ADENOCARD Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019937/002.

Names and composition

"ADENOCARD" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ADENOSINE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019937/002 ADENOCARD ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020059/001 ADENOSCAN ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML) **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020059/002 ADENOSCAN ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML) **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019937/002 ADENOCARD ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077425/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
077425/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
090212/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
090212/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
090450/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
090450/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
202313/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
202313/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
203883/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 60MG per 20ML (3MG per ML)
203883/002 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 90MG per 30ML (3MG per ML)
076404/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
076500/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
076501/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
076564/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077133/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077283/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
077897/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 3MG per ML
078076/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
078618/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 3MG per ML
078640/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
078676/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
078686/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
079147/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 3MG per ML
090010/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
090220/001 ADENOSINE ADENOSINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML

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Answered questions

Adenocard?
I have ventricular tachyardia and am about to have an EP study done, i'm wondering if when they instigate an arrythmia will they have to give me adenocard to get my heart back to normal pace, i know they will be testing different meds to see which works best for me, just wondering if this drug would be one of... Asked by Elmer Lavina 1 month ago.

I have ventricular tachyardia and am about to have an EP study done, i'm wondering if when they instigate an arrythmia will they have to give me adenocard to get my heart back to normal pace, i know they will be testing different meds to see which works best for me, just wondering if this drug would be one of them, i've heard horror stories about this drug and am afraid to take it!!?? Answered by Eduardo Butorac 1 month ago.

I have "experienced" Adenocard 2 times d/t an abnormal heart rythm. I can say from 1st hand experience, the reason I finally worked up enought nerve to get an EP study and ablation was because I never wanted to recieve another dose of adenocard in my life. I was afraid to get it again. I cried the last time they took me to the emergency room because I knew I was going to get it again. I was in the abnormal rythm when they took me to the cath lab to have the ablation. They put me to sleep, and I do not remember getting anything except for a drug which made my heart beat race for a short period of time, then I was back out into a twilight sleep. You will not be awake enough to know what they are giving you during the study. Dont be afraid. They have to stimulate your heart to find out where your abnomal rythm is coming from. They dont use the Adenocard, but they do microscopically put a burn in your heart to make the abnormal rythm stop once they get it going. You will be fine. Answered by Leonor Kliever 1 month ago.

They probably will not use adenocard as it is mostly for SVT. Cordarone is the most common and best drug used today and has no severe side effects. If however your doctor did decide you were in SVT instead of V tach and wanted to use adenocard, rest assured, I have been an ICU nurse for 13 years and have used this drug countless times. I have never once saw a patient have a bad result from this drug. As far as I know there has never been one case that I have ever read in any medical journal of any ill effects suffered from the use of adenocard. Most people only complain of a "Funny feeling in my chest" lasting only 3 to 5 seconds. Good luck, I hope this eases your mind. Answered by Buster Bandemer 1 month ago.

i work for a an office of cardiologists and usually we use "adenosine" during a cardiolite stress test (aden card/pers card), which we use on people who are unable to walk a treadmill/and/or have lung problems to get their heart rate up in order for them to conduct a scan when the dye is injected both through iv....is this maybe what you are asking about? if so it is used to "stress" the heart as if you were working out and increases your heart rate...so i am thinking if this is what you are talking about it's probably not what they will use to get your heart back in rythm. Answered by Melani Wennersten 1 month ago.


Anyone here ever receive a drug called Adenosine (adenocard). How did you feel?
In 2005 I decided to take matters into my own hands and see a cardiac electrophysioligist. I had what is called AV node re entry and the episodes were becoming more frequent and lasting longer. The drug of choice for supraventricular tach is Adenocard. Of course the ER physician and the cardiologist thinks its... Asked by Felisa Wassinger 1 month ago.

In 2005 I decided to take matters into my own hands and see a cardiac electrophysioligist. I had what is called AV node re entry and the episodes were becoming more frequent and lasting longer. The drug of choice for supraventricular tach is Adenocard. Of course the ER physician and the cardiologist thinks its no big deal, but they are not on the recieving end of this heart stopping drug. I knew they were about to whoop it on me because they always started an IV with a big fat IV catheter and pulled out this red box which contained the drug. Its not a normal drug. It stops your heart and literally makes you pass out. I would go into the ER with a heart rate of 230 and, when they pushed this drug in, could feel my head go light and a feeling of deep loss and despair, and literally pass out. Have you ever given Adenocard or been on the recieving end? How did it make you feel? I have been ablated and now stopped doing the AV node re entry because I was so afraid of the drug. I didnt want anymore of it. Answered by Toni Schockley 1 month ago.

I've given Adenocard a couple times in the field and in the ER. My patients have told me it is an INCREDIBLY unpleasant experience, they've told me its like dying. They get short of breath, go pale and sometimes pass out. The drug itself knocks out the cardiac conduction system in the heart, causing asystole for a couple of seconds, the sense of despair you feel is your body reacting to your heart stopping, not a pleasant experience. Several patients in the field have refused adenocard treatment and would rather receive synchronized cardioversion to treat their SVT. I suppose that speaks measures about how unpleasant the drugs is if people are willing to get shocked with up to 200-360J(depending on monitor) of electricity to avoid it. If you found the drug therapy to be incredibly unpleasant, I would say that your results were pretty much inline with everything I've been told either by my own patients, co-workers or other medical workers. Answered by Josefina Olevera 1 month ago.

I have pstv, I had stv since the late 80's, every now and then, couple times a year or so. It is now more often and lasts longer. I have been in er 4 times for this, I was given Adenosine each time, last time it lasted like 15 seconds, it's very uncomfortable, but is over fast, seemed longer the last time I was counting during it. I need a different med, digoxin is what I take for it! I am very frightened of having an epstudy and ablation, so I hope I can get on something that will work for me, is it true that you can't take vitamins, like D3,fish oil,.etc with dig? Because it will interact with the dig.Does any one know about this? I have been taking Dig for just over 2 months. dr gave dig because I told him, my blood pressure was 80/40 during the first episode and that's why he gave the digoxin. Answered by Ashanti Nyland 1 month ago.

We discussed using this drug earlier in the semester. It's exactly as you and the previous post describe. We were told that the physician should warn the patient before administering the drug that it's not fun. It makes you feel awful, and you feel like you really have to pee, but you won't actually pee. It sounds awful and I'm sorry you have to go through that. Try discussing your concerns with your cardiologist to find out if there are other options that might work for you. Answered by Vivan Ludera 1 month ago.

I go to the ER about 3 times a year I have PSVT and they give me Adenosine the 6 don t work but when they give me 12 works everytime for conversion it don t bother me at all no ill affects over in a few seconds I don t pass out it Answered by Ardelia Burde 1 month ago.

Around 12 yrs. ago a man called here asking for me by name,and I answered,the phone isn't under my name though.There was this guy I really liked and I'd ordered something at this place he worked,so I knew he had access to my #.I had hoped it was him,but then he claimed he was from Sprint.As I had picked it up on the first ring,nothing was left on the call display.He only asked if I was interested in the phone service,I said no,and the call ended shortly after.I called Sprint the next day since I didn't think it was really them who had called.They said no they hadn't and they would never ask for someone by their first name,and since the phone wasn't in my name,they wouldn't be trying to get me as a customer.I have no way of knowing if it was my crush who called,but he never followed through with anything else,so nothing ever came of it.This must sound convoluted and strange,but I always wondered who made that call and why. Answered by Juliane Henwood 1 month ago.


Adenocard? and Inderal LA?
I had an EP study done today, they gave me no sedative, but did have to administer adenocard as well as Inderal La. Now i feel weird, lightheaded, vertigo, and fatigue. I'm wondering if this is normal reactions to these drugs or if I'm having an adverse reaction. The hospital said that i was fine, but... Asked by Teddy Angeletti 1 month ago.

I had an EP study done today, they gave me no sedative, but did have to administer adenocard as well as Inderal La. Now i feel weird, lightheaded, vertigo, and fatigue. I'm wondering if this is normal reactions to these drugs or if I'm having an adverse reaction. The hospital said that i was fine, but i'm still worried because my pupils are HUGE!!! How long will this feeling last? anyone ever had it before? Answered by Savanna Beshero 1 month ago.

Adenocard is a short acting drug and the effect should be gone in a few minutes. Inderal LA is a long acting beta-blocker and can cause fatigue and dizziness. talk to your doctor if your symptoms persist and have your blood pressure checked. Answered by Sparkle Reiger 1 month ago.


Any one know anything about denocard?
2 questions- Since Adenocard has such a short half life, why can it be given Intramuscurally? Is it actually effective IM? Also- What would happen if someone in mild sinus tachycardia (say, 120bpm) took 4 - 6 mg IM? Asked by Carri Hudach 1 month ago.

Adenosine (Adenocard) must be given intravenously to have an effect. Adenosine acts rapidly and is very quickly metabolized to inactive compounds. When Adenosine is given IV it slows conduction in the AV node, which is between the top chambers (atria) and the bottom chambers (ventricles.) It causes a pause for 3-5 seconds during which time the underlying atrial rhythm can be determined. If Adenosine was given intramuscularly, then it would be absorbed very slowly and would not be able to reach a concentration in the blood to have therapeutic properties since it is rapidly metabolized. Adenosine can interfere with the reentry pathways of certain rhythms, such as SVT (specifically AV nodal reentrant tachycardia.) If Adenosine was given to someone in sinus tachycardia, atrial fibriallation, or atrial flutter, then Adenosine will slow down AV conduction for 3-5 seconds but it would return to the previous rhythm. This is because the rhythm is coming from above the AV node in the SA node or the atrium. Adenosine is therefore useless for sinus tachycardia. Sinus tachycardia has many causes and treatment should be focused on treating the underlying cause of the sinus tachycardia. It can be caused by pain, anxiety, thyroid disease, anemia, dehydration, etc. Hope this helps. Good luck. Answered by Celina Waller 1 month ago.


What are the basics of emergency medicine?
I am doing a reaserch project and want to know the basics of emergency medicine, like what types of drugs are used, and what types of cases you would have to take? Asked by Pauletta Wisman 1 month ago.

Epi, atropine, lidocaine, Adenocard, Amioderone, Cardizem, Diprivan, Flumazenil, Mag sulfate, Narcan, Nitorglycerine, Promethazine, Slou-medrol, Veceronium, Dextrose 50%, sodium bicarbonate, Ipatroprium bromide, metaproterenol, ASA, Dopamine, Lidocaine, Dextrose5%, Morphine, valium. This is a pretty borad question. What type of emergency medicine are you refering to? EMT-B is 3 months 130 hrs, EMT-A 4 months 180 hrs, Paramedic, 1-2 yrs some get associates degrees, MD, Med school residency. Answered by Theodora Kozyra 1 month ago.

University degree Answered by Stephen Karrenberg 1 month ago.

You always treat the three B's first - breathing, beating (heart), and (severe) bleeding. Answered by Azalee Lark 1 month ago.


Electrophysiologist?
I'm having an ablation done next week for VT, I've tried to research the doctor who is doing this (Dr. Robert Styperek) in Rome, ga. I can't find any info on him. It says that he is just an M.D. and F.A.C.C, which i don't know the meaning of!! I'm terrified to have this done, can anyone give me... Asked by Colene Barocio 1 month ago.

I'm having an ablation done next week for VT, I've tried to research the doctor who is doing this (Dr. Robert Styperek) in Rome, ga. I can't find any info on him. It says that he is just an M.D. and F.A.C.C, which i don't know the meaning of!! I'm terrified to have this done, can anyone give me some advice and has anyone ever used him before? He works at Redmond Regional ?!!!! Answered by Lavinia Flinchum 1 month ago.

Who referred you to this MD? He/She should be able to tell you if he is a good doctor or not. I had an EP study and ablation in October and was cured. I was scared, but I knew what I had to do because I could not keep getting doses of Adenocard. I was afraid they would screw up in the ER, and something would go awry and I would die over a dose of Adenocard. It may sound crazy, but I am a hospital nurse and I know the possibilities. When you get into the cath lab, you will be wired and things are so high tech in the procedure, if anything even remotely looks wrong, they are on it immediately. You have the best of high technology and its amazing what they can do. I was so scared and the monitor tech in the cath lab during the procedure told me I was in the best place to be for my heart to be acting crazy, which it did on the cath table before the procedure started. There were 3 people besides the electrophysiologist in the lab with me and they were very knowledgable and kind. They will sedate you and make you so relaxed you could care less what they do. The hardest part for me was waking up briefly while they were pushing the catheters up into my groins on both sides. They gave me some pain meds and gorked me out again. It is my understanding they can approach thru your neck. This procedure is really huge if you are having it done, but the EP doctors think it is fairly benign and tell you there is nothing to it. I know you will be fine. You are much more likely to have problems from v tach then to have problems from the EP study. and ablation. Take someone with you to drive you home. I left the same day about 2 hours after the procedure. Take a couple days off work to let your sites heal up and relax. You will do great. I feel re born since my heart quit going crazy on me. It is the 1st time in 20 yrs I have been able to get on a plane or go horse back riding. It feels sooooo goood. Answered by Ryan Burak 1 month ago.

Sorry, I also don't know him, but an MD, F.A.C.C. is a good start. You might want to check if he also passed the Electrophysiology board examinations. Try searching the web for NASPEx. I think they list people who have taken and passed the exam. And you might want to find out how long he has been doing this. Try to find someone with at least a few years of experience behind him or who is working with a group of more experienced electrophysiologists, not someone fresh out a fellowship working alone.. It is a high tech area of medicine, and it helps to have someone who has been around the block a few times :>).Don't be afraid to ask him this. He should not be offended. You are simply asking for some information. He will probably not be working alone. VT ablations can be a bit involved, but you will be on several monitors and carefully watched the entire time. There will likely be several staff members and nurses, as well as a clinical expert representative for the equipment and computerized mapping system that they will be using. this team of specialists will collaborate to provide you with the best possible outcome. Good Luck. Answered by Carman Zoch 1 month ago.

Don't know him personally, but FACC means a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology. Sounds like he is qualified, and hospitals require at least a fair level of competence if the doctor is allowed to be on staff. Don't work yourself up into tachycardia worrying about this. This is a fairly common procedure nowadays, and you need to be aware that sometimes they have to do it more than once to ablate the problem area. Take a deep breath and try not to worry, just try to imagine how nice life will be after this is over. Answered by Isaias Topolewski 1 month ago.


I had a radiofrequency ablation in October. Will this cause any long term problems?
I had AV nod re-entrant tachycardia and kept winding up in the ER with pulse rates over 240, I was terrified of getting more Adenocard, so they ablated it, I had palpitations something terrible for about 8 months after the procedure which seem to have stopped for the most part. Now I am wondering if I have made... Asked by Solange Woytowich 1 month ago.

I had AV nod re-entrant tachycardia and kept winding up in the ER with pulse rates over 240, I was terrified of getting more Adenocard, so they ablated it, I had palpitations something terrible for about 8 months after the procedure which seem to have stopped for the most part. Now I am wondering if I have made myself at a higher risk for future heart problems which they never thought about like what if I needed that accessory pathway for something they never told me about. I think the ablation was like a micro heart attac put in a great spot to make my heart beat right. At any rate, the physician who fixed me was sent from God and I am so thankful he took the time and fixed me. I feel like it is almost too good to be true. Answered by Phoebe Council 1 month ago.

It is a wonderful thing, my daughter had it done 4 times between the ages of 8-10 yrs of age. The last one finally got the trouble spot for her and gave her a life she never knew existed. She could go out of town for the day with friends, she could fo swimming, she could stay the nite at friends. She hasn't had any problems and her last one was in 1995 at the age of 10, she is 21 now and healthy as can be. No more ER's, no more meds, no more life flights to a bigger hospital. She was one of the first to have it done and I have never regretted agreeing to let them do it. It was RFA or pacemaker with defib. , so yes RFA is a lifesaver and she has had no side effects in the 11 yrs since. Hope this helps you feel a little better about it. Answered by Yetta Boven 1 month ago.


I want to send cookies to my cardiologist to tell him thank you, is this appropriate?
also, I was not billed for his services. He teaches the procedure and this one was on the house. I am just an ordinary person, a little on the heavy side, and I have no connections. He was just doing me a good deed and I cannot say how greatful I am. I was thinking for 18 years I had panic attacs until I took my... Asked by Stacy Nelmes 1 month ago.

I am 42 years old and had something called AV node re-entry. After 18 plus years of having terrible heart arrythmias, I referred myself to a physician and went to a consult not very optomistic he could fix me. He did! Wow what a change in my whole life! Just talking about it brings me to tears. I had such a bad arrythmia, I was afraid to go anywhere or do anything. As a RN, I work with heart doctors who did not encourage me to have the procedure and people made jokes about me dying on the table and told me horror stories about the procedure. I went into the cath lab with tears rolling down my face terrified out of my gord he was going to kill me on the table. In less than 1/2 hr I was fixed. I owe my entire sanity to this electrophysiologist who fixed me. He has made such a change in my life and I cannot begin to express how thankful I am he took the time to fix the problem I kept downplaying because I didnt want people to keep worrying me. I was scared. Should I send cookies? Answered by Era Bearce 1 month ago.

also, I was not billed for his services. He teaches the procedure and this one was on the house. I am just an ordinary person, a little on the heavy side, and I have no connections. He was just doing me a good deed and I cannot say how greatful I am. I was thinking for 18 years I had panic attacs until I took my 12 lead EKG's to the consult. He laughed and could not believe anyone would think a heart rate of 240 was panic attacs. The hospital who bills seperately sent me a huge bill which my insurance covered nicely. It was worth everything I have to stop having that arrythmia. I would be sitting reading a newspaper and my heart started beating wildly. I could be walking thru the mall and wham, my heart started going crazy. It stuck too, so I had no choice but to go to the hospital ER. I did it on Thanksgiving. I did it while out to dinner with my friends. I bet I have been to the ER over 20 times for this problem and the cure (Adenocard) is not funny. It stops your heart. Answered by Shannon Selkey 1 month ago.

yes and the nurses will love it, too! Answered by Reggie Guardipee 1 month ago.

Yes, a gift of cookies would be totally appropriate, especially if they are directed to the department/office as a whole. I think that a personalized card to go with them is an excellent idea too. Health care professionals are generally NOT supposed to accept gifts of cash or cash equivalents (gift certificates, etc.) as these may be seen (whether truly or just by appearance) to influence their decisions or quality of care. "Consumable" gifts, however, may be accepted -- this also includes flowers, balloons, cards and such. You didn't mention whether this cardiologist works for a hospital or is in private practice -- if the former, the hospital *may* have some more specific policy regarding what sort of gifts you should or shouldn't give (in which case you could easily find out by placing a call to the main hospital switchboard without your doc knowing), but I can't imagine why they wouldn't consider cookies to be OK. Answered by Melanie Colon 1 month ago.

Yes it is life altering! I had the same procedure for the same problem in July and now I'm not afraid to get my heart rate past 100 by excercising or something. Before I was scared to even run for the bus! I still have atrial fib but the ablation even helped with that. So, I KNOW your gratitude....it's getting your life back! Go ahead & send cookies! Everyone loves postive feedback, especially if someone goes out of their way to let you know how they feel. Just be sure to leave your name on the box of cookies so he knows it's not some sort of prank. And congratulations on your new lease on life!! Answered by Marchelle Frederic 1 month ago.

I think a really nice veggie tray would be even better. I work with cardiologists, and they would prefer a healthy snack instead of a sugar one. I'm sure they will enjoy and appreciate the cookies if you do send them, but receiving a healthy tray will indicate to them that you understand that a healthy lifestyle is key......and besides, I LOVE those veggie trays Answered by Fonda Plumley 1 month ago.

ANything you do, cookies, a card, will be welcome and enjoyed. Often times medical personel are blamed if something goes wrong and ignored if things go well. THey love sweets. Just be aware that anything eatable will proabably be shared with the entire staff and plan,, purchase, cook accordingly. Answered by Angelo Tarrance 1 month ago.

No. He is being well paid for his services by you and/or your insurance company. He is only doing his job. People need to stop worshiping doctors and maybe they will stop charging such ridiculous fees, c Answered by Nelida Nguyan 1 month ago.

Of course!! Maybe some flowers or a bottle of wine would be nice. Make it personal and thoughtful. Answered by Rod Musselman 1 month ago.

send a card instead with a brief note expressing your gratitude, this is a better, more simple and classy way of doing what you wish to accomplish. :D Answered by Glenn Lanze 1 month ago.

Send him a pack of ciggaretes. Answered by Gwenda Schroyer 1 month ago.


I have Supraventricular Tachycardia and now they found PVC's - isn't this combination dangerous???
I had my first episode of SVT a little more than a year ago - 210 bpm - and was hospitalized. Since, I have had four more, about 4 months apart. I have always had the symptoms of the PVC's once I had the SVT episode, but assumed it was a part of SVT. The SVT is controlled by medication, but the PVC's have... Asked by Patrice Binger 1 month ago.

I had my first episode of SVT a little more than a year ago - 210 bpm - and was hospitalized. Since, I have had four more, about 4 months apart. I have always had the symptoms of the PVC's once I had the SVT episode, but assumed it was a part of SVT. The SVT is controlled by medication, but the PVC's have persisted and worsened. They keep me up at night when they are bad and I feel a very uncomfortable "squeezing" sensation in my chest - at worst I have pain and dizziness with memory "blanks" and inability to think clearly. I wore a monitor for 24 hours and have yet to hear back on it - but the stress test clearly showed PVC's in the doctor's office. I was told it was benign, but they are so extremely uncomfortable I am concerned. Answered by Guillermina Huett 1 month ago.

I had the same thing as you. When I walked into the ER, my heart rate was 240 and stuck there for about an hour when they whipped out this drug called Adenocard. They started an IV and put in in really fast. My heart stopped for about 5 seconds then came back into a normal sinus rythm. My heartbeat too was contolled on medications for about 10 yrs then suddenly, I was in the ER about 4 times in a year and decided I had to do something about it. You need to see and cardiologist who specializes in electrophysiolgy. He will tell you if you are in need of specialized treatment. It will also give you some peace of mind to know your going to be ok. Answered by Cecille Blander 1 month ago.

I am so sorry that you are going through this. My prayers are with you. Just remember, whenever you have any questions concerning your health ask your doctor. That's what he or she is there for. If you don't take care about yourself and take charge of your life no one will. Best wishes, sweetie. Answered by Anisa Ports 1 month ago.

Hell yea did they not explain this to you. Answered by Tyrell Augusto 1 month ago.


Is there Homapathy remedies for Wpw and SVT?
WPW and SVT are heart conditions and I was wondering if anyone with experience of either of these conditions have used homepath remedies? Asked by Stephane Fritzpatrick 1 month ago.

Svt Emedicine Answered by Luci Schellhorn 1 month ago.

3 & 5 are brill , you ould hve asked these 1 at a time , i would have given you 2 stars Answered by Margo Mcglathery 1 month ago.

Homeopathic "medicines" are just water. So drink a glass of filtered tap water - it's the same thing and MUCH cheaper. Answered by Raina Vignola 1 month ago.


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