ACHROMYCIN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 050266/001.

Names and composition

"ACHROMYCIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Answered questions

Can tetracycline be used as a anti-biotic?
I think i have oral herpes, and my mom found tetracycline in our med closet, can it be used to temporally cure or stop the infection. the infection is at the bottom - middle - lower lip, and between my lip and my gum, i cant eat or drink easily, and my mouth is always dry. i don't want to call the doc yet, but i... Asked by Cathie Whyne 5 months ago.

I think i have oral herpes, and my mom found tetracycline in our med closet, can it be used to temporally cure or stop the infection. the infection is at the bottom - middle - lower lip, and between my lip and my gum, i cant eat or drink easily, and my mouth is always dry. i don't want to call the doc yet, but i might have to. at the moment I'm on massive about of Ibuprofen to stop the pain, a friend has Vicodin and i am seriously thinking about taking some, the pain is getting almost unbearable. please can anyone help? Answered by Elroy Cotreau 5 months ago.

Tetracycline, (achromycin,) is an antibiotic, and it is often used for the treatment of some STD's, such as chlamydia. However, just taking a few temporarily would not do any good. You need to have a full round of the appropriate antibiotic for your condition. Your not even sure of exactly what you do have at this point. I would suggest you see a physician tomorrow for a proper diagnosis and treatment. Answered by Mirna Kindig 5 months ago.

Tetracycline IS an antibiotic. But what you have is a virus, and antibiotics do not help viruses. Plus, it is dangerous and illegal to take someone else's prescription drugs. And when you take antibiotics, you need to take a FULL course of antibiotics. What you are doing otherwise is NOT curing the infection, and creating drug resistant super bugs. Answered by Deandre Flennoy 5 months ago.


Can you still take Tetracycline when pregnant?
Can you still take Tetracycline (common brands: Achromycin V, Sumycin) when pregnant? This is an acne pill. Asked by Devin Flaker 5 months ago.

My best guess is NO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If you found out you are pregnant and are currently taking this med, discontinue until you can get in to see your doctor and ask them. You can also google the medication and they often say in the write up whether it is safe during pregnancy. Use both Tetracycline and pregnant together in your google search and you should get a better answer until you can talk to your doc! Answered by Alane Mcluckie 5 months ago.

No. It can impair the development of fetal bone and cause possible cognitive defects. Answered by Pamula Illig 5 months ago.


Find out about fatty tissue on liver?
Asked by Oda Landero 5 months ago.

Fatty liver is an excessive accumulation of a type of fat (triglyceride) inside the liver cells. In the United States and other Western countries, the most common causes of fatty liver are alcoholism, obesity, diabetes, and elevated serum triglyceride levels. Other causes include malnutrition, hereditary disorders of metabolism (such as the glycogen storage diseases (see Muscular Dystrophy and Related Disorders: Introduction and Hereditary Metabolic Disorders: Glycogen Storage Diseases), and drugs (such as corticosteroids, tetracyclineSome Trade Names ACHROMYCIN V TETRACYN SUMYCIN , and aspirinSome Trade Names ECOTRIN ASPERGUM ). The mechanism by which these diseases or factors cause fat to accumulate within liver cells is not known. Simply eating a high-fat diet, for example, does not produce a fatty liver. One possible explanation is that these diseases or factors slow the rate at which fat is processed (metabolized) and excreted by the body. The resulting buildup of fat within the body, according to this theory, is then stored inside the liver cells. Sometimes the cause of fatty liver is not clear, especially when it occurs in newborns; however, it is likely to be a defect in the mitochondria of the liver cells. In some people, a fatty liver not due to alcohol abuse or drugs and toxins but associated with obesity, diabetes mellitus, and raised serum triglycerides will progress to scarring (fibrosis) and cirrhosis, possibly because of underlying inflammation. This type of fatty liver is sometimes referred to as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. known Causes of Fatty Liver Obesity Diabetes Chemicals and drugs (such as alcohol, corticosteroids, tetracyclines, valproate, methotrexate, carbon tetrachloride, and yellow phosphorus) Malnutrition and a low-protein diet Pregnancy Vitamin A toxicity Bypass surgery of the small intestine Cystic fibrosis (most likely accompanied by malnutrition) Hereditary defects in glycogen, galactose, tyrosine, or homocystine metabolism Medium-chain aryl dehydrogenase deficiency Cholesterol esterase deficiency Phytanic acid storage disease (Refsum's disease) Abetalipoproteinemia Reye's syndrome Symptoms and Diagnosis Fatty liver usually produces no symptoms. In rare cases, however, it results in jaundice (a yellowish discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes), nausea, vomiting, pain, and abdominal tenderness. A physical examination that reveals an enlarged liver without any other symptoms suggests fatty liver. Liver function tests are also performed to determine if there is a liver abnormality, such as inflammation (see Liver Function Tests), which sometimes accompanies the extra fat in the liver cells and can be associated with the development of cirrhosis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Excess fat in the liver can be detected on abdominal ultrasound. The diagnosis may be confirmed by a liver biopsy, in which a doctor inserts a long hollow needle through the skin to obtain a small piece of liver tissue for examination under a microscope (see Diagnostic Tests for Liver and Gallbladder Disorders: Biopsy of the Liver). Prognosis and Treatment Although excessive fat in the liver may not in itself be a serious problem (the fat can disappear, for example, if the person stops drinking), its underlying cause might be. For example, repeated liver injury from toxic substances such as alcohol may eventually progress from fatty liver to cirrhosis (severe scarring of the liver). Therefore, treatment of fatty liver aims at minimizing or eliminating the underlying cause of the disorder. Answered by Johnathon Cormia 5 months ago.


Can a woman take birth control pills with diet pills and still have the pill be effective?
I am currently on loestrin24e and was wondering is there any research proving that the pill will not be effective if the person takes the pill also? Asked by Sindy Kollar 5 months ago.

The birth control pill consists of hormones which essentially make your body think it is pregnant. Your ovaries will then not release an egg each month, meaning that sperm would have nothing to fertilize. Advantages- very effective when taken properly, can lessen PMS symptoms, lighten "period" bleedings Disadvantages- must remember to take a pill every day, at around the same time. some people experience other side effects. After you stop taking the pill, the extra hormones go away and you can become pregnant again. Your period does not go away completely, but it is more correctly called a "withdrawal bleed," since it is not a true period and is just a break in the hormone dose to allow your body to continue to regulate itself. The pill AND a condom is one of the most effective methods of preventing pregnancy! Perfect use of both methods is over 99% effective. Answered by Romana Sautner 5 months ago.


Fatty liver degeneration?
what is fatty liver degeneration .What are its causes .How it affacts human health .What is its remeady Asked by Ed Keel 5 months ago.

Here is a bunch of information for you- D Fatty liver is an excessive accumulation of a type of fat (triglyceride) inside the liver cells. In the United States and other Western countries, the most common causes of fatty liver are alcoholism, obesity, diabetes, and elevated serum triglyceride levels. Other causes include malnutrition, hereditary disorders of metabolism (such as the glycogen storage diseases (see Muscular Dystrophy and Related Disorders: Introduction and Hereditary Metabolic Disorders: Glycogen Storage Diseases), and drugs (such as corticosteroids, tetracyclineSome Trade Names ACHROMYCIN V TETRACYN SUMYCIN , and aspirinSome Trade Names ECOTRIN ASPERGUM ). The mechanism by which these diseases or factors cause fat to accumulate within liver cells is not known. Simply eating a high-fat diet, for example, does not produce a fatty liver. One possible explanation is that these diseases or factors slow the rate at which fat is processed (metabolized) and excreted by the body. The resulting buildup of fat within the body, according to this theory, is then stored inside the liver cells. Sometimes the cause of fatty liver is not clear, especially when it occurs in newborns; however, it is likely to be a defect in the mitochondria of the liver cells. In some people, a fatty liver not due to alcohol abuse or drugs and toxins but associated with obesity, diabetes mellitus, and raised serum triglycerides will progress to scarring (fibrosis) and cirrhosis, possibly because of underlying inflammation. This type of fatty liver is sometimes referred to as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Known Causes of Fatty Liver Obesity Diabetes Chemicals and drugs (such as alcohol, corticosteroids, tetracyclines, valproate, methotrexate, carbon tetrachloride, and yellow phosphorus) Malnutrition and a low-protein diet Pregnancy Vitamin A toxicity Bypass surgery of the small intestine Cystic fibrosis (most likely accompanied by malnutrition) Hereditary defects in glycogen, galactose, tyrosine, or homocystine metabolism Medium-chain aryl dehydrogenase deficiency Cholesterol esterase deficiency Phytanic acid storage disease (Refsum's disease) Abetalipoproteinemia Reye's syndrome Symptoms and Diagnosis Fatty liver usually produces no symptoms. In rare cases, however, it results in jaundice (a yellowish discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes), nausea, vomiting, pain, and abdominal tenderness. A physical examination that reveals an enlarged liver without any other symptoms suggests fatty liver. Liver function tests are also performed to determine if there is a liver abnormality, such as inflammation (see Liver Function Tests), which sometimes accompanies the extra fat in the liver cells and can be associated with the development of cirrhosis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Excess fat in the liver can be detected on abdominal ultrasound. The diagnosis may be confirmed by a liver biopsy, in which a doctor inserts a long hollow needle through the skin to obtain a small piece of liver tissue for examination under a microscope (see Diagnostic Tests for Liver and Gallbladder Disorders: Biopsy of the Liver). Prognosis and Treatment Although excessive fat in the liver may not in itself be a serious problem (the fat can disappear, for example, if the person stops drinking), its underlying cause might be. For example, repeated liver injury from toxic substances such as alcohol may eventually progress from fatty liver to cirrhosis (severe scarring of the liver). Therefore, treatment of fatty liver aims at minimizing or eliminating the underlying cause of the disorder. Last reviewed/revised February 1, 2003 Liver Degenerative Disease When compared to other health conditions, it is striking how little attention is given to diseases of the liver, particularly considering the rising level of concern about health and health-related environmental issues. Hepatoprotection (or protection of the liver) is a subject that should be of intense interest because the liver plays a critical role in all aspects of metabolism and overall health. This protocol will present intriguing information about the role of the liver and explain why a well-functioning liver is essential for overall health. Also identified will be environmental hazards that constantly challenge the detoxification capacity of the liver. Research on the effects of alcohol on the liver will be discussed. Additionally, you will learn what you can do to support and optimize the function of your liver and thus optimize your future health and quality of life. Some beneficial herbs will also be described. In Europe and Asia, herbal liver tonics have been in common use for decades--perhaps even for centuries. The effectiveness of the herbs used in these remedies has been validated during the past several decades through research and clinical studies. These herbs generally contain antioxidants; membrane-stabilizing and bile-enhancing compounds; or substances that prevent depletion of sulfhydryl compounds, such as glutathione. WHAT DOES THE LIVER DO? The liver is located on the right side of the body in the upper abdomen. In the human, it is the second largest organ of the body, weighing about 4 lbs (skin is the largest organ). Even while being exposed to tremendous potential for damage, the liver performs a multitude of essential functions: metabolizing, detoxifying, and regenerating. It does an extraordinary job of keeping us alive and healthy by metabolizing the food we eat, that is, breaking it down into useful parts, and by having detoxifying abilities that protect us from the damaging effects of numerous toxic compounds that we are exposed to on a daily basis. Several times each day, our entire blood supply passes through the liver. At any given time, about a pint of blood is in the liver (or 10% of the total blood volume of an adult) (NIDDK 2000). In addition, the liver has impressive restorative capabilities and is the only organ in the body that is capable of regenerating itself when part of it has been damaged. The metabolizing functions of the liver are numerous. The liver is intricately involved in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism; in the storage of vitamins and minerals; and in many essential physiological processes. The liver is also involved in several regulatory mechanisms that control blood sugar levels and hormone levels. It synthesizes proteins (such as plasma albumin, fibrinogen, and most globulins) and lipids and lipoproteins (phospholipids, cholesterol), as well as bile acids that are excreted in the detoxification process (NIDDK 2000). Other important functions of the liver include production of prothrombin and fibrinogen (two blood-clotting factors) and heparin (a mucopolysaccharide sulfuric acid ester that helps prevent blood from clotting within the circulatory system). The liver also processes glucose into glycogen and stores it until the muscles need energy; some glucose is also converted into fat and stored. The released glycogen becomes glucose in the bloodstream. Additionally, the liver produces and secretes bile (stored in the gallbladder), that is needed to break down and digest fatty acids, and produces blood protein and hundreds of enzymes needed for digestion and other bodily functions. As the liver breaks down proteins, it produces urea, which it synthesizes from carbon dioxide and ammonia. (Urea is the primary solid component of urine, and it is eventually excreted by the kidneys.) Essential trace elements such as iron and copper as well as vitamins A, D, and B12 are also stored in the liver. The detoxifying function is an essential part of human body metabolism, with the liver playing a key role in the process. Toxic chemicals, of both internal and external origin, constantly bombard the liver. Even our normal everyday metabolic processes produce a wide range of toxins that are neutralized in the liver. The regenerating capacity of the liver is one of the most intriguing survival mechanisms of the body. The liver is an incredibly resilient organ. Up to 75% of its cells can be surgically removed or destroyed by disease before it ceases to function (AMA 1989). As with some other organs, the liver has been designed with an excess of tissue to protect it from damage or loss of function. The healthy parts of the liver have an amazing capacity to regenerate new, healthy liver tissue to replace damaged liver tissue. We are very fortunate that the liver has a regeneration capacity because our health depends on a well-functioning liver. CONDITIONS LEADING TO LIVER DAMAGE The symptoms that are indicative of reduced liver function or possible liver damage include general malaise; fatigue; digestive disturbances such as constipation; allergies and chemical sensitivities; weight loss; jaundice; edema; and mental confusion. Generalized pruritus (itching), nausea, and vomiting can also result from impaired hepatofunction. The causes of liver damage are numerous and may include congenital defects (malformed or absent bile ducts); obstructed bile ducts (cholestasis); autoimmune disorders; metabolic disorders (hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease); tumors; toxins (drugs, overdoses, poisons); alcohol-related conditions (cirrhosis); bacterial and parasitic infections; and viral infections (hepatitis B and C). This section discusses several chronic disorders and diseases that can lead to degenerative liver damage without proper diagnosis and treatment. Cholestasis Cholestasis is interruption or stagnation of the bile flow in any part of the biliary system, beginning with the liver. Cholestasis has several causes, including obstruction of the bile ducts by the presence of gallstones or a tumor, drug and alcohol use, hepatitis, and existing liver disease (Glanze 1996). In the United States, an important cause of cholestasis and impaired liver function is the consumption of alcohol. Other common causes of cholestasis are viral hepatitis and the side effects of various drugs, particularly steroidal hormones (including estrogen and oral contraceptives). Cholestasis can cause alterations of liver function tests, indicating cellular damage. In the initial stages of liver dysfunction, standard tests (serum bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, SGOT, LDH, GGTP, etc.) may not be sensitive enough to be of value for complete, early diagnosis. However, the measurement of serum bile acids is a safe, sensitive test to determine the functional capacity of the liver. Treatment for cholestasis includes surgery so that there will be unobstructed bile flow from the liver. Drug-induced cholestasis will generally disappear if the causative drug is discontinued. There is no specific treatment for cholestasis caused by hepatitis. However, bile flow will improve slowly if inflammation of the liver can be resolved. Wilson's Disease Answered by Laurinda Pevehouse 5 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: fatty liver degeneration? what is fatty liver degeneration .What are its causes .How it affacts human health .What is its remeady Answered by Caroline Slawson 5 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Fatty liver. The treatment of fatty liver depends on what is causing it, and generally, treating the underlying cause will remove the problem. Answered by Penni Spera 5 months ago.

The next time it snows, up your karma as well as shovel your neighbor's sidewalk also. Answered by Chery Mcpeck 5 months ago.

Cary a new motivational photo with you Answered by Fredrick Simer 5 months ago.

Just about any physical activity burns energy Answered by May Klinnert 5 months ago.

Instead of sitting and looking at, listen to books on tape while you walk, clean, or garden. Answered by Jong Uzee 5 months ago.

Remain faithful to a more lean protein/green plant diet regime Answered by Lane Odair 5 months ago.


How to get rid of a canker?
man these things hurt sometimes....totally just had a candy night with the girls last night and it's not good today. i was wondering if anyone knows how to get rid of one in a night? Asked by Marla Tramonti 5 months ago.

Canker Sore Treatment Self-Care at Home * Try rinsing your mouth with a solution of 1/2-teaspoon salt dissolved in 8 ounces of water. * Another mixture that may be helpful consists of 1-2 tablespoons of Maalox mixed with one-half tablespoon of liquid diphenhydramine (Benadryl). * A number of medications are available over-the-counter, for example, calamine (Calamox) lotion. * Liquids or ointments with a numbing ingredient such as benzocaine (Anbesol, Orabase, Tanac) help relieve the discomfort of canker sores. Medical Treatment Although there is no cure for canker sores, treatment can decrease symptoms, reduce the likelihood that they will return, and prolong periods of remission. * Applying certain steroid salves directly to the sore is effective if you use the salve early in an attack. If over-the-counter medications do not help, a common prescription consists of triamcinolone acetonide, a corticosteroid, in a sticking dental paste (Kenalog in Orabase). Typically, you apply the paste to the lesions 3 times daily. More recently, doctors have prescribed amlexanox (Aphthasol). Although no one knows why amlexanox works, it may be related to its anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. * Tetracycline suspensions (Achromycin, Nor-tet, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap) used as a mouthwash can relieve pain and accelerate healing. * The doctor can prescribe viscous lidocaine (an anesthetic) to numb the ulcers before meals and at bedtime, making it easier for you to eat. * A slurry made with Carafate, a prescription medication used to treat peptic ulcers, has been reported to successfully coat canker sores, promoting comfort and healing. * The doctor may prescribe folic acid, iron, or vitamin B12 supplements if you are deficient in these. In such cases, you may require several months of therapy to improve. No benefit has been shown, however, from taking these vitamins if you are not deficient. * For unknown reasons, some women may develop new attacks or worsening of canker sores during their premenstrual phase. An estrogen-dominant oral contraceptive may help if given for 4-6 months. * In extremely severe cases, doctors may consider giving oral doses of corticosteroids, if they believe the benefits of treatment exceed the risks of oral steroids. Risks include weight gain, weakening of the immune system, brittle bones, increase in gastric acidity leading to ulcers, and others. * Cimetidine (Tagamet) may be useful in treating canker sores. This is the same medication that decreases acid production by the stomach and is used for peptic ulcers and heartburn. The FDA has not approved cimetidine officially for canker sores. * Additional drugs reported to be beneficial include colchicine, pentoxifylline (Trental), and dapsone (Avlosulfon). Colchicine may aid prevention as well as treatment. At this time, the FDA has approved none of these drugs for canker sores. * Recently, a new prescription drug, Debacterol, has been released. Debacterol is applied to the ulcer and helps to seal it and allow it to heal. Answered by Clementine Gavilanes 5 months ago.

You have to let it run it's course which is about a week. In the meantime, you can put Orabase on it. Don't use Orajel or Ambasol because that wears off in a few minutes. Orabase creates a film over the sore and keeps the pain away. You can also brush your teeth and swish with mouthwash to kill the bacteria and that also helps with pain. I get those things all the time. Answered by Lavonne Stroede 5 months ago.

not really anything to help it heal significantly faster, but you can get products like anbesol for the pain. there is a product callled Gly-Oxide is about the only commercial product out there, it helps reduce healing time a little but probably wont go away over night, its available at most pharmacies (if not ask if they do special orders and can get it for you if you are interested in it) Answered by Dean Zybia 5 months ago.

Apple cider vinegar. It'll sting something fierce, but it'll go away. Answered by Shawanda Rochelle 5 months ago.

Gargal with salt water!! Answered by Audie Troyani 5 months ago.

ambasol and sea salt Answered by Nelda Ducotey 5 months ago.


If I have an Urinary Tract Infection by me an my partner having sex could he catch it?
Asked by Trish Tannous 5 months ago.

Your partner could catch it if the bacteria in your urinary tract finds its way into his urinary tract. Possible but not probable. Perhaps getting rid of the UTI you have would solve the problem better. Urinary tract infection is a disease that needs to be treated right away if only for the discomfort it brings. People suffering from this condition tend to feel pain in their lower abdomen. But more than that, the infection may spread to different body parts and vital organs. And at that point, the condition becomes very hard to cure. The treatment for urinary tract infection starts with a series of consultation with your doctor. A laboratory inspection of urine is required. For milder cases of this disease, the use of antibacterial drugs is sufficient. Examples of such drugs are Bactrim, Amoxil, and Cipro. Doctors usually recommend that these drugs are taken within a couple of weeks in order to suppress the infection in the urethra and prevent the kidneys from being affected. Other drugs that can be used to treat UTI are Periostat and Achromycin. However, more severe cases of urinary tract infection would require surgery. This method is usually performed on patients whose conditions put them at the risk of spinal cord injuries. The same is true if the infection had lead to bladder stones or prostate cancer. However, there are also self-cures and home treatments for UTI. These treatments are usually prescribed to patients as part of their recovery and maintenance medication. Pain relievers that can be bought over-the-counter such as Advil and Tylenol can be taken for mild and recurrent aches. The use of heating pads may also help. Part of the treatment therapy for urinary tract infection is lifestyle change. Patients are strongly advised against consuming alcohol and coffee while on medication and thereafter. Smoking is also prohibited as it decreases the effect of drugs and exposes the body to further infections. Smoking also puts you at risk of bladder cancer. The home treatment procedures for urinary tract infection include drinking plenty of water. Water can help flush out all the infections present in the urinary tract. Drinking cranberry juice may also help in speeding up the healing process. Cranberry contains proanthocyanins, which can prevent bacteria from sticking into the walls of the urinary tract. As such, it becomes easier to wash them away. Additionally, patients suffering from urinary tract infection are advised not to soak in the bath tub as the water and the scents placed in it could further irritate the urethra. Take a shower instead of using the bath tub. It is also important to urinate often if you have UTI to eliminate the bacteria. Keeping it in may exacerbate the condition as urine is mainly composed of wastes. Patients with UTI should strictly follow the instructions of their doctor to make sure that their condition is treated in the shortest span of time. Don't skip medicine dosages or visits to the doctor. Your doctor needs to monitor your condition after taking the prescribed medicines. This is very important so that he can adjust the dosage as necessary. Urinary tract infection is a highly treatable disease. But if left ignored, it could lead to a condition that is very hard to reverse. Answered by Jena Welton 5 months ago.

Yep, he could catch it. Stop having sex until you have had it cleared by your local doctor. Don't share towels either, that's another way to spread the infection. Drink plenty of water, and have a glass of cranberry juice. Doctors suggest that women drink 1 glass of this juice each day in order to prevent Urinary Tract Infections. Your doctor will put you on antibiotics. Go and get it seen to, it can develop into something more sinister. Answered by Maurita Arroliga 5 months ago.

If you are a female.......I wouldn't worry about giving your partner the UTI. Although, i can't imagine you'd want to have sex anyways because of frequent peeing urges, but okay. The reason i wouldn't worry is because it takes the UTI a lot longer to travel in order to reach the bladder. If you're a male, just don't do it! Literally. You will more than likely give your partner the UTI. I don't think you want to explain to her why you're giving her an absurd amount of cranberry juice afterwards!!!! In either case, go to your doctor and get a prescription for it, or if you don't want to....go get yourself the Langers Lite Cranberry Juice at the store, you'll pretty much need to drink an entire 64 fl oz of it to wipe it out! I wouldn't be having sex! Answered by Jung Reper 5 months ago.

Yes, your partner can get your infection. Hold off on getting intimate for now. Setup an appointment with your doctor and you'll need antibiotics and drink alot of water. After you are cleared up. Go for it. Good Luck Answered by Buffy Heitschmidt 5 months ago.

No, but if you have sex while you have an infection, your symptoms may get worse. Answered by Deidra Wamhoff 5 months ago.

i wouldnt have sex if i had uti if i were you. you need to get it treated asap. i got it it goes away fast dont worrry. Answered by Dorothy Moonsommy 5 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
050266/001 ACHROMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE OINTMENT/OPHTHALMIC 10MG per GM
050268/001 ACHROMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
050272/001 ACHROMYCIN HYDROCORTISONE; TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE OINTMENT/OPHTHALMIC 1.5% and 1%
050273/002 ACHROMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 250MG per VIAL
050273/003 ACHROMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
050276/001 ACHROMYCIN PROCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE; TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40MG per VIAL and 100MG per VIAL
050276/003 ACHROMYCIN PROCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE; TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40MG per VIAL and 250MG per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
050263/002 ACHROMYCIN V TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
050266/001 ACHROMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE OINTMENT/OPHTHALMIC 10MG per GM
050268/001 ACHROMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
050273/002 ACHROMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 250MG per VIAL
050273/003 ACHROMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
050278/001 ACHROMYCIN V TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
050278/003 ACHROMYCIN V TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
050493/001 TOPICYCLINE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE FOR SOLUTION/TOPICAL 2.2MG per ML
050653/001 ACTISITE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE FIBER, EXTENDED RELEASE/PERIODONTAL 12.7MG per FIBER
060059/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060082/003 TETRACYN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060082/004 TETRACYN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
060095/001 TETRACYN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
060096/001 TETRACYN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 250MG per VIAL
060096/002 TETRACYN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
060173/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 125MG
060173/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060174/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
060290/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060290/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
060291/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
060343/001 TETRACHEL TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060343/003 TETRACHEL TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
060347/001 PANMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060400/001 SUMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
060429/001 SUMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060429/002 SUMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
060429/003 SUMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
060429/004 SUMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 125MG
060446/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
060469/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060469/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
060469/003 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
060471/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060471/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
060633/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
060704/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060704/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
060736/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060736/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
060768/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060768/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
060783/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
060783/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
061147/001 SUMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
061147/002 SUMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
061147/003 SUMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
061147/004 SUMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
061148/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
061148/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
061214/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
061443/001 RETET TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
061443/002 RETET TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
061468/001 TETRAMED TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
061471/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
061658/001 BRISTACYCLINE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
061658/002 BRISTACYCLINE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
061685/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
061685/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
061705/001 PANMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
061705/002 PANMYCIN TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
061725/001 CYCLOPAR TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
061725/002 CYCLOPAR TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
061734/001 ROBITET TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
061734/002 ROBITET TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
061802/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
061802/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
061837/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
061837/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
061888/001 BRISTACYCLINE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
061888/002 BRISTACYCLINE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
062085/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
062103/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
062103/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
062175/001 CYCLOPAR TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
062300/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
062300/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
062332/001 CYCLOPAR TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
062332/002 CYCLOPAR TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
062343/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
062343/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
062540/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
062540/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
062686/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
062686/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
062752/001 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
062752/002 TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TETRACYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG

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