Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020184/001.

Names and composition

"ACEON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020184/001 ACEON PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
020184/002 ACEON PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
020184/003 ACEON PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 8MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020184/001 ACEON PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
020184/002 ACEON PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
020184/003 ACEON PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
078138/001 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
078138/002 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
078138/003 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
078263/001 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
078263/002 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
078263/003 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
079070/001 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
079070/002 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
079070/003 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
090072/001 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
090072/002 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
090072/003 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
090463/001 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
090463/002 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
090463/003 PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE PERINDOPRIL ERBUMINE TABLET/ORAL 8MG

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Answered questions

Does grapefruit juice affect Aceon?
I've heard that consuming grapefruit and grapefruit juice can have adverse effects on certain drugs if they are taken in conjunction. Aceon (perindopril) is an ACE inhibitor used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). Is Aceon among the drugs that are are affected? If so, how long must one wait between... Asked by Madge Borroto 1 year ago.

I've heard that consuming grapefruit and grapefruit juice can have adverse effects on certain drugs if they are taken in conjunction. Aceon (perindopril) is an ACE inhibitor used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). Is Aceon among the drugs that are are affected? If so, how long must one wait between drinking the juice and taking the drug (i.e. at breakfast) ? Answered by Theola Oroz 1 year ago.

sbutk - It turns out that an enzyme called bergamottin found in grapefruit juice inhibits the activity of something called the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme in the intestinal wall. The CYP3A4 isoenzyme metabolizes many of the medicines people take, so inhibiting this can lead to increases in blood levels for these drugs. These increased levels can lead, in turn, to a higher risk of side effects. Fortunately, perindopril is NOT one of the medications metabolized through this pathway. Therefore, grapefruit juice will NOT affect your blood levels of the drug. Drugs that ARE affected by grapefruit juice include some antifungals (ketoconazole, etc.), channel blockers (diltiazem, nifedipine, etc.), digoxin, statin drugs (atorvastatin, etc.), macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, etc.), PDE5 inhibitors (Viagra, etc.), SSRI antidepressants (fluoxetine, etc.), tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline, etc.), and warfarin. When in doubt, it is always best to ask your pharmacist... hope that helps! Answered by Rocco Hardman 1 year ago.

I have read some articles about this questions and there are doctors who answered that grapefruit juice and Aceon has no interaction with each other. maybe you can try to do more research, but for me maybe it depends on what brand of grapefruit juice you will drink because not all brands of the grapefruit juice contains the same ingredients and the fact that there are things that do not interact well with aceon, maybe some grapefruit juice affects Aceon. I think this can help you. Just do google with pharmacyescrow.org/s346-s-ACEON Answered by Ayana Huscher 1 year ago.

How much are you drinking? Generally grapefruit juice will mess up blood pressure medicine due to the acidity in it. I have never heard of it messing up the pill or depo. If you are on a grapefuit diet I strongly urge you to stop. It is not healthy and can have some horrible effects. It can cause liver problems and it can be hard on your colon and intestines. Moderation is key. I was on this diet years ago and I eventually got sick because of it. The best way to manage your diet is through a variety of fruits and vegetables and lean meats. Exercise is also important. Too much of anything is not safe. Hope this helps . Answered by Margarita Hawkins 1 year ago.

read the labels on your meds. some meds mixed with grapefruit could be deadly. be careful. Answered by Marquis Lomas 1 year ago.


Give me a list of ace inhibitor medications?
TO MIDAGEVET, I APPOLOGIZE FOR THE NEG COMMENT, IAM NEW TO THIS AND WOULD GIVE ALL ANSWERS A THUMBS UP, JUST DON'T KNOW HOW. BUT ANYONE WILLING TO TAKE TIME TO ANSWER, I APPRECIATE AND GIVE A THUMBS UP. BEING AN RN, I KNOW SEVERAL BUT WAS JUST WANTING TO GET MORE OF A LIST THEN WHAT I KNOW OFF THE TOP OF MY... Asked by Alfredia Taccariello 1 year ago.

TO MIDAGEVET, I APPOLOGIZE FOR THE NEG COMMENT, IAM NEW TO THIS AND WOULD GIVE ALL ANSWERS A THUMBS UP, JUST DON'T KNOW HOW. BUT ANYONE WILLING TO TAKE TIME TO ANSWER, I APPRECIATE AND GIVE A THUMBS UP. BEING AN RN, I KNOW SEVERAL BUT WAS JUST WANTING TO GET MORE OF A LIST THEN WHAT I KNOW OFF THE TOP OF MY HEAD. BUT THANKS FOR TAKING THE TIME. AND THUMBS UP. Answered by Arlene Bello 1 year ago.

Altace aceon Captopril Lotesin Mavik Prinivil Univasc Vasotec Answered by Anika Vonholt 1 year ago.

ACE inhibitors can be divided into three groups based on their molecular structure: Sulfhydryl-containing ACE inhibitors * Captopril (Capoten®), the first ACE inhibitor Dicarboxylate-containing ACE inhibitors This is the largest group, including: * Enalapril (Vasotec®/Renitec®) * Ramipril (Altace®/Tritace®/Ramace®/Ramiwin®) * Quinapril (Accupril®) * Perindopril (Coversyl®) * Lisinopril (Lisodur®/Lopril®/Prinivil®/Zestril®) * Benazepril (Lotensin®) ] Phosphonate-containing ACE inhibitors * Fosinopril (Monopril®), the only member Naturally occurring Casokinins and lactokinins are breakdown products of casein and whey that occur naturally after ingestion of milk products, especially sour milk. Their role in blood pressure control is uncertain. Answered by Maisha Coon 1 year ago.

I take atenolol. It had the side effect of stopping my migraine headaches. (A good thing.) Update: I guess the reason I got the thumbs down was because atenolol is a beta blocker not an ace inhibitor. Sorry. Answered by Tonette Bortle 1 year ago.

captopril (Capoten), benazepril (Lotensin), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) fosinopril (Monopril), ramipril (Altace), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), and trandolapril (Mavik). Answered by Yajaira Alkema 1 year ago.

benazepril..captopril .enalapril.enalaprilat..fosinopril..lisi... .. Answered by Earnestine Seiner 1 year ago.


Perindopril is it any good ?
hi i asked a question before about blood pressure and have been given perindopril 4mg i am rather dubious about taking it.my doc says it works on a hormone produced by the kidneys but the side-effects include inability to get a hard-on ,i find it all worry .already with cycling and reducing stress my bp lower... Asked by Fransisca Hotz 1 year ago.

hi i asked a question before about blood pressure and have been given perindopril 4mg i am rather dubious about taking it. my doc says it works on a hormone produced by the kidneys but the side-effects include inability to get a hard-on ,i find it all worry .already with cycling and reducing stress my bp lower reading is improving the worst having been 170/115 but last week at the nurse it was 150/104 and 187/111. when my doc takes it soley with the old type machine its improved to 140/84 then to-day 162/90 i was a bit stressed, is all this bad enough for medication? Answered by Milton Swindler 1 year ago.

Aceon is the brand name.....It is of a class of drugs called ACE inhibitors - ED is not a common side effect - very very rare. More likely to get dry cough that never seems to go away. Good drug, has good efficacy. Considered a 3d generation of this class of medication -others that are 3d gen ACE are Mavik ( trandolapril ) and Altace (ramapril). Doc gave you correct mech of action for the drug - interupts the RAA cascade in the body. Consider a other classes of BP lowering drugs in combo - calcium channel blockers and or diuretics to lower your overall blood volume. Many options - take care of yourself outside of the pharma, then add the pharma to do the rest.... Answered by Leda Laidler 1 year ago.

Perindopril is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. Perindopril is in a class of medications called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. It makes blood flow more smoothly by preventing the production of certain natural chemicals that tighten the blood vessels. You have got Hypertension Stage 2. Please check the function of your kidneys, heart and retina. Answered by Everett Irizarri 1 year ago.


Can you tell me about Lisinopril?
My brother got this prescribed by a Doctor for his blood pressure, but it's not working that good per my brother's words. Can you tell me about it? Asked by Renae Beaz 1 year ago.

I'm not sure what it is you want to know about lisinopril. It's not capitalized, this is the generic name for Zestril and Prinivil. It's in the classification of antihypertensive meds known as ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors. Although the action is unnkown, it's thought to result primarily from the suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The most common adverse reactions are dizziness, orhtostatic hypotension, nasal congestion and diarrhea. A few of the less common adverse effects are headache, fatigue, nausea, impotence, rash and a persistent dry nonproductive cough. The life-threatening adverse reactions are hyperkalemia and rarely, anaphalaxis with afcial, throat and laryngeal edema. It has a number of drug interactions. Interacts with Capsaicin to cause an ACE-inhibitor-induced cough. May cause hyperkalemia when used with potassium-containing salt substitutes. It can increase creatinine, BUN, potassium, bilirubin levels and liver function test values. The treatment of hypertension is typically a 3-step one. Step 1 is making changes in diet, weight loss and changes in lifestyle (no smoking, reduced or no drinking, exercise, stress management). If this doesn't work, Step 2 is introducing an antihypertensive while continuing Step 1. Dosage adjuments may be needed for maximum effectiveness. If both Steps 1 & 2 fail to produce the desired results, Step 3 is adding another antihypertensive. I have no idea what your brother's dosage is and for how long he's been using it or anything else he's done to lower his blood pressure but he may need a dosage adjustment. He should also be following Step 1. Suggest he speak to his doctor. Answered by Alanna Papadopoulos 1 year ago.

Yes it is for your blood pressure, and yes if you stop it for 2 weeks your blood pressure will go back up. Lisinopril is actually used to help kidneys, it acts in the kidneys to lower the filtration pressure (blood pressure in the kidney) this is beneficial for the kidneys long term, but in some patients it lowers the filtration pressure to much, to the point that the kidneys can't filter the blood properly. From what you are describing, I would bet this is what is going on. Just stop taking the lisinopril, they will check you again in a few weeks and may put you back on a lower dose of the lisinopril or try a different blood pressure medications. Answered by Ashton Pickelsimer 1 year ago.

Zestril Classification Answered by Laticia Gagnon 1 year ago.

Prinivil Classification Answered by Iluminada Gavinski 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Dwight Reifsteck 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Kathi Terrian 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Augusta Weinrib 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Lakendra Langbehn 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Keila Thigpin 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Marcie Pantoliano 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Ladonna Vavricka 1 year ago.


Why isnt my high blood pressure under control even when I take medication?
correction on meds: it is Aceon and NOT Ambien sorry Asked by Kimberley Markve 1 year ago.

the medication just might not be working for you. everyone's body reacts differently to different meds. call your doctor, explain what's happening, and perhaps ask to switch to something different. Answered by So Arthurs 1 year ago.

Well, I say this coming from a chiropractic background... while the medicines may have helped with you in the past, your body will build up a tolerance to them. Either consult your MD, or visit with a Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) in your area. It's also possible that your headaches are completely unrelated to your HBP this time around, and something else is causing the pain. Also, DCs can counsel you on measures to help you get your BP under control without medication, so that you may not have to rely on the meds in the future. I realize people don't have the best view of chiropractic, but I can speak from my experience - I was 23 years old and on 28 pills a day that were doing nothing more than making my SYMPTOMS disappear. 6 weeks after being under chiropractic care, I was able to wean myself off of ALL of the medications and my condition is practically non-existent. Good luck! Answered by Wilda Youket 1 year ago.

There's a couple of avenues that can reduce your BP 1 is clean out your arteries thats the hard one but coughing and exercise helps keep them clean.2 is make your blood more fluid easier to pump this can be done by taking 1 low dose aspirin every day. Inform your doctor of all medication that you take this includes supplements and herbal cures. By telling your Dr.you are getting someone else involved in the process that enables success and forces us to focus on objectives. No smoking. No drinking, its either time to do something about it or get some life insurance that covers expenses and leaves the kids with a few quid.and stop trying. Ace inhibitors work you may need something heavy duty like ramipril you need to be serious about it . All the best Answered by Kenton Pooser 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Jimmy Danca 1 year ago.

I assume you mean Ambien for the first medication. That is a sleep aid...not a medication for hypertension. As to the Benicar, hypertension is a progressive disease. So it just may be time to up (or change) your medications. Also, it is not unusual for a doctor to have to tweak your prescriptions occasionally to find what works right just for you. I've been hypertensive for 2-3 years now and have had my medication changed 3 times. But don't just judge whether this is necessary by headaches. You could be right, but you would be better off buy an electronic blood pressure unit and actually monitoring your blood pressure...not just one symptom. Answered by Armida Evanich 1 year ago.

Is it Ambien? This medication is for sleep. Benicar HCT? Is for your B/P Your experience may be that you had headaches when they found your HTN but that does not necessarily indicate that your B/P is still high. It sounds like there may be a lot of stress factors in your life since you are taking something to help you sleep and this most definitely can cause muscle tension and headaches in the neck. It can also cause HTN. The only way to monitor this is to have yourself checked. There are times when B/P medications do not work for some and work well for others. You need to schedule another appointment for assessment/follow-up. It may be the doctor will need to try a different type of B/P medication for your treatment. I would try to look at your lifestyle, eating habits, and exercise regime to try and determine what is causing your sleeping difficulty. Make the changes that need to be made to eliminate the stressors in your life. Answered by Hattie Scroggin 1 year ago.

Ambien is a sedative not high blood pressure med. Tell your doctor, I use Zocor for hypertension. I went through several meds before I found one that has consistent, effective results. I have never heard of HBP and headaches being related to each other. P.S. If you are taking Ambien for insomnia ask your doc. for Ambien CR it works much more effectively. I use it for once in a blue moon for restlessness. Answered by Yulanda Franson 1 year ago.

Man this is a serious issue, one of my loved ones is experiencing this currently. And this person's is high as 204/110! You gotta change your life style just for a few months or weeks. Change your diet and exercise. Your heart is a muscle, keep it in good shape. The vessels in our brain are not as strong as the ones in our body, increased pressure can be bad for them. I can recommend, but you gotta ask your doc, and get your cholesterol checked immediately. Start with a daily timed walk, get a family member or a friend, or you gotta do what you gotta do and do it yourself. Increase the time daily and then when you feel you are ready begin jogging and exercises. And diet, no foods with grease, or very very little. Very less salt, very less carbs, and lots of fish, if you can't afford it get cans of tuna. Just bombard yourself with fruits and vegetables like anything. Begin with this and I'll pray for you. Answered by Toshiko Vanegas 1 year ago.

What is your caffeine intake? I have very hard to control HTN as well. It took a couple of doctors and more than a few meds to keep it almost normal. See your doctor, maybe he needs to change or increase your meds. Exercise and diet also help. Answered by Tony Keto 1 year ago.

Try eating a lot of healthy high fiber foods. Bananas are very good for high blood pressure and oatmeal. Anything with fiber fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains. And try to lower your salt intake. Answered by Titus Pucci 1 year ago.

Maybe your medication needs to be changed, Do you take 1 med at PM and 1 med in am?, are you watching your diet? Answered by Lucinda Mcmikle 1 year ago.


Show me the medication lisinopril?
Asked by Larry Mcdonell 1 year ago.

lisinopril Generic Name: lisinopril (lyse IN oh pril) Brand names: Prinivil, Zestril What is lisinopril? Feedback for lisinopril As a treatment for... Avg User Ratings [?] High Blood Pressure 10 3 comments Rate it! Heart Attack 8.0 1 comments Rate it! Heart Failure Be the first to rate it 0 comments Showing 3 of 4 conditions - Show All... Compare with other drugs. Share your Experience Ask a Question Lisinopril is in a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme. Lisinopril is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), congestive heart failure, and to improve survival after a heart attack. Lisinopril may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What is the most important information I should know about lisinopril? Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Lisinopril could cause birth defects in the baby if you take the medication during pregnancy. Use an effective form of birth control. Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can further lower your blood pressure and may increase some of the side effects of lisinopril. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking lisinopril, unless your doctor has told you to. Vomiting, diarrhea, or heavy sweating can cause you to become dehydrated. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure while you are taking lisinopril. Drink plenty of water each day while you are taking this medication. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking lisinopril? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to lisinopril or to any other ACE inhibitor, such as benazopril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik). Before using lisinopril, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: * kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); * liver disease; * heart disease or congestive heart failure; * diabetes; or * a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome, Sjogren's syndrome, lupus, scleroderma, or rheumatoid arthritis. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use lisinopril, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Lisinopril could cause birth defects in the baby if you take the medication during pregnancy. Use an effective form of birth control. Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether lisinopril passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take lisinopril? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Take each dose with a full glass of water. Lisinopril can be taken with or without food. Vomiting, diarrhea, or heavy sweating can cause you to become dehydrated. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure while you are taking lisinopril. Drink plenty of water each day while you are taking this medication. To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood pressure will need to be checked on a regular basis. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking lisinopril. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. Store lisinopril at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Symptoms of a lisinopril overdose may include feeling extremely dizzy or light-headed, or fainting. What should I avoid while taking lisinopril? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can further lower your blood pressure and may increase some of the side effects of lisinopril. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking lisinopril, unless your doctor has told you to. Lisinopril side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; severe stomach pain; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: * feeling light-headed, fainting; * urinating more or less than usual, or not at all; * fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; * tired feeling, muscle weakness, and pounding or uneven heartbeats; * chest pain; or * swelling, rapid weight gain. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: * cough; * dizziness, drowsiness, headache; * nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, upset stomach; or * mild skin itching or rash. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect lisinopril? Before taking lisinopril, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: * lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith); * gold injections, or aurothioglucose (Solganal); * a potassium supplement such as K-Dur, Klor-Con; * salt substitutes that contain potassium; * insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth; * aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), and others; or * a diuretic (water pill). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use lisinopril or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There may be other drugs not listed that can affect lisinopril. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Where can I get more information? * Your pharmacist has information about lisinopril written for health professionals that you may read. * Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. * Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Wen Bertoncini 1 year ago.

this isnt a question....why dont you go talk to a pharmacist Answered by Evelyne Leskovac 1 year ago.


Does grapefruit juice affect Aceon?
I've heard that consuming grapefruit and grapefruit juice can have adverse effects on certain drugs if they are taken in conjunction. Aceon (perindopril) is an ACE inhibitor used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). Is Aceon among the drugs that are are affected? If so, how long must one wait between... Asked by Natasha Comish 1 year ago.

I've heard that consuming grapefruit and grapefruit juice can have adverse effects on certain drugs if they are taken in conjunction. Aceon (perindopril) is an ACE inhibitor used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). Is Aceon among the drugs that are are affected? If so, how long must one wait between drinking the juice and taking the drug (i.e. at breakfast) ? Answered by Else Saysana 1 year ago.

sbutk - It turns out that an enzyme called bergamottin found in grapefruit juice inhibits the activity of something called the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme in the intestinal wall. The CYP3A4 isoenzyme metabolizes many of the medicines people take, so inhibiting this can lead to increases in blood levels for these drugs. These increased levels can lead, in turn, to a higher risk of side effects. Fortunately, perindopril is NOT one of the medications metabolized through this pathway. Therefore, grapefruit juice will NOT affect your blood levels of the drug. Drugs that ARE affected by grapefruit juice include some antifungals (ketoconazole, etc.), channel blockers (diltiazem, nifedipine, etc.), digoxin, statin drugs (atorvastatin, etc.), macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, etc.), PDE5 inhibitors (Viagra, etc.), SSRI antidepressants (fluoxetine, etc.), tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline, etc.), and warfarin. When in doubt, it is always best to ask your pharmacist... hope that helps! Answered by Albertina Macdowell 1 year ago.

I have read some articles about this questions and there are doctors who answered that grapefruit juice and Aceon has no interaction with each other. maybe you can try to do more research, but for me maybe it depends on what brand of grapefruit juice you will drink because not all brands of the grapefruit juice contains the same ingredients and the fact that there are things that do not interact well with aceon, maybe some grapefruit juice affects Aceon. I think this can help you. Just do google with pharmacyescrow.org/s346-s-ACEON Answered by Kendal Helsel 1 year ago.

How much are you drinking? Generally grapefruit juice will mess up blood pressure medicine due to the acidity in it. I have never heard of it messing up the pill or depo. If you are on a grapefuit diet I strongly urge you to stop. It is not healthy and can have some horrible effects. It can cause liver problems and it can be hard on your colon and intestines. Moderation is key. I was on this diet years ago and I eventually got sick because of it. The best way to manage your diet is through a variety of fruits and vegetables and lean meats. Exercise is also important. Too much of anything is not safe. Hope this helps . Answered by Sebastian Thadison 1 year ago.

read the labels on your meds. some meds mixed with grapefruit could be deadly. be careful. Answered by Deandre Gabrenas 1 year ago.


Give me a list of ace inhibitor medications?
TO MIDAGEVET, I APPOLOGIZE FOR THE NEG COMMENT, IAM NEW TO THIS AND WOULD GIVE ALL ANSWERS A THUMBS UP, JUST DON'T KNOW HOW. BUT ANYONE WILLING TO TAKE TIME TO ANSWER, I APPRECIATE AND GIVE A THUMBS UP. BEING AN RN, I KNOW SEVERAL BUT WAS JUST WANTING TO GET MORE OF A LIST THEN WHAT I KNOW OFF THE TOP OF MY... Asked by Gale Outten 1 year ago.

TO MIDAGEVET, I APPOLOGIZE FOR THE NEG COMMENT, IAM NEW TO THIS AND WOULD GIVE ALL ANSWERS A THUMBS UP, JUST DON'T KNOW HOW. BUT ANYONE WILLING TO TAKE TIME TO ANSWER, I APPRECIATE AND GIVE A THUMBS UP. BEING AN RN, I KNOW SEVERAL BUT WAS JUST WANTING TO GET MORE OF A LIST THEN WHAT I KNOW OFF THE TOP OF MY HEAD. BUT THANKS FOR TAKING THE TIME. AND THUMBS UP. Answered by Rikki Patwell 1 year ago.

Altace aceon Captopril Lotesin Mavik Prinivil Univasc Vasotec Answered by Ruben Gommer 1 year ago.

ACE inhibitors can be divided into three groups based on their molecular structure: Sulfhydryl-containing ACE inhibitors * Captopril (Capoten®), the first ACE inhibitor Dicarboxylate-containing ACE inhibitors This is the largest group, including: * Enalapril (Vasotec®/Renitec®) * Ramipril (Altace®/Tritace®/Ramace®/Ramiwin®) * Quinapril (Accupril®) * Perindopril (Coversyl®) * Lisinopril (Lisodur®/Lopril®/Prinivil®/Zestril®) * Benazepril (Lotensin®) ] Phosphonate-containing ACE inhibitors * Fosinopril (Monopril®), the only member Naturally occurring Casokinins and lactokinins are breakdown products of casein and whey that occur naturally after ingestion of milk products, especially sour milk. Their role in blood pressure control is uncertain. Answered by Leandro Weis 1 year ago.

I take atenolol. It had the side effect of stopping my migraine headaches. (A good thing.) Update: I guess the reason I got the thumbs down was because atenolol is a beta blocker not an ace inhibitor. Sorry. Answered by Lou Stoltz 1 year ago.

captopril (Capoten), benazepril (Lotensin), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) fosinopril (Monopril), ramipril (Altace), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), and trandolapril (Mavik). Answered by Geralyn Cavalero 1 year ago.

benazepril..captopril .enalapril.enalaprilat..fosinopril..lisi... .. Answered by Pat Cicchetti 1 year ago.


Perindopril is it any good ?
hi i asked a question before about blood pressure and have been given perindopril 4mg i am rather dubious about taking it.my doc says it works on a hormone produced by the kidneys but the side-effects include inability to get a hard-on ,i find it all worry .already with cycling and reducing stress my bp lower... Asked by Abby Leuasseur 1 year ago.

hi i asked a question before about blood pressure and have been given perindopril 4mg i am rather dubious about taking it. my doc says it works on a hormone produced by the kidneys but the side-effects include inability to get a hard-on ,i find it all worry .already with cycling and reducing stress my bp lower reading is improving the worst having been 170/115 but last week at the nurse it was 150/104 and 187/111. when my doc takes it soley with the old type machine its improved to 140/84 then to-day 162/90 i was a bit stressed, is all this bad enough for medication? Answered by Dennis Arboleda 1 year ago.

Aceon is the brand name.....It is of a class of drugs called ACE inhibitors - ED is not a common side effect - very very rare. More likely to get dry cough that never seems to go away. Good drug, has good efficacy. Considered a 3d generation of this class of medication -others that are 3d gen ACE are Mavik ( trandolapril ) and Altace (ramapril). Doc gave you correct mech of action for the drug - interupts the RAA cascade in the body. Consider a other classes of BP lowering drugs in combo - calcium channel blockers and or diuretics to lower your overall blood volume. Many options - take care of yourself outside of the pharma, then add the pharma to do the rest.... Answered by Jena Mcconathy 1 year ago.

Perindopril is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. Perindopril is in a class of medications called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. It makes blood flow more smoothly by preventing the production of certain natural chemicals that tighten the blood vessels. You have got Hypertension Stage 2. Please check the function of your kidneys, heart and retina. Answered by Liane Colford 1 year ago.


Can you tell me about Lisinopril?
My brother got this prescribed by a Doctor for his blood pressure, but it's not working that good per my brother's words. Can you tell me about it? Asked by Kiera Manivong 1 year ago.

I'm not sure what it is you want to know about lisinopril. It's not capitalized, this is the generic name for Zestril and Prinivil. It's in the classification of antihypertensive meds known as ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors. Although the action is unnkown, it's thought to result primarily from the suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The most common adverse reactions are dizziness, orhtostatic hypotension, nasal congestion and diarrhea. A few of the less common adverse effects are headache, fatigue, nausea, impotence, rash and a persistent dry nonproductive cough. The life-threatening adverse reactions are hyperkalemia and rarely, anaphalaxis with afcial, throat and laryngeal edema. It has a number of drug interactions. Interacts with Capsaicin to cause an ACE-inhibitor-induced cough. May cause hyperkalemia when used with potassium-containing salt substitutes. It can increase creatinine, BUN, potassium, bilirubin levels and liver function test values. The treatment of hypertension is typically a 3-step one. Step 1 is making changes in diet, weight loss and changes in lifestyle (no smoking, reduced or no drinking, exercise, stress management). If this doesn't work, Step 2 is introducing an antihypertensive while continuing Step 1. Dosage adjuments may be needed for maximum effectiveness. If both Steps 1 & 2 fail to produce the desired results, Step 3 is adding another antihypertensive. I have no idea what your brother's dosage is and for how long he's been using it or anything else he's done to lower his blood pressure but he may need a dosage adjustment. He should also be following Step 1. Suggest he speak to his doctor. Answered by Davida Enockson 1 year ago.

Yes it is for your blood pressure, and yes if you stop it for 2 weeks your blood pressure will go back up. Lisinopril is actually used to help kidneys, it acts in the kidneys to lower the filtration pressure (blood pressure in the kidney) this is beneficial for the kidneys long term, but in some patients it lowers the filtration pressure to much, to the point that the kidneys can't filter the blood properly. From what you are describing, I would bet this is what is going on. Just stop taking the lisinopril, they will check you again in a few weeks and may put you back on a lower dose of the lisinopril or try a different blood pressure medications. Answered by Wilda Mewbourn 1 year ago.

Zestril Classification Answered by Cari Tonche 1 year ago.

Prinivil Classification Answered by Chloe Bambaci 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Nelson Lumbert 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Chadwick Lantis 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Sal Koser 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Cheri Mettle 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Zachariah Rowley 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Laurie Fails 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Krystle Fullford 1 year ago.


Why isnt my high blood pressure under control even when I take medication?
correction on meds: it is Aceon and NOT Ambien sorry Asked by Marquita Sancen 1 year ago.

the medication just might not be working for you. everyone's body reacts differently to different meds. call your doctor, explain what's happening, and perhaps ask to switch to something different. Answered by Tomeka Garrahan 1 year ago.

Well, I say this coming from a chiropractic background... while the medicines may have helped with you in the past, your body will build up a tolerance to them. Either consult your MD, or visit with a Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) in your area. It's also possible that your headaches are completely unrelated to your HBP this time around, and something else is causing the pain. Also, DCs can counsel you on measures to help you get your BP under control without medication, so that you may not have to rely on the meds in the future. I realize people don't have the best view of chiropractic, but I can speak from my experience - I was 23 years old and on 28 pills a day that were doing nothing more than making my SYMPTOMS disappear. 6 weeks after being under chiropractic care, I was able to wean myself off of ALL of the medications and my condition is practically non-existent. Good luck! Answered by Nidia Medling 1 year ago.

There's a couple of avenues that can reduce your BP 1 is clean out your arteries thats the hard one but coughing and exercise helps keep them clean.2 is make your blood more fluid easier to pump this can be done by taking 1 low dose aspirin every day. Inform your doctor of all medication that you take this includes supplements and herbal cures. By telling your Dr.you are getting someone else involved in the process that enables success and forces us to focus on objectives. No smoking. No drinking, its either time to do something about it or get some life insurance that covers expenses and leaves the kids with a few quid.and stop trying. Ace inhibitors work you may need something heavy duty like ramipril you need to be serious about it . All the best Answered by Miles Dillinger 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Chung Hartse 1 year ago.

I assume you mean Ambien for the first medication. That is a sleep aid...not a medication for hypertension. As to the Benicar, hypertension is a progressive disease. So it just may be time to up (or change) your medications. Also, it is not unusual for a doctor to have to tweak your prescriptions occasionally to find what works right just for you. I've been hypertensive for 2-3 years now and have had my medication changed 3 times. But don't just judge whether this is necessary by headaches. You could be right, but you would be better off buy an electronic blood pressure unit and actually monitoring your blood pressure...not just one symptom. Answered by Theresia Curro 1 year ago.

Is it Ambien? This medication is for sleep. Benicar HCT? Is for your B/P Your experience may be that you had headaches when they found your HTN but that does not necessarily indicate that your B/P is still high. It sounds like there may be a lot of stress factors in your life since you are taking something to help you sleep and this most definitely can cause muscle tension and headaches in the neck. It can also cause HTN. The only way to monitor this is to have yourself checked. There are times when B/P medications do not work for some and work well for others. You need to schedule another appointment for assessment/follow-up. It may be the doctor will need to try a different type of B/P medication for your treatment. I would try to look at your lifestyle, eating habits, and exercise regime to try and determine what is causing your sleeping difficulty. Make the changes that need to be made to eliminate the stressors in your life. Answered by Edra Groberg 1 year ago.

Ambien is a sedative not high blood pressure med. Tell your doctor, I use Zocor for hypertension. I went through several meds before I found one that has consistent, effective results. I have never heard of HBP and headaches being related to each other. P.S. If you are taking Ambien for insomnia ask your doc. for Ambien CR it works much more effectively. I use it for once in a blue moon for restlessness. Answered by Krishna Graner 1 year ago.

Man this is a serious issue, one of my loved ones is experiencing this currently. And this person's is high as 204/110! You gotta change your life style just for a few months or weeks. Change your diet and exercise. Your heart is a muscle, keep it in good shape. The vessels in our brain are not as strong as the ones in our body, increased pressure can be bad for them. I can recommend, but you gotta ask your doc, and get your cholesterol checked immediately. Start with a daily timed walk, get a family member or a friend, or you gotta do what you gotta do and do it yourself. Increase the time daily and then when you feel you are ready begin jogging and exercises. And diet, no foods with grease, or very very little. Very less salt, very less carbs, and lots of fish, if you can't afford it get cans of tuna. Just bombard yourself with fruits and vegetables like anything. Begin with this and I'll pray for you. Answered by Ruth Thiesfeld 1 year ago.

What is your caffeine intake? I have very hard to control HTN as well. It took a couple of doctors and more than a few meds to keep it almost normal. See your doctor, maybe he needs to change or increase your meds. Exercise and diet also help. Answered by Melony Hunnicut 1 year ago.

Try eating a lot of healthy high fiber foods. Bananas are very good for high blood pressure and oatmeal. Anything with fiber fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains. And try to lower your salt intake. Answered by Liberty Cafarella 1 year ago.

Maybe your medication needs to be changed, Do you take 1 med at PM and 1 med in am?, are you watching your diet? Answered by Pennie Beaufort 1 year ago.


Show me the medication lisinopril?
Asked by Dwight Macmurray 1 year ago.

lisinopril Generic Name: lisinopril (lyse IN oh pril) Brand names: Prinivil, Zestril What is lisinopril? Feedback for lisinopril As a treatment for... Avg User Ratings [?] High Blood Pressure 10 3 comments Rate it! Heart Attack 8.0 1 comments Rate it! Heart Failure Be the first to rate it 0 comments Showing 3 of 4 conditions - Show All... Compare with other drugs. Share your Experience Ask a Question Lisinopril is in a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme. Lisinopril is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), congestive heart failure, and to improve survival after a heart attack. Lisinopril may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What is the most important information I should know about lisinopril? Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Lisinopril could cause birth defects in the baby if you take the medication during pregnancy. Use an effective form of birth control. Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can further lower your blood pressure and may increase some of the side effects of lisinopril. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking lisinopril, unless your doctor has told you to. Vomiting, diarrhea, or heavy sweating can cause you to become dehydrated. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure while you are taking lisinopril. Drink plenty of water each day while you are taking this medication. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking lisinopril? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to lisinopril or to any other ACE inhibitor, such as benazopril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik). Before using lisinopril, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: * kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); * liver disease; * heart disease or congestive heart failure; * diabetes; or * a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome, Sjogren's syndrome, lupus, scleroderma, or rheumatoid arthritis. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use lisinopril, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Lisinopril could cause birth defects in the baby if you take the medication during pregnancy. Use an effective form of birth control. Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether lisinopril passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take lisinopril? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Take each dose with a full glass of water. Lisinopril can be taken with or without food. Vomiting, diarrhea, or heavy sweating can cause you to become dehydrated. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure while you are taking lisinopril. Drink plenty of water each day while you are taking this medication. To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood pressure will need to be checked on a regular basis. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking lisinopril. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. Store lisinopril at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Symptoms of a lisinopril overdose may include feeling extremely dizzy or light-headed, or fainting. What should I avoid while taking lisinopril? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can further lower your blood pressure and may increase some of the side effects of lisinopril. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking lisinopril, unless your doctor has told you to. Lisinopril side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; severe stomach pain; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: * feeling light-headed, fainting; * urinating more or less than usual, or not at all; * fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; * tired feeling, muscle weakness, and pounding or uneven heartbeats; * chest pain; or * swelling, rapid weight gain. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: * cough; * dizziness, drowsiness, headache; * nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, upset stomach; or * mild skin itching or rash. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect lisinopril? Before taking lisinopril, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: * lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith); * gold injections, or aurothioglucose (Solganal); * a potassium supplement such as K-Dur, Klor-Con; * salt substitutes that contain potassium; * insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth; * aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), and others; or * a diuretic (water pill). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use lisinopril or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There may be other drugs not listed that can affect lisinopril. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Where can I get more information? * Your pharmacist has information about lisinopril written for health professionals that you may read. * Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. * Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Sari Kinsman 1 year ago.

this isnt a question....why dont you go talk to a pharmacist Answered by Enda Mykins 1 year ago.


Does grapefruit juice affect Aceon?
I've heard that consuming grapefruit and grapefruit juice can have adverse effects on certain drugs if they are taken in conjunction. Aceon (perindopril) is an ACE inhibitor used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). Is Aceon among the drugs that are are affected? If so, how long must one wait between... Asked by Lela Conkle 1 year ago.

I've heard that consuming grapefruit and grapefruit juice can have adverse effects on certain drugs if they are taken in conjunction. Aceon (perindopril) is an ACE inhibitor used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). Is Aceon among the drugs that are are affected? If so, how long must one wait between drinking the juice and taking the drug (i.e. at breakfast) ? Answered by Alma Hersberger 1 year ago.

sbutk - It turns out that an enzyme called bergamottin found in grapefruit juice inhibits the activity of something called the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme in the intestinal wall. The CYP3A4 isoenzyme metabolizes many of the medicines people take, so inhibiting this can lead to increases in blood levels for these drugs. These increased levels can lead, in turn, to a higher risk of side effects. Fortunately, perindopril is NOT one of the medications metabolized through this pathway. Therefore, grapefruit juice will NOT affect your blood levels of the drug. Drugs that ARE affected by grapefruit juice include some antifungals (ketoconazole, etc.), channel blockers (diltiazem, nifedipine, etc.), digoxin, statin drugs (atorvastatin, etc.), macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, etc.), PDE5 inhibitors (Viagra, etc.), SSRI antidepressants (fluoxetine, etc.), tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline, etc.), and warfarin. When in doubt, it is always best to ask your pharmacist... hope that helps! Answered by Vernita Caspi 1 year ago.

I have read some articles about this questions and there are doctors who answered that grapefruit juice and Aceon has no interaction with each other. maybe you can try to do more research, but for me maybe it depends on what brand of grapefruit juice you will drink because not all brands of the grapefruit juice contains the same ingredients and the fact that there are things that do not interact well with aceon, maybe some grapefruit juice affects Aceon. I think this can help you. Just do google with pharmacyescrow.org/s346-s-ACEON Answered by Danilo Schmidtka 1 year ago.

How much are you drinking? Generally grapefruit juice will mess up blood pressure medicine due to the acidity in it. I have never heard of it messing up the pill or depo. If you are on a grapefuit diet I strongly urge you to stop. It is not healthy and can have some horrible effects. It can cause liver problems and it can be hard on your colon and intestines. Moderation is key. I was on this diet years ago and I eventually got sick because of it. The best way to manage your diet is through a variety of fruits and vegetables and lean meats. Exercise is also important. Too much of anything is not safe. Hope this helps . Answered by Anja Morron 1 year ago.

read the labels on your meds. some meds mixed with grapefruit could be deadly. be careful. Answered by Bud Tucke 1 year ago.


Give me a list of ace inhibitor medications?
TO MIDAGEVET, I APPOLOGIZE FOR THE NEG COMMENT, IAM NEW TO THIS AND WOULD GIVE ALL ANSWERS A THUMBS UP, JUST DON'T KNOW HOW. BUT ANYONE WILLING TO TAKE TIME TO ANSWER, I APPRECIATE AND GIVE A THUMBS UP. BEING AN RN, I KNOW SEVERAL BUT WAS JUST WANTING TO GET MORE OF A LIST THEN WHAT I KNOW OFF THE TOP OF MY... Asked by Alfonzo Alverez 1 year ago.

TO MIDAGEVET, I APPOLOGIZE FOR THE NEG COMMENT, IAM NEW TO THIS AND WOULD GIVE ALL ANSWERS A THUMBS UP, JUST DON'T KNOW HOW. BUT ANYONE WILLING TO TAKE TIME TO ANSWER, I APPRECIATE AND GIVE A THUMBS UP. BEING AN RN, I KNOW SEVERAL BUT WAS JUST WANTING TO GET MORE OF A LIST THEN WHAT I KNOW OFF THE TOP OF MY HEAD. BUT THANKS FOR TAKING THE TIME. AND THUMBS UP. Answered by Cyril Szklarski 1 year ago.

Altace aceon Captopril Lotesin Mavik Prinivil Univasc Vasotec Answered by Corie Murphy 1 year ago.

ACE inhibitors can be divided into three groups based on their molecular structure: Sulfhydryl-containing ACE inhibitors * Captopril (Capoten®), the first ACE inhibitor Dicarboxylate-containing ACE inhibitors This is the largest group, including: * Enalapril (Vasotec®/Renitec®) * Ramipril (Altace®/Tritace®/Ramace®/Ramiwin®) * Quinapril (Accupril®) * Perindopril (Coversyl®) * Lisinopril (Lisodur®/Lopril®/Prinivil®/Zestril®) * Benazepril (Lotensin®) ] Phosphonate-containing ACE inhibitors * Fosinopril (Monopril®), the only member Naturally occurring Casokinins and lactokinins are breakdown products of casein and whey that occur naturally after ingestion of milk products, especially sour milk. Their role in blood pressure control is uncertain. Answered by Lachelle Cracknell 1 year ago.

I take atenolol. It had the side effect of stopping my migraine headaches. (A good thing.) Update: I guess the reason I got the thumbs down was because atenolol is a beta blocker not an ace inhibitor. Sorry. Answered by Pilar Sieracki 1 year ago.

captopril (Capoten), benazepril (Lotensin), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) fosinopril (Monopril), ramipril (Altace), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), and trandolapril (Mavik). Answered by Jacinda Stamps 1 year ago.

benazepril..captopril .enalapril.enalaprilat..fosinopril..lisi... .. Answered by Connie Sesma 1 year ago.


Perindopril is it any good ?
hi i asked a question before about blood pressure and have been given perindopril 4mg i am rather dubious about taking it.my doc says it works on a hormone produced by the kidneys but the side-effects include inability to get a hard-on ,i find it all worry .already with cycling and reducing stress my bp lower... Asked by Arlyne Sharperson 1 year ago.

hi i asked a question before about blood pressure and have been given perindopril 4mg i am rather dubious about taking it. my doc says it works on a hormone produced by the kidneys but the side-effects include inability to get a hard-on ,i find it all worry .already with cycling and reducing stress my bp lower reading is improving the worst having been 170/115 but last week at the nurse it was 150/104 and 187/111. when my doc takes it soley with the old type machine its improved to 140/84 then to-day 162/90 i was a bit stressed, is all this bad enough for medication? Answered by Ora Buonaiuto 1 year ago.

Aceon is the brand name.....It is of a class of drugs called ACE inhibitors - ED is not a common side effect - very very rare. More likely to get dry cough that never seems to go away. Good drug, has good efficacy. Considered a 3d generation of this class of medication -others that are 3d gen ACE are Mavik ( trandolapril ) and Altace (ramapril). Doc gave you correct mech of action for the drug - interupts the RAA cascade in the body. Consider a other classes of BP lowering drugs in combo - calcium channel blockers and or diuretics to lower your overall blood volume. Many options - take care of yourself outside of the pharma, then add the pharma to do the rest.... Answered by Catalina Nosis 1 year ago.

Perindopril is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. Perindopril is in a class of medications called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. It makes blood flow more smoothly by preventing the production of certain natural chemicals that tighten the blood vessels. You have got Hypertension Stage 2. Please check the function of your kidneys, heart and retina. Answered by Mirtha Homby 1 year ago.


Can you tell me about Lisinopril?
My brother got this prescribed by a Doctor for his blood pressure, but it's not working that good per my brother's words. Can you tell me about it? Asked by Yuk Sandella 1 year ago.

I'm not sure what it is you want to know about lisinopril. It's not capitalized, this is the generic name for Zestril and Prinivil. It's in the classification of antihypertensive meds known as ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors. Although the action is unnkown, it's thought to result primarily from the suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The most common adverse reactions are dizziness, orhtostatic hypotension, nasal congestion and diarrhea. A few of the less common adverse effects are headache, fatigue, nausea, impotence, rash and a persistent dry nonproductive cough. The life-threatening adverse reactions are hyperkalemia and rarely, anaphalaxis with afcial, throat and laryngeal edema. It has a number of drug interactions. Interacts with Capsaicin to cause an ACE-inhibitor-induced cough. May cause hyperkalemia when used with potassium-containing salt substitutes. It can increase creatinine, BUN, potassium, bilirubin levels and liver function test values. The treatment of hypertension is typically a 3-step one. Step 1 is making changes in diet, weight loss and changes in lifestyle (no smoking, reduced or no drinking, exercise, stress management). If this doesn't work, Step 2 is introducing an antihypertensive while continuing Step 1. Dosage adjuments may be needed for maximum effectiveness. If both Steps 1 & 2 fail to produce the desired results, Step 3 is adding another antihypertensive. I have no idea what your brother's dosage is and for how long he's been using it or anything else he's done to lower his blood pressure but he may need a dosage adjustment. He should also be following Step 1. Suggest he speak to his doctor. Answered by Sanford Zorens 1 year ago.

Yes it is for your blood pressure, and yes if you stop it for 2 weeks your blood pressure will go back up. Lisinopril is actually used to help kidneys, it acts in the kidneys to lower the filtration pressure (blood pressure in the kidney) this is beneficial for the kidneys long term, but in some patients it lowers the filtration pressure to much, to the point that the kidneys can't filter the blood properly. From what you are describing, I would bet this is what is going on. Just stop taking the lisinopril, they will check you again in a few weeks and may put you back on a lower dose of the lisinopril or try a different blood pressure medications. Answered by Olevia Ancy 1 year ago.

Zestril Classification Answered by Jeffry Occhino 1 year ago.

Prinivil Classification Answered by Phillip Habina 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Darleen Trisler 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Janyce Tiu 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Alan Nakamoto 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Magen Benvenuti 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Ellis Siar 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Carie Shawgo 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Myrle Dender 1 year ago.


Why isnt my high blood pressure under control even when I take medication?
correction on meds: it is Aceon and NOT Ambien sorry Asked by Eva Dickus 1 year ago.

the medication just might not be working for you. everyone's body reacts differently to different meds. call your doctor, explain what's happening, and perhaps ask to switch to something different. Answered by Sharell Likos 1 year ago.

Well, I say this coming from a chiropractic background... while the medicines may have helped with you in the past, your body will build up a tolerance to them. Either consult your MD, or visit with a Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) in your area. It's also possible that your headaches are completely unrelated to your HBP this time around, and something else is causing the pain. Also, DCs can counsel you on measures to help you get your BP under control without medication, so that you may not have to rely on the meds in the future. I realize people don't have the best view of chiropractic, but I can speak from my experience - I was 23 years old and on 28 pills a day that were doing nothing more than making my SYMPTOMS disappear. 6 weeks after being under chiropractic care, I was able to wean myself off of ALL of the medications and my condition is practically non-existent. Good luck! Answered by Carl Drager 1 year ago.

There's a couple of avenues that can reduce your BP 1 is clean out your arteries thats the hard one but coughing and exercise helps keep them clean.2 is make your blood more fluid easier to pump this can be done by taking 1 low dose aspirin every day. Inform your doctor of all medication that you take this includes supplements and herbal cures. By telling your Dr.you are getting someone else involved in the process that enables success and forces us to focus on objectives. No smoking. No drinking, its either time to do something about it or get some life insurance that covers expenses and leaves the kids with a few quid.and stop trying. Ace inhibitors work you may need something heavy duty like ramipril you need to be serious about it . All the best Answered by Rubin Tauras 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Fallon Gadison 1 year ago.

I assume you mean Ambien for the first medication. That is a sleep aid...not a medication for hypertension. As to the Benicar, hypertension is a progressive disease. So it just may be time to up (or change) your medications. Also, it is not unusual for a doctor to have to tweak your prescriptions occasionally to find what works right just for you. I've been hypertensive for 2-3 years now and have had my medication changed 3 times. But don't just judge whether this is necessary by headaches. You could be right, but you would be better off buy an electronic blood pressure unit and actually monitoring your blood pressure...not just one symptom. Answered by Ruben Geisinger 1 year ago.

Is it Ambien? This medication is for sleep. Benicar HCT? Is for your B/P Your experience may be that you had headaches when they found your HTN but that does not necessarily indicate that your B/P is still high. It sounds like there may be a lot of stress factors in your life since you are taking something to help you sleep and this most definitely can cause muscle tension and headaches in the neck. It can also cause HTN. The only way to monitor this is to have yourself checked. There are times when B/P medications do not work for some and work well for others. You need to schedule another appointment for assessment/follow-up. It may be the doctor will need to try a different type of B/P medication for your treatment. I would try to look at your lifestyle, eating habits, and exercise regime to try and determine what is causing your sleeping difficulty. Make the changes that need to be made to eliminate the stressors in your life. Answered by Franklyn Vickery 1 year ago.

Ambien is a sedative not high blood pressure med. Tell your doctor, I use Zocor for hypertension. I went through several meds before I found one that has consistent, effective results. I have never heard of HBP and headaches being related to each other. P.S. If you are taking Ambien for insomnia ask your doc. for Ambien CR it works much more effectively. I use it for once in a blue moon for restlessness. Answered by Keitha Derouen 1 year ago.

Man this is a serious issue, one of my loved ones is experiencing this currently. And this person's is high as 204/110! You gotta change your life style just for a few months or weeks. Change your diet and exercise. Your heart is a muscle, keep it in good shape. The vessels in our brain are not as strong as the ones in our body, increased pressure can be bad for them. I can recommend, but you gotta ask your doc, and get your cholesterol checked immediately. Start with a daily timed walk, get a family member or a friend, or you gotta do what you gotta do and do it yourself. Increase the time daily and then when you feel you are ready begin jogging and exercises. And diet, no foods with grease, or very very little. Very less salt, very less carbs, and lots of fish, if you can't afford it get cans of tuna. Just bombard yourself with fruits and vegetables like anything. Begin with this and I'll pray for you. Answered by Amber Goulding 1 year ago.

What is your caffeine intake? I have very hard to control HTN as well. It took a couple of doctors and more than a few meds to keep it almost normal. See your doctor, maybe he needs to change or increase your meds. Exercise and diet also help. Answered by Georgeann Bankston 1 year ago.

Try eating a lot of healthy high fiber foods. Bananas are very good for high blood pressure and oatmeal. Anything with fiber fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains. And try to lower your salt intake. Answered by Brande Ehinger 1 year ago.

Maybe your medication needs to be changed, Do you take 1 med at PM and 1 med in am?, are you watching your diet? Answered by Angelyn Brackelsberg 1 year ago.


Show me the medication lisinopril?
Asked by Corazon Clarenbach 1 year ago.

lisinopril Generic Name: lisinopril (lyse IN oh pril) Brand names: Prinivil, Zestril What is lisinopril? Feedback for lisinopril As a treatment for... Avg User Ratings [?] High Blood Pressure 10 3 comments Rate it! Heart Attack 8.0 1 comments Rate it! Heart Failure Be the first to rate it 0 comments Showing 3 of 4 conditions - Show All... Compare with other drugs. Share your Experience Ask a Question Lisinopril is in a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme. Lisinopril is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), congestive heart failure, and to improve survival after a heart attack. Lisinopril may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What is the most important information I should know about lisinopril? Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Lisinopril could cause birth defects in the baby if you take the medication during pregnancy. Use an effective form of birth control. Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can further lower your blood pressure and may increase some of the side effects of lisinopril. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking lisinopril, unless your doctor has told you to. Vomiting, diarrhea, or heavy sweating can cause you to become dehydrated. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure while you are taking lisinopril. Drink plenty of water each day while you are taking this medication. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking lisinopril? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to lisinopril or to any other ACE inhibitor, such as benazopril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik). Before using lisinopril, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: * kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); * liver disease; * heart disease or congestive heart failure; * diabetes; or * a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome, Sjogren's syndrome, lupus, scleroderma, or rheumatoid arthritis. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use lisinopril, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Lisinopril could cause birth defects in the baby if you take the medication during pregnancy. Use an effective form of birth control. Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether lisinopril passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take lisinopril? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Take each dose with a full glass of water. Lisinopril can be taken with or without food. Vomiting, diarrhea, or heavy sweating can cause you to become dehydrated. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure while you are taking lisinopril. Drink plenty of water each day while you are taking this medication. To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood pressure will need to be checked on a regular basis. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking lisinopril. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. Store lisinopril at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Symptoms of a lisinopril overdose may include feeling extremely dizzy or light-headed, or fainting. What should I avoid while taking lisinopril? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can further lower your blood pressure and may increase some of the side effects of lisinopril. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking lisinopril, unless your doctor has told you to. Lisinopril side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; severe stomach pain; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: * feeling light-headed, fainting; * urinating more or less than usual, or not at all; * fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; * tired feeling, muscle weakness, and pounding or uneven heartbeats; * chest pain; or * swelling, rapid weight gain. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: * cough; * dizziness, drowsiness, headache; * nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, upset stomach; or * mild skin itching or rash. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect lisinopril? Before taking lisinopril, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: * lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith); * gold injections, or aurothioglucose (Solganal); * a potassium supplement such as K-Dur, Klor-Con; * salt substitutes that contain potassium; * insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth; * aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), and others; or * a diuretic (water pill). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use lisinopril or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There may be other drugs not listed that can affect lisinopril. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Where can I get more information? * Your pharmacist has information about lisinopril written for health professionals that you may read. * Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. * Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Loma Badertscher 1 year ago.

this isnt a question....why dont you go talk to a pharmacist Answered by Treasa Grode 1 year ago.


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