ADENOSINE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 077425/001.

Names and composition

"ADENOSINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ADENOSINE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
077425/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
077425/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
090212/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
090212/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
090450/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
090450/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
202313/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
202313/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
203883/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
203883/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
076404/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
076500/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
076501/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
076564/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077133/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077283/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077897/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 3MG per ML
078076/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
078618/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 3MG per ML
078640/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
078676/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
078686/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
079147/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 3MG per ML
090010/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
090220/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020059/001 ADENOSCAN ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML) **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020059/002 ADENOSCAN ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML) **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019937/002 ADENOCARD ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077425/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
077425/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
090212/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
090212/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
090450/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
090450/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
202313/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
202313/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
203883/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
203883/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
076404/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
076500/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
076501/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
076564/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077133/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077283/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077897/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 3MG per ML
078076/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
078618/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 3MG per ML
078640/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
078676/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
078686/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
079147/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 3MG per ML
090010/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
090220/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML

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Answered questions

What is Adenosine Triphosphate? 11th grade Biology?
I know it plays a major role in DNA exchanging but pls break down what it does? Why do we need it? .. What is -phosphate? What is Adenosine Monphosphate? What is Adenosine Diphosphate ? Thanks(: Asked by Rosina Ohrnstein 1 month ago.

Adenosine triphosphate is the basic unit of energy in a cell. Cells need to do many things in order to maintain homoestasis and stay alive. These include many catabolic (breakdown of molecules for energy and raw materials) and anabolic (building up biomolecules) reactions. ATP is made in catabolic reactions, where chemical bonds are broken and the energy released is used to make ATP. Anabolic reactions require the input of energy, you need ATP power the production of complex proteins for example. Other uses of ATP: most of the ATP in our bodies powers ion channels, Na/K ATPase that pumps Na out and K in. ATP's energy is used to make proteins, phospholipids, nucleic acids. Phosphate is a phosphorus atom bound to four oxygens. It typically has a negative charge. ATP is an adenosine (ribose sugar with adenine nitrogenous base) molecule with three phosphates attatched to it. The phosphates' negative charges repel. It takes alot of energy to place them there thus alot of energy is released when the bonds between the phoshates, phosphodiester bonds, are broken. Adenosine triphosphate (3 phosphates) ----- cleavage/cutting of the last phosphodiester bond -----> adenosine diphosphate (2 phosphates) ----- cleavage/cutting of the last phosphodiester bond -----> adenosine monophosphate. ATP is energy currency. ADP is made after ATP is used up, it is also later used to make more ATP by adding another phosphate group. AMP is produced when there is low energy in the cell. Answered by An Ennett 1 month ago.

Adensosine Triphosphate (ATP) is essentially a molecule that stores energy for use in your cells. Think of it like a rechargeable battery if you like. The energy is stored in the bond that holds the last of the three (TRIphosphate) phosphates. When that bond is broken, energy is released and the phosphate 'leaves' and you now have Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP). The phosphate can be rejoined to another ADP molecule to create more ATP (this happens in cellular respiration). The reason ATP is needed in DNA replication etc. is because every chemical reaction requires some amount of energy to happen. Answered by Elma Dehetre 1 month ago.


What is Adenosine Triphosphate?
Asked by Joie Loiseau 1 month ago.

Adenosine Triphosphate, usually abbreviated ATP, is an organic molecule that acts like the wallet of living cell energy. There are trillions and trillions of them, but each one only holds ONE unit of energy. There are processes in each of our cells, like glycolysis (splitting up of a glucose molecule) and the Krebs Cycle (further reactions on carbon-based molecules) which result in energy. This energy is "stored" when the process adds a phosphate to ADP (Adenosine Diphosphate), which raises it to a higher energy state, thus those processes create ATP. Then, other biological processes in living cells, which NEED energy, get it by removing the phosphate from ATP, producing a Phosphate and ADP again. The ATP and the ADP and Phosphate are not "consumed", but rather, are "recycled" over and over again, thus, it's like earning one dollar (one phosphate) each time, and filling the wallet which holds only one dollar (ADP) to become a full wallet (ATP), which can then be "spent" (split into ADP and Phosphate) again. The combining to make ATP "costs", or takes energy, whereas the split to phosphate and ADP releases energy, like spending that "dollar". This is only part of the big answer to your question, so I hope it covers what you needed. Answered by Kendrick Zolondek 1 month ago.

Adenosine Triphosphate or ATP for short is a molecule which organisms produce and is hydrolyzed to form Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP). This hydrolysis causes a phosphate group to fall off from ATP and release energy. Short version: ATP is used to power cells. Answered by Tawnya Boullion 1 month ago.

Adenosine triphosphate(ATP) is the NTP(Nucleotide triphosphate) in which nuleotide is adenine.it is the energy currency & consumesin many metabolic processes like respiration,photosynthesis,etc. it produces also from reducing powers(FADH2,NADPH2) in ETS(electron transport system) Answered by Venessa Eleam 1 month ago.

ATP helps provide energy for a cell created during photosynthesis Answered by Ferdinand Panas 1 month ago.


Adenosine triphosphate AD?
can someone give me some ideas on how to create a Adenosine triphosphate magazine Ad. and explain to me in dept what is ATP? please and thank you : ) Asked by Chung Cornfield 1 month ago.

adenosine triphosphate ATP the cells currency. boy that magazine project must be a pain haha well anyway i dont have ideas but i do know what ATP is and what it does as i said it is the cells currency. it is the main energy source for cells. it consists of adenosine and 3 phosphate groups (PO4^2-) the phosphate groups are what gives it energy. why? in a phosphate group, there are 4 oxygens which are very electronegative and pull electrons from the phosphate closer to itself than to the oxygen, creating polarity. the negatively charged oxygens are still held in place by the phosphate however, so they stay in place, but the negative charges repel and the repelling force is what creates the energy. when ATP is used, it places a phosphate onto the substance and becomes ADP (adenosine diphosphate - 2 phosphate groups now) it can be used for various purposes: to function in respiration, photosynthesis, or to change the configuration of a transport protein to let things in or out of the cell. ATP is a rechargeable battery. when it uses a phosphate and becomes ADP it can become ATP again by gaining a phosphate group. They can gain an extra phosphate group by substrate level phosphorylation or by getting a phosphate attached to it by the energy made by ATP synthase in the ETC substrate level phosphorylation is when the ADP picks up phosphate groups from a previously charged substrate(occurs in glycolysis and krebs cycle (citric acid cycle)) ATP is made in cellular respiration whcih has 3 stages, glycolysis, krebs cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation or chemiosmosis (im not entirely sure what it is exactly called but it happens at the ETC) now im too lazy to get into respiration but im sure the teacher already told u about this well yea thats all i got cuz im only a sophomore so yea good luck with ur ad or bribe the teacher to give u an A without doing ur hw Answered by Amanda Kemper 1 month ago.


What is a benefit of ATP adenosine triphosphate!!!???!!!! 10 points plz?
Asked by Cathi Pu 1 month ago.

Adenosine triphosphate is a compound containing adenosine, a purine-based nucleotide of adenine and ribose sugar found in human cells. Adenosine can have as many as three phosphate groups; adenosine triphosphate is the one involved in a great may physiological interactions. ATP participates in synthesizing nucleic acids, assists in proper metabolism, muscle contraction, and neurotransmission, and also affects the heart’s functions, the dilation of blood vessels, and the liver’s ability to utilize glycogen. Using hydrolysis, ATP breaks down into the simpler forms of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), and finally into simple adenosine. And adenosine is crucial to our health because it supplies our cells with energy. It is also a factor in our production of ribonucleic acid--RNA. Our bodies supply themselves with adenosine monophosphate from our diets, and then ATP supplies us with energy as it is needed. *** So, in short ATP: *** helps synthesize nucleic acids assists - in proper metabolism - in muscle contraction - and in neurotransmission affects - the heart's functions - the dilation of blood vessels - and the liver's ability to utilize glycogen supplies our cells with energy is a factor in our production of RNA Answered by Kristeen Demming 1 month ago.

A triply phosphorylated organic and organic compound that function as “potential distant places money” for organisms. . As and while needed, this bond potential is utilized for biosynthetic, osmotic and mechanical artwork that we carry out. the main extreme form of potential distant places money in residing structures is the bond potential in a chemical called adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Answered by Roscoe Landreth 1 month ago.

because the bonds between the phosphate groups are so unstable, there is a great amount of potential energy stored in the bonds. when they are broken, the energy is released to be used for various activities around the cell. Answered by Jesse Fulker 1 month ago.

ATP is energy, basically. Two ATP are needed to begin cellular respiration, and you end up with 32 extra at the end of the electron transport chain (depending on how you look at it. ) Answered by Ocie Shalwani 1 month ago.


Adenosine triphosphate?
adenosine triphosphate Asked by Nora Codde 1 month ago.

adenosine triphosphate is what is more commonly known as ATP and is what is required in all living organisms for energy. It is made from glucose during glycolysis, and the Krebs cycle. Dont really know what else you want, seeing as you didnt really ask a question. Answered by Twila Palladino 1 month ago.

i dont understand the question. adenosine is the chemical that attatched to to adenosine receptors on our brain, thats what makes us tired. i dunno about the triphosphate, and what does that have to do with botany anyway? Answered by Sharolyn Zabloudil 1 month ago.

ATP is highest source of energy in the universe imean it stores energy in the form of phosphate bonds Answered by Thurman Kasprowicz 1 month ago.

ATP? Really cool stuff. I have a bunch of that in my cells. Answered by Terence Kraushaar 1 month ago.

wuts ur question again? Answered by Ariane Novick 1 month ago.


Adenosine monophosphate?
Hi can you briefly describe what adenosine monophosphate is used for? and also, what it is...thanx ^_^ Asked by Rosalina Huntoon 1 month ago.

Adenosine monophosphate (AMP), also known as 5'-adenylic acid, is a nucleotide that is used as a monomer in RNA. It is an ester of phosphoric acid and the nucleoside adenosine. AMP consists of a phosphate group, the sugar ribose, and the nucleobase adenine. Answered by Maudie Winterrowd 1 month ago.


What is adenosine triphosphate??& what does it do?
P.s be more specific & much details Asked by Ingrid Filmer 1 month ago.

Adenosine triphosphate abbreviated ATP, is composed of three phosphates and a purine nucleoside adenosine. Many biochemist consider ATP to be the most important molecule on the planet. Every living thing including viruses need it to reproduce or to stay alive. Many of the chemical processes that need to be carried out are energetically unfavorable reactions, and ATP is used to overcome the energy activation barrier of energetically unfavorable reactions. ATP is also used in the transfer of phosphate groups. When ATP is used as an energy source, ATP is cleaved and converted to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which releases -30kj/mol of energy. Most of a cell's ATP is generated by ATP synthases located in the mitochondria via oxidative phosphorylation. Edit: Clarified a statement. Answered by Lucina Catignani 1 month ago.


What is adenosine triphosphate?
Asked by Elda Zigomalas 1 month ago.

Adenosine -triphosphate (ATP) is a multifunctional nucleotide that is most important as a "molecular currency" of intracellular energy transfer. In this role ATP transports chemical energy within cells for metabolism. It is produced as an energy source during the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration and consumed by many enzymes and a multitude of cellular processes including biosynthetic reactions, motility and cell division. ATP is also incorporated into nucleic acids by polymerases in the processes of DNA replication and transcription. In signal transduction pathways, ATP is used as a substrate by kinases that phosphorylate proteins and lipids, as well as by adenylate cyclase, which uses ATP to produce the second messenger molecule cyclic AMP. Answered by Emilio Dinsmoor 1 month ago.

It's a multifunctional nucleotide that is most important as a "molecular currency" of intracellular energy transfer. In this role ATP transports chemical energy within cells for metabolism. It is produced as an energy source during the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration and consumed by many enzymes and a multitude of cellular processes including biosynthetic reactions, motility and cell division. ATP is also incorporated into nucleic acids by polymerases in the processes of DNA replication and transcription. In signal transduction pathways, ATP is used as a substrate by kinases that phosphorylate proteins and lipids, as well as by adenylate cyclase, which uses ATP to produce the second messenger molecule cyclic AMP. The structure of this molecule consists of a purine base (adenine) attached to the 1' carbon atom of a pentose (ribose). Three phosphate groups are attached at the 5' carbon atom of the pentose sugar. When ATP is used in DNA synthesis, the ribose sugar is first converted to deoxyribose by ribonucleotide reductase. ATP was discovered in 1929 by Karl Lohmann, and was proposed to be the main energy-transfer molecule in the cell by Fritz Albert Lipmann in 1941. Answered by Jesusita Billinger 1 month ago.


What is adenosine deaminase activity?
its connection with pleural fluid Asked by Jeffery Petiet 1 month ago.

it removes an amine group from adenosine. oops, didn't see the lung part of the question... Here is the abstract from the article I cited below... Abstract Adenosine has been implicated to play a role in the inflammatory lung disease, asthma; however, there are few in vivo model systems with which to study the role of adenosine in aspects of this disease. We recently generated mice deficient in the purine catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) that controls the levels of adenosine in tissues and cells. Results presented here demonstrate that elevated adenosine levels in ADA-deficient mice result in abnormal lung development and the promotion of lung inflammation and damage. ADA-deficient mice exhibit alveolar defects that are overcome by biochemically restoring ADA enzymatic activity to these animals. In addition, lowering ADA substrates in the lung using enzyme therapy reverses lung eosinophilia and mucus production. These results suggest that elevated adenosine, and perhaps abnormal adenosine signaling, are implicated in abnormal lung development and lung inflammation and damage in ADA-deficient mice. These mice will therefore serve as useful in vivo models in which to study the role of purinergic signaling in aspects of lung development and disease. Drug Dev. Res. 52:416-423, 2001. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Answered by Margarett Touton 1 month ago.

Well I'm quite sure that lack of this enzyme in pleural fluid results in a buildup of dATP which results in the buildup of a cysteine derivative that prevents new lymphocytes from maturing. This can result in SCID. I believe its normal function is to salvage adenosine so that more ATP can be generated. Answered by Jerrie Whelan 1 month ago.


Can anyone give me any reliable information about adenosine?
I am just trying to figure out just how safe it is to use, and if people have died from it. Thank you for your help. Please give any references that you can as well. My mother is in the hospital and they are talking about administering this to her. Thanks again. Asked by Gerald Censky 1 month ago.

Hi. No doctor would be considering giving your mother Adenosine unless it's absolutely necessary. It's a drug we use to correct heart rhythm. I'm guessing that your mothers heart is in a rhythm called SVT (Supraventricular Tachycardia), If this is the case, it means your mothers heart is beating way too fast and the rhythm is life threatening if it's left untreated. Adenosine will correct the rhythm and get your mothers heart to beat in Normal Sinus Rhythm (the normal rhythm of your heart). Adenosine is given intravenously (through the vein) and doses of 6-12mg shouldn't have any adverse effects. If more than that is needed, it's given by infusion, it can cause the blood pressure drop. Nursing staff will be monitoring this closely and it will be acted quickly if it happens, so don't worry. I'm sure your mother will be good hands. I'm a registered nurse on an emergency department, and we've given Adenosine countless times to people in SVT, without any problem whatsoever. Every drug has is risks and side effects - even Paracetamol (Tylenol), which no-one thinks anything of taking. Medicine is all about weighing up benefit against risk. Using Adenosine, the benefit is far greater than the risk. For further information on Adenosine, go to www.drugs.com Hope this helps. Answered by Marine Greeb 1 month ago.


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