Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018337/001.

Names and composition

"ACETAMINOPHEN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ACETAMINOPHEN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018337/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
018337/002 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 325MG
018337/003 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
070607/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
070608/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
071010/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
071011/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
073106/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
073107/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 325MG
073108/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
075077/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
076200/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
078569/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
090205/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
202605/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
204052/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
204767/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
207229/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016401/001 NEOPAP ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
017756/001 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
017756/002 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
017785/001 INJECTAPAP ACETAMINOPHEN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
018060/001 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
018060/002 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
018060/003 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 325MG
018337/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
018337/002 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 325MG
018337/003 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
018337/004 INFANTS' FEVERALL ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 80MG
019872/001 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
019872/002 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
022450/001 OFIRMEV ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
070607/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
070608/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
071010/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
071011/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
072218/001 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
072237/001 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
072344/001 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 325MG
073106/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
073107/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 325MG
073108/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
075077/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
076200/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
078569/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
090205/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
202605/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
204052/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
204767/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
207229/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG

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Answered questions

What are the dangers of acetaminophen?
A guy friend depends on Tylenol p.m. every night. Asked by Fredericka Mcnaughton 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen - Cumulative Effect Can Cause Acute Liver Failure (Keep reading the dosage alert is at the bottom. Acetaminophen, commonly known as Tylenol, is regarded as one of the safest pain relievers. Reportedly, over 100 million people/year take acetaminophen for various painful conditions, including arthritis. Liver damage occurs in a relatively small number of people who take acetaminophen, yet accidental overdose and acute liver failure caused by acetaminophen is recognized as a growing problem. Though labels of products containing acetaminophen disclose how much of the ingredient is in the product, some people put themselves at risk by not keeping track of their total daily intake of acetaminophen. Acetaminophen is in many narcotic drugs available only by prescription, such as Darvocet, Vicodin, and Percocet. Acetaminophen is also in many over-the-counter headache, cold, sinus, and flu medications. The total acetaminophen intake per day must be tracked. It is recommended that adults take no more than 4,000 mg/day of acetaminophen (the equivalent of 8 extra-strength 500 mg tablets or capsules). Because acetaminophen is considered "safe", patients are too often careless about their total daily intake. Answered by Francisco Losiewski 1 year ago.

Tylenol PM is tylenol and benadryl. He is probably using it to sleep. Too much tylenol is hard on the liver, you would need in excess of 4,000 mg per day to be in excess. If he is dependent on something to help him sleep every single night, he needs to see his MD and find out why he is having difficulties. Answered by Florine Brogdon 1 year ago.


What could happen if you take 10 acetaminophen in a day?
over the course of the day not all together at once. Would like i die. Asked by Daniel Leanos 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen dosage recommendation is as follows: 1)Regular strength (325 mg): 2 pills every 4 to 6 hours... do not exceed 12 in 24 hour period. (Taking 10 pills in one day should not, in most cases be a problem) 2) Extra Strength (500 mg): 2 pills every 4 to 6 hours ... do not exceed 8 in a 24 hour period (Taking 10 pills can become a problem) 3) Extended release (650mg): 2 pills every 8 hours... do not exceed 6 in a 24 hour period (Taking 10 is a definite problem and you should be checked for possible liver cell damage) 4) Liquid acetaminophen (500 mg per 15 ml): 2 Tablespoonfuls (30 mg total) every 4 to 6 hours. Not to exceed 8 Tbsp. in 24 hour period (you mentioned pills...so this doesn't apply) No one should take over 4 g (4000mg) a day. However, some people are more sensitive to the drug than other are. Therefore, for some, even the limit of 4000 mg a day would be too high. If you overdose on acetaminophen, it is best to go to the ER right away. They will remove the contents of the pills from the stomach and give you medications that will help the liver process what is left in your body. If you definitely did overdose and you just let it go...you may be looking at liver cell damage which will cause your immune system of the body to respond to it and cause inflammation inside the liver which causes the liver to enlarge in size. Stopping the medication and getting help right away is the best way to prevent this. Many times, patient who do overdose, will throw up the contents of their stomach. However, this does not guarantee that they have lost all of the drug...the drug may have already been absorbed. For 10 pills, you may not die...just have the starting of liver problems. The cells of the liver can heal if the medication is stopped. Be sure that you don't take any medications that have acetaminophen in it...as this drug is combined with many other medications... so overdosing is quite easy to do. You should have blood tests run to see how well the liver functions are doing and the liver enzymes to see if there is liver cell damage. I hope this information has been of help to you. Answered by Angelita Banecker 1 year ago.

It could seriously damage your liver. Acetaminophen isn't supposed to be used in large doses or for long periods of time because it really is harder on your liver. I suggest Ibuprofen because you can take more often for longer periods of time. Don't take it if you have had history of stomach bleeding or stomach pain because Ibuprofen can be irritating to the stomach and in sever cases cause bleeding. Naproxen is another alternative to Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen but is only take every 12 hours or so. If you are seriously worried though, I suggest you ask your doctor. He/she will be happy to help you find a safe, effective pain medication and dosage! :) Also, the brand names of each are listed below. Acetaminophen- Tylenol Ibuprofen- Advil Naproxen- Aleve Answered by Jerry Jeanbaptise 1 year ago.

No you wont die, but an overdose of acetaminophen or constant usage of that amt can do severe damage to your liver. Answered by Monroe Rossin 1 year ago.

The recommended dose used to be up to twelve a day, and it took billions of doses over decades of use for a few cases of chronic toxicity to cause the recommended maximum dose to be decreased. There is a risk of eventually developing chronic toxicity, but it's mighty small. Answered by Omer Blye 1 year ago.

10 regular strength, not much. 10 extra strength will put you over the recommended daily limit, but one occurrence won't do any significant damage. Answered by Melida Huntoon 1 year ago.

Severe liver damage, organ failure, habituation (decreased response to drug), and fatality are all possible. Answered by Courtney Heger 1 year ago.

Heavy load on your liver. Answered by Emilie Kibbler 1 year ago.

it's harmful to your liver and your stomach will probably be pumped Answered by Lisbeth Vormwald 1 year ago.

That will ruin your liver if you don't overdose first Answered by Carl Radick 1 year ago.


Is 1500 mg of Acetaminophen too much to take at once?
Just wondering. I've heard a lot of conflicting answers. I know its bad to take that much often, but doing it once wouldn't do anything bad would it? I'd imagine it wouldn't.. What is the limit you should take of that in a single day? Asked by Pearle Pettit 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen overdose is one of the most common poisonings worldwide. People often think that acetaminophen, a pain-relieving medicine, is extremely safe. However, it may be deadly if taken in large doses. Acetaminophen Dosage For regular and extra-strength doses of acetaminophen, recommendations typically start at two tablets every four to six hours as needed. If you are taking the extended-release version, it is recommended that you take two tablets every eight hours. For children ages 6 to 12, the suggested dose is one regular-strength tablet every four to six hours as needed. For adults and children age 12 and older, the recommended dose is as follows:   Regular-strength (325 mg) acetaminophen: Two tablets every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed 12 tablets in 24 hours   Extra-strength (500 mg) acetaminophen: Two tablets (or geltabs) every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed 8 tablets in 24 hours   Extended-release (650 mg) acetaminophen: Two tablets (or geltabs) every eight hours, not to exceed six tablets in 24 hours   Liquid acetaminophen (500 mg per 15 mL): Two tablespoons (30 mL total) every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed eight tablespoonfuls in 24 hours.   It is important to avoid taking more than 4 grams (4000 mg) of acetaminophen per day. This includes other sources of acetaminophen, including many prescription pain medications and many nonprescription cold and cough remedies. Answered by Dianne Maitland 1 year ago.

Your gonna make your stomach bleed that ONE time dummy! Answered by Griselda Zhen 1 year ago.


Question about 5 mg Oxy Codone / 325 mg acetaminophen?
Also, can it be abused? If so, please provide some details. Thanks! Asked by Brandee Kulesa 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is used to relieve many kinds of minor aches and pains, including headaches, muscle aches, backaches, toothaches, menstrual cramps, arthritis, and the aches and pains that often accompany colds. It is suitable for control of pain following minor surgery, or for post-surgical pain after the need for stronger pain relievers has been reduced. Acetaminophen is also used in combination with narcotic analgesics both to increase pain relief and reduce the risk that the narcotics will be abused. Brand names of this drug - brand names, including Tylenol, Panadol, Aspirin Free Anacin. Whereas Oxycodone is a narcotic alkaloid with trade name: Roxicodone; drug class: synthetic opioid analgesic (Controlled Substance Schedule II); action: attaches to opiate receptors in the central nervous system; uses: moderate-to-severe pain, normally used in combination with aspirin or acetaminophen. Acetaminophen and Oxycodone are not one and the same and it is generally taken together. But this combination drug should be taken only on medical advice and should not be taken on long term basis. If taken on long term you may notice allergic reaction, hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat, shallow breathing, slow heartbeat; seizure (convulsions); cold, clammy skin; confusion; severe weakness or dizziness; or feeling light-headed, fainting. - Answered by Merlin Izaguine 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is just Tylenol - you've probably taken it before alone OxyContin is just a brand name for oxycodone - so if you were taking just oxycodone (without the acetaminophen) that would be OxyContin Yes, people tend to abuse any narcotic - Most affects are short term (pain relief, 'high') - but acetaminophen can cause liver damage, do not drink alcohol while taking it and NEVER have more than 4000mg per day Answered by Nathanial Borlace 1 year ago.

The dog needs to see a vet immediately. Acetaminophen is toxic to dogs, so up to 325 mg is going to be a problem for your small dog. Answered by Fredrick Fifield 1 year ago.

acetaminophen is a pain reliever also known as tylenol. oxycodone is the main ingredient in oxycontin so yes they are the same thing. yes, it abused very often. the short term effects are constipation, urine retention, small pupils, etc. the long term effects are addiction, withdrawal when off the pills, etc. i am a recovering addict to narcotics such as this one. Answered by Marinda Mccloskey 1 year ago.

generic name on the left, brand name on the right: acetaminophen(APAP)= Tylenol oxycodone extended release(ER)= OxyContin oxycodone immediate release(IR)= Roxycodone, OxyIR, OxyFast. oxycodone w/APAP= Percocet, Tylox, Roxicet. --------------------------------------... Anything with OXYCODONE (OxyContin, Roxycodone, Percocet, etc.) is a SCHEDULE II contolled substance, and is likely to be abused. When you say "this exact drug (5/325)", you must be referring to PERCOCET 5/325 (oxycodone 5mg w/ acetaminophen 325mg). Percocet contains oxycodone, therefore it IS a controlled substance, and CAN be abused. --------------------------------------... SIDE EFFECTS differ from person to person (side effects can include dizziness, nausea/vomiting, and constipation). --------------------------------------... Often a tolerance is built, so the person must take more and more of the drug to satisfy their needs. WITHDRAWAL can be a painful process that can include (but is not limited to): pain, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, anxiety, fever, etc. Symptoms of withdrawal usually begin within 6-8 hours of discontinuation. Answered by Milagros Childrey 1 year ago.

OxyContin is the trade name for extended release oxycodone. However, in this formulation it is not extended release nor does OxyContin have Tylenol (acetaminophen) in it. So technically, no its not the same. Answered by Romeo Fenlon 1 year ago.


How much Acetaminophen is too much Acetaminophen? (Nyquil, see dose & weight)?
I'm 115 pounds 5"5' female and I took 4 capsules... This doesn't seem like an outrageous amount as I've heard of people taking more... but with my size, what will be the likely outcome? Asked by Will Patuto 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is one of only a few drugs with a maximum dose set in stone. The maximum dose is 1,000 mg (1 gram) at one time. The maximum daily dose is 4,000 mg (4 grams) in divided doses. 1,000 mg can be repeated every 4-6hrs as needed up to 4,000 mg/day. And weight (contrary to popular belief) has little or nothing to do with many drugs. So you took 2,000 mg at onetime, twice the maximum. Other people might have taken more (often to abuse it) but they are seriously harming themselves. If two is not enough then you need to see your doctor or at least get one of the medications without acetaminophen and if you want to take acetaminophen just take one or two tablets of Tylenol or generic acetaminophen (with nothing else). And always make sure you are not taking multiple things with acetaminophen in it. A dose higher than 1,000 mg can cause serious problems. Typically doing that once is won't hurt you but there have been a few people to go into liver failure from taking 1,500 mg at one time. That is extremely rare but it can happen. And taking more than 1,000 mg at a time over weeks or months can certainly cause damage. Tens of thousands of people are hospitalized due to acetaminophen and about 500 die in North America every year from acetaminophen. The technical toxic dose is 10,000 mg. As stupid as it may sound, just because other people take more does not make it OK. Most people know nothing about drugs and the FDA actually wants to pull acetaminophen doses that large. They want to make 1,000 mg prescription and only have 325 mg in a OTC dose. They even want Vicodin and Percocet removed from market because some people take 20-60 a day. Answered by Leontine Soscia 1 year ago.

You'll be fine. You shouldn't even get too sick. Probably some discomfort if anything though. You shouldn't take more than 2000mg of acetaminophen within 8 hours. Figure out the dosage you took, if it's under 2000mg you are good. Assuming each capsule has 500mg or less the worst that can happen is you might throw up. I just took 1300mg a couple days ago with a bunch of other stuff, and I threw up three times and I was fine. (This was an accident, don't mix acetaminophen with other chemicals that act on the liver). I don't believe 1300mg of acetaminophen on it's own is enough to make you feel anything negative. Answered by Joana Lemaster 1 year ago.

In the US 1400 people a year go to the ER from acute liver failure due to acetaminophen overdose. Of those, around 170 die each year from the same. This is because it seems like a harmless drug, but slightly more than the recommended dose is very harmful to the liver. There is a fascinating "This American Life" that talks about acetaminophen, and this is where I am quoting my information from. Alot of people will tell you it's pretty harmless, and it's not their fault, they just don't know the facts, that it's actually terrible for the liver. It has taken the FDA 24 years to issue a warning label regarding it's affects on the liver, despite excessive requests from doctors. Please use caution about how much you take, and if it isn't helping your pain, please ask your doctor for a stronger medication without acetaminophen. Hope this helps and sorry to be so preachy. Answered by Janel Dewese 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is hard on the liver, but the effects are cumulative. Heavy use over a long period can cause liver damage. Your body will be able to process the amount you mentioned here, only don't make it a habit. I won't touch anything containing this drug. All the liver I have left I'm saving for alcohol. Answered by Rosella Manely 1 year ago.

how long does it take for too much Tylenol to show from too much tylenol Answered by Lina Daher 1 year ago.

as long as u don't take anymore, most likely nothing. if u do however start to feel sick, i suggest seeing ur doctor. Answered by Rosaria Taitague 1 year ago.


Does acetaminophen cause blood thinning?
Asked by Liliana Medalion 1 year ago.

No, acetaminophen (brand name is Tylenol) does NOT cause blood thinning. It is NOT an NSAID (Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug). Aspirin, ibuprofen, and a number of other drugs (both over-the-counter and prescription) are NSAIDs. They have an effect on the cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme system. Aspirin in particular is a good blood thinner, because it causes all the platelets in your bloodstream (at the time when you take it) to be permanently changed so that they don't want to stick together to form a blood clot. This effect acts on the individual platelets, and so when those changed platelets get old and are filtered out of your blood by your body, then all the new platelets that replace them are ready and able to form blood clots. This is why people who take aspirin to thin their blood to prevent heart attacks (and other blood clot problems) have to take their aspirin every day (in order to make sure that most of their body's platelets are prevented from forming blood clots). Acetaminophen (Tylenol) DOES, however, increase the effect of a very common blood thinner known as warfarin (brand name Coumadin). Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information on the potential increase in blood thinning caused by this drug interaction. Take a look at the link below, particularly the part on acetaminophen at the bottom of the webpage. Hope this helps! Answered by Sophie Saris 1 year ago.

Is Acetaminophen A Blood Thinner Answered by Ellyn Loehrs 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Does acetaminophen cause blood thinning? Answered by Dion Windish 1 year ago.

What I've been told is Aspirin causes blood thinning and is used by some patients with heart conditions in a low dose. Acetaminophen is Tylenol type pain control medicine without aspirin in it and should not have the same effect. Answered by Cyrstal Lovato 1 year ago.

Is Tylenol A Blood Thinner Answered by Sharen Yochem 1 year ago.

asprin thins the blood. Acetaminophen messes up your liver if you use to much. Answered by Thi Holstege 1 year ago.

Not that I am aware of. ONLY Aspirin can thin the blood. Answered by Bernadette Delara 1 year ago.

yep any aspirin can thin the blood Answered by Latesha Schanding 1 year ago.


What "intermolecular forces" does Tylenol (Acetaminophen) have?
Ionic Ion Dipole Hydrogen Bonding Dipole Dipole Ion-Induced Dipole Dipole-Induced Dipole London Dispersion Thanks! Asked by Dian Kamke 1 year ago.

Well, acetaminophen is a neutral molecule, not an ion, so it wouldn't have ionic, ion-dipole, or ion-induced dipole forces. Acetaminophen does have hydrogen atoms in hydroxyl (O-H) and amide (H-N-(C=O)) groups that can engage in hydrogen bonding to lone electron pairs on the hydroxyl and amide carbonyl oxygen atoms. Acetaminophen is not a symmetric molecule, so it has a permanent electric dipole moment; therefore, there can be dipole-dipole interactions between acetaminophen molecules. Technically speaking, the permanent electric dipole moment of one acetaminophen molecule can induce dipole moments in other acetaminophen molecules, so there is a dipole-induced dipole interaction. Likewise, a spontaneous instantaneous dipole moment in one molecule can induce a an instantaneous dipole moment in another molecule, so there can be induced dipole-induced dipole (London dispersion) interactions. These effects are small compared to the dipole-dipole interaction, so sometimes people neglect these interactions if the dipole-dipole interaction is present. **************************************... Edit: This answer applies to the forces between acetaminophen molecules in pure acetaminophen crystals; if other chemicals are present at the molecular level, other interactions may apply. Answered by Rachelle Massingale 1 year ago.


Delayed Signs of Accidental Acetaminophen Overdose?
About 2 and a half years ago, when i was either 16 or 17, I took 20 triple C pills (with a beer I think) because I used to have a bad problem with pills and other drugs which I don't anymore thankfully. After I ingested them, I threw up I think between 6 and 8 hours later. Now lately if I go out and drink with... Asked by Melvin Clevland 1 year ago.

About 2 and a half years ago, when i was either 16 or 17, I took 20 triple C pills (with a beer I think) because I used to have a bad problem with pills and other drugs which I don't anymore thankfully. After I ingested them, I threw up I think between 6 and 8 hours later. Now lately if I go out and drink with some of my friends, which I hardly do mind you, I wake up the next day with a sore feeling on the upper right side of my back under my shoulder blade which I think may be my liver. I also sometimes get this feeling after I take 1 or 2 OTC pain pills. Since the 20 triple C pills contained 500 mg of acetaminophen a piece and I am 5' 8" and weigh 140 pounds, I want to know if I do have liver damage, how bad it might be, and if I'm going to be alright or not. I'm kind of freaking out because I don't want to be diagnosed with some very serious and life-changing disorder just because I was stupid at one point in my life. Another reason I'm worried is the fact that I'm in the DEP for the Air Force and I don't think they would allow me to go to basic or even join anymore since they are so picky if they found out this problem that I've just recently discovered. I'm going to the the Dr. to schedule an appointment today and get all the liver tests run when I go in for it. I just wish someone could shed a little insight on the situation before I go and see my doctor and even give me tips on how to strengthen my body/liver back up. And no I didn't go to the hospital after I overdosed. Serious answers only please. Answered by Dalia Rairdon 1 year ago.

well you said it organ damage liver pancreas spleen gallbladder stomach you probably have ULCERs and bleeding ulcers and you need a gastroscope rule out h pyloric bacteria this should not hurt you from the airforce its STRESS and yu will have lots of it so you will need to take prevacid nexium type drugs no alcohol no cigarette bland diet rice oatmeal corn bread etc you cna't take medication if it filters thru the liver you may need a liver transplant if it shows damage hard to say what you did to your self, Answered by Sybil Wikert 1 year ago.


What are the dangers of acetaminophen?
A guy friend depends on Tylenol p.m. every night. Asked by Carol Bircher 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen - Cumulative Effect Can Cause Acute Liver Failure (Keep reading the dosage alert is at the bottom. Acetaminophen, commonly known as Tylenol, is regarded as one of the safest pain relievers. Reportedly, over 100 million people/year take acetaminophen for various painful conditions, including arthritis. Liver damage occurs in a relatively small number of people who take acetaminophen, yet accidental overdose and acute liver failure caused by acetaminophen is recognized as a growing problem. Though labels of products containing acetaminophen disclose how much of the ingredient is in the product, some people put themselves at risk by not keeping track of their total daily intake of acetaminophen. Acetaminophen is in many narcotic drugs available only by prescription, such as Darvocet, Vicodin, and Percocet. Acetaminophen is also in many over-the-counter headache, cold, sinus, and flu medications. The total acetaminophen intake per day must be tracked. It is recommended that adults take no more than 4,000 mg/day of acetaminophen (the equivalent of 8 extra-strength 500 mg tablets or capsules). Because acetaminophen is considered "safe", patients are too often careless about their total daily intake. Answered by Kimberely Quist 1 year ago.

Tylenol PM is tylenol and benadryl. He is probably using it to sleep. Too much tylenol is hard on the liver, you would need in excess of 4,000 mg per day to be in excess. If he is dependent on something to help him sleep every single night, he needs to see his MD and find out why he is having difficulties. Answered by Li Junke 1 year ago.


What could happen if you take 10 acetaminophen in a day?
over the course of the day not all together at once. Would like i die. Asked by Lee Gaulin 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen dosage recommendation is as follows: 1)Regular strength (325 mg): 2 pills every 4 to 6 hours... do not exceed 12 in 24 hour period. (Taking 10 pills in one day should not, in most cases be a problem) 2) Extra Strength (500 mg): 2 pills every 4 to 6 hours ... do not exceed 8 in a 24 hour period (Taking 10 pills can become a problem) 3) Extended release (650mg): 2 pills every 8 hours... do not exceed 6 in a 24 hour period (Taking 10 is a definite problem and you should be checked for possible liver cell damage) 4) Liquid acetaminophen (500 mg per 15 ml): 2 Tablespoonfuls (30 mg total) every 4 to 6 hours. Not to exceed 8 Tbsp. in 24 hour period (you mentioned pills...so this doesn't apply) No one should take over 4 g (4000mg) a day. However, some people are more sensitive to the drug than other are. Therefore, for some, even the limit of 4000 mg a day would be too high. If you overdose on acetaminophen, it is best to go to the ER right away. They will remove the contents of the pills from the stomach and give you medications that will help the liver process what is left in your body. If you definitely did overdose and you just let it go...you may be looking at liver cell damage which will cause your immune system of the body to respond to it and cause inflammation inside the liver which causes the liver to enlarge in size. Stopping the medication and getting help right away is the best way to prevent this. Many times, patient who do overdose, will throw up the contents of their stomach. However, this does not guarantee that they have lost all of the drug...the drug may have already been absorbed. For 10 pills, you may not die...just have the starting of liver problems. The cells of the liver can heal if the medication is stopped. Be sure that you don't take any medications that have acetaminophen in it...as this drug is combined with many other medications... so overdosing is quite easy to do. You should have blood tests run to see how well the liver functions are doing and the liver enzymes to see if there is liver cell damage. I hope this information has been of help to you. Answered by Joesph Rehak 1 year ago.

It could seriously damage your liver. Acetaminophen isn't supposed to be used in large doses or for long periods of time because it really is harder on your liver. I suggest Ibuprofen because you can take more often for longer periods of time. Don't take it if you have had history of stomach bleeding or stomach pain because Ibuprofen can be irritating to the stomach and in sever cases cause bleeding. Naproxen is another alternative to Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen but is only take every 12 hours or so. If you are seriously worried though, I suggest you ask your doctor. He/she will be happy to help you find a safe, effective pain medication and dosage! :) Also, the brand names of each are listed below. Acetaminophen- Tylenol Ibuprofen- Advil Naproxen- Aleve Answered by Wen Sadahiro 1 year ago.

No you wont die, but an overdose of acetaminophen or constant usage of that amt can do severe damage to your liver. Answered by Clarice Ferrales 1 year ago.

The recommended dose used to be up to twelve a day, and it took billions of doses over decades of use for a few cases of chronic toxicity to cause the recommended maximum dose to be decreased. There is a risk of eventually developing chronic toxicity, but it's mighty small. Answered by Janel Steedman 1 year ago.

10 regular strength, not much. 10 extra strength will put you over the recommended daily limit, but one occurrence won't do any significant damage. Answered by Jerri Yerly 1 year ago.

Severe liver damage, organ failure, habituation (decreased response to drug), and fatality are all possible. Answered by Sherice Safrit 1 year ago.

Heavy load on your liver. Answered by Lizbeth Demateo 1 year ago.

it's harmful to your liver and your stomach will probably be pumped Answered by Lorenza Imperial 1 year ago.

That will ruin your liver if you don't overdose first Answered by Eugenia Losiewski 1 year ago.


Is 1500 mg of Acetaminophen too much to take at once?
Just wondering. I've heard a lot of conflicting answers. I know its bad to take that much often, but doing it once wouldn't do anything bad would it? I'd imagine it wouldn't.. What is the limit you should take of that in a single day? Asked by Katherin Tylman 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen overdose is one of the most common poisonings worldwide. People often think that acetaminophen, a pain-relieving medicine, is extremely safe. However, it may be deadly if taken in large doses. Acetaminophen Dosage For regular and extra-strength doses of acetaminophen, recommendations typically start at two tablets every four to six hours as needed. If you are taking the extended-release version, it is recommended that you take two tablets every eight hours. For children ages 6 to 12, the suggested dose is one regular-strength tablet every four to six hours as needed. For adults and children age 12 and older, the recommended dose is as follows:   Regular-strength (325 mg) acetaminophen: Two tablets every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed 12 tablets in 24 hours   Extra-strength (500 mg) acetaminophen: Two tablets (or geltabs) every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed 8 tablets in 24 hours   Extended-release (650 mg) acetaminophen: Two tablets (or geltabs) every eight hours, not to exceed six tablets in 24 hours   Liquid acetaminophen (500 mg per 15 mL): Two tablespoons (30 mL total) every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed eight tablespoonfuls in 24 hours.   It is important to avoid taking more than 4 grams (4000 mg) of acetaminophen per day. This includes other sources of acetaminophen, including many prescription pain medications and many nonprescription cold and cough remedies. Answered by Kimbra Sain 1 year ago.

Your gonna make your stomach bleed that ONE time dummy! Answered by Marvis Riechers 1 year ago.


Question about 5 mg Oxy Codone / 325 mg acetaminophen?
Also, can it be abused? If so, please provide some details. Thanks! Asked by Brianna Owca 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is used to relieve many kinds of minor aches and pains, including headaches, muscle aches, backaches, toothaches, menstrual cramps, arthritis, and the aches and pains that often accompany colds. It is suitable for control of pain following minor surgery, or for post-surgical pain after the need for stronger pain relievers has been reduced. Acetaminophen is also used in combination with narcotic analgesics both to increase pain relief and reduce the risk that the narcotics will be abused. Brand names of this drug - brand names, including Tylenol, Panadol, Aspirin Free Anacin. Whereas Oxycodone is a narcotic alkaloid with trade name: Roxicodone; drug class: synthetic opioid analgesic (Controlled Substance Schedule II); action: attaches to opiate receptors in the central nervous system; uses: moderate-to-severe pain, normally used in combination with aspirin or acetaminophen. Acetaminophen and Oxycodone are not one and the same and it is generally taken together. But this combination drug should be taken only on medical advice and should not be taken on long term basis. If taken on long term you may notice allergic reaction, hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat, shallow breathing, slow heartbeat; seizure (convulsions); cold, clammy skin; confusion; severe weakness or dizziness; or feeling light-headed, fainting. - Answered by Anya Goetjen 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is just Tylenol - you've probably taken it before alone OxyContin is just a brand name for oxycodone - so if you were taking just oxycodone (without the acetaminophen) that would be OxyContin Yes, people tend to abuse any narcotic - Most affects are short term (pain relief, 'high') - but acetaminophen can cause liver damage, do not drink alcohol while taking it and NEVER have more than 4000mg per day Answered by Archie Sanfratello 1 year ago.

The dog needs to see a vet immediately. Acetaminophen is toxic to dogs, so up to 325 mg is going to be a problem for your small dog. Answered by Carry Nease 1 year ago.

acetaminophen is a pain reliever also known as tylenol. oxycodone is the main ingredient in oxycontin so yes they are the same thing. yes, it abused very often. the short term effects are constipation, urine retention, small pupils, etc. the long term effects are addiction, withdrawal when off the pills, etc. i am a recovering addict to narcotics such as this one. Answered by Toi Densieski 1 year ago.

generic name on the left, brand name on the right: acetaminophen(APAP)= Tylenol oxycodone extended release(ER)= OxyContin oxycodone immediate release(IR)= Roxycodone, OxyIR, OxyFast. oxycodone w/APAP= Percocet, Tylox, Roxicet. --------------------------------------... Anything with OXYCODONE (OxyContin, Roxycodone, Percocet, etc.) is a SCHEDULE II contolled substance, and is likely to be abused. When you say "this exact drug (5/325)", you must be referring to PERCOCET 5/325 (oxycodone 5mg w/ acetaminophen 325mg). Percocet contains oxycodone, therefore it IS a controlled substance, and CAN be abused. --------------------------------------... SIDE EFFECTS differ from person to person (side effects can include dizziness, nausea/vomiting, and constipation). --------------------------------------... Often a tolerance is built, so the person must take more and more of the drug to satisfy their needs. WITHDRAWAL can be a painful process that can include (but is not limited to): pain, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, anxiety, fever, etc. Symptoms of withdrawal usually begin within 6-8 hours of discontinuation. Answered by Tim Seltzen 1 year ago.

OxyContin is the trade name for extended release oxycodone. However, in this formulation it is not extended release nor does OxyContin have Tylenol (acetaminophen) in it. So technically, no its not the same. Answered by Domitila Broddy 1 year ago.


How much Acetaminophen is too much Acetaminophen? (Nyquil, see dose & weight)?
I'm 115 pounds 5"5' female and I took 4 capsules... This doesn't seem like an outrageous amount as I've heard of people taking more... but with my size, what will be the likely outcome? Asked by Alona Otex 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is one of only a few drugs with a maximum dose set in stone. The maximum dose is 1,000 mg (1 gram) at one time. The maximum daily dose is 4,000 mg (4 grams) in divided doses. 1,000 mg can be repeated every 4-6hrs as needed up to 4,000 mg/day. And weight (contrary to popular belief) has little or nothing to do with many drugs. So you took 2,000 mg at onetime, twice the maximum. Other people might have taken more (often to abuse it) but they are seriously harming themselves. If two is not enough then you need to see your doctor or at least get one of the medications without acetaminophen and if you want to take acetaminophen just take one or two tablets of Tylenol or generic acetaminophen (with nothing else). And always make sure you are not taking multiple things with acetaminophen in it. A dose higher than 1,000 mg can cause serious problems. Typically doing that once is won't hurt you but there have been a few people to go into liver failure from taking 1,500 mg at one time. That is extremely rare but it can happen. And taking more than 1,000 mg at a time over weeks or months can certainly cause damage. Tens of thousands of people are hospitalized due to acetaminophen and about 500 die in North America every year from acetaminophen. The technical toxic dose is 10,000 mg. As stupid as it may sound, just because other people take more does not make it OK. Most people know nothing about drugs and the FDA actually wants to pull acetaminophen doses that large. They want to make 1,000 mg prescription and only have 325 mg in a OTC dose. They even want Vicodin and Percocet removed from market because some people take 20-60 a day. Answered by Cruz Georgiadis 1 year ago.

You'll be fine. You shouldn't even get too sick. Probably some discomfort if anything though. You shouldn't take more than 2000mg of acetaminophen within 8 hours. Figure out the dosage you took, if it's under 2000mg you are good. Assuming each capsule has 500mg or less the worst that can happen is you might throw up. I just took 1300mg a couple days ago with a bunch of other stuff, and I threw up three times and I was fine. (This was an accident, don't mix acetaminophen with other chemicals that act on the liver). I don't believe 1300mg of acetaminophen on it's own is enough to make you feel anything negative. Answered by Treasa Haulk 1 year ago.

In the US 1400 people a year go to the ER from acute liver failure due to acetaminophen overdose. Of those, around 170 die each year from the same. This is because it seems like a harmless drug, but slightly more than the recommended dose is very harmful to the liver. There is a fascinating "This American Life" that talks about acetaminophen, and this is where I am quoting my information from. Alot of people will tell you it's pretty harmless, and it's not their fault, they just don't know the facts, that it's actually terrible for the liver. It has taken the FDA 24 years to issue a warning label regarding it's affects on the liver, despite excessive requests from doctors. Please use caution about how much you take, and if it isn't helping your pain, please ask your doctor for a stronger medication without acetaminophen. Hope this helps and sorry to be so preachy. Answered by Lakisha Jerome 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is hard on the liver, but the effects are cumulative. Heavy use over a long period can cause liver damage. Your body will be able to process the amount you mentioned here, only don't make it a habit. I won't touch anything containing this drug. All the liver I have left I'm saving for alcohol. Answered by Brooks Masuda 1 year ago.

how long does it take for too much Tylenol to show from too much tylenol Answered by Josphine Lajoy 1 year ago.

as long as u don't take anymore, most likely nothing. if u do however start to feel sick, i suggest seeing ur doctor. Answered by Amos Hussein 1 year ago.


Does acetaminophen cause blood thinning?
Asked by Young Spayd 1 year ago.

No, acetaminophen (brand name is Tylenol) does NOT cause blood thinning. It is NOT an NSAID (Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug). Aspirin, ibuprofen, and a number of other drugs (both over-the-counter and prescription) are NSAIDs. They have an effect on the cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme system. Aspirin in particular is a good blood thinner, because it causes all the platelets in your bloodstream (at the time when you take it) to be permanently changed so that they don't want to stick together to form a blood clot. This effect acts on the individual platelets, and so when those changed platelets get old and are filtered out of your blood by your body, then all the new platelets that replace them are ready and able to form blood clots. This is why people who take aspirin to thin their blood to prevent heart attacks (and other blood clot problems) have to take their aspirin every day (in order to make sure that most of their body's platelets are prevented from forming blood clots). Acetaminophen (Tylenol) DOES, however, increase the effect of a very common blood thinner known as warfarin (brand name Coumadin). Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information on the potential increase in blood thinning caused by this drug interaction. Take a look at the link below, particularly the part on acetaminophen at the bottom of the webpage. Hope this helps! Answered by Leeann Safe 1 year ago.

Is Acetaminophen A Blood Thinner Answered by Issac Sinkfield 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Does acetaminophen cause blood thinning? Answered by Alison Maruyama 1 year ago.

What I've been told is Aspirin causes blood thinning and is used by some patients with heart conditions in a low dose. Acetaminophen is Tylenol type pain control medicine without aspirin in it and should not have the same effect. Answered by Idalia Rousselle 1 year ago.

Is Tylenol A Blood Thinner Answered by Meta Pinkney 1 year ago.

asprin thins the blood. Acetaminophen messes up your liver if you use to much. Answered by Erma Dimick 1 year ago.

Not that I am aware of. ONLY Aspirin can thin the blood. Answered by Mui Gorder 1 year ago.

yep any aspirin can thin the blood Answered by Onie Serene 1 year ago.


What "intermolecular forces" does Tylenol (Acetaminophen) have?
Ionic Ion Dipole Hydrogen Bonding Dipole Dipole Ion-Induced Dipole Dipole-Induced Dipole London Dispersion Thanks! Asked by Delicia Jagher 1 year ago.

Well, acetaminophen is a neutral molecule, not an ion, so it wouldn't have ionic, ion-dipole, or ion-induced dipole forces. Acetaminophen does have hydrogen atoms in hydroxyl (O-H) and amide (H-N-(C=O)) groups that can engage in hydrogen bonding to lone electron pairs on the hydroxyl and amide carbonyl oxygen atoms. Acetaminophen is not a symmetric molecule, so it has a permanent electric dipole moment; therefore, there can be dipole-dipole interactions between acetaminophen molecules. Technically speaking, the permanent electric dipole moment of one acetaminophen molecule can induce dipole moments in other acetaminophen molecules, so there is a dipole-induced dipole interaction. Likewise, a spontaneous instantaneous dipole moment in one molecule can induce a an instantaneous dipole moment in another molecule, so there can be induced dipole-induced dipole (London dispersion) interactions. These effects are small compared to the dipole-dipole interaction, so sometimes people neglect these interactions if the dipole-dipole interaction is present. **************************************... Edit: This answer applies to the forces between acetaminophen molecules in pure acetaminophen crystals; if other chemicals are present at the molecular level, other interactions may apply. Answered by Antonette Sumler 1 year ago.


Delayed Signs of Accidental Acetaminophen Overdose?
About 2 and a half years ago, when i was either 16 or 17, I took 20 triple C pills (with a beer I think) because I used to have a bad problem with pills and other drugs which I don't anymore thankfully. After I ingested them, I threw up I think between 6 and 8 hours later. Now lately if I go out and drink with... Asked by Tristan Dumay 1 year ago.

About 2 and a half years ago, when i was either 16 or 17, I took 20 triple C pills (with a beer I think) because I used to have a bad problem with pills and other drugs which I don't anymore thankfully. After I ingested them, I threw up I think between 6 and 8 hours later. Now lately if I go out and drink with some of my friends, which I hardly do mind you, I wake up the next day with a sore feeling on the upper right side of my back under my shoulder blade which I think may be my liver. I also sometimes get this feeling after I take 1 or 2 OTC pain pills. Since the 20 triple C pills contained 500 mg of acetaminophen a piece and I am 5' 8" and weigh 140 pounds, I want to know if I do have liver damage, how bad it might be, and if I'm going to be alright or not. I'm kind of freaking out because I don't want to be diagnosed with some very serious and life-changing disorder just because I was stupid at one point in my life. Another reason I'm worried is the fact that I'm in the DEP for the Air Force and I don't think they would allow me to go to basic or even join anymore since they are so picky if they found out this problem that I've just recently discovered. I'm going to the the Dr. to schedule an appointment today and get all the liver tests run when I go in for it. I just wish someone could shed a little insight on the situation before I go and see my doctor and even give me tips on how to strengthen my body/liver back up. And no I didn't go to the hospital after I overdosed. Serious answers only please. Answered by Arturo Skwarek 1 year ago.

well you said it organ damage liver pancreas spleen gallbladder stomach you probably have ULCERs and bleeding ulcers and you need a gastroscope rule out h pyloric bacteria this should not hurt you from the airforce its STRESS and yu will have lots of it so you will need to take prevacid nexium type drugs no alcohol no cigarette bland diet rice oatmeal corn bread etc you cna't take medication if it filters thru the liver you may need a liver transplant if it shows damage hard to say what you did to your self, Answered by Bernadine Steinbach 1 year ago.


What are the dangers of acetaminophen?
A guy friend depends on Tylenol p.m. every night. Asked by Mayra Unch 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen - Cumulative Effect Can Cause Acute Liver Failure (Keep reading the dosage alert is at the bottom. Acetaminophen, commonly known as Tylenol, is regarded as one of the safest pain relievers. Reportedly, over 100 million people/year take acetaminophen for various painful conditions, including arthritis. Liver damage occurs in a relatively small number of people who take acetaminophen, yet accidental overdose and acute liver failure caused by acetaminophen is recognized as a growing problem. Though labels of products containing acetaminophen disclose how much of the ingredient is in the product, some people put themselves at risk by not keeping track of their total daily intake of acetaminophen. Acetaminophen is in many narcotic drugs available only by prescription, such as Darvocet, Vicodin, and Percocet. Acetaminophen is also in many over-the-counter headache, cold, sinus, and flu medications. The total acetaminophen intake per day must be tracked. It is recommended that adults take no more than 4,000 mg/day of acetaminophen (the equivalent of 8 extra-strength 500 mg tablets or capsules). Because acetaminophen is considered "safe", patients are too often careless about their total daily intake. Answered by Caitlin Uvalles 1 year ago.

Tylenol PM is tylenol and benadryl. He is probably using it to sleep. Too much tylenol is hard on the liver, you would need in excess of 4,000 mg per day to be in excess. If he is dependent on something to help him sleep every single night, he needs to see his MD and find out why he is having difficulties. Answered by Merle Deshotel 1 year ago.


What could happen if you take 10 acetaminophen in a day?
over the course of the day not all together at once. Would like i die. Asked by Estefana Hubbert 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen dosage recommendation is as follows: 1)Regular strength (325 mg): 2 pills every 4 to 6 hours... do not exceed 12 in 24 hour period. (Taking 10 pills in one day should not, in most cases be a problem) 2) Extra Strength (500 mg): 2 pills every 4 to 6 hours ... do not exceed 8 in a 24 hour period (Taking 10 pills can become a problem) 3) Extended release (650mg): 2 pills every 8 hours... do not exceed 6 in a 24 hour period (Taking 10 is a definite problem and you should be checked for possible liver cell damage) 4) Liquid acetaminophen (500 mg per 15 ml): 2 Tablespoonfuls (30 mg total) every 4 to 6 hours. Not to exceed 8 Tbsp. in 24 hour period (you mentioned pills...so this doesn't apply) No one should take over 4 g (4000mg) a day. However, some people are more sensitive to the drug than other are. Therefore, for some, even the limit of 4000 mg a day would be too high. If you overdose on acetaminophen, it is best to go to the ER right away. They will remove the contents of the pills from the stomach and give you medications that will help the liver process what is left in your body. If you definitely did overdose and you just let it go...you may be looking at liver cell damage which will cause your immune system of the body to respond to it and cause inflammation inside the liver which causes the liver to enlarge in size. Stopping the medication and getting help right away is the best way to prevent this. Many times, patient who do overdose, will throw up the contents of their stomach. However, this does not guarantee that they have lost all of the drug...the drug may have already been absorbed. For 10 pills, you may not die...just have the starting of liver problems. The cells of the liver can heal if the medication is stopped. Be sure that you don't take any medications that have acetaminophen in it...as this drug is combined with many other medications... so overdosing is quite easy to do. You should have blood tests run to see how well the liver functions are doing and the liver enzymes to see if there is liver cell damage. I hope this information has been of help to you. Answered by Lashunda Bingamon 1 year ago.

It could seriously damage your liver. Acetaminophen isn't supposed to be used in large doses or for long periods of time because it really is harder on your liver. I suggest Ibuprofen because you can take more often for longer periods of time. Don't take it if you have had history of stomach bleeding or stomach pain because Ibuprofen can be irritating to the stomach and in sever cases cause bleeding. Naproxen is another alternative to Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen but is only take every 12 hours or so. If you are seriously worried though, I suggest you ask your doctor. He/she will be happy to help you find a safe, effective pain medication and dosage! :) Also, the brand names of each are listed below. Acetaminophen- Tylenol Ibuprofen- Advil Naproxen- Aleve Answered by Sharita Amentler 1 year ago.

No you wont die, but an overdose of acetaminophen or constant usage of that amt can do severe damage to your liver. Answered by Tesha Camper 1 year ago.

The recommended dose used to be up to twelve a day, and it took billions of doses over decades of use for a few cases of chronic toxicity to cause the recommended maximum dose to be decreased. There is a risk of eventually developing chronic toxicity, but it's mighty small. Answered by Micheline Senter 1 year ago.

10 regular strength, not much. 10 extra strength will put you over the recommended daily limit, but one occurrence won't do any significant damage. Answered by Mertie Kobrin 1 year ago.

Severe liver damage, organ failure, habituation (decreased response to drug), and fatality are all possible. Answered by Alanna Philps 1 year ago.

Heavy load on your liver. Answered by Cherlyn Willmann 1 year ago.

it's harmful to your liver and your stomach will probably be pumped Answered by Chang Quintela 1 year ago.

That will ruin your liver if you don't overdose first Answered by Aisha Mogannam 1 year ago.


Is 1500 mg of Acetaminophen too much to take at once?
Just wondering. I've heard a lot of conflicting answers. I know its bad to take that much often, but doing it once wouldn't do anything bad would it? I'd imagine it wouldn't.. What is the limit you should take of that in a single day? Asked by Marcene President 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen overdose is one of the most common poisonings worldwide. People often think that acetaminophen, a pain-relieving medicine, is extremely safe. However, it may be deadly if taken in large doses. Acetaminophen Dosage For regular and extra-strength doses of acetaminophen, recommendations typically start at two tablets every four to six hours as needed. If you are taking the extended-release version, it is recommended that you take two tablets every eight hours. For children ages 6 to 12, the suggested dose is one regular-strength tablet every four to six hours as needed. For adults and children age 12 and older, the recommended dose is as follows:   Regular-strength (325 mg) acetaminophen: Two tablets every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed 12 tablets in 24 hours   Extra-strength (500 mg) acetaminophen: Two tablets (or geltabs) every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed 8 tablets in 24 hours   Extended-release (650 mg) acetaminophen: Two tablets (or geltabs) every eight hours, not to exceed six tablets in 24 hours   Liquid acetaminophen (500 mg per 15 mL): Two tablespoons (30 mL total) every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed eight tablespoonfuls in 24 hours.   It is important to avoid taking more than 4 grams (4000 mg) of acetaminophen per day. This includes other sources of acetaminophen, including many prescription pain medications and many nonprescription cold and cough remedies. Answered by Jannie Waser 1 year ago.

Your gonna make your stomach bleed that ONE time dummy! Answered by Isela Schweinsberg 1 year ago.


Question about 5 mg Oxy Codone / 325 mg acetaminophen?
Also, can it be abused? If so, please provide some details. Thanks! Asked by Kathy Pivec 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is used to relieve many kinds of minor aches and pains, including headaches, muscle aches, backaches, toothaches, menstrual cramps, arthritis, and the aches and pains that often accompany colds. It is suitable for control of pain following minor surgery, or for post-surgical pain after the need for stronger pain relievers has been reduced. Acetaminophen is also used in combination with narcotic analgesics both to increase pain relief and reduce the risk that the narcotics will be abused. Brand names of this drug - brand names, including Tylenol, Panadol, Aspirin Free Anacin. Whereas Oxycodone is a narcotic alkaloid with trade name: Roxicodone; drug class: synthetic opioid analgesic (Controlled Substance Schedule II); action: attaches to opiate receptors in the central nervous system; uses: moderate-to-severe pain, normally used in combination with aspirin or acetaminophen. Acetaminophen and Oxycodone are not one and the same and it is generally taken together. But this combination drug should be taken only on medical advice and should not be taken on long term basis. If taken on long term you may notice allergic reaction, hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat, shallow breathing, slow heartbeat; seizure (convulsions); cold, clammy skin; confusion; severe weakness or dizziness; or feeling light-headed, fainting. - Answered by Reena Hertz 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is just Tylenol - you've probably taken it before alone OxyContin is just a brand name for oxycodone - so if you were taking just oxycodone (without the acetaminophen) that would be OxyContin Yes, people tend to abuse any narcotic - Most affects are short term (pain relief, 'high') - but acetaminophen can cause liver damage, do not drink alcohol while taking it and NEVER have more than 4000mg per day Answered by Celia Bergner 1 year ago.

The dog needs to see a vet immediately. Acetaminophen is toxic to dogs, so up to 325 mg is going to be a problem for your small dog. Answered by Jeni Blackwelder 1 year ago.

acetaminophen is a pain reliever also known as tylenol. oxycodone is the main ingredient in oxycontin so yes they are the same thing. yes, it abused very often. the short term effects are constipation, urine retention, small pupils, etc. the long term effects are addiction, withdrawal when off the pills, etc. i am a recovering addict to narcotics such as this one. Answered by Hipolito Dottin 1 year ago.

generic name on the left, brand name on the right: acetaminophen(APAP)= Tylenol oxycodone extended release(ER)= OxyContin oxycodone immediate release(IR)= Roxycodone, OxyIR, OxyFast. oxycodone w/APAP= Percocet, Tylox, Roxicet. --------------------------------------... Anything with OXYCODONE (OxyContin, Roxycodone, Percocet, etc.) is a SCHEDULE II contolled substance, and is likely to be abused. When you say "this exact drug (5/325)", you must be referring to PERCOCET 5/325 (oxycodone 5mg w/ acetaminophen 325mg). Percocet contains oxycodone, therefore it IS a controlled substance, and CAN be abused. --------------------------------------... SIDE EFFECTS differ from person to person (side effects can include dizziness, nausea/vomiting, and constipation). --------------------------------------... Often a tolerance is built, so the person must take more and more of the drug to satisfy their needs. WITHDRAWAL can be a painful process that can include (but is not limited to): pain, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, anxiety, fever, etc. Symptoms of withdrawal usually begin within 6-8 hours of discontinuation. Answered by Willa Hendershott 1 year ago.

OxyContin is the trade name for extended release oxycodone. However, in this formulation it is not extended release nor does OxyContin have Tylenol (acetaminophen) in it. So technically, no its not the same. Answered by Elena Hirneise 1 year ago.


How much Acetaminophen is too much Acetaminophen? (Nyquil, see dose & weight)?
I'm 115 pounds 5"5' female and I took 4 capsules... This doesn't seem like an outrageous amount as I've heard of people taking more... but with my size, what will be the likely outcome? Asked by Malena Cartegena 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is one of only a few drugs with a maximum dose set in stone. The maximum dose is 1,000 mg (1 gram) at one time. The maximum daily dose is 4,000 mg (4 grams) in divided doses. 1,000 mg can be repeated every 4-6hrs as needed up to 4,000 mg/day. And weight (contrary to popular belief) has little or nothing to do with many drugs. So you took 2,000 mg at onetime, twice the maximum. Other people might have taken more (often to abuse it) but they are seriously harming themselves. If two is not enough then you need to see your doctor or at least get one of the medications without acetaminophen and if you want to take acetaminophen just take one or two tablets of Tylenol or generic acetaminophen (with nothing else). And always make sure you are not taking multiple things with acetaminophen in it. A dose higher than 1,000 mg can cause serious problems. Typically doing that once is won't hurt you but there have been a few people to go into liver failure from taking 1,500 mg at one time. That is extremely rare but it can happen. And taking more than 1,000 mg at a time over weeks or months can certainly cause damage. Tens of thousands of people are hospitalized due to acetaminophen and about 500 die in North America every year from acetaminophen. The technical toxic dose is 10,000 mg. As stupid as it may sound, just because other people take more does not make it OK. Most people know nothing about drugs and the FDA actually wants to pull acetaminophen doses that large. They want to make 1,000 mg prescription and only have 325 mg in a OTC dose. They even want Vicodin and Percocet removed from market because some people take 20-60 a day. Answered by Ethyl Channell 1 year ago.

You'll be fine. You shouldn't even get too sick. Probably some discomfort if anything though. You shouldn't take more than 2000mg of acetaminophen within 8 hours. Figure out the dosage you took, if it's under 2000mg you are good. Assuming each capsule has 500mg or less the worst that can happen is you might throw up. I just took 1300mg a couple days ago with a bunch of other stuff, and I threw up three times and I was fine. (This was an accident, don't mix acetaminophen with other chemicals that act on the liver). I don't believe 1300mg of acetaminophen on it's own is enough to make you feel anything negative. Answered by Parthenia Vanguilder 1 year ago.

In the US 1400 people a year go to the ER from acute liver failure due to acetaminophen overdose. Of those, around 170 die each year from the same. This is because it seems like a harmless drug, but slightly more than the recommended dose is very harmful to the liver. There is a fascinating "This American Life" that talks about acetaminophen, and this is where I am quoting my information from. Alot of people will tell you it's pretty harmless, and it's not their fault, they just don't know the facts, that it's actually terrible for the liver. It has taken the FDA 24 years to issue a warning label regarding it's affects on the liver, despite excessive requests from doctors. Please use caution about how much you take, and if it isn't helping your pain, please ask your doctor for a stronger medication without acetaminophen. Hope this helps and sorry to be so preachy. Answered by Yvonne Bickell 1 year ago.

Acetaminophen is hard on the liver, but the effects are cumulative. Heavy use over a long period can cause liver damage. Your body will be able to process the amount you mentioned here, only don't make it a habit. I won't touch anything containing this drug. All the liver I have left I'm saving for alcohol. Answered by Nerissa Leaman 1 year ago.

how long does it take for too much Tylenol to show from too much tylenol Answered by Carlos Thate 1 year ago.

as long as u don't take anymore, most likely nothing. if u do however start to feel sick, i suggest seeing ur doctor. Answered by Kimber Sturwold 1 year ago.


Does acetaminophen cause blood thinning?
Asked by Lula Reither 1 year ago.

No, acetaminophen (brand name is Tylenol) does NOT cause blood thinning. It is NOT an NSAID (Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug). Aspirin, ibuprofen, and a number of other drugs (both over-the-counter and prescription) are NSAIDs. They have an effect on the cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme system. Aspirin in particular is a good blood thinner, because it causes all the platelets in your bloodstream (at the time when you take it) to be permanently changed so that they don't want to stick together to form a blood clot. This effect acts on the individual platelets, and so when those changed platelets get old and are filtered out of your blood by your body, then all the new platelets that replace them are ready and able to form blood clots. This is why people who take aspirin to thin their blood to prevent heart attacks (and other blood clot problems) have to take their aspirin every day (in order to make sure that most of their body's platelets are prevented from forming blood clots). Acetaminophen (Tylenol) DOES, however, increase the effect of a very common blood thinner known as warfarin (brand name Coumadin). Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information on the potential increase in blood thinning caused by this drug interaction. Take a look at the link below, particularly the part on acetaminophen at the bottom of the webpage. Hope this helps! Answered by Gary Neita 1 year ago.

Is Acetaminophen A Blood Thinner Answered by Julian Goynes 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Does acetaminophen cause blood thinning? Answered by Leigh Gopin 1 year ago.

What I've been told is Aspirin causes blood thinning and is used by some patients with heart conditions in a low dose. Acetaminophen is Tylenol type pain control medicine without aspirin in it and should not have the same effect. Answered by Jesica Noblin 1 year ago.

Is Tylenol A Blood Thinner Answered by Anette Herkert 1 year ago.

asprin thins the blood. Acetaminophen messes up your liver if you use to much. Answered by Alva Heinold 1 year ago.

Not that I am aware of. ONLY Aspirin can thin the blood. Answered by Bernie Boutelle 1 year ago.

yep any aspirin can thin the blood Answered by Delinda Didlake 1 year ago.


What "intermolecular forces" does Tylenol (Acetaminophen) have?
Ionic Ion Dipole Hydrogen Bonding Dipole Dipole Ion-Induced Dipole Dipole-Induced Dipole London Dispersion Thanks! Asked by Lanette Pietzsch 1 year ago.

Well, acetaminophen is a neutral molecule, not an ion, so it wouldn't have ionic, ion-dipole, or ion-induced dipole forces. Acetaminophen does have hydrogen atoms in hydroxyl (O-H) and amide (H-N-(C=O)) groups that can engage in hydrogen bonding to lone electron pairs on the hydroxyl and amide carbonyl oxygen atoms. Acetaminophen is not a symmetric molecule, so it has a permanent electric dipole moment; therefore, there can be dipole-dipole interactions between acetaminophen molecules. Technically speaking, the permanent electric dipole moment of one acetaminophen molecule can induce dipole moments in other acetaminophen molecules, so there is a dipole-induced dipole interaction. Likewise, a spontaneous instantaneous dipole moment in one molecule can induce a an instantaneous dipole moment in another molecule, so there can be induced dipole-induced dipole (London dispersion) interactions. These effects are small compared to the dipole-dipole interaction, so sometimes people neglect these interactions if the dipole-dipole interaction is present. **************************************... Edit: This answer applies to the forces between acetaminophen molecules in pure acetaminophen crystals; if other chemicals are present at the molecular level, other interactions may apply. Answered by Hannah Guilmette 1 year ago.


Delayed Signs of Accidental Acetaminophen Overdose?
About 2 and a half years ago, when i was either 16 or 17, I took 20 triple C pills (with a beer I think) because I used to have a bad problem with pills and other drugs which I don't anymore thankfully. After I ingested them, I threw up I think between 6 and 8 hours later. Now lately if I go out and drink with... Asked by Tara Clute 1 year ago.

About 2 and a half years ago, when i was either 16 or 17, I took 20 triple C pills (with a beer I think) because I used to have a bad problem with pills and other drugs which I don't anymore thankfully. After I ingested them, I threw up I think between 6 and 8 hours later. Now lately if I go out and drink with some of my friends, which I hardly do mind you, I wake up the next day with a sore feeling on the upper right side of my back under my shoulder blade which I think may be my liver. I also sometimes get this feeling after I take 1 or 2 OTC pain pills. Since the 20 triple C pills contained 500 mg of acetaminophen a piece and I am 5' 8" and weigh 140 pounds, I want to know if I do have liver damage, how bad it might be, and if I'm going to be alright or not. I'm kind of freaking out because I don't want to be diagnosed with some very serious and life-changing disorder just because I was stupid at one point in my life. Another reason I'm worried is the fact that I'm in the DEP for the Air Force and I don't think they would allow me to go to basic or even join anymore since they are so picky if they found out this problem that I've just recently discovered. I'm going to the the Dr. to schedule an appointment today and get all the liver tests run when I go in for it. I just wish someone could shed a little insight on the situation before I go and see my doctor and even give me tips on how to strengthen my body/liver back up. And no I didn't go to the hospital after I overdosed. Serious answers only please. Answered by Iraida Clover 1 year ago.

well you said it organ damage liver pancreas spleen gallbladder stomach you probably have ULCERs and bleeding ulcers and you need a gastroscope rule out h pyloric bacteria this should not hurt you from the airforce its STRESS and yu will have lots of it so you will need to take prevacid nexium type drugs no alcohol no cigarette bland diet rice oatmeal corn bread etc you cna't take medication if it filters thru the liver you may need a liver transplant if it shows damage hard to say what you did to your self, Answered by Howard Ragins 1 year ago.


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