ADALAT CC Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020198/001.

Names and composition

"ADALAT CC" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NIFEDIPINE.

Answered questions

Has anyone ever taken Adalat cc?
It's a medicine that treats high blood pressure and is pregnancy safe. How was it? Did you experience side effects? Please let me know. Thanks. Asked by Rochelle Gauntlett 6 months ago.

Medicines and their possible side effects can affect individual people in different ways. The following are some of the side effects that are known to be associated with this medicine. Because a side effect is stated here, it does not mean that all people using this medicine will experience that or any side effect. * Headache * Flushing * Dizziness * Disturbances of the gut such as diarrhoea, constipation, nausea, vomiting, indigestion or abdominal pain * Swollen ankles caused by fluid retention (peripheral oedema) * Tiredness * Awareness of your heart beat (heart palpitations) * Increased heart rate (tachycardia) * Shaking, usually of the hands (tremor) * Skin reactions such as rash, sweating or itching * Visual disturbances * Increased need to pass urine * Impotence * Depression * Pain in the muscles (myalgia) * Pins and needles sensations (paraesthesia) * Abnormal enlargement of breasts in men (gynaecomastia) * Enlargement of the gums (gingival hyperplasia) The side effects listed above may not include all of the side effects reported by the drug's manufacturer. For more information about any other possible risks associated with this medicine, please read the information provided with the medicine or consult your doctor or pharmacist. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine whether it is safe for you to continue taking Adalat or Adalat XL. * More common side effects may include: Constipation, cough, dizziness, fatigue, flushing, giddiness, headache, heartburn, heat sensation, light-headedness, mood changes, muscle cramps, nasal congestion, nausea, sore throat, swelling of arms, legs, hands, and feet, tremors, wheezing Answered by Kori Sotos 6 months ago.

Anytime you are pregnant and on meds, you need to consult your doctor ASAP. Some medications are dangerous to the baby and, therefore, have to be stopped for the duration of pregnancy. Answered by Stefany Biderman 6 months ago.


Has anyone ever taken Adalat cc for high blood pressure during pregnancy?
My doctor prescribed this medicine for me for my blood pressure and because I'll be conceiving soon and this medicine is pregnancy safe. How was the medicine during pregnancy and did you experience any side effects? Asked by Claudia Bulock 6 months ago.

Medicines and their possible side effects can affect individual people in different ways. The following are some of the side effects that are known to be associated with this medicine. Because a side effect is stated here, it does not mean that all people using this medicine will experience that or any side effect. * Headache * Flushing * Dizziness * Disturbances of the gut such as diarrhoea, constipation, nausea, vomiting, indigestion or abdominal pain * Swollen ankles caused by fluid retention (peripheral oedema) * Tiredness * Awareness of your heart beat (heart palpitations) * Increased heart rate (tachycardia) * Shaking, usually of the hands (tremor) * Skin reactions such as rash, sweating or itching * Visual disturbances * Increased need to pass urine * Impotence * Depression * Pain in the muscles (myalgia) * Pins and needles sensations (paraesthesia) * Abnormal enlargement of breasts in men (gynaecomastia) * Enlargement of the gums (gingival hyperplasia) The side effects listed above may not include all of the side effects reported by the drug's manufacturer. For more information about any other possible risks associated with this medicine, please read the information provided with the medicine or consult your doctor or pharmacist. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine whether it is safe for you to continue taking Adalat or Adalat XL. * More common side effects may include: Constipation, cough, dizziness, fatigue, flushing, giddiness, headache, heartburn, heat sensation, light-headedness, mood changes, muscle cramps, nasal congestion, nausea, sore throat, swelling of arms, legs, hands, and feet, tremors, wheezing Answered by Dalton Botras 6 months ago.

Keep this particular meal between 400 and 1000 calories. Serve yourself a scaled-down portion, so if you like going back for seconds, you'll just finish up eating a normal-size portion. Answered by Cheree Wehrenberg 6 months ago.

Keep this kind of meal between 400 and 600 calories. Serve yourself a smaller portion, so if you like coming back again for seconds, you'll just find yourself eating a normal-size portion. Answered by Pasty Milar 6 months ago.

Music makes you eat more. According to a study by the journal Psychology and also Marketing, soft, classical tunes encourage that you take time over your meal, so you consume more meal. So, switch off – silence could make you more aware of what you’re putting in your mouth. Answered by Lucina Woudenberg 6 months ago.

Purchase smaller plates. Little crockery means portion control is a lot easier – those diminutive amounts suddenly look huge and you’ll be happier to consume less. Answered by Jeniffer Gamero 6 months ago.

It’s Friday brunch time and you just can’t stop going back pertaining to seconds. But hang on! Stop for just a minute and suck on an extra strong mint. The flavour can put you off that next plate of chicken korma/roast beef/sushi medley. Answered by Glendora Gasparino 6 months ago.

Nosh on baked carrot chips as opposed to greasy potato chips. Answered by Marie Randlett 6 months ago.

Bask in the sunshine. Just 20 minutes of Vitamin D absorption each day will boost your ability to loose weight. Answered by Johanne Dukart 6 months ago.

Get back to basics – burn more calorie consumption than you ingest. Answered by Venetta Busico 6 months ago.

Add veggies to baked goods. You'll never even taste the zucchini in these brownies or the sweet potato in these kinds of cookies. Answered by Frankie Ukosata 6 months ago.


Is Nifedipine (Procardia XL, Adalat, Adalat CC) OK to use to stop contractions.?
My girlfriend was givin Nifedipine to stop contractions at almost 8 months pregnant. I looked up the medicine and it said it was for heart problems and I was wondering is it ok? Asked by Jacquelyne Behran 6 months ago.

NO!!! ABSOLUTELY NOT!!! STOP HER THAT KIND OF MEDICATION IS WAY TO STRONG FOR A PREGNANT WOMAN ITS NOT FOR CONTRACTIONS IT A MEDICATION FOR HEART FAILURE IT CAN ACT AS DEADLY AS RAT POISEN TO YOUR CHILD I KNOW THIS I STUDY IT STOP AS SOON AS POSSILBE AND QUESTION YOUR DOCTORS MOTIVE I MEAN SOME DOCTORS ARE JUST TO LAZY TO DO A HOURS RESEARCH ANDD PROVIDE THE PREVAILING PAIN MEDICATION BUT THAT CAN COST U YOUR GIRLFRIEND AND HER BABY/YOU YOUR FAMILY GOODLUCK SWEET Answered by Scottie Fauble 6 months ago.

You are right in that Procardia is a cardiac medication. It is classified as a pregnancy catagory C; which means that adverse effects have been shown in animals, but there isn't enough data in pregnant women. In this case the MD has to weigh the risks vs. the benefits. That being said, Procardia is used very frequently in pregnant women to stop preterm contractions, because it is usually very effective at doing that, and no adverse outcomes have been proven. Answered by Cecille Aprigliano 6 months ago.

Don't know for sure. It is pregnancy category C. But her doc would know if it's used for this. Answered by Lorie Mruczek 6 months ago.


Gf went into labor early?
my gf was having contractions every 6 min they gave her adalat cc and it just slowed them down and they had to give her another now today shes starting to feel them again but not as bad could she go back into labor again shes 35 weeks? Asked by Stefany Sibbald 6 months ago.

IF SHE HAS THE BABY THE BABY WILL BE MORE THAN LIKELY OK JUST MAKE SURE THAT THEY GIVE HER THE IV STEROIDS FOR YOU BABY'S UNDER DEVELOPED LUNGS Answered by Stella Humiston 6 months ago.

35 weeks is not too terribly early. Your baby will be fine if born early...it's possible that the baby will need to be in NICU for a couple of weeks if there are any breathing issues. If your girlfriend thinks she is going into labor again, she should go to the hospital right away, just to be safe...it would not be good to accidentally have a home birth at 35 weeks. Answered by Latia Baugher 6 months ago.

Yes, she could go into labor and deliver the baby. But not to worry, 35 weeks is pretty good. My daughter was two days shy of 35 weeks and was just fine. She could breathe, roomed in with me and came home when I did. Answered by Shauna Lazor 6 months ago.

You should go down to the hospital and get her evaluated again. I've also got pre-term contractions, and I was told anytime I got more than 4 an hour, or if they were coming regularly, to go to the hospital. At 35 weeks, your doctor may decide to go ahead and deliver. I'm at 32 weeks, and my doctor said she'll be happy if I can make it to at least 35 weeks before I deliver. Answered by Zenaida Kirschenbaum 6 months ago.

yes she can the will probably keep her if she goes back to the hospital now to keep an eye on the babies heartbeat and stress level but if she does go into labor to have the baby there should be no worries if that baby is ready to come nothing is going to stop him i promise mother of soon to be 6 Answered by Debera Schmeidler 6 months ago.

yep...if shes goin back into labor then shes most likely gonna have the baby early. 35 weeks isnt that bad, youll still have a healthy baby. Answered by Quinn Wiederhold 6 months ago.

Have her breathe as you count quantity to eight and after 8 breaths have her carry her breath for ten seconds and after the ten seconds repeat the 8 breaths till you the wellness facility and she or he starts off to be under the care of a doctor or a nurse. additionally carry her hand and rub her gently on her hands. The touching has a relaxing effect as she is familiar with somebody cares for her and is there for her which will enable her know she isn't on my own and you're along with her each and every of how. The respiration, counting and touching will help her take her recommendations off the trials and panic she is feeling quickly and she or he will have the potential to start to quiet down. stable success to the two considered one of you and congratulations on twins. Answered by Isobel Schwaderer 6 months ago.

She could go back into labor at any time. To be safe have her call up her doctor and tell him/her that she's feeling contractions again. They will tell her what to do from there. Best of luck to both of you. Answered by Aaron Virgen 6 months ago.

yes she could, it might just be that you have a baby early and the way technology is so advanced both of them should be okay! Good Luck, just pray about it. Answered by Dalton Lofton 6 months ago.

Yes, it could happen again, if they get closer together again she will need to go back in! Time them! Good Luck! Answered by Holley Virgie 6 months ago.


Anyone been on Nifedipine?
Has anyone taken this for pre-term labor to stop contractions? just curious as to what happened once you stopped taking it! Asked by Allene Dedios 6 months ago.

Do not stop taking nifedipine without first talking to your doctor, even if you begin to feel better. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. Do not crush, chew, or break any form of nifedipine. Swallow the pills whole. Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects. You should discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. What is nifedipine? Nifedipine is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine relaxes (widens) your blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. Nifedipine is used to lower hypertension (high blood pressure) and to treat angina (chest pain). Nifedipine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking nifedipine? Before taking nifedipine, tell your doctor if you have ■kidney disease; ■liver disease; ■another disease of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, low blood pressure, or coronary artery disease. You may not be able to take nifedipine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. Nifedipine is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether nifedipine will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take nifedipine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. Nifedipine passes into breast milk. Do not take nifedipine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 65 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from nifedipine. Your doctor may prescribe a lower dose of this medication. How should I take nifedipine? Take nifedipine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. Take each dose with a full glass of water. Adalat CC should be taken on an empty stomach. Do not crush, chew, or break any form of nifedipine. Swallow the pills whole. Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects. You should discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Occasionally, the Procardia XL tablet shell may be seen in the stool. This is not harmful. The medicine has been absorbed by the body and the tablet shell is designed to be eliminated in the stool. Do not stop taking nifedipine without first talking to your doctor, even if you begin to feel better. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. Store nifedipine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention. Symptoms of a nifedipine overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking nifedipine? Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects. You should discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. Use caution when you stand or sit up from a lying position, especially if you wake up during the night. You may become dizzy when changing positions. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness or dizziness while taking nifedipine. What are the possible side effects of nifedipine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking nifedipine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: ■an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); ■unusually fast or slow heartbeats; ■severe dizziness or fainting; ■psychosis; ■yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice); or ■swelling of the legs or ankles. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take nifedipine and talk to your doctor if you experience ■headache, fatigue, or tiredness; ■flushing; ■insomnia; ■vivid or abnormal dreams; ■nausea or c Answered by Mohammed Haddaway 6 months ago.

ask the doc Answered by Devon Delagado 6 months ago.


Raynauds Syndrome there is no cure?
I was diagnosed with Raynauds Syndrome. I have terribly cold toes and fingers at certain times....what can I do to ease the symptoms, besides stay out of the cold? thanks Asked by Delisa Schrab 6 months ago.

A variety of steps can decrease Raynaud's attacks and help you feel better overall: Don't smoke. Smoking causes skin temperature to drop by constricting blood vessels, which may lead to an attack. Inhaling secondhand smoke also may aggravate Raynaud's. Exercise. Your doctor may encourage you to exercise regularly, particularly if you have primary Raynaud's. Exercise can increase circulation, among other health benefits. Control stress. Because stress may trigger an attack, learning to recognize and avoid stressful situations may help control the number of attacks. Avoid caffeine. Caffeine causes your blood vessels to narrow and may increase the signs and symptoms of Raynaud's. Take care of your hands and feet. If you have Raynaud's, guard your hands and feet from injury. Don't walk barefoot. Take care of your nails to avoid injuring sensitive toes and fingertips. In addition, avoid wearing anything that compresses blood vessels in your hands or feet, such as tight wristbands, rings or footwear. Avoid workplace triggers. Avoiding tools that vibrate the hand may reduce the frequency of attacks. During an attack: What should you do? What should you do if you're experiencing an attack of Raynaud's? The first and most important action is to warm your hands or feet or any other affected areas of skin. The following steps can help you gently warm your fingers and toes: Move to a warmer area. Place your hands under your armpits. Wiggle your fingers and toes. Make wide circles, or windmills, with your arms. Run warm — but not hot — water over your fingers and toes. Massage your hands and feet. If a stressful situation triggers an attack, you can help stop the attack by getting out of the stressful situation and relaxing. If you're trained in biofeedback, you can use this technique along with warming your hands or feet in water to help lessen the attack.Niacin. Niacin, also known as vitamin B-3, causes blood vessels to dilate, increasing blood flow to skin. Niacin supplements may be useful in treating Raynaud's, although niacin supplements may have side effects. Medications Depending on the cause of your symptoms, medications may prove effective at treating Raynaud's. To widen (dilate) blood vessels and promote circulation, your doctor may prescribe: Calcium channel blockers. These drugs relax and open up small blood vessels in your hands and feet. They decrease the frequency and severity of attacks in most people with Raynaud's. These drugs can also help heal skin ulcers on your fingers or toes. Examples include nifedipine (Adalat CC, Afeditab CR, Procardia), amlodipine (Norvasc) and felodipine (Plendil). Alpha blockers. Some people find relief with drugs called alpha blockers, which counteract the actions of norepinephrine, a hormone that constricts blood vessels. Examples include prazosin (Minipress) and doxazosin (Cardura). Vasodilators. Some doctors prescribe a vasodilator — a drug that relaxes blood vessels — such as nitroglycerin cream to your fingers to help heal skin ulcers. Your doctor may also prescribe vasodilator drugs that are commonly used to treat other conditions, but may effectively relieve the symptoms of Raynaud's. These drugs include the high blood pressure drug losartan (Cozaar), the erectile dysfunction medication sildenafil (Viagra), the antidepressant medication fluoxetine (Prozac), and a class of medication called prostaglandins. You and your doctor may find that one drug works better for you than another. Some drugs used to treat Raynaud's have side effects that may require you to stop taking the medication. A drug may also lose effectiveness over time. Work with your doctor to find what works best for you. Some medications actually can aggravate Raynaud's by leading to increased blood vessel spasm. Your doctor may recommend that you avoid taking: Certain over-the-counter (OTC) cold drugs. Examples include drugs that contain pseudoephedrine (Actifed, Chlor-Trimeton, Sudafed). Beta blockers. This class of drugs, used to treat high blood pressure and heart disease, includes metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard) and propranolol (Inderal, Innopran XL). Birth control pills. If you use birth control pills, you may wish to switch to another method of contraception because these drugs affect your circulation and may make you more prone to attacks. Talk to your doctor before stopping the pill. Answered by Twanda Jaecks 6 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Raynauds Syndrome there is no cure? I was diagnosed with Raynauds Syndrome. I have terribly cold toes and fingers at certain times....what can I do to ease the symptoms, besides stay out of the cold? thanks Answered by Reginald Crumpton 6 months ago.

Hello. I've had it for years, and i can tell you that the only thing you can do for it is to keep your feet and hands as warm as you can. When it's cold, i take hot baths, and wear 2 pairs of socks. Try moving your feet and hands as much as possible to keep good blood circulation going. Make sure if you go outside when it's cold to always wear warm gloves, and lined boots. That's really all you can do since there's no cure. Mine usually is ok in the summer, but as soon as it gets cold, it gets really bad. Answered by Olin Meldahl 6 months ago.

check for diabetes. get the a1c test. diabetes causes circulation problems. Answered by Von Mele 6 months ago.


How to treat Raynaud decease?
In the cold, like cold floor, cold Gym, my toes/fingers turn white Asked by Sandra Zagroba 6 months ago.

Self-care and prevention steps usually are effective in dealing with mild symptoms of Raynaud's. If these aren't adequate, however, medications are available to treat more-severe forms of the condition. The goals of treatment are to: Reduce the number and severity of attacks Prevent tissue damage Treat any underlying disease or condition Medications Depending on the cause of your symptoms, medications may prove effective at treating Raynaud's. To widen (dilate) blood vessels and promote circulation, your doctor may prescribe: Calcium channel blockers. These drugs relax and open up small blood vessels in your hands and feet. They decrease the frequency and severity of attacks in most people with Raynaud's. These drugs can also help heal skin ulcers on your fingers or toes. Examples include nifedipine (Adalat CC, Afeditab CR, Procardia), amlodipine (Norvasc) and felodipine (Plendil). Alpha blockers. Some people find relief with drugs called alpha blockers, which counteract the actions of norepinephrine, a hormone that constricts blood vessels. Examples include prazosin (Minipress) and doxazosin (Cardura). Vasodilators. Some doctors prescribe a vasodilator — a drug that relaxes blood vessels — such as nitroglycerin cream to your fingers to help heal skin ulcers. Your doctor may also prescribe vasodilator drugs that are commonly used to treat other conditions, but may effectively relieve the symptoms of Raynaud's. These drugs include the high blood pressure drug losartan (Cozaar), the erectile dysfunction medication sildenafil (Viagra), the antidepressant medication fluoxetine (Prozac), and a class of medication called prostaglandins. Answered by Jacques Rockymore 6 months ago.


Lisinopril Substitute?
I have been taking Lisinopril since May of last year. I never had a problem with before and found out on a unrealated visit to the ER for a spider bite. The next day i went to my doctor and was given Lisinopril. It was about 2 weeks later I started getting this really bad cough.. I thought maybe it was just... Asked by Emelina Orzechowski 6 months ago.

I have been taking Lisinopril since May of last year. I never had a problem with before and found out on a unrealated visit to the ER for a spider bite. The next day i went to my doctor and was given Lisinopril. It was about 2 weeks later I started getting this really bad cough.. I thought maybe it was just something going around the office. I would have coughing fits so bad I would start gagging and throwing up food ... stomach acid or nothing at all. This would go on till I would lose my voice. The doc gave me anti-bios inhalers ... I have had this crap for a year spending so much money on whatever the doctor would say along with god only knows bottles of cough med, cough drops, allergy pills... Mussinex DM . Finally last week one of my friends looked it up on webmd and found that Lisinopril is known for all of the misery I have been going through for the last year many days lost at work more sleepless nights to count. I call my Doctor Friday morning and ask them to take me off of Lisinopril so they gave me Afeditab CR 30 mg 1 at bedtime a generic for Adalat CC. I have takjen it for two nights and my blood pressure has been close to 171/101- 158/96 the lowest it has been was 130/90 I have had to take clonidine both days to pull my bp down. I will be calling my doctor 1st thing in the morning. Lisinopril did keep my bp low but this cough is really interfering in my work perf. and sleep..... I did not sleep for over 36 hours a few nights ago because the cough was soooooooooo bad. Does anyone know a good sub for Lisinopril I do not have insurance but heck this crap they put me on was $50. and seems to belong in the trash. Does anyone have any suggestions that I can mnetion to my doc in the morning... especially if you have experienced similar problems and now are taking something else ..Thanks in advance for your response Sleepless in Nashville;0) Answered by Patricia Ambrosia 6 months ago.

Side affect of Lisnopril, an ACE type drug, is a dry non- productive cough, I was on that drug for about less than month, got the cough, was taken off and placed on Cozaar, an ARB type drug, been on it for 10 yrs. Cozaar will having a generic formula should be out by now. An ACE(inhibitor) means Angiotensin converting enzyme, which helps regulate blood pressure and the other ARB Angiotensin Resisting blocker. Two proteins that affect blood pressure are Angiotensin I and Angiotensin II that causes the blood pressure to rise. These drugs either ACE or ARB controls those proteins. Are you watching your sodium/salt intake which may increase blood pressure? If your overweight, you may want to lose a few pounds. Ask your Dr. f Answered by Carolyne Weismantle 6 months ago.

Substitute For Lisinopril Answered by Ezekiel Regier 6 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Lisinopril Substitute? I have been taking Lisinopril since May of last year. I never had a problem with before and found out on a unrealated visit to the ER for a spider bite. The next day i went to my doctor and was given Lisinopril. It was about 2 weeks later I started getting this really bad cough.. I thought... Answered by Jolanda Knickman 6 months ago.

Hi there, just wanted to mention, I enjoyed this discussion. Very valuable replies Answered by Ismael Josephs 6 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020198/001 ADALAT CC NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
020198/002 ADALAT CC NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
020198/003 ADALAT CC NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018482/002 PROCARDIA NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018482/001 PROCARDIA NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
019478/002 ADALAT NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
019478/001 ADALAT NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
019684/001 PROCARDIA XL NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
019684/002 PROCARDIA XL NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
019684/003 PROCARDIA XL NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
020198/001 ADALAT CC NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
020198/002 ADALAT CC NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
020198/003 ADALAT CC NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
072409/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
072579/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
072556/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
072651/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
072781/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
073250/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
073421/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
074045/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
075108/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075128/001 AFEDITAB CR NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075269/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
075269/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075289/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075289/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
075414/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
075414/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 90MG
075659/001 AFEDITAB CR NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
076070/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
077127/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
077127/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
077410/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
077899/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
077899/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
077899/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
090602/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
090602/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
090602/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
090649/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
090649/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
090649/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
201071/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
201071/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
201071/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
202644/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
202644/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
202987/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
202987/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
202987/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
203126/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
203126/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
203126/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - Blog - All rights reserved