GERD. I never really noticed that I had acid reflux because I coughed to much all the time. I did however use a lot of Tums and stuff. He put me on Prilosec and within a couple of weeks I noticed an immediate difference in my asthma. He also added a very low dose of Singular as a preventive medication and I do have two different inhalers (Flovent & Aerobid ....I just got a third and am not sure what it is) and have a nebulizer at home for emergencies and so I don't have to go the ER for breathing treatments. Once I got the GERD and acid reflux under control my Asthma and Bronchitis haven't acted back up once. I'm sure now that it's hot I'm going to have some problems but I never in a million years would have guessed that it was acid reflux causing my problem. For all the years I suffered with the Asthma and all the steroids I took could kick my famly Dr. in the foot for not knowing what was wrong!!!! Peace, Love & Happiness Answered by Kathaleen Sundblad 3 months ago.

Yes it can cause coughing, especially when you're sleeping. It can also damage little by little your vocal cords. Remember that when reflux go up, it can go directly to your trachea. About the asthma attacks, I am not sure. Answered by Stephine Greeves 3 months ago.

The FASTEST and BEST I have found for symptoms is a teaspoon of baking soda in a small glass a couple of sips as needed Answered by Essie Lochan 3 months ago.

It may cause some coughing but asthma, I think not. Answered by Lucio Kinner 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018340/001 AEROBID FLUNISOLIDE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.25MG per INH

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018148/001 NASALIDE FLUNISOLIDE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.025MG per SPRAY
018340/001 AEROBID FLUNISOLIDE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.25MG per INH
020409/001 NASAREL FLUNISOLIDE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.029MG per SPRAY
021247/001 AEROSPAN HFA FLUNISOLIDE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.078MG per INH
074805/001 FLUNISOLIDE FLUNISOLIDE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.025MG per SPRAY
077436/001 FLUNISOLIDE FLUNISOLIDE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.029MG per SPRAY
077704/001 FLUNISOLIDE FLUNISOLIDE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.025MG per SPRAY

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