ADEFOVIR DIPIVOXIL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 202051/001.

Names and composition

"ADEFOVIR DIPIVOXIL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ADEFOVIR DIPIVOXIL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
202051/001 ADEFOVIR DIPIVOXIL ADEFOVIR DIPIVOXIL TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
202051/001 ADEFOVIR DIPIVOXIL ADEFOVIR DIPIVOXIL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
021449/001 HEPSERA ADEFOVIR DIPIVOXIL TABLET/ORAL 10MG

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Answered questions

Is this tablet "ADEFOVIR" more effective then zeffix for HBV?
please tell me 4 different tablets for HB Virus. actually i have HB Virus my doctor gave me zeffix starting two months.but now (3rd month )he changed tablets, and gave me adefovir. please...... Asked by Alphonse Machen 1 month ago.

In many cases, yes. It's difficult to say because everyone is different. Adefovir is the newer Rx compared to Zeffix. I can't say why your doctor would switch you with only a 2-3 month period on it unless there was no improvement (you may be resistant). I've not dealt with that Rx personally, but from what I've read alone, it leads one to believe that Adefovir may be more potent than Zeffix. Zeffix can be taken by children, Adefovir is still in clinical testing for childrens' use. If you want to look into them, currently there are seven medications approved to treat HBV. Interferon Alpha Pegylated Interferon Lamivudine (Zeffix) Adefovir Dipivoxil Entecavir Telbivudine Tenofovir From what I've read, Tenofovir seems to be stronger than Adefovir. I'm sure your doctor is considering a number of things when prescribing which to take, including your age, physical status, any other medications/conditions, etc. But on a side note, if you look at all the info and still aren't put at ease, I'd call the doctor and ask. :) I'm sure they will be more than happy to explain why they switched your Rx. I'll post a few links that may answer some questions about the meds. Just be sure to stay in 'close' contact with your doctor if your symptoms change at all. This will let them know if it is indeed working or if you need to come in. Adefovir is a serious Rx and should be monitored closely. :) I hope this helps & Live well. :) Answered by Antoinette Cotner 1 month ago.


I have a chronic hepa b,what will hapen to me???
i was diagnosed with cronic hepa b during my medical examination for a certain job.,what do u think i should do??.,what will happen to me??.,will i be a carrier fore ever?? Asked by Elise Iniestra 1 month ago.

First things first. You have to find out if you indeed have chronic Hep B! They usually have a PERSISTENT HbsAg (hepatitis B surface antigen) after six months. If you do have persistent HbsAg...then you have chronic Hepatitis B. You will need treatment. If you do not HbsAg and instead has HbsAb (hepatitis B surface antibody) then you do not have chronic Hepatitis B. You have resolved acute hepatitisB. You don't need treatment. Treatment for chronic hep B and C are DIFFERENT!! As the approach to chronic Hep C is by Peg Intron and Ribavirin. Chronic Hep B is treated with either Lamivudine, adefovir, tenofovir or entecavir. They are all oral medications. Untreated Chronic Hep B...a small percentage will develop LIVER CIRRHOSIS and another small percentage will develop Hepatocellular carcinoma (Hepatic cancer). The risk of developing above complications is doubled with the use of alcohol. Answered by Gregg Petr 1 month ago.

Chronic hepatitis can develop over a number of years without the patient ever having acute hepatitis or even feeling sick. As the liver repairs itself, fibrous tissue develops, much like a scar forms after a cut or injury to the skin heals. Advanced scarring of the liver is called cirrhosis. Over time, cirrhosis irreversibly damages the liver, eventually ending in liver failure. But if you've got someone with a close blood type, they can donate half of their liver to you, and eventually it'll grow whole and become a brand new liver. Also, I'm not sure if this'll work, but after you get a new liver get the vaccination. Yes there is such a thing - that'll prevent hepB in the future. Good luck. One more thing.. American Doctors are quacks. See another one and get tested because I've been misdiagnosed on more than 3 occasions for very simple things I ended up solving myself. Answered by Sid Redlinger 1 month ago.

yes, you will be a carrier forever. i would ask about treatment since your infection is chronic. you may qualify for study trials with medications . the newest treatment they have been studying for hbv infection is what those are put on who have hepatitis c infection- ' treatment is called antiviral chemotherapy, usually consists of alpha interferon and ribavirin. ask your doctor what you can do. also, having hep b should not prevent you from working in any field! Answered by Merissa Paulhus 1 month ago.

one is you need to see a doctor first and confirm the findings you could get very ill and it might not do anything for years ask a doctor Answered by Collen Issa 1 month ago.

this isn't something you should ask on yahoo answers, many people will tell you things that will scare you and are probably incorrect. See a medical specialist. Answered by Lindsy Araneo 1 month ago.

You don't have much time left :( Answered by Madeline Oldroyd 1 month ago.


Does anyone know the latest treatments for Hepatitis B?
My Fiancée was just diagnosed with Hepatitis B, she lives in the Philippines. What is the latest therapy available for treating this deadly disease? There are ways, I am sure, to arrest and/or even reverse the damage the Hepatitis B virus causes. What are they? The more information you can give the better. Thanks Asked by Tomas Fickling 1 month ago.

If you know you've been exposed to hepatitis B virus, call your doctor immediately. Receiving an injection of hepatitis B immune globulin within 24 hours of coming in contact with the virus may help protect you from developing hepatitis B. You should also receive the first in a series of three shots of the hepatitis B vaccine. Once you've developed chronic hepatitis B, few treatment options exist. In some cases — especially if you don't have signs and symptoms or liver damage — your doctor may suggest monitoring, rather than treating, your condition. In other cases, your doctor may recommend treatment with antiviral medications. When liver damage is severe, liver transplantation may be the only option. Drug therapies Doctors use five drugs to treat chronic HBV infection Interferon. Your body naturally produces interferon to help protect against invading organisms such as viruses. Taking additional interferon that has been made in a laboratory may stimulate your body's immune response to HBV and help prevent the virus from replicating in your cells. Not everyone is a candidate for treatment with interferon. In a few cases, interferon eliminates the virus completely, although the infection can later return. Interferon has a number of side effects — many of which resemble signs and symptoms of hepatitis B. These include depression, fatigue, muscle pains, body aches, fever and nausea. Signs and symptoms are usually worse during the first two weeks of treatment and in the first four to six hours after receiving an injection of interferon. A more serious side effect that may occur over time is a decreased production of red blood cells. Two interferon medications are available — interferon alfa-2b (Intron A) and peginterferon alfa-2a (Pegasys). Intron A is given by injection several times a week. Pegasys is given by injection once a week. Telbivudine (Tyzeka). This antiviral medication helps prevent HBV from replicating in your cells. It's taken in pill form once a day and has almost no side effects for up to a year. Studies show telbivudine is more effective than are other common treatments such as lamivudine and adefovir dipivoxil. However, you can experience a severe worsening of symptoms when you stop taking the drug. And telbivudine can cause a drug-resistant form of HBV, particularly when taken as a long-term treatment. Entecavir (Baraclude). This antiviral medication is taken once a day in pill form. Studies comparing Baraclude with lamivudine found Baraclude to be more effective. Baraclude may cause serious worsening of symptoms when the drug is stopped. Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV). This older antiviral medication is similar to telbivudine, though slightly less strong. It's usually taken in pill form once a day. Side effects during treatment are generally minimal, but you may experience a severe worsening of symptoms when you stop taking the drug. Lamivudine can also cause a drug-resistant form of HBV, particularly when taken as a long-term treatment. Tell your doctor if you have kidney problems or a history of pancreatitis before starting this medication. If you experience worsening jaundice or any unusual bruising, bleeding or fatigue while taking lamivudine, call your doctor right away. Adefovir dipivoxil (Hepsera). This drug, taken in pill form once daily, also helps prevent HBV from replicating in your cells. An added benefit is that it's effective in people who are resistant to lamivudine. Like lamivudine, side effects during treatment usually are minimal, but symptoms may worsen when you go off the medication. And Hepsera may cause kidney problems. Liver transplantation When your liver has been severely damaged, a liver transplant may be an option. The encouraging news is that these transplants are increasingly successful. Unfortunately, not enough donor organs are available for every person who needs a transplant. Answered by Agnus Heit 1 month ago.

There is a treatment out there called 'o-zone', it clears your body of toxins and even hepatitis. It is used by Anthony Kiedis of Red Hot Chilli Peppers. It is illegal in some countries though and can be difficult to obtain. Another answer is the oral drugs administered by your local health clinic or even a form of chemotherapy. Answered by Alisia Riesgraf 1 month ago.

They have been using antiviral chemotherapy for HBV with some success. It will consist of time released interferon and an oral antiviral medication such as ribavirin. You can call the American Liver Foundation to find out more or visit their website! :o) Answered by Candi Mok 1 month ago.


What is viral hepatitis and how do you get it?
Asked by Tenesha Hebden 1 month ago.

Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver. Several different viruses cause viral hepatitis. They are named the hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E viruses. All of these viruses cause acute, or short-term, viral hepatitis. The hepatitis B, C, and D viruses can also cause chronic hepatitis, in which the infection is prolonged, sometimes lifelong. Other viruses may also cause hepatitis, but they have yet to be discovered and they are obviously rare causes of the disease. Symptoms of Viral Hepatitis Symptoms include jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes) fatigue abdominal pain loss of appetite nausea vomiting diarrhea low grade fever headache However, some people do not have symptoms. Hepatitis A Disease Spread Primarily through food or water contaminated by feces from an infected person. Rarely, it spreads through contact with infected blood. People at Risk International travelers; people living in areas where hepatitis A outbreaks are common; people who live with or have sex with an infected person; and, during outbreaks, day care children and employees, men who have sex with men, and injection drug users. Prevention The hepatitis A vaccine; also, avoiding tap water when traveling internationally and practicing good hygiene and sanitation. Treatment Hepatitis A usually resolves on its own over several weeks. Hepatitis B Disease Spread Through contact with infected blood, through sex with an infected person, and from mother to child during childbirth. People at Risk People who have sex with an infected person, men who have sex with men, injection drug users, children of immigrants from disease-endemic areas, infants born to infected mothers, people who live with an infected person, health care workers, hemodialysis patients, people who received a transfusion of blood or blood products before July 1992 or clotting factors made before 1987, and international travelers. Prevention The hepatitis B vaccine. Treatment For chronic hepatitis B: drug treatment with alpha interferon, peginterferon, lamivudine, or adefovir dipivoxil. Acute hepatitis B usually resolves on its own. Very severe cases can be treated with lamivudine. Hepatitis C Disease Spread Primarily through contact with infected blood; less commonly, through sexual contact and childbirth. People at Risk Injection drug users, people who have sex with an infected person, people who have multiple sex partners, health care workers, infants born to infected women, hemodialysis patients, and people who received a transfusion of blood or blood products before July 1992 or clotting factors made before 1987. Prevention There is no vaccine for hepatitis C; the only way to prevent the disease is to reduce the risk of exposure to the virus. This means avoiding behaviors like sharing drug needles or sharing personal items like toothbrushes, razors, and nail clippers with an infected person. Treatment Chronic hepatitis C: drug treatment with peginterferon alone or combination treatment with peginterferon and the drug ribavirin. Acute hepatitis C: treatment is recommended if it does not resolve within 2 to 3 months. Hepatitis D Disease Spread Through contact with infected blood. This disease occurs only in people who are already infected with hepatitis B. People at Risk Anyone infected with hepatitis B: Injection drug users who have hepatitis B have the highest risk. People who have hepatitis B are also at risk if they have sex with a person infected with hepatitis D or if they live with an infected person. Also at risk are people who received a transfusion of blood or blood products before July 1992 or clotting factors made before 1987. Prevention Immunization against hepatitis B for those not already infected; also, avoiding exposure to infected blood, contaminated needles, and an infected person's personal items (toothbrush, razor, nail clippers). Treatment Chronic hepatitis D: drug treatment with alpha interferon. Hepatitis E Disease Spread Through food or water contaminated by feces from an infected person. This disease is uncommon in the United States. People at Risk International travelers; people living in areas where hepatitis E outbreaks are common; and people who live or have sex with an infected person. Prevention There is no vaccine for hepatitis E; the only way to prevent the disease is to reduce the risk of exposure to the virus. This means avoiding tap water when traveling internationally and practicing good hygiene and sanitation. Treatment Hepatitis E usually resolves on its own over several weeks to months. Other Causes of Viral Hepatitis Some cases of viral hepatitis cannot be attributed to the hepatitis A, B, C, D, or E viruses. This is called non A-E hepatitis. Scientists continue to study the causes of non A-E hepatitis. Hope Through Research The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, through its Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, supports basic and clinical research into the nature and transmission of the hepatitis viruses, and the activation and mechanisms of the immune system. Results from these studies are used in developing new treatments and methods of prevention. For More Information American Liver Foundation (ALF) 75 Maiden Lane, Suite 603 New York, NY 10038–4810 Phone: 1–800–GO–LIVER (465–4837), 1–888–4HEP–USA (443–7872), or 212–668–1000 Fax: 212–483–8179 Email: [email protected] Internet: www.liverfoundation.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Viral Hepatitis 1600 Clifton Road Mail Stop C-14 Atlanta, GA 30333 Phone: 1–800–443–7232 or 404–371–5900 Email: [email protected] Internet: www.cdc.gov/hepatitis Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) 504 Blick Drive Silver Spring, MD 20904–2901 Phone: 1–800–891–0707 or 301–622–4200 Fax: 301–622–4702 Email: [email protected] Internet: www.hepatitisfoundation.org Answered by Raisa Knatt 1 month ago.

Hepatitis A and E are spread through dirty water or contaminated food. Both of these cause temporary inflammation of the liver and are usually (but not always) self-limited. They are mostly a problem for little kids and pregnant women. Hepatitis B and C are blood borne illnesses and can be transmitted through unprotected sex, needle sharing, (iv drug use, unclean tattoo parlors) and unsafe blood transfusions. Both B and C cause acute and chronic liver inflammation which can progress to cirrhosis and liver failure as well as cancer. Hepatitis D you can only get if you already have Hepatitis B, but it makes it much worse, and increases your chances for both liver failure and liver cancer. Answered by Milagro Barayuga 1 month ago.

There are several types of Hepatitis A-E What type you referring to? www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/hepatitis/... Answered by Hye Olvey 1 month ago.

you put your mouth somewhere real dirty. Answered by Micheal Verrill 1 month ago.


PLEASE HELP! i was told i have hepatitis B today. How serious is it? and what about my boyfriend we are?
sexual active and use no protection? please answer! im scared. Asked by Kiara Henkensiefken 1 month ago.

What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a liver disease. Hepatitis (HEP-ah-TY-tis) makes your liver swell and stops it from working right. You need a healthy liver. The liver does many things to keep you alive. The liver fights infections and stops bleeding. It removes drugs and other poisons from your blood. The liver also stores energy for when you need it. What causes hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is caused by a virus. A virus is a germ that causes sickness. (For example, the flu is caused by a virus.) People can pass viruses to each other. The virus that causes hepatitis B is called the hepatitis B virus. How could I get hepatitis B? Hepatitis B spreads by contact with an infected person's blood, semen, or other body fluid. You could get hepatitis B by having sex with an infected person without using a condom sharing drug needles having a tattoo or body piercing done with dirty tools that were used on someone else getting pricked with a needle that has infected blood on it (health care workers can get hepatitis B this way) living with someone who has hepatitis B sharing a toothbrush or razor with an infected person traveling to countries where hepatitis B is common An infected woman can give hepatitis B to her baby at birth. You can NOT get hepatitis B by shaking hands with an infected person hugging an infected person sitting next to an infected person What are the symptoms? Hepatitis B can make you feel like you have the flu. You might feel tired feel sick to your stomach have a fever not want to eat have stomach pain have diarrhea Some people have dark yellow urine light-colored stools yellowish eyes and skin Some people don’t have any symptoms. If you have symptoms or think you might have hepatitis B, go to a doctor. What are the tests for hepatitis B? To check for hepatitis B, the doctor will test your blood. These tests show if you have hepatitis B and how serious it is. The doctor will take some blood to check for hepatitis B. The doctor may also do a liver biopsy. A biopsy (BYE-op-see) is a simple test. The doctor removes a tiny piece of your liver through a needle. The doctor checks the piece of liver for signs of hepatitis B and liver damage. How is hepatitis B treated? Treatment for hepatitis B may involve A drug called interferon (in-ter-FEAR-on). It is given through shots. Most people are treated for 4 months. A drug called lamivudine (la-MIV-you-deen). You take it by mouth once a day. Treatment is usually for one year. Hepatitis B is treated through shots of medicine. A drug called adefovir dipivoxil (uh-DEH-foh-veer dih-pih-VOX-ill). You take it by mouth once a day. Treatment is usually for one year. Surgery. Over time, hepatitis B may cause your liver to stop working. If that happens, you will need a new liver. The surgery is called a liver transplant. It involves taking out the old, damaged liver and putting in a new, healthy one from a donor. How can I protect myself? You can get the hepatitis B vaccine. A vaccine is a drug that you take when you are healthy that keeps you from getting sick. Vaccines teach your body to attack certain viruses, like the hepatitis B virus. The hepatitis B vaccine is given through three shots. All babies should get the vaccine. Infants get the first shot within 12 hours after birth. They get the second shot at age 1 to 2 months and the third shot between ages 6 and 18 months. Older children and adults can get the vaccine, too. They get three shots over 6 months. Children who have not had the vaccine should get it. You need all of the shots to be protected. If you are traveling to other countries, make sure you get all the shots before you go. If you miss a shot, call your doctor or clinic right away to set up a new appointment. Vaccines protect you from getting hepatitis B. You can also protect yourself and others from hepatitis B if you People who touch blood at work should wear gloves to protect themselves from hepatitis B. use a condom when you have sex don’t share drug needles with anyone wear gloves if you have to touch anyone’s blood don’t use an infected person’s toothbrush, razor, or anything else that could have blood on it make sure any tattooing or body piercing is done with clean tools Answered by Jerrica Schembri 1 month ago.

Topic Overview What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a virus that infects the liver. Most adults who get hepatitis B have it for a short time and then get better. This is called acute hepatitis B. You can have hepatitis B and not know it. You may not have symptoms. If you do, they can make you feel like you have the flu. But as long as you have the virus, you can spread it to others. Sometimes the virus causes a long-term infection, called chronic hepatitis B. Over time, it can damage your liver. Babies and young children infected with the virus are more likely to get chronic hepatitis B. What causes hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is caused by the hepatitis B virus. It is spread through contact with the blood and body fluids of an infected person. You may get hepatitis B if you: Have sex with an infected person without using a condom. Share needles (used for injecting drugs) with an infected person. Get a tattoo or piercing with tools that were not cleaned well. Share personal items like razors or toothbrushes with an infected person. A mother who has the virus can pass it to her baby during delivery. If you are pregnant and think you may have been exposed to hepatitis B, get tested. If you have the virus, your baby can get shots to help prevent infection with the virus. You cannot get hepatitis B from casual contact such as hugging, kissing, sneezing, coughing, or sharing food or drinks. What are the symptoms? Many people with hepatitis B do not know they have it, because they do not have symptoms. If you do have symptoms, you may just feel like you have the flu. Symptoms include: Feeling very tired. Mild fever. Headache. Not wanting to eat. Feeling sick to your stomach or vomiting. Belly pain. Diarrhea or constipation. Muscle aches and joint pain. Skin rash. Yellowish eyes and skin (jaundice). Jaundice usually appears only after other symptoms have started to go away. Most people with chronic hepatitis B have no symptoms. How is hepatitis B diagnosed? A simple blood test can tell your doctor if you have the hepatitis B virus now or if you had it in the past. Your doctor will also be able to tell if you have had the vaccine to prevent the virus. If your doctor thinks you may have liver damage from hepatitis B, he or she may use a needle to take a tiny sample of your liver for testing. This is called a liver biopsy. How is it treated? In most cases, hepatitis B goes away on its own. You can relieve your symptoms at home by resting, eating healthy foods, drinking plenty of water, and avoiding alcohol and drugs. Also, find out from your doctor what medicines and herbal products to avoid, because some can make liver damage caused by hepatitis B worse. Answered by Cherelle Schumucker 1 month ago.

Yeah, your boyfriend should probalby get tested. But from reading around, Hep B doesn't sound like such a bad thing. "Acute" Hep B sounds like just the flu or anything else and will go away after u get over it. But sometimes if your immune system struggles too much and can't beat it fast enough (like several months), it develops into "chronic" Hep B. That's the kind that will cause liver damage. Either way, you should start seeing a doctor about it and they can help you and treat you and find out if you need treatment. :) Oh, and don't be too nervous about telling your bf, sheesh, you could have got it from him. Good luck and you'll be fine. :) Answered by Janene Sialana 1 month ago.

OK. First you really need to call your doctor to have them explain it all to you! That's why they get paid the big bucks! the bad news, yes he should be tested for it as well as unprotected sex is one way to spread Hep B. The good news, Hep B is just a virus that some people get that is often "Cured" with out any treatment at all. Your bodies own immune system is generally strong enough to get rid of the virus on it's own. It's Hepatitis C that's bad news! Answered by Hassie Vitullo 1 month ago.

The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is very common worldwide, with more than 350 million people infected. Those with long term HBV are at high risk of developing liver cirrhosis or liver cancer. Hepatitis B is most frequently passed on through the exchange of bodily fluids with an infected person. HBV is estimated to be 50 to 100 times more infectious than HIV.1 HBV can be spread in the following ways: by unprotected (without a condom) penetrative sex (when the penis enters the anus, vagina or mouth) with someone who is infectious. Also by sex that draws blood with someone who is infected. by sharing contaminated needles or other drug-injecting equipment. by using non-sterilised equipment for tattooing, acupuncture or body piercing. from an infected mother to her baby, most commonly during delivery. Immunisation of the baby at birth prevents the transmission of hepatitis B. through a blood transfusion in a country where blood is not screened for blood-borne viruses such as HBV. Hepatitis B cannot be spread through sneezing, coughing, hugging or coming in contact with the faeces of someone who is infected. ***you should inform your partner, and have them tested! Good Luck, to you both! Answered by Ariel Stuttgen 1 month ago.

Transmission results from exposure to infectious blood or body fluids containing blood. Possible forms of transmission include (but are not limited to) unprotected sexual contact, blood transfusions, re-use of contaminated needles & syringes, and vertical transmission from mother to child during childbirth. Answered by Jason Needler 1 month ago.

you create this troubles by doing the wrong sex with you boy Friend, you must stay away from him for at Li's 10 months or over a year,you got this from using the same needle, or you do oral sex without first be clean. this is the majors problems with today's society, they doing sex before they Cline themselves, that is disgusting. be careful now from spreading this very bad diseases (virus) Answered by Deanna Gauwain 1 month ago.

Talk to a doctor first. Then, at least it's not C, because that's whats really bad. Answered by Amparo Pott 1 month ago.


Injections for cure of hepatits-b...are there any side effects..?
i have come to know that there are some type of injections available that can cure hepatits-b completely.But i have heared that they have side effects too and these injections are very costly too.the person given that injections lossed hairs from whole boady and also looses alomst 40% wieght.IS it true..??they... Asked by Claretta Thull 1 month ago.

i have come to know that there are some type of injections available that can cure hepatits-b completely.But i have heared that they have side effects too and these injections are very costly too.the person given that injections lossed hairs from whole boady and also looses alomst 40% wieght.IS it true..?? they cost alsomt 2.5 lac...are they available below tat cost.. pls help as i am suffering from this disease and wanna get curesd witihn nex 3 months. i will be very very thankful to those who helped me in gewtting fully cured within 3 months. Answered by Jacquelin Foree 1 month ago.

There are different stages of hepatitis B, and the majority of patients do not require treatments. There is an acute infection with hepatitis B. About 80% of people infected with hepatitis B have the acute infection which lasts for weeks, and then they clear the infection and would not have any further problems with hepatitis B in the future. Hepatitis B immunoglobulin (antibodies) can be given after a known exposure to hepatitis B (if not immunized) to prevent the acute hepatitis B infection. I don't think this is the injection you are talking about though. Treatment for acute hepatitis B is usually supportive care only. Rarely if it is severe then anti-viral therapy is considered in acute hepatitis. The other 20% of patients infected with hepatitis B do not clear the infection and go onto chronic hepatitis B. It is actually a little more complex than this, because the rate of going on to the chronic phase depends on the age of infection. For example, 90% of infants born with hepatitis B will go onto the chronic phase, 20-50% of individuals infected between ages 2-5 will go onto the chronic phase, and less than 5% of adults infected will go onto the chronic phase. Most patients with hepatitis B do not have symptoms. Some patients in the chronic phase are just carriers and do not have much liver damage. Other patients may have high viral loads and have progressive liver damage. The goal of treatment is to reduce the viral load, reduce liver damage to prevent progression to cirrhosis, and help the immune system clear the infection. Cure is usually not possible because even with therapy the virus may remain in the body. The decision to treat is determined by lab tests, including the degree of elevation of liver function tests, tests for liver function (PT/INR, albumin), whether certain markers of the virus are positive (Hepatitis B Surface Antigen and Hepatitis B E Antigen) and sometimes liver biopsy results. Usually a Hepatologist or Infectious Disease Physician evaluates these and determines if treatment should be started and the appropriate treatment for the individual. There are several treatments approved for chronic hepatitis B and I will discuss them. These treatments have been shown to reduce viral load, sometimes help clear the infection, but none of them technically "cure" hepatitis B. Response to therapy varies also. Pegylated Interferon (Pegasys) is given by injection once a week usually for six months to a year. The drug can cause side effects such as flu-like symptoms, headache, hair loss, fatigue, insomnia, nausea, diarrhea and depression. This is the only injection approved for Hepatitis B and it has the most side effects of the treatments available. It is also used with Ribavirin for hepatitis C. This is what your friend was probably taking. Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV, Zeffix, or Heptodin) is a pill that is taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common reported side effects include headache, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea and insomnia. Adefovir Dipivoxil (Hepsera) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common reported side effects are headache, abdominal pain, diarrhea, weakness, and worsening liver function within 12 weeks of discontinuing. Entecavir (Baraclude) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. Side effects are less common with this than the other treatments, but it can be associated with worsening liver tests when discontinued. Telbivudine (Tyzeka, Sebivo) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common side effects are headache and fatigue. Tenofovir (Viread) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common side effects reported are chest pain, other pain, nausea, diarrhea and weakness. As I said before, you need to discuss this with your doctor to determine if treatment is appropriate in your case and the best option in your case. Good luck to you. Answered by Madelene Reinholdt 1 month ago.


What medecine or treatment to get solution of hepatitis b?
what medecine or treatment to get solution of hepatitis b? Asked by Rosina Perkiss 1 month ago.

Lamivudine is one treatment for HBV, however the virus commonly becomes resistant to it and leads to disease progression. Adefovir dipivoxil is another treatment option, however virologic suppression is not optimal. A third drug, Entecavir, has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients who don’t respond to lamivudine. Answered by Burton Ganze 1 month ago.


I want a doctor that know about hapatitis b to explain this and recommend drug to be takin?
Specimen :bloodInvestigation:Prothombin time : 21secControl :15secRatio : 1.4I n r :1.65Platelet :135,000/mm3(150,000 – 400,000)P v c :35%(33 – 50)HBs Ag :positiveHBe Ag : negativeANTI-HBe : positiveANTI-HBc : positiveANTI-HCV : NEGATVES G O T ; 14u/l(0 – 12)S G P T :... Asked by Margit Victoria 1 month ago.

Specimen :blood Investigation: Prothombin time : 21sec Control :15sec Ratio : 1.4 I n r :1.65 Platelet :135,000/mm3(150,000 – 400,000) P v c :35%(33 – 50) HBs Ag :positive HBe Ag : negative ANTI-HBe : positive ANTI-HBc : positive ANTI-HCV : NEGATVE S G O T ; 14u/l(0 – 12) S G P T : 10u/l(0-12) ALK-PHOS : 29u/l(9 – 35) Abdominal scan Liver : the liver is normal in size with smooth outline and homogenous echogenicity.no focal lesion is seen. Gallbladder : the gallbladder is well defined with no stone in situ or thickened wall. The ductal systems are normal Pancreas : the pancreas is normal in outline and echogenicity the lesser sac are normal. No lesser sac mass is seen Spleen : the spleen is normal in size outline and echogenicity. Kidneys : right renal length = 111mm Left renal length = 119mm The capsules are smooth with well differtiated corticomedullary patterns. No ascites is seen no cyst, mass or focal lesion is seen. No para-aortic lymphadenopathy is seen. Impression :naormal study Answered by Brooke Riesenweber 1 month ago.

Your study is fairly normal except for the hepb results- and not enlarged liver or ascites- What I need to know about Hepatitis B On this page: What is hepatitis B? What causes hepatitis B? How could I get hepatitis B? What are the symptoms? What are the tests for hepatitis B? How is hepatitis B treated? How can I protect myself? For More Information Acknowledgments What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a liver disease. Hepatitis (HEP-ah-TY-tis) makes your liver swell and stops it from working right. You need a healthy liver. The liver does many things to keep you alive. The liver fights infections and stops bleeding. It removes drugs and other poisons from your blood. The liver also stores energy for when you need it. What causes hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is caused by a virus. A virus is a germ that causes sickness. (For example, the flu is caused by a virus.) People can pass viruses to each other. The virus that causes hepatitis B is called the hepatitis B virus. How could I get hepatitis B? Hepatitis B spreads by contact with an infected person's blood, semen, or other body fluid. You could get hepatitis B by having sex with an infected person without using a condom sharing drug needles having a tattoo or body piercing done with dirty tools that were used on someone else getting pricked with a needle that has infected blood on it (health care workers can get hepatitis B this way) living with someone who has hepatitis B sharing a toothbrush or razor with an infected person traveling to countries where hepatitis B is common An infected woman can give hepatitis B to her baby at birth or through her breast milk. You can NOT get hepatitis B by shaking hands with an infected person hugging an infected person sitting next to an infected person What are the symptoms? Hepatitis B can make you feel like you have the flu. You might feel tired feel sick to your stomach have a fever not want to eat have stomach pain have diarrhea Some people have dark yellow urine light-colored stools yellowish eyes and skin Some people don't have any symptoms. If you have symptoms or think you might have hepatitis B, go to a doctor. The doctor will take some blood to check for hepatitis B. What are the tests for hepatitis B? To check for hepatitis B, the doctor will test your blood. These tests show if you have hepatitis B and how serious it is. The doctor may also do a liver biopsy. A biopsy (BYE-op-see) is a simple test. The doctor removes a tiny piece of your liver through a needle. The doctor checks the piece of liver for signs of hepatitis B and liver damage. How is hepatitis B treated? Treatment for hepatitis B may involve Hepatitis B is treated through shots of medicine. A drug called interferon (in-ter-FEAR-on). It is given through shots. Most people are treated for 4 months. A drug called lamivudine (la-MIV-you-deen). You take it by mouth once a day. Treatment is usually for one year. A drug called adefovir dipivoxil (uh-DEH-foh-veer dih-pih-VOX-ill). You take it by mouth once a day. Treatment is usually for one year. Surgery. Over time, hepatitis B may cause your liver to stop working. If that happens, you will need a new liver. The surgery is called a liver transplant. It involves taking out the old, damaged liver and putting in a new, healthy one from a donor. How can I protect myself? (if you don't have the disease) You can get the hepatitis B vaccine. Vaccines protect you from getting hepatitis B. A vaccine is a drug that you take when you are healthy that keeps you from getting sick. Vaccines teach your body to attack certain viruses, like the hepatitis B virus. The hepatitis B vaccine is given through three shots. All babies should get the vaccine. Infants get the first shot within 12 hours after birth. They get the second shot at age 1 to 2 months and the third shot between ages 6 and 18 months. Older children and adults can get the vaccine, too. They get three shots over 6 months. Children who have not had the vaccine should get it. You need all of the shots to be protected. If you are traveling to other countries, make sure you get all the shots before you go. If you miss a shot, call your doctor or clinic right away to set up a new appointment. You can also protect yourself and others from hepatitis B if you People who touch blood at work should wear gloves to protect themselves from hepatitis B. use a condom when you have sex don't share drug needles with anyone wear gloves if you have to touch anyone's blood don't use an infected person's toothbrush, razor, or anything else that could have blood on it make sure any tattooing or body piercing is done with clean tools For More Information You can also get information about hepatitis B from these groups: American Liver Foundation (ALF) 75 Maiden Lane, Suite 603 New York, NY 10038–4810 Phone: 1–800–GO–LIVER (465–4837), 1–888–4HEP–USA (443–7872), or 212–668–1000 Fax: 212–483–8179 Email: [email protected] Internet: www.liverfoundation.org Hepatitis B Foundation 700 East Butler Avenue Doylestown, PA 18901–2697 Phone: 215–489–4900 Fax: 215–489–4920 Email: [email protected] Internet: www.hepb.org Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) 504 Blick Drive Silver Spring, MD 20904–2901 Phone: 1–800–891–0707 or 301–622–4200 Fax: 301–622–4702 Email: [email protected] Internet: www.hepfi.org There are other types of hepatitis. The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse also has booklets about hepatitis A and hepatitis C: What I need to know about Hepatitis A What I need to know about Hepatitis C You can get a free copy of each of these booklets by calling 1–800–891–5389 or by writing to NDDIC 2 Information Way Bethesda, MD 20892–3570 Hepatitis information for health professionals is also available. Acknowledgments The individuals listed here provided editorial guidance or facilitated field testing for this publication. The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse would like to thank these individuals for their contribution. Bruce Bacon, M.D. Chair, Education Committee American Liver Foundation New York, NY Luby Garza-Abijaoude, M.S., R.D., L.D. Texas Department of Health Austin, TX Thelma Thiel, R.N., B.A. Hepatitis Foundation International Cedar Grove, NJ --------------------------------------... National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse 2 Information Way Bethesda, MD 20892–3570 Email: [email protected] The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Established in 1980, the Clearinghouse provides information about digestive diseases to people with digestive disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. The NDDIC answers inquiries, develops and distributes publications, and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about digestive diseases. Publications produced by the Clearinghouse are carefully reviewed by both NIDDK scientists and outside experts. This publication is not copyrighted. The Clearinghouse encourages users of this publication to duplicate and distribute as many copies as desired. --------------------------------------... NIH Publication No. 04–4228 December 2003 Answered by Na Colombe 1 month ago.

Take those Homeopathic Remedies within the given dosage and you are going to be cured with none aspect results or headaches :- a million.SULFUR 30 two.BRYONIA 30 three.CARDUUS MARIANUS in Q (Mother Tincture) four.CHELIDONIUM MAJUS in Q (Mother Tincture) five.LYCOPODIUM 1M(one thousand) Take alleviation a million and a pair of 3 times an afternoon part hour earlier than foods adopted by way of 20 drops each and every of three and four part hour after foods in combination in a part a cup of sizzling water and take five after every week of taking the above more often than not only one dose every week. Avoid Chocolates, Coffee, Mints and Red Meat at the same time taking Homeopathic Medicines and avert all foodstuffs, which offers you constipation in any respect expenses. If there's any ambiguity approximately the dosage or the efficiency of the remedy please question me earlier than doing whatever. And preserve me published approximately your growth a minimum of each 3 days. It could be larger if you happen to ship me the main points of the sufferer precisely the way in which she or he feels now not the medical professionals Diagnosis permit the sufferer describe their possess feeling precisely the way in which they're feeling the above will transparent all in spite of everything however it could be plenty larger if you happen to ship entire main points. Take Care and God Bless you! Answered by Quentin Herpolsheimer 1 month ago.

You have an active infection. So far It has not gotten bad. It will probably pass. They might give antivirals, but I'm not sure. The big question is how do you feel. Answered by Silvana Jackso 1 month ago.


Treatment for Hepatitis B?
Asked by Ines Larriviere 1 month ago.

There are four medications currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of active hepatitis B infection. * Alfa Interferon (Brand names: INTRON A, INFERGEN, ROFERON): Interferon is an antiviral agent with antiproliferative and immunomodulatory agent that is administered by subcutaneous injection daily or three times per week, for 12-16 weeks or longer. With adequate teaching, the injections can easily be administered at home by patients. High pretreatment ALT and lower levels of HBV DNA are the most important predictors of response to alfa interferon therapy. Virologic response to alfa interferon occurs in less than 10 percent of patients with normal ALT. A sustained response can be seen in 15 - 30 percent of patients with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B and less than half of the responders show sustained clearance of HBsAg. Side Effects: Depression – this is more commonly seen in patients with a prior history of depression. Muscle aches, fatigue, and low grade fevers are common and may be minimized by taking Tylenol (acetaminophen). Occasionally, patients may develop low white blood cell count, headaches, irritability, and thyroid dysfunction. Underlying autoimmune disorders may also be unmasked. * b) Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV, 3TC): inhibits hepatitis B viral DNA synthesis. It should be taken orally, once daily. It is approved for use in adults and children and is usually tolerated well. Occasionally, it may cause a rise in the liver enzyme ALT. Pretreatment ALT is an important predictor of response, with HBeAg conversion occurring in over a third of patients when the ALT is greater than five times normal. While Lamivudine benefits patients with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B, the vast majority of patients relapse once treatment is stopped. * Adefovir dipivoxil (Hepsera): inhibits DNA polymerase activity and reverse transcriptase. This drug is administered orally on a daily basis and is typically well tolerated. It can be associated with kidney dysfunction, particularly if used in high doses. The optimal duration of therapy is not yet clear. About 50 - 60 percent of HBeAg positive and negative hepatitis B patients respond to this medication; data regarding the durability of response is awaited. * Baraclude (Entecavir): is the latest drug approved by the FDA for treatment of chronic hepatitis B. It works by inhibiting the function of Hepatitis B virus polymerase. Side effects include headache, fatigue, dizziness, nausea, and transient elevation in liver enzymes. This drug is taken orally, once daily and the optimal duration of therapy is not yet established. In patients with severe liver dysfunction, a liver transplant may be required. Answered by Gabriel Grays 1 month ago.

each of the 4 treatments the previous poster listed are phenomenally expensive so let's hope you got great insurance also, not everyone with hepatitis b requires treatment. there are multiple stages of the disease some people have a chronic but inactive disease, and this requires no treatment i believe, but not sure those with active hep b (as indicated by high viral loads from a PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test are candidates for treatment anyone with hep b or hep c should absolutely not be drinking any alcohol of any kind. the risk for developing liver cancer (HCC, or hepatocellular carcinoma) is exponentially increased if you do and anyone with hepatitis already has a much higher relative risk of liver cancer than those without hep Answered by Janay Wente 1 month ago.

A pedometer can help keep an eye on your steps. If you're definitely not getting 10, 000 steps a day, you're not moving enough. Answered by Emile Calnimptewa 1 month ago.

Natural applesauce is a good dip for fruits such because bananas and melons. Answered by Vicki Durkins 1 month ago.

Tired of eating your salad on the plate? Fill a whole wheat pita with salad as well as a splash of lemon for any twist. Answered by Joella Beccue 1 month ago.

Never eat any snack food from the box, carton or bag it came in. You're less gonna overeat if you separate snack foods into appropriate fist-sized servings. Answered by Susanne Coghill 1 month ago.

this is not a question - cut and paste it in your search and you will find answers - if you meant is there treatment for hep the answer is yes Answered by Cris Suns 1 month ago.

Natural applesauce is a wonderful dip for fruits such while bananas and melons. Answered by Carrol Nayar 1 month ago.


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