Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019885/001.

Names and composition

"ACCUPRIL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019885/001 ACCUPRIL QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
019885/002 ACCUPRIL QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
019885/003 ACCUPRIL QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
019885/004 ACCUPRIL QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019885/001 ACCUPRIL QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
019885/002 ACCUPRIL QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
019885/003 ACCUPRIL QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
019885/004 ACCUPRIL QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
075504/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
075504/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
075504/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
075504/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
076036/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
076036/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076036/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
076036/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
076049/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
076049/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076049/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
076049/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
076240/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
076240/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076240/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
076240/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
076459/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
076459/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076459/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
076459/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
076607/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
076607/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076607/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
076607/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
076694/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
076694/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076694/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
076694/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
076803/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
076803/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076803/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
076803/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
077690/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
077690/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
077690/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
077690/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
078457/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
078457/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
078457/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
078457/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
090800/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
090800/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
090800/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
090800/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
202725/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
202725/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
202725/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
202725/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
205823/001 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
205823/002 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
205823/003 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
205823/004 QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE QUINAPRIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Can the hypertension drug Mavik (4 mg) be replaced with Accupril (40 mg)?
The Mavik is 4mg and that's what was originally took. Now Accupril is supposedly related to Mavik and it's 40 mg. Is it safe to take the accupril? Asked by Stanley Cabon 2 years ago.

Definitely discuss with your doctor first.... there are many medications out there that belong to the same "family" but act in slightly different ways....They may also have slightly different ingredients making them up which can cause allergic reactions. Your doctor may have purposely changed you from the Mavik to the Accupril as the Mavik wasn't doing the best job. Because there are so many different hypertension medications, sometimes it takes a little while to find the correct one for you. Always check with your doctor, and if you're not sure, KEEP ASKING until you understand :) Hope that helps! Answered by Dino Clive 2 years ago.

Quote "firstor stleast your phrmcist. theymy" unquote. Someone is trying to be a Doctor. It is your writing that no one can understand. You are allowed to type correctly. Use the spell checker! ♣ Answered by Delinda Reusser 2 years ago.

well, you should always consult with your doctor firstor stleast your phrmcist. theymy be related but work differently. Answered by Cherise Filipelli 2 years ago.


How long does it take before Accupril begins to lower blood pressure?
I began taking it a few days ago and I am still testing in the pre-hypertension range. Thanks! Asked by Dyan Muriel 2 years ago.

Esmerelda, My accupril was added to a diuretic for blood pressure that wasn't enough. By my next doctor's visit a month later, I was already in the range where I needed to be. Answered by Delphine Kiko 2 years ago.

Accupril is in a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme. It prevents certain enzymes in the body from narrowing blood vessels. It can take a little while to get the right dose so don't get too concerned just yet. Here is a bit of a guide, and as we don't know your age or other health details it is open to interpretation. OK... Dosage for most adults: Oral: Hypertension: Initial: 10-20 mg once daily, adjust according to blood pressure response at peak and trough blood levels; initial dose may be reduced to 5 mg in patients receiving diuretic therapy if the diuretic is continued; usual dose range 10-40 mg once daily Elderly: Initial: 2.5-5 mg/day; increase dosage at increments of 2.5-5 mg at 1- to 2-week intervals. Answered by Francisco Bineau 2 years ago.

people might act differently on medicines and some poeple that I know who are actually taking this medication said that it takes them 3 weeks and more before they the medicine totally effect. But, there were also people who are also using this also said that they only take 2 weeks for them to feel the effect of the medicine. however, it will always depend on the body of the person regarding on how their body accept the medication. usually, it takes 2-4 weeks. If you want to know more about it check pharmacyescrow.org/s38-s-ACCUPRIL ,,, Answered by Mike Yazdani 2 years ago.


Will Accupril lower my rapid heart beat QUICKLY?
I'm 42 & I feel like I'm having heart palpitations. I normally have a normal heartrate, but I drank a lot of coffee & took about 7 Neurontins (300mg). Will Accupril do the trick fast? If not, what should I do? Asked by Chelsie Boss 2 years ago.

You're asking in the wrong category. However, because I have palpitations, I Googled Accupril & palpitations and it seems Accuprial is more likely to cause palpitations than resolve them. So, I would suggest you see your doctor and get evaluated. If you're throwing garden variety PVCs, then you probably have nothing to worry about. However, your physician may want to modify your meds. One thing is certain. You should avoid caffeine and other stimulants. Caffeine is probably the most common trigger for palpitations. Good luck and good health!! ♠ Answered by Amina Subera 2 years ago.


Can I take Accupril (5mg) with Neurontin & Vistaril?
Asked by Evelyne Calleja 2 years ago.

This is an ideal question to be answered by your local pharmacist who will share his/her knowledge for free.Be safe ! Regards. Answered by Damion Eckhart 2 years ago.


Does Lipitor, Nexium, arthrotec, activan, accupril, or lexapro I shouldn't take when eating grapefruit?
I am taking the medications listed above. Is there one I shouldn't be eating with grapefruit? Asked by Marci Gabbamonte 2 years ago.

Lipitor (atorvastatin) and grapefruit should be separated by 12 hours. Answered by Virgil Parshall 2 years ago.

Lipitor (atorvastatin) is the one that interacts most with grapefruit juice. Most people take statins at night, so if you take your lipitor at night and drink grapefruit juice in the morning you will be just fine. It takes a lot of grapefruit juice to affect drug levels in vivo, and by spacing it out by several hours you will avoid this interaction. There is a chemical in grapefruit juice that is broken down by the same enzyme as Lipitor, by using them together you increase the levels and duration of both the chemical and the drug in the body. I assumed by activan you meant Ativan (lorazepam). All the others are fine (there was a minor interaction with Lexapro and grapefruit juice, but those are usually of no consequence). Also be aware SSRIs and NSAIDs can increase bleeding risk, but always consult your doctor/pharmacist before altering your drug therapy. Answered by Kaycee Robel 2 years ago.

You can have grapefruit a couple of hours apart from the lipitor or statin. You should not take the statin with grapefruit juice. It increases the absorption of the statin from the gut. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her to verify this. Answered by Darla Woullard 2 years ago.


Does the medicine bystolic and accupril mess me up or make me feel drugged up?
new blood pressure medicine. when i take it is it gonna make me loopy or will i feel normal? will i have weird side effects right away? Asked by Shanta Fils 2 years ago.

There's no way to predict if a particular patient will react to a given medicine. They shouldn't cause you any problems. Can they? Yes. Will they, who knows. If they DO cause you problems, call your doctor. Answered by Marisha Zari 2 years ago.

Actually people are different from each other and the way that you might react on a certain medicine like these two might differ from how the others will react on them. However, if you are talking about taking them together, take not that there were medicines that interact well with each other and there are some that does not. You might consider talking to your doctor first for you to know if it will be safe to take them together or if both of them were safe for you to take. More information about Accupril pharmacyescrow.org/s38-s-ACCUPRIL Answered by Hilton Earlywine 2 years ago.


Blood pressure is usually 131/81 average: take accupril for hypertension 20mg. when anxious it is higher.?
anxiety when taking pressure..so I take deep breaths Asked by Rosendo Eiken 2 years ago.

Your blood pressure is a little more than what is considered optimal but not that far off. Your blood pressure is considered going into mild pre-hyptertension. And blood pressure can go up when you are anxious - A lot of people's pressure goes up when they go to the doc - called 'white coat' hypertension. The docs usually take this into consideration. Taking deep breaths for a minute or two can help - breathing in slowly and out slowly for a minute or two. Don't worry - it sounds as if you are o.k. Answered by Juan Kanner 2 years ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Shalanda Nonroe 2 years ago.

Pre-hypertension (120-139 /80-89 mmHg) only refers to people who are not already on HTN meds. As far as white coat hypertension that is correct. The best way to know your true blood pressure is to buy a machine that you can check your own blood pressure at home. They have automatic and semi-automatic machines, which are a lot more accurate than the one at Supermarkets. Since you have hypertension your goal is most likely less than 140/90 unless you have diabetes, in which case your goal needs to be less than 130/80. When you take your blood pressure it is best to have not been eating, drinking or smoking for at least 30min. Makes sure you have been sitting for 5min and have your legs uncrossed. Check blood pressure on your left arm, unless contraindicated. Write your results in a little book, that way you can keep track of your true blood pressure, and you can present (show) this to your doctor so he knows if your blood pressure is truly controlled and that is not a fluke! Answered by Kathi Weemhoff 2 years ago.

Pulse rate above 100 is called Tachycardia. Answered by Elise Urmeneta 2 years ago.

accupril Side effects * abdominal pain with or without nausea or vomiting * allergic reactions like skin rash or hives, swelling of the hands, feet, face, lips, throat, or tongue * dark urine * difficulty breathing * dizzy, lightheaded or fainting spell * fever or sore throat * irregular heart beat, chest pain * pain or difficulty passing urine * unusually weak * yellowing of the eyes or skin * change in sex drive or performance * cough * dry mouth * headache * tiredness This list may not describe all possible side effects. Answered by Bree Hutchison 2 years ago.

My doctor told me to call him when my b.p. is high Answered by Norberto Mynnerlyn 2 years ago.


Can the hypertension drug Mavik (4 mg) be replaced with Accupril (40 mg)?
The Mavik is 4mg and that's what was originally took. Now Accupril is supposedly related to Mavik and it's 40 mg. Is it safe to take the accupril? Asked by Erwin Kilfoyle 2 years ago.

Definitely discuss with your doctor first.... there are many medications out there that belong to the same "family" but act in slightly different ways....They may also have slightly different ingredients making them up which can cause allergic reactions. Your doctor may have purposely changed you from the Mavik to the Accupril as the Mavik wasn't doing the best job. Because there are so many different hypertension medications, sometimes it takes a little while to find the correct one for you. Always check with your doctor, and if you're not sure, KEEP ASKING until you understand :) Hope that helps! Answered by Lois Waterston 2 years ago.

Quote "firstor stleast your phrmcist. theymy" unquote. Someone is trying to be a Doctor. It is your writing that no one can understand. You are allowed to type correctly. Use the spell checker! ♣ Answered by Hilde Delapuente 2 years ago.

well, you should always consult with your doctor firstor stleast your phrmcist. theymy be related but work differently. Answered by Margert Kinabrew 2 years ago.


How long does it take before Accupril begins to lower blood pressure?
I began taking it a few days ago and I am still testing in the pre-hypertension range. Thanks! Asked by Joyce Rash 2 years ago.

Esmerelda, My accupril was added to a diuretic for blood pressure that wasn't enough. By my next doctor's visit a month later, I was already in the range where I needed to be. Answered by Velma Alar 2 years ago.

Accupril is in a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme. It prevents certain enzymes in the body from narrowing blood vessels. It can take a little while to get the right dose so don't get too concerned just yet. Here is a bit of a guide, and as we don't know your age or other health details it is open to interpretation. OK... Dosage for most adults: Oral: Hypertension: Initial: 10-20 mg once daily, adjust according to blood pressure response at peak and trough blood levels; initial dose may be reduced to 5 mg in patients receiving diuretic therapy if the diuretic is continued; usual dose range 10-40 mg once daily Elderly: Initial: 2.5-5 mg/day; increase dosage at increments of 2.5-5 mg at 1- to 2-week intervals. Answered by Desirae Seabaugh 2 years ago.

people might act differently on medicines and some poeple that I know who are actually taking this medication said that it takes them 3 weeks and more before they the medicine totally effect. But, there were also people who are also using this also said that they only take 2 weeks for them to feel the effect of the medicine. however, it will always depend on the body of the person regarding on how their body accept the medication. usually, it takes 2-4 weeks. If you want to know more about it check pharmacyescrow.org/s38-s-ACCUPRIL ,,, Answered by Ollie Decio 2 years ago.


Will Accupril lower my rapid heart beat QUICKLY?
I'm 42 & I feel like I'm having heart palpitations. I normally have a normal heartrate, but I drank a lot of coffee & took about 7 Neurontins (300mg). Will Accupril do the trick fast? If not, what should I do? Asked by Aliza Piche 2 years ago.

You're asking in the wrong category. However, because I have palpitations, I Googled Accupril & palpitations and it seems Accuprial is more likely to cause palpitations than resolve them. So, I would suggest you see your doctor and get evaluated. If you're throwing garden variety PVCs, then you probably have nothing to worry about. However, your physician may want to modify your meds. One thing is certain. You should avoid caffeine and other stimulants. Caffeine is probably the most common trigger for palpitations. Good luck and good health!! ♠ Answered by Carma Gama 2 years ago.


Can I take Accupril (5mg) with Neurontin & Vistaril?
Asked by Harris Muncie 2 years ago.

This is an ideal question to be answered by your local pharmacist who will share his/her knowledge for free.Be safe ! Regards. Answered by Lorenzo Gettig 2 years ago.


Does Lipitor, Nexium, arthrotec, activan, accupril, or lexapro I shouldn't take when eating grapefruit?
I am taking the medications listed above. Is there one I shouldn't be eating with grapefruit? Asked by Laverne Dolfay 2 years ago.

Lipitor (atorvastatin) and grapefruit should be separated by 12 hours. Answered by Nikole Yo 2 years ago.

Lipitor (atorvastatin) is the one that interacts most with grapefruit juice. Most people take statins at night, so if you take your lipitor at night and drink grapefruit juice in the morning you will be just fine. It takes a lot of grapefruit juice to affect drug levels in vivo, and by spacing it out by several hours you will avoid this interaction. There is a chemical in grapefruit juice that is broken down by the same enzyme as Lipitor, by using them together you increase the levels and duration of both the chemical and the drug in the body. I assumed by activan you meant Ativan (lorazepam). All the others are fine (there was a minor interaction with Lexapro and grapefruit juice, but those are usually of no consequence). Also be aware SSRIs and NSAIDs can increase bleeding risk, but always consult your doctor/pharmacist before altering your drug therapy. Answered by Kerry Barbera 2 years ago.

You can have grapefruit a couple of hours apart from the lipitor or statin. You should not take the statin with grapefruit juice. It increases the absorption of the statin from the gut. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her to verify this. Answered by Marguerite Zuver 2 years ago.


Does the medicine bystolic and accupril mess me up or make me feel drugged up?
new blood pressure medicine. when i take it is it gonna make me loopy or will i feel normal? will i have weird side effects right away? Asked by Camellia Martian 2 years ago.

There's no way to predict if a particular patient will react to a given medicine. They shouldn't cause you any problems. Can they? Yes. Will they, who knows. If they DO cause you problems, call your doctor. Answered by Kathi Wile 2 years ago.

Actually people are different from each other and the way that you might react on a certain medicine like these two might differ from how the others will react on them. However, if you are talking about taking them together, take not that there were medicines that interact well with each other and there are some that does not. You might consider talking to your doctor first for you to know if it will be safe to take them together or if both of them were safe for you to take. More information about Accupril pharmacyescrow.org/s38-s-ACCUPRIL Answered by Florine Jorn 2 years ago.


Blood pressure is usually 131/81 average: take accupril for hypertension 20mg. when anxious it is higher.?
anxiety when taking pressure..so I take deep breaths Asked by Herlinda Wheeles 2 years ago.

Your blood pressure is a little more than what is considered optimal but not that far off. Your blood pressure is considered going into mild pre-hyptertension. And blood pressure can go up when you are anxious - A lot of people's pressure goes up when they go to the doc - called 'white coat' hypertension. The docs usually take this into consideration. Taking deep breaths for a minute or two can help - breathing in slowly and out slowly for a minute or two. Don't worry - it sounds as if you are o.k. Answered by Sigrid Meath 2 years ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Sari Cornford 2 years ago.

Pre-hypertension (120-139 /80-89 mmHg) only refers to people who are not already on HTN meds. As far as white coat hypertension that is correct. The best way to know your true blood pressure is to buy a machine that you can check your own blood pressure at home. They have automatic and semi-automatic machines, which are a lot more accurate than the one at Supermarkets. Since you have hypertension your goal is most likely less than 140/90 unless you have diabetes, in which case your goal needs to be less than 130/80. When you take your blood pressure it is best to have not been eating, drinking or smoking for at least 30min. Makes sure you have been sitting for 5min and have your legs uncrossed. Check blood pressure on your left arm, unless contraindicated. Write your results in a little book, that way you can keep track of your true blood pressure, and you can present (show) this to your doctor so he knows if your blood pressure is truly controlled and that is not a fluke! Answered by Donna Magpali 2 years ago.

Pulse rate above 100 is called Tachycardia. Answered by Carmela Eyrich 2 years ago.

accupril Side effects * abdominal pain with or without nausea or vomiting * allergic reactions like skin rash or hives, swelling of the hands, feet, face, lips, throat, or tongue * dark urine * difficulty breathing * dizzy, lightheaded or fainting spell * fever or sore throat * irregular heart beat, chest pain * pain or difficulty passing urine * unusually weak * yellowing of the eyes or skin * change in sex drive or performance * cough * dry mouth * headache * tiredness This list may not describe all possible side effects. Answered by Becki Sappington 2 years ago.

My doctor told me to call him when my b.p. is high Answered by Delfina Huffine 2 years ago.


Can the hypertension drug Mavik (4 mg) be replaced with Accupril (40 mg)?
The Mavik is 4mg and that's what was originally took. Now Accupril is supposedly related to Mavik and it's 40 mg. Is it safe to take the accupril? Asked by Kary Mellom 2 years ago.

Definitely discuss with your doctor first.... there are many medications out there that belong to the same "family" but act in slightly different ways....They may also have slightly different ingredients making them up which can cause allergic reactions. Your doctor may have purposely changed you from the Mavik to the Accupril as the Mavik wasn't doing the best job. Because there are so many different hypertension medications, sometimes it takes a little while to find the correct one for you. Always check with your doctor, and if you're not sure, KEEP ASKING until you understand :) Hope that helps! Answered by Kathey Saputo 2 years ago.

Quote "firstor stleast your phrmcist. theymy" unquote. Someone is trying to be a Doctor. It is your writing that no one can understand. You are allowed to type correctly. Use the spell checker! ♣ Answered by Holley Tlatelpa 2 years ago.

well, you should always consult with your doctor firstor stleast your phrmcist. theymy be related but work differently. Answered by Lorene Runkel 2 years ago.


How long does it take before Accupril begins to lower blood pressure?
I began taking it a few days ago and I am still testing in the pre-hypertension range. Thanks! Asked by Erik Ytuarte 2 years ago.

Esmerelda, My accupril was added to a diuretic for blood pressure that wasn't enough. By my next doctor's visit a month later, I was already in the range where I needed to be. Answered by Izetta Baus 2 years ago.

Accupril is in a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme. It prevents certain enzymes in the body from narrowing blood vessels. It can take a little while to get the right dose so don't get too concerned just yet. Here is a bit of a guide, and as we don't know your age or other health details it is open to interpretation. OK... Dosage for most adults: Oral: Hypertension: Initial: 10-20 mg once daily, adjust according to blood pressure response at peak and trough blood levels; initial dose may be reduced to 5 mg in patients receiving diuretic therapy if the diuretic is continued; usual dose range 10-40 mg once daily Elderly: Initial: 2.5-5 mg/day; increase dosage at increments of 2.5-5 mg at 1- to 2-week intervals. Answered by Emilie Febo 2 years ago.

people might act differently on medicines and some poeple that I know who are actually taking this medication said that it takes them 3 weeks and more before they the medicine totally effect. But, there were also people who are also using this also said that they only take 2 weeks for them to feel the effect of the medicine. however, it will always depend on the body of the person regarding on how their body accept the medication. usually, it takes 2-4 weeks. If you want to know more about it check pharmacyescrow.org/s38-s-ACCUPRIL ,,, Answered by Clementina Oldfield 2 years ago.


Will Accupril lower my rapid heart beat QUICKLY?
I'm 42 & I feel like I'm having heart palpitations. I normally have a normal heartrate, but I drank a lot of coffee & took about 7 Neurontins (300mg). Will Accupril do the trick fast? If not, what should I do? Asked by Terry Straker 2 years ago.

You're asking in the wrong category. However, because I have palpitations, I Googled Accupril & palpitations and it seems Accuprial is more likely to cause palpitations than resolve them. So, I would suggest you see your doctor and get evaluated. If you're throwing garden variety PVCs, then you probably have nothing to worry about. However, your physician may want to modify your meds. One thing is certain. You should avoid caffeine and other stimulants. Caffeine is probably the most common trigger for palpitations. Good luck and good health!! ♠ Answered by Hortensia Krauel 2 years ago.


Can I take Accupril (5mg) with Neurontin & Vistaril?
Asked by Mireya Villasenor 2 years ago.

This is an ideal question to be answered by your local pharmacist who will share his/her knowledge for free.Be safe ! Regards. Answered by Adolfo Kelty 2 years ago.


Does Lipitor, Nexium, arthrotec, activan, accupril, or lexapro I shouldn't take when eating grapefruit?
I am taking the medications listed above. Is there one I shouldn't be eating with grapefruit? Asked by Candida Tutko 2 years ago.

Lipitor (atorvastatin) and grapefruit should be separated by 12 hours. Answered by Lea Oehmig 2 years ago.

Lipitor (atorvastatin) is the one that interacts most with grapefruit juice. Most people take statins at night, so if you take your lipitor at night and drink grapefruit juice in the morning you will be just fine. It takes a lot of grapefruit juice to affect drug levels in vivo, and by spacing it out by several hours you will avoid this interaction. There is a chemical in grapefruit juice that is broken down by the same enzyme as Lipitor, by using them together you increase the levels and duration of both the chemical and the drug in the body. I assumed by activan you meant Ativan (lorazepam). All the others are fine (there was a minor interaction with Lexapro and grapefruit juice, but those are usually of no consequence). Also be aware SSRIs and NSAIDs can increase bleeding risk, but always consult your doctor/pharmacist before altering your drug therapy. Answered by Viviana Deruiter 2 years ago.

You can have grapefruit a couple of hours apart from the lipitor or statin. You should not take the statin with grapefruit juice. It increases the absorption of the statin from the gut. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her to verify this. Answered by Maryellen Mullick 2 years ago.


Does the medicine bystolic and accupril mess me up or make me feel drugged up?
new blood pressure medicine. when i take it is it gonna make me loopy or will i feel normal? will i have weird side effects right away? Asked by Charley Sampang 2 years ago.

There's no way to predict if a particular patient will react to a given medicine. They shouldn't cause you any problems. Can they? Yes. Will they, who knows. If they DO cause you problems, call your doctor. Answered by Adelaide Bordin 2 years ago.

Actually people are different from each other and the way that you might react on a certain medicine like these two might differ from how the others will react on them. However, if you are talking about taking them together, take not that there were medicines that interact well with each other and there are some that does not. You might consider talking to your doctor first for you to know if it will be safe to take them together or if both of them were safe for you to take. More information about Accupril pharmacyescrow.org/s38-s-ACCUPRIL Answered by Shawn Herl 2 years ago.


Blood pressure is usually 131/81 average: take accupril for hypertension 20mg. when anxious it is higher.?
anxiety when taking pressure..so I take deep breaths Asked by Sumiko Payamps 2 years ago.

Your blood pressure is a little more than what is considered optimal but not that far off. Your blood pressure is considered going into mild pre-hyptertension. And blood pressure can go up when you are anxious - A lot of people's pressure goes up when they go to the doc - called 'white coat' hypertension. The docs usually take this into consideration. Taking deep breaths for a minute or two can help - breathing in slowly and out slowly for a minute or two. Don't worry - it sounds as if you are o.k. Answered by Detra Petrarca 2 years ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Debbra Pier 2 years ago.

Pre-hypertension (120-139 /80-89 mmHg) only refers to people who are not already on HTN meds. As far as white coat hypertension that is correct. The best way to know your true blood pressure is to buy a machine that you can check your own blood pressure at home. They have automatic and semi-automatic machines, which are a lot more accurate than the one at Supermarkets. Since you have hypertension your goal is most likely less than 140/90 unless you have diabetes, in which case your goal needs to be less than 130/80. When you take your blood pressure it is best to have not been eating, drinking or smoking for at least 30min. Makes sure you have been sitting for 5min and have your legs uncrossed. Check blood pressure on your left arm, unless contraindicated. Write your results in a little book, that way you can keep track of your true blood pressure, and you can present (show) this to your doctor so he knows if your blood pressure is truly controlled and that is not a fluke! Answered by Waltraud Heister 2 years ago.

Pulse rate above 100 is called Tachycardia. Answered by Fay Viard 2 years ago.

accupril Side effects * abdominal pain with or without nausea or vomiting * allergic reactions like skin rash or hives, swelling of the hands, feet, face, lips, throat, or tongue * dark urine * difficulty breathing * dizzy, lightheaded or fainting spell * fever or sore throat * irregular heart beat, chest pain * pain or difficulty passing urine * unusually weak * yellowing of the eyes or skin * change in sex drive or performance * cough * dry mouth * headache * tiredness This list may not describe all possible side effects. Answered by Kenia Toting 2 years ago.

My doctor told me to call him when my b.p. is high Answered by Melinda Mansanares 2 years ago.


Can the hypertension drug Mavik (4 mg) be replaced with Accupril (40 mg)?
The Mavik is 4mg and that's what was originally took. Now Accupril is supposedly related to Mavik and it's 40 mg. Is it safe to take the accupril? Asked by Rolanda Casadei 2 years ago.

Definitely discuss with your doctor first.... there are many medications out there that belong to the same "family" but act in slightly different ways....They may also have slightly different ingredients making them up which can cause allergic reactions. Your doctor may have purposely changed you from the Mavik to the Accupril as the Mavik wasn't doing the best job. Because there are so many different hypertension medications, sometimes it takes a little while to find the correct one for you. Always check with your doctor, and if you're not sure, KEEP ASKING until you understand :) Hope that helps! Answered by Lashaun Loraine 2 years ago.

Quote "firstor stleast your phrmcist. theymy" unquote. Someone is trying to be a Doctor. It is your writing that no one can understand. You are allowed to type correctly. Use the spell checker! ♣ Answered by Miguel Perna 2 years ago.

well, you should always consult with your doctor firstor stleast your phrmcist. theymy be related but work differently. Answered by Euna Vais 2 years ago.


How long does it take before Accupril begins to lower blood pressure?
I began taking it a few days ago and I am still testing in the pre-hypertension range. Thanks! Asked by Lucius Suk 2 years ago.

Esmerelda, My accupril was added to a diuretic for blood pressure that wasn't enough. By my next doctor's visit a month later, I was already in the range where I needed to be. Answered by Cherish Velazco 2 years ago.

Accupril is in a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme. It prevents certain enzymes in the body from narrowing blood vessels. It can take a little while to get the right dose so don't get too concerned just yet. Here is a bit of a guide, and as we don't know your age or other health details it is open to interpretation. OK... Dosage for most adults: Oral: Hypertension: Initial: 10-20 mg once daily, adjust according to blood pressure response at peak and trough blood levels; initial dose may be reduced to 5 mg in patients receiving diuretic therapy if the diuretic is continued; usual dose range 10-40 mg once daily Elderly: Initial: 2.5-5 mg/day; increase dosage at increments of 2.5-5 mg at 1- to 2-week intervals. Answered by Theodora Mickell 2 years ago.

people might act differently on medicines and some poeple that I know who are actually taking this medication said that it takes them 3 weeks and more before they the medicine totally effect. But, there were also people who are also using this also said that they only take 2 weeks for them to feel the effect of the medicine. however, it will always depend on the body of the person regarding on how their body accept the medication. usually, it takes 2-4 weeks. If you want to know more about it check pharmacyescrow.org/s38-s-ACCUPRIL ,,, Answered by Errol Kulow 2 years ago.


Will Accupril lower my rapid heart beat QUICKLY?
I'm 42 & I feel like I'm having heart palpitations. I normally have a normal heartrate, but I drank a lot of coffee & took about 7 Neurontins (300mg). Will Accupril do the trick fast? If not, what should I do? Asked by Renea Bond 2 years ago.

You're asking in the wrong category. However, because I have palpitations, I Googled Accupril & palpitations and it seems Accuprial is more likely to cause palpitations than resolve them. So, I would suggest you see your doctor and get evaluated. If you're throwing garden variety PVCs, then you probably have nothing to worry about. However, your physician may want to modify your meds. One thing is certain. You should avoid caffeine and other stimulants. Caffeine is probably the most common trigger for palpitations. Good luck and good health!! ♠ Answered by Zandra Horse 2 years ago.


Can I take Accupril (5mg) with Neurontin & Vistaril?
Asked by Lovie Cupelli 2 years ago.

This is an ideal question to be answered by your local pharmacist who will share his/her knowledge for free.Be safe ! Regards. Answered by Genoveva Hiney 2 years ago.


Does Lipitor, Nexium, arthrotec, activan, accupril, or lexapro I shouldn't take when eating grapefruit?
I am taking the medications listed above. Is there one I shouldn't be eating with grapefruit? Asked by Fran Munyer 2 years ago.

Lipitor (atorvastatin) and grapefruit should be separated by 12 hours. Answered by Laure Varin 2 years ago.

Lipitor (atorvastatin) is the one that interacts most with grapefruit juice. Most people take statins at night, so if you take your lipitor at night and drink grapefruit juice in the morning you will be just fine. It takes a lot of grapefruit juice to affect drug levels in vivo, and by spacing it out by several hours you will avoid this interaction. There is a chemical in grapefruit juice that is broken down by the same enzyme as Lipitor, by using them together you increase the levels and duration of both the chemical and the drug in the body. I assumed by activan you meant Ativan (lorazepam). All the others are fine (there was a minor interaction with Lexapro and grapefruit juice, but those are usually of no consequence). Also be aware SSRIs and NSAIDs can increase bleeding risk, but always consult your doctor/pharmacist before altering your drug therapy. Answered by Stanton Makarem 2 years ago.

You can have grapefruit a couple of hours apart from the lipitor or statin. You should not take the statin with grapefruit juice. It increases the absorption of the statin from the gut. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her to verify this. Answered by Chantel Praylow 2 years ago.


Does the medicine bystolic and accupril mess me up or make me feel drugged up?
new blood pressure medicine. when i take it is it gonna make me loopy or will i feel normal? will i have weird side effects right away? Asked by Lino Lile 2 years ago.

There's no way to predict if a particular patient will react to a given medicine. They shouldn't cause you any problems. Can they? Yes. Will they, who knows. If they DO cause you problems, call your doctor. Answered by Arlyne Vanderslice 2 years ago.

Actually people are different from each other and the way that you might react on a certain medicine like these two might differ from how the others will react on them. However, if you are talking about taking them together, take not that there were medicines that interact well with each other and there are some that does not. You might consider talking to your doctor first for you to know if it will be safe to take them together or if both of them were safe for you to take. More information about Accupril pharmacyescrow.org/s38-s-ACCUPRIL Answered by Kaitlin Litehiser 2 years ago.


Blood pressure is usually 131/81 average: take accupril for hypertension 20mg. when anxious it is higher.?
anxiety when taking pressure..so I take deep breaths Asked by Kaila Cartagena 2 years ago.

Your blood pressure is a little more than what is considered optimal but not that far off. Your blood pressure is considered going into mild pre-hyptertension. And blood pressure can go up when you are anxious - A lot of people's pressure goes up when they go to the doc - called 'white coat' hypertension. The docs usually take this into consideration. Taking deep breaths for a minute or two can help - breathing in slowly and out slowly for a minute or two. Don't worry - it sounds as if you are o.k. Answered by Darron Frodsham 2 years ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Larita Notarnicola 2 years ago.

Pre-hypertension (120-139 /80-89 mmHg) only refers to people who are not already on HTN meds. As far as white coat hypertension that is correct. The best way to know your true blood pressure is to buy a machine that you can check your own blood pressure at home. They have automatic and semi-automatic machines, which are a lot more accurate than the one at Supermarkets. Since you have hypertension your goal is most likely less than 140/90 unless you have diabetes, in which case your goal needs to be less than 130/80. When you take your blood pressure it is best to have not been eating, drinking or smoking for at least 30min. Makes sure you have been sitting for 5min and have your legs uncrossed. Check blood pressure on your left arm, unless contraindicated. Write your results in a little book, that way you can keep track of your true blood pressure, and you can present (show) this to your doctor so he knows if your blood pressure is truly controlled and that is not a fluke! Answered by Rey Duckey 2 years ago.

Pulse rate above 100 is called Tachycardia. Answered by Clarita Scheppke 2 years ago.

accupril Side effects * abdominal pain with or without nausea or vomiting * allergic reactions like skin rash or hives, swelling of the hands, feet, face, lips, throat, or tongue * dark urine * difficulty breathing * dizzy, lightheaded or fainting spell * fever or sore throat * irregular heart beat, chest pain * pain or difficulty passing urine * unusually weak * yellowing of the eyes or skin * change in sex drive or performance * cough * dry mouth * headache * tiredness This list may not describe all possible side effects. Answered by Micha Oxton 2 years ago.

My doctor told me to call him when my b.p. is high Answered by Mable Shick 2 years ago.


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